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Type 1 Diabetes And Pregnancy What To Eat

Meal Planning For Pregnant Women With Diabetes

Meal Planning For Pregnant Women With Diabetes

Your meal plan for diabetes needs to be modified when you are pregnant. The total calories you need are based on your prepregnancy weight, age, activity level, and whether you are carrying more than one baby. Dieting to lose weight during pregnancy is not recommended, because you may not receive enough nourishment for you and your baby, and it may increase your risk for premature delivery. Follow these guidelines for your meal plan during pregnancy. Carbohydrate Inadequate carbohydrate intake can result in low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) for women taking insulin and in ketone production for women who have gestational diabetes. Excessive carbohydrate intake can result in elevated blood sugar levels. Make sure your meal plan contains: Complex carbohydrate, especially foods high in fiber, such as oatmeal, brown rice, bran cereal, whole wheat bread, whole wheat pasta, and beans. Fresh fruits. Milk. Fresh or frozen vegetables. Limit these carbohydrate foods in your diet: Refined sugar and foods with a high content of refined sugars (sweets) Refined starches, such as highly processed breakfast cereals, instant potatoes, instant rice, or instant noodles Fruit juice Protein If your kidney function is impaired, your protein allowance may be lowered. Fat Monounsaturated fats and omega-3 fats, rather than saturated fats, should continue to be the primary source of fat in your diet. Fiber Get enough fiber each day. Fiber can help stabilize your blood sugar levels and relieve constipation, which is common during pregnancy. Most people get far more sodium than they need. Talk to your doctor about how much sodium you should eat. Vitamins and minerals Take a prenatal vitamin with folic acid and iron to meet your body's increased need for these micronutrients. Folic acid is needed for th Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Pregnancy Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Pregnancy Diet

Women with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) are accustomed to meal planning to control blood sugar levels. But the changing nutritional and insulin needs that accompany pregnancy require exceptional dietary consideration and planning. For this reason, the American Diabetes Association recommends an individualized meal plan for pregnant woman with diabetes. Careful diet planning along with blood sugar monitoring and insulin adjustments help keep blood sugar levels in a safe range to promote the health of the mom and baby. Video of the Day Every pregnant woman with T1DM is unique. Therefore, the American Diabetes Association doesn't recommend a standard diet with specific foods or amounts to eat and avoid. Rather, the goal is to craft an individualized, well-balanced diet that provides the calories and nutrients needed for the baby’s growth and mom’s health while keeping blood sugar levels stable. Each woman's pregnancy diet is different, depending on factors such as her weight, activity level, food preferences and where she is in her pregnancy. Consuming 3 nutritious meals plus 2 to 4 snacks at around the same time each day helps stabilize blood sugar levels. Eating a variety of high-quality foods that are rich in multiple nutrients helps ensure healthy levels of proteins, carbohydrates, fats, fiber, vitamins and minerals. Matching carbohydrate intake to insulin therapy is more complex during pregnancy because insulin sensitivity and needs change. Low blood sugar is most likely during the first trimester, and high levels are common during the second and third trimesters as insulin resistance builds. As both highs and lows are risky for the mom and baby, the carbohydrate content of meals and snacks is a key consideration in T1DM meal planning and insulin matching -- and providi Continue reading >>

Having A Healthy Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes: Advice From New Moms

Having A Healthy Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes: Advice From New Moms

I never questioned whether or not I wanted to be a mom. I was a little girl who catalogued every personality trait of her twelve Cabbage Patch Kids (four of which happened to have type 1 diabetes) and who planned out exactly how many kids she would have someday and what their names would be and what color eyes they would have: one brown-eyed child, one blue. When I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 10, one of my pediatric endocrinologist’s first reassurances to my parents was that I’d be able to have healthy pregnancies someday. I didn’t even know it was something I should have been worried about. And, after that reassurance, I really never worried about what a pregnancy with type 1 diabetes would entail until I got there. I was 25 years old when I saw my first A1c under 8.5%. By the time I was married at age 28, my A1c was the lowest it had ever been – 7%. I was at a crossroad where I was emotionally ready to start a family but had to honestly assess where my diabetes management was. My healthcare team wanted my A1c at or below 6.0% before trying to conceive. This target seemed positively impossible for someone with my A1c history. It was 2008. I turned to the Internet and discovered the marvel that is the Diabetes Online Community. On TuDiabetes.org in their Oh! Baby!!! group, I found women just like me. Just. Like. Me. They were close to my age, wanted to start families, and some of them were a step ahead or only a step behind where I was in the process. I found a wealth of information and support. Six months later, with an A1c of 6.1% and so many helpful words of wisdom put into practice, I began trying to conceive my daughter. In the six years I have been a part of the Diabetes Online Community, I have seen so many would-be mommies realize their dre Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating For Type 1 Diabetes

Healthy Eating For Type 1 Diabetes

Eating the right food, at the right time is important for managing type 1 diabetes . Getting the balance right can be a challenge, but alongside exercise , and insulin treatment, it is essential. Making the right food choices for a meal is not just about managing blood glucose levels for a couple of hours, healthy eating has an impact on health in the long-term for people with type 1 diabetes. It is an area where there are many myths among the facts about what you can and can't eat, but overall Diabetes UK says you should still be able to enjoy a wide variety of food. It makes sense to get to know as much as possible about good food selection, but this is not something to do on your own. As part of your diabetes care team, an appointment with a dietitian is important both when you are first diagnosed, and with check-ups as part of your treatment plan reviews. Carbohydrates are a vital part of any balanced diet , but they have a special significance for people with type 1 diabetes because of the way carbs are converted into glucose in the body. There are two main categories of carbs - sugars and starchy carbohydrates. Sugars are in sweet foods, as you would expect, including sugar itself. Starchy carbohydrates are in common foods like potatoes, bread, pasta and cereals. How many carbs you need will vary from person to person, how much a person weighs, how active they are and their age. Overall, you'll probably be advised to make starchy carbs add up to a third of your food and drink intake. The rate at which the carbohydrates are turned into glucose needs to be matched with appropriate doses of insulin to stop blood glucose levels spiking too high or dropping too low. Diabetes UK recommends trying to have a routine with starchy carbohydrate so around the same amount is Continue reading >>

Pregnancy And Type 1 Diabetes

Pregnancy And Type 1 Diabetes

When you are pregnant, your ideal scenario is to not gain too much weight, pass each milestone without worry, and have a safe, fast delivery that results in a healthy baby. When you have Type 1 diabetes, however, the ideal pregnancy may seem unattainable. Lisa Pink, a new mother, was able to manage her pregnancy along with her diabetes to have a healthy baby girl. She summed up her experience: “It’s a lot of work. However, it’s also worth it when you hold your healthy, perfect baby!” Before conception Lisa learned she had Type 1 diabetes when she was 25 years old. She didn’t think about pregnancy and starting a family until she reached her mid-30s. Lisa didn’t know any mothers with Type 1 diabetes, but two of her friends knew of women who had managed their diabetes throughout successful pregnancies. Encouraged, Lisa went to her doctor a year before she and her husband began trying to become pregnant, which is highly recommended. A woman with Type 1 diabetes should attain healthy blood glucose levels before conception. This is important for the baby’s health during pregnancy but also before conception. The National Institutes of Health recommends that a woman with Type 1 diabetes have blood glucose levels in the target range of 80 to 110 mg/dl before eating and 100 to 155 mg/dl one to two hours after eating for three to six months before becoming pregnant. During pregnancy, the recommended target blood glucose range is 60 to 99 mg/dl before eating and 100 to 129 mg/dl one to two hours after eating. Safe sugar Meeting these target ranges will help decrease the chance of too much sugar being passed to your baby. Too much sugar may cause a fetus to grow too quickly or possibly harm the early development of organs. Having a large baby was one of Lisa’s concer Continue reading >>

Pregnancy And Type 1

Pregnancy And Type 1

Im new to the forum, because quite frankly Ive been doing crazy amounts of research on all of the risks myself and our baby are subjected to since finding out that I am pregnant. I go to the doctor tomorrow, but Im anxious to hear of others experiences having type 1 diabetes and the struggles they faced. Im especially worried because my last A1c level was tested at a 13 which is very high! Im concerned for the health of our baby. He/She was not planned, but we consider ourselves blessed nonetheless. Since testing positive, Ive been obsessed with checking my blood sugar and eating healthy diabetic meals. Ive managed to get my glucose levels back down into the mid 100s and they are steadily improving. Has anyone been through the same situation and can provide me any advice? Speaking as someone who is half way through their first pregnancy, I can definitely attest to the challenge that being diabetic and pregnant poses! Controlling your blood sugar, paying attention to what you are eating and going to the doctor (the many, many doctors) will control just about every aspect of your life. I prepared for a year before we started trying because I wanted to have my sugars perfect before stepping up to that challenge. I wanted to minimize every possible risk so that I could have as close to a normal pregnancy experience as possible and so my kid would have the best chance at being born healthy. Even still, it has been a stressful adventure. I do hope for the best for you and your baby, but I personally cant imagine starting this challenge in the same position. It sounds like you are still struggling to keep your diabetes under control for your own sake. Adding hormones and weight gain and normal insulin resistance from pregnancy on top of that is going to be incredibly difficul Continue reading >>

Ten Dietitian Tips For Pregnancy In Type 1 Diabetes

Ten Dietitian Tips For Pregnancy In Type 1 Diabetes

Guest Post, Sally Marchini, Dietitian I’ve been asked to write this blog as a dietitian. It’s a little challenging mostly because each of us has different requirements and should set personalised targets, so these tips are for a general guide only. I recommend that you should check with your own diabetes health professionals before changing any current plan. Hopefully what you learn in this blog will help you to be the leader of your d-team of health professionals. Keeping track of any questions you have to ask them will be a great advantage to you and your baby. Having a baby as a person with type 1 diabetes can be a frustrating and scary experience, but it doesn’t need to be if we know how to help our healthcare team to provide us the best support along the way. Planning As with most aspects of diabetes, planning ahead is essential for best results. It’s not always possible to plan a pregnancy, but if you have the opportunity to do so then your chances of birth anomalies will be greatly reduced. Ideally planning will begin at least 6 -12 months in advance. During this time it’s important to ensure that you: are taking precautions to avoid pregnancy during this timeframe have started on a folic acid supplement of 5mg/day have asked your doctor about the need for iodine supplementation talk to you doctor about stopping statins and all other diabetes meds except insulin stop smoking minimise alcoholic consumption improve your physical fitness HbA1c target Your main diabetes target will be to aim for an HbA1c of around 6% to minimise risk of anomalies in your pregnancy. But you don’t want to get there too quickly as it may affect your own eyesight (retinopathy). This is one area where medical guidance is particularly important. Once you get there, it’s impor Continue reading >>

Having A Healthy Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes

Having A Healthy Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes

Kerri Sparling was 7 years old when she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. She grew up believing that she'd never be able to have children of her own. But by the time she became an adult, significant technological advances in managing the illness gave her hope. With two decades of blood sugar control under her belt, Sparling eventually looked around for models of a healthy pregnancy with type 1 diabetes. Aside from Julia Robert’s character in the movie Steel Magnolia, she didn’t find much. Roberts’ character had type 1 diabetes and successfully carried a child to term, only to die soon after from diabetes complications. “It wasn’t a positive image,” Sparling said. Undaunted by the Hollywood dramatization, Sparling did her own research and, in preparation for pregnancy and with the help of her endocrinologist, worked for more than a year to get her A1C — a standard test to find out average blood sugar levels over several months — below seven. Sparling, now 34, has a 3-year-old daughter and confirms that while type 1 diabetes and pregnancy might be a challenging mix, a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby are both possible. That said, pregnancy demanded a lot more insulin than she was used to taking, and she had to spend the last month of her pregnancy in the hospital with pre-eclampsia (high blood pressure in pregnancy) before her 6-pound, 13-ounce baby girl was delivered by Caesarean section. “Pregnancy has a definitive end,” Sparling said. “I felt I could make it through to the end of that. But diabetes goes on and on.” Like Sparling, other diabetic women can get pregnant. But without proper monitoring and extra precautions, the chronic illness puts both the mother and the baby at risk for various complications. Here are some of the important m Continue reading >>

Type 1 Pregnancy Risks And How To Minimize Them

Type 1 Pregnancy Risks And How To Minimize Them

There’s a lot to consider when trying to get pregnant or being pregnant as a Type 1 woman. There’s of course, the maternal desire to do everything you can for your unborn child so that he or she may have the best life possible. An ideal pregnancy is a full-term and uneventful one, the outcome a healthy, happy baby. Having Type 1 diabetes doesn’t mean you can’t have that; it just means that you have to be more vigilant, more prepared because of the heightened risks involved. But you’re a Type 1, so you already know how to do that. In fact, you’ve been doing it ever since “D-day,” so take a deep breath and trust yourself. All pregnancies have the chance for complications, but having Type 1 makes you more susceptible to specific ones. Here are the most important things to do in order to lower those risks: Pregnancy Advice for lowering risks for complications 1. Keep your blood glucose levels in range The most important thing you can do as a Type 1 mother-to-be is to try and get your blood glucose levels in a healthy range. Check your number and check often. This will decrease the chance of excessive sugars being given to your baby. Excessive sugars for your baby may cause them to grow quickly as if being “over fed” (Macrosomia) or can do harm to the early development of organs (fully developed by week seven). This is not just vital for your baby’s health during pregnancy but also before conception. Doctors recommend having your blood glucose levels in range three to six months before you become pregnant. Target blood glucose range pre-pregnancy (NIH) – 80-110 mg/dl before eating 100-155 mg/dl 1-2 hours after eating Target blood glucose range during pregnancy (NIH) – 60-99 mg/dl before eating 100-129 mg/dl 1-2 hours after eating Be sure to set goal Continue reading >>

Have Diabetes? 7 Tips For A Healthy Pregnancy

Have Diabetes? 7 Tips For A Healthy Pregnancy

Dealing with disease and pregnancy Pregnancy is full of challenges—and even more so if you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. So how do you handle a demanding disease and pregnancy? It may not be as hard as you think, says Cheryl Alkon, author of Balancing Pregnancy With Pre-Existing Diabetes. But you do need a plan. Before starting a family, check out these 7 tips that can help you ace diabetes management and have a healthy pregnancy. Get your blood sugar under control If you're thinking about getting pregnant, you need to kick bad habits (like smoking), lose weight (if you're overweight), and take prenatal vitamins. You can add one more item to the list if you have diabetes: Get your blood sugar under control. If your blood sugar levels are too high or too low, you may have a tough time getting pregnant. "In that case, your body may recognize that it's not a hospitable place for a pregnancy," says Alkon. Women with type 2 diabetes are particularly at risk for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which can also make it difficult to get pregnant. Medications that stimulate ovulation, such as Clomid and Serophene, can help. Assemble a diabetes team Pregnant women with diabetes could have up to three times as many appointments as women at a lower risk of complications. Find a high-risk obstetrician to monitor your pregnancy and check whether your endocrinologist is willing to work with your ob-gyn. "You want doctors who really know what diabetes is all about," says Alkon. The constant monitoring, ultrasounds, and additional blood sugar tests add up. So "make sure you know the ins and outs of your insurance plan," she adds. Consider going off oral medications Most doctors suggest that pregnant women with type 2 diabetes discontinue oral medications, says Alkon. This is because Continue reading >>

What To Eat When You Have Type 1 Diabetes

What To Eat When You Have Type 1 Diabetes

It's important to eat a healthy diet when you have type 1 diabetes. That doesn't mean you can't enjoy tasty food, including some of your favorites. With type 1 diabetes, your body stops making insulin. So you take insulin every day either through shots or a pump. It’s also key to track your blood sugar levels. Insulin is only part of the picture. Diet and exercise also play important roles in helping keep your blood sugar levels stable. When you make healthy food choices and eat consistent amounts through the day, it can help control your sugars. It can also lower your chance of diabetes-related problems like heart disease, kidney disease, and nerve damage. Some experts used to think there was a "diabetes diet." They thought people with diabetes had to avoid all foods with sugars or stop eating certain other foods. But when you have type 1, you can eat the same healthy diet as everyone else. Follow some general guidelines: Eat less unhealthy fat. Cut back on the saturated fats you find in high-fat meats like bacon and regular ground beef, as well as full-fat dairy like whole milk and butter. Unhealthy fats raise your chance of heart disease. With diabetes, you face higher-than-average odds of getting heart disease. Make smart food choices to lower that risk. Get enough fiber. It may help control your blood sugar. You can get fiber from whole grains, beans, and fruits and vegetables. Try to get 25-30 grams a day. Those high-fiber foods are always better choices than low-fiber carbs such as refined 'white' grains and processed sugary foods. Carbohydrates are your body's main source of energy. You get them from many foods, like grains (pasta, bread, crackers, and cookies), fruits and vegetables, dairy products, and sugars. Carbs raise your blood sugar levels faster than Continue reading >>

Diabetic Pregnancy Diet

Diabetic Pregnancy Diet

My belly at my babyshower (6 months pregnant) First off, Im going to assume that you want to take extra care while pregnant because youre a diabetic and want to do everything in your power to keep your child safe. Yes, there are women who eat anything and everything and gain 100 pounds while pregnant. You know better and the fact that youre reading this right now means you want to do your best. I researched a ton while pregnant and even before getting pregnant (even though my pregnancy was unplanned). I am a total worrier-not warrior, worry-er. I felt that I should do everything in my power to keep my children safe (I had twins) and I wanted to have a non-guilty conscience should something go wrong. Obviously Iwould beextremely sympathetic to the woman who did some things I wouldnt and had something go wrong during her pregnancy becauseanything but sympathy in this casewould just be cruel and illogical. The point is we women are very sacrificial like this so I know you get what Im saying. I wanted to do everything I personally could stand to do right. Anyway, I was really strict with how I ate. I looked all around me during my pregnancy and saw all of these happy pregnant women, lounging in restaurants or parks, eating chocolate ice cream and deli meat sandwiches while drinking regular coke. I was jealous of how relaxed they were. I was pretty on top of things. Especially when it came to blood sugar control-but thats another post. I can give you is reassurance in knowing that A: I had out of control diabetes for over a decade before getting it well under control, B: I had a twin pregnancy which is risky even for a non-diabetic, and C: My babies and I ended up fine-which I hope can give you some consolation if you are feeling anxiety or worry over your own pregnancy as Continue reading >>

Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes: Craving Carbohydrates

Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes: Craving Carbohydrates

Pregnancy with Type 1 Diabetes: Craving Carbohydrates When not pregnant, Id say 75 grams of carbs would be sort of a higher day for me, while I usually aimed for 30 to 50 grams of carbs per day. 1st. Pregnancy: During my first pregnancy, I certainly craved more carbs than I care to eat in my non-pregnant lifestyle as a woman with type 1 diabetesbut those cravings really pertained mostly to strawberries, peaches, oranges, and occasional ice cream. My other meals were general a more balanced mix of protein and fat withsome carb.In addition to strawberries, I also really craved eggs in the morning and for dinner,steak. Steak was the only real animal meatI wantedand I wanted it nearly daily. 2nd Pregnancy: This time, in my 2nd pregnancy, I couldnt care less about steak. I eat an egg or two in the morning sometimes out of obligation and to merely delay the consumption of what Ireally want: a giant bowl of Chex and Cheerioswith fresh blueberries and unsweetened almond milk. Carb-count? Oh, depending on the size of the bowl I choose, theres at least 50 grams in a smaller serving and more like 75 grams in the size of the bowl Id actually like to eat. 75 grams in one bowl is what Id normally eat in an entire day of lower-impact carbs. And this is cereal. *Reminder: the following is simply tips from one fellow diabetic to another but you should consult your diabetes healthcare team when adjusting your own insulin doses and nutritional intake. 3 Tips forManaging Carb-Cravings During Pregnancy Girl, get enoughinsulin! If youre gonna indulge in the carbs, then you simply need enough insulin to go with it. During this 2nd pregnancy, I am definitely taking more background/basal insulin than I did during my last pregnancy. While Im probably eatingfewer calories overall and exercising Continue reading >>

I Have Type 1 – Diabetes What Can I Eat?

I Have Type 1 – Diabetes What Can I Eat?

From the moment you are diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes you are likely to be faced with what seems like an endless list of new tasks that need to become part of everyday life – injections, testing, treating a hypo, monitoring and eating a healthy, balanced diet. No wonder it can all seem so daunting and overwhelming. One of your first questions is likely to be “what can I eat?” But, with so much to take in, you could still come away from appointments feeling unsure about the answer. Plus, there are lots of myths about diabetes and food that you will need to navigate too. If you’ve just been diagnosed and aren’t sure about what you can and can’t eat, here’s what you need to know. I've just been diagnosed with Type 1 – what can I eat? In one word... anything. It may come as a surprise, but all kinds of food are fine for people with Type 1 diabetes to eat. In the past, people were sent away after their diagnosis with a very restrictive diet plan. This was because the availability of insulin was limited and the type of insulin treatment was very restrictive. As insulin treatments have been developed to be much more flexible, the days of “do's and don'ts” are long gone. The way to go nowadays is to try and fit the diabetes and insulin around the same healthy, balanced diet that is recommended for everyone, with lots of fruit and veg and some food from all the food groups. Is there anything I should avoid? Before your diagnosis of diabetes, it is likely that you experienced an unquenchable thirst. It is a good idea to avoid sugary drinks and fruit juices as a way of quenching thirst. They usually put blood glucose levels up very high and very quickly – which is why they can be a useful treatment for a hypo (low blood glucose levels). Instead, drink water, Continue reading >>

Top 10 Foods For Diabetes And Pregnancy

Top 10 Foods For Diabetes And Pregnancy

Guest post by Regina M. Shirley RD, LDN of Serving Up Diabetes There are a lot of food lists out there: Top 10 Superfoods for Health, Top 10 Foods to fight Cancer, and many more. As someone with diabetes, there are also a lot of lists we can abide by: the low glycemic index list of foods, foods under 100 calories, low-carb foods, etc. Go ask any dietitian, and we will tell you to eat a balanced diet that contains a food item from each food group at most every meal, with healthy snacks in between. This is a general guideline, and most Americans don’t have enough hours in the day to incorporate all the right food groups into their daily eating plan. I used to be one of those, call me a bit of a hypocrite, but as much as I tell people that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, I was just a coffee girl in the morning, maybe with an English muffin thrown in there or a healthy nut bar. While planning for my pregnancy, I decided I needed to revamp my diet a bit to make sure that I would give my baby the best chance at developing strong organs in the first trimester. I did a lot of reading, and implemented what I already knew as well, and created my own “Top 10” list for baby and me. Here is a list of foods that I have incorporated in my diet that pack the most vitamins and nutrients (folic acid, iron and calcium are of most importance), and are even low on the glycemic index list (helpful for the blood sugars) so are also idea for people with diabetes in general. Eggs – 1-2 eggs per day in the form of hard boiled, scrambled, or in an egg and cheese whole-grain sandwich that I made myself. I buy the cage-free farm fresh eggs from my local farm. Many people think that whole eggs are bad for you because of the cholesterol in the yolk, and that egg whites are al Continue reading >>

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