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Type 1 Diabetes And Urinary Incontinence

Is Diabetes Messing With Your Bladder And Sex Life?

Is Diabetes Messing With Your Bladder And Sex Life?

If you've noticed your sex life isn't what it used to be, and your bladder doesn't have the staying power that it once did, it may be time to talk to your doctor. A growing body of research finds that those with diabetes are more prone to urologic and sexual problems than those without the diagnosis. The good news: these problems can be treated and improved, or even eliminated. Paying attention to good lifestyle habits may also help, experts say. Both urologic and sexual problems are more common with age, but having diabetes, by itself, boosts the risk of both, says Aruna V. Sarma, MD, research associate professor of urology and epidemiology at the University of Michigan. She and two other experts talked about the issues at the recent annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association. Dr. Sarma conducted a study to tease out the effects of age versus the effects of diabetes on how likely men and women would be to develop urologic and sexual problems. "We know now with our data that the burden of these [complications] is greater in those with diabetes, and their diabetes affects the complications." Among the findings from her research and that of others: • If men report type 2 diabetes, they have almost twice the risk of urinary problems as men without the diagnosis. Urinary problems include infections, incontinence, and bladder cancer. • Having type 2 diabetes increases the risk of getting bladder cancer by about 70%, especially in those who have been diagnosed less than five years, some research finds. Almost 50% of men with diabetes have erectile dysfunction, or ED (those with type 1 are even more likely, about 62%), while the overall percent among those men without diabetes is about 25%. • While about 15% of women in one study who did not have type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

People with diabetes commonly experience problems with controlling their bladder and bowel. This can involve accidental leakage, incomplete emptying, passing urine frequently (frequency) or feeling the need to rush to the toilet (urgency). Common causes of incontinence There are four main ways that diabetes may cause problems with bladder and bowel control: Obesity: This is a key factor in people developing Type 2 (non-insulin dependant) diabetes and it is also a major risk factor for developing incontinence. The pelvic floor muscles support most of your body weight. Any excess weight further strains these muscles, weakening them. Weak pelvic floor muscles do not support the bladder and bowel as it should. If this happens you may notice leakage when coughing and sneezing (also known as stress incontinence) or the need to frequently or urgently visit the toilet. Nerve damage: Poorly controlled or long-term diabetes may cause damage to the nerves, (neuropathy) and commonly occurs in the feet. Similarly, it may affect the bladder and bowel. Nerve damage to the bladder and bowel causes loss of sensation so there may be little warning of needing to go to the toilet or lack of awareness of the bladder filling. The bladder and bowel may not empty well, increasing the risk of developing urinary tract infections, kidney damage or constipation. Reduced immunity - Diabetes interferes with the immune system increasing the risk to infections. A common infection experienced by people with diabetes is urinary tract infection (UTI). It is the combination of the immune system changes and the poor bladder emptying that causes these infections and often they keep reoccurring. Treatment includes antibiotics and strategies to promote bladder emptying. In addition personal hygiene is particu Continue reading >>

3 Options For Treating Diabetes-related Incontinence

3 Options For Treating Diabetes-related Incontinence

3 Options for Treating Diabetes-Related Incontinence What to consider if prescription treatments dont work. Incontinence is a common side effect of Type 2 diabetes that is generally caused by neuropathy, or nerve damage from high blood sugar levels. There are different kinds of incontinence, but the one most commonly caused by Type 2 nerve damage is called urge incontinence, or an overactive bladder. If youve tried prescription medications and youre still not making it to the bathroom in time, there are other options. However, each option does carry some risk. The most common surgical procedure is sacral nerve stimulation . This is when a small neurotransmitter device is tucked under the skin near the bladder and above the buttock. The device sends minor electrical impulses that regulate and control the bladder. A plus to this procedure is that its reversible. The risks associated with this procedure are the same as those associated with other implantable medical devices: infection, mechanical failure, and pain at the implant site. Another procedure which is not yet approved by the FDA is botox . The procedure involves injections along the bladder floor to prevent nerves that cause incontinence from communicating. The effects last for approximately six to nine months. Trials of botox for incontinence have found that it slightly increases the risk of urinary tract infections and significantly increases the risk of urinary retention, or difficulty emptying the bladder. A less common surgery is called bladder augmentation , which is also referred to as enterocystoplasty or augmentation cystoplasty. The surgery attaches a part of the small intestine to the bladder to create a larger bladder; this can minimize leaks. Its considered a last resort treatment, as the surgery in Continue reading >>

A Study Of Bladder Dysfunction In Women With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

A Study Of Bladder Dysfunction In Women With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Introduction: Diabetes mellitus has been associated with an earlier onset and increased severity of urologic diseases that often result in debilitating urologic complications. Diabetic bladder dysfunction refers to a group of bladder symptoms occurring in patients with diabetes mellitus ranging from bladder over activity to impaired bladder contractility. Aim: Bladder dysfunction is an under evaluated issue in women with diabetes. Aim of our study was to investigate prevalence of bladder dysfunction and its relation with other chronic complications of diabetes in women with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: In a hospital-based cross sectional study, a cohort of women with type 2 diabetes mellitus who had lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) were enrolled. We used the American Urological Association Symptom Index (AUA-SI) to assess the severity of LUTS and the Indevus Urgency Severity Scale (IUSS) to assess presence of overactive bladder (OAB). Age-BMI- matched controls that did not have diabetes but had lower urinary tract symptoms were also studied and compared with women with type 2 diabetes. Urodynamic evaluation was done in willing patients. Results: LUTS attributable to bladder dysfunction were reported in 67% of women with type 2 diabetes after exclusion of other causes. Out of them, 36% had moderate to severe LUTS (total AUA-SI score >7). Prevalence of OAB was 53%. Urodynamic evaluation revealed presence of stress urinary incontinence in 48% patients and changes of detrusor over activity and detrusor under activity in 23% and 11% patients, respectively. Among the chronic complications of diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, nephropathy, and presence of metabolic syndrome were significantly associated with moderate to severe LUTS and OAB. Conclusion: Bladder dysf Continue reading >>

Developing Incontinence With Diabetes

Developing Incontinence With Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes, is a lifelong disease characterized by high levels of glucose in the blood. Those experiencing this disease face many additional challenges beyond diabetes itself. One of these challenges is the increased occurrence and severity of both fecal and urinary incontinence. There are several aspects that connect diabetes and incontinence, but the increased incidence of obesity in diabetics can be considered the main cause. Increased weight, especially in the abdomen, places excessive strain on the muscles of the pelvic floor that control bladder function. This strain or pressure causes involuntary urine leakage, and this type of urinary incontinence is called stress incontinence. Any movements that increase pressure in the abdominal area such as coughing, sneezing, laughing, physical activity, etc. will cause the leakage of small amounts of urine. Another factor linking diabetes to urinary incontinence is the effect diabetes may have on nerve function in the bladder. Damaged nerves can cause overactive bladder or urge incontinence. Urge incontinence is when the muscular wall in the bladder has a sudden contraction causing the urge to urinate and sometimes the loss of urine. Fast movements and activities likes sitting and standing can trigger urge incontinence. Nerve damage caused by diabetes may also cause a loss of bladder sensation and weakened pelvic floor muscles creating the inability to completely empty the bladder. If a diabetic's muscles and nerves become too damaged and fail to ever cause bladder contractions, overflow incontinence will occur. With overflow incontinence the bladder never empties and continuously leaks. An early warning sign of the onset of overflow incontinence is a slow or timid stream of urine whil Continue reading >>

Sex, Urinary, And Bladder Problems Of Diabetes

Sex, Urinary, And Bladder Problems Of Diabetes

What sexual problems can occur in men with diabetes? Erectile Dysfunction Erectile dysfunction is a consistent inability to have an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. The condition includes the total inability to have an erection and the inability to sustain an erection. Estimates of the prevalence of erectile dysfunction in men with diabetes vary widely, ranging from 20 to 75 percent. Men who have diabetes are two to three times more likely to have erectile dysfunction than men who do not have diabetes. Among men with erectile dysfunction, those with diabetes may experience the problem as much as 10 to 15 years earlier than men without diabetes. Research suggests that erectile dysfunction may be an early marker of diabetes, particularly in men ages 45 and younger. In addition to diabetes, other major causes of erectile dysfunction include high blood pressure, kidney disease, alcohol abuse, and blood vessel disease. Erectile dysfunction may also occur because of the side effects of medications, psychological factors, smoking, and hormonal deficiencies. Men who experience erectile dysfunction should consider talking with a health care provider. The health care provider may ask about the patient's medical history, the type and frequency of sexual problems, medications, smoking and drinking habits, and other health conditions. A physical exam and laboratory tests may help pinpoint causes of sexual problems. The health care provider will check blood glucose control and hormone levels and may ask the patient to do a test at home that checks for erections that occur during sleep. The health care provider may also ask whether the patient is depressed or has recently experienced upsetting changes in his life. Treatments for erectile dysfunction caused by nerve damage, Continue reading >>

Diabetes Incontinence: What You Should Know

Diabetes Incontinence: What You Should Know

Oftentimes, having one condition can increase your risk for other issues. This is true for diabetes and incontinence, or the accidental release of urine or fecal matter. Incontinence can also be a symptom of an overactive bladder (OAB), which is the sudden urge to urinate. One Norwegian study found that incontinence affected 39 percent of women with diabetes and 26 percent of women without diabetes. Another review suggested that type 2 diabetes may affect incontinence, but more research is needed. In general, lots of people deal with various types of incontinence and levels of severity. The common types include: stress, leakage is due to pressure on the bladder urge, uncontrolled leakage due to a need to void overflow, leakage due to full bladder functional, nerve, or muscle damage causes leakage transient incontinence, a temporary side effect from a condition or medication Read on to learn how diabetes contributes to incontinence and what you can to do manage the condition. The exact link between diabetes and incontinence is unknown. The four possible ways that diabetes can contribute to incontinence are: obesity puts pressure on your bladder nerve damage affects the nerves that control the bowel and the bladder a compromised immune system increases the risk for urinary tract infections (UTIs), which can cause incontinence diabetes medication may cause diarrhea Also, high blood sugar levels seen with diabetes can cause you to become thirstier and urinate more. The excess sugar in your blood triggers thirst, which then leads to more frequent urination. Other factors that may increase your risk include: being female, as women have a higher risk for incontinence than men childbirth older age other health conditions such as prostate cancer or multiple sclerosis obstruction Continue reading >>

Urinary Incontinence In Individuals With Diabetes Mellitus

Urinary Incontinence In Individuals With Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Spectrum Volume 11 Number 4, 1998, Pages 241-247 These pages are best viewed with Netscape version 3.0 or higher or Internet Explorer version 3.0 or higher. When viewed with other browsers, some characters or attributes may not be rendered correctly. Adeline M.Yerkes, BSN, MPH In Brief Urinary incontinence, a common and costly symptom, is a problem many health care providers will encounter among their caseload of people with diabetes. Dysfunctions of urination have long been known as a problem associated with diabetes, although the literature on the subject is limited. The neurogenic bladder is more commonly discussed in the literature as an issue related to such chronic conditions and diseases as spinal cord lesions, muscular dystrophy, and multiple sclerosis. Also called cystopathy, the neurogenic bladder is considered a form of autonomic neuropathy. It begins with selective damage to autonomic afferent nerves, leaving motor function intact but impairing the sensation of bladder fullness and, therefore, resulting in decreased urinary frequency. As this neuropathy progresses, autonomic efferent nerves become involved, leading to incomplete bladder emptying, urinary dribbling, and overflow incontinence. This article will focus on the diagnosis and management of urinary incontinence. Although less than 1% of all neuropathies are related to the neurogenic bladder,1 due to the prevalence of diabetes, the prevalence of obesity (a risk factor for urinary incontinence) among patients with type 2 diabetes, and the overall prevalence of urinary incontinence (especially among women), most health care practitioners are likely to encounter patients with urinary incontinence. URINARY CONTINENCE AND MICTURITION Urinary continence is the storage of urine, and micturition is Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy: Treatment For Urinary Problems - Topic Overview

Diabetic Neuropathy: Treatment For Urinary Problems - Topic Overview

Treatment for urinary problems caused by diabetic neuropathy depends on the exact problem. Typical problems and their treatment include: Not being able to know when the bladder is full. Urinating on a regular schedule is the usual approach to treating this problem. For instance, you might urinate every 4 hours, whether you think your bladder is full or not. If neuropathy is causing you to urinate involuntarily (incontinence), medicines such as oxybutynin (Ditropan) or tolterodine (Detrol) may help. Men with urinary incontinence caused by neuropathy may be helped by medicines such as alfuzosin (Uroxatral), silodosin (Rapaflo), or tamsulosin (Flomax). Straining to urinate and not being able to empty the bladder completely. This problem may be treated with medicine, such as bethanechol (Urecholine). In more severe cases, a thin tube may be used to empty the bladder on a regular basis. This is called periodic catheterization. Trouble emptying the bladder may be worse in pregnant women. Disruption of the proper emptying of the bladder. This may cause urinary tract infections (UTIs). UTIs may be treated with antibiotics. Drinking more fluids each day can help prevent UTIs. This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.© 1995-2015 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated. Continue reading >>

Urinary Incontinence

Urinary Incontinence

Tweet Incontinence is defined as the loss of ability to control when you pass urine. Urinary incontinence is relatively common and affects about 5% and 13% of men and women respectively. There are a number of types of treatments which can be used to control incontinence. Types of incontinence There are a number of different forms of urinary incontinence, of which stress incontinence and urge incontinence are the most common. Stress incontinence can result from activities that can put the bladder under increased pressure, which includes laughing, sneezing, exercise or heavy lifting. Urge incontinence is when you leak urine and get a sudden urge to urinate giving you little time to respond to the urge before you empty your bladder. Needing to urinate often at night is an example of urge incontinence. Symptoms of incontinence The main symptom of incontinence is a loss of control of your bladder. This may be present in the form of leaking of small amounts of urine or needing to suddenly pass large amounts of urine. Causes of urinary incontinence Causes of incontinence may include the following: High blood glucose levels Urinary tract infections Autonomic neuropathy Certain medications An enlarged prostate gland Post menopausal changes in the bladder muscles Medications which may lead to incontinence include blood pressure medications, diuretics, hormone replacement therapy treatments, sedatives and some medications for Alzheimer's disease. Diagnosing urinary incontinence If you feel you may have incontinence, speak to your doctor. Incontinence is a common condition which you needn't feel embarrassed about. To help diagnose incontinence, your GP will ask you a number of questions and may ask you to complete a bladder diary for a number of days. Tests for incontinence may als Continue reading >>

Risk Factors For Urinary Incontinence Among Women With Type 1 Diabetes: Findings From The Epidemiology Of Diabetes Interventions And Complications Study - Sciencedirect

Risk Factors For Urinary Incontinence Among Women With Type 1 Diabetes: Findings From The Epidemiology Of Diabetes Interventions And Complications Study - Sciencedirect

Volume 73, Issue 6 , June 2009, Pages 1203-1209 Risk Factors for Urinary Incontinence Among Women With Type 1 Diabetes: Findings From the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications Study Author links open overlay panel Aruna V.Sarmaa Get rights and content To determine risk factors for, and long-term effects of, glycemic control on urinary incontinence among women with type 1 diabetes enrolled in the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications study. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (1982-1993) cohort follow-up, Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications trial, began in 1994. In 2004, the female participants (n = 550) completed a self-administered questionnaire on incontinence. Our primary outcome was weekly or greater incontinence, overall and by type. Multivariate regression models were used to determine independent predictors of weekly urinary incontinence, both overall and by type. Overall, 38% of women reported any incontinence and 17% reported weekly or greater incontinence. An increasing body mass index (odds ratio 1.1, 95% confidence interval 1.1-1.2) was significantly associated with weekly incontinence, overall and by type. Advancing age and 2 urinary tract infections in the previous year were associated with weekly urge incontinence (odds ratio 1.4, 95% confidence interval 1.0-2.0 per 5 years, and odds ratio 4.9, 95% confidence interval 1.8-13.5, respectively). Weaker evidence was seen for increased risk with age for overall weekly incontinence (22% per 5 years, P = .06) and stress incontinence (21% per 5 years, P = .08). Urinary incontinence is common among women with type 1 diabetes and the risk factors, including advancing age, increased weight, and previous urinary tract infection, are important. Weigh Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Symptoms And Incontinence

Diabetes, Symptoms And Incontinence

Diabetes is a metabolic syndrome where the blood sugar levels become higher than normal, which can cause a range of symptoms. It occurs when the pancreas fails to produce enough or any insulin to move glucose into the cells in our body. This causes a buildup of sugars in the blood. It can be separated into several conditions Prediabetes – characterised by slightly raised blood sugar levels. This condition can be reversed by adopting a healthy lifestyle Type 1 diabetes – is an autoimmune disease where the body fails to produce insulin, insulin replacement therapy is needed Type 2 diabetes – or diabetes mellitus is a metabolic condition where the body struggles to produce enough insulin. Adopting a low sugar and low carb lifestyle can help to keep the condition in check This is a condition that is on the rise. It is thought that the high levels of obesity is contributing to the issue with many being diagnosed prediabetes or with type 2 diabetes as a result. It is estimated that there are around 2.9 million sufferers in the UK. This condition can lead to other serious conditions such as heart disease, kidney disease and blindness. Some people can also experience issues with bladder and/ or bowel continence issues, which may cause embarrassment. Diabetes Symptoms There are some key diabetes symptoms that are common including:- Increased thirst Needing to urinate more often Increased hunger Weight loss Fatigue Dizziness Nausea There are also some symptoms that are specific to your type and vary greatly from person to person. Why might a person become incontinent? Bladder problems can be experienced by people with diabetes. This can be caused by a neurogenic bladder, which is caused by nerve damage (neuropathy) that can happen if blood sugar levels are not bought under Continue reading >>

Urinary Incontinence Among Women With Type 1 Diabeteshow Common Is It?

Urinary Incontinence Among Women With Type 1 Diabeteshow Common Is It?

Urinary Incontinence Among Women With Type 1 DiabetesHow Common is it? Aruna V. Sarma ,1,* Alka M. Kanaya ,2 Leroy M. Nyberg ,3 John W. Kusek ,,3 Eric Vittinghoff ,2 Brandy Rutledge ,4 Patricia A. Cleary ,4 Patricia Gatcomb ,5 and Jeanette S. Brown 2,, for the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications Research Group 1 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 2 University of California, San Francisco, California 3 National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 4 The Biostatistics Center, The George Washington University, Washington 5 Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut * Correspondence: Department of Urology, University of Michigan, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-0759 (telephone: 734-763-7514; FAX: 734-936-9536; e-mail: [email protected] ) Financial interest and/or other relationship with Pfizer, Eli Lilly and deCODE Genetics. Supported by NIDDK K-24 Mid-career Investigator Award in Patient Oriented Research PA-98-053. The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at J Urol See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. We compared the prevalence, level of bother and effect on daily activities of urinary incontinence among women with type 1 diabetes enrolled in the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications study to a population based sample of women with normal glucose. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of women with type 1 diabetes and normal glucose tolerance using 2 study populations. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial cohort followup, Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications, began in 1994. In Continue reading >>

Let’s Talk About Incontinence And Diabetes

Let’s Talk About Incontinence And Diabetes

People with diabetes are more prone to incontinence. The first step in successful treatment is to discuss the issue out loud. If you are dealing with incontinence, you’re not alone. A study by the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) suggests that over half of older Americans experience incontinence at some point. There is a known connection between diabetes and incontinence. One of the most common complications of diabetes is nerve damage, or neuropathy, which is caused by high blood sugar levels. According to the Simon Foundation for Continence, your body has a network of autonomic nerves that run from your heart to your bladder, which can be affected by diabetic neuropathy, including nerves in the bladder and the bowel. More often than not, incontinence is caused by damage to these nerves and muscles. Neuropathy also affects the legs and hands, which can indirectly lead to issues of incontinence since people who have decreased mobility, or experience pain with movement, may have trouble making it to the bathroom quickly enough. There are other ways a diabetes diagnosis can raise the risk of incontinence. Those who have gestational diabetes during pregnancy, for instance, have a higher than average chance of giving birth to larger baby. These deliveries increase the risk of damaging the muscles surrounding the birth canal, including muscles that control the bladder. Obesity can cause similar damage to your bladder muscles. Certain medications and heart problems may also cause urinary incontinence. According to the HHS study, it costs over $4,000 a year, on average, to manage incontinence. Treatment usually involves improving control of blood sugar and weight, and treating hypertension and high cholesterol, as well as avoiding food and drinks known to tri Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Bladder And Bowel Control

Diabetes And Bladder And Bowel Control

This fact sheet has been developed to assist people looking for more information about diabetes and bladder and control People with diabetes commonly experience problems with controlling their bladder and bowel. The incontinence refers to bladder and bowel control problems. This can involve accidental leakage, incomplete emptying, passing urine frequently (frequency) or feeling the need to rush to the toilet (urgency). Poor control of the bladder and bowel is an important health problem. It can interfere with work, social activities or sexual and personal relationships. It is important that you seek help because these problems can be cured, treated or better managed. Talk to your doctor or call the Continence Helpline 0800 650 659. Normal bladder and bowel control Knowing how the bladder and bowel normally work will help you understand the problems you may be experiencing. The bladder and bowel store and expel body waste. The bladder stores and passes urine (wee) regularly throughout the day. On average we should pass urine 4-6 times during the day and once over night. This will vary depending upon how much you drink, what you drink and how much you exercise and perspire. Your bladder should easily hold 350 – 500 mls. When it is around about half full you will start to become aware of your bladder filling. You should not go to the toilet at this point but put it off until the urge is stronger but not yet urgent. The lower bowel stores and expels faeces (poo). The normal range for bowel movements is anywhere from 3 times per day to 3 times per week. The faeces you pass should be soft formed and easily passed with no straining. The pelvic floor muscles play an essential role in giving us control over the bladder and bowel. When we hold on to go to the toilet we are rely Continue reading >>

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