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Type 1 Diabetes And Pregnancy Symptoms

Guest Post: Pregnancy, Miscarriage, And Type 1 Diabetes.

Guest Post: Pregnancy, Miscarriage, And Type 1 Diabetes.

Today's guest post comes from my dear friend Kate Boylan, who has experienced a journey with diabetes, pregnancy, and miscarriage. I'm grateful that there are people like Kate who put it out there like this, even when it must still feel raw. I hope there's some healing found for her in sharing. * * * “It has absolutely nothing to do with diabetes.” That is what the renowned Boston-area high-risk obstetrician reported to me and my husband right after she told us that I was miscarrying my first pregnancy. She went on, “Based on the irregular heartbeat, and the lack of growth in the last week, I am almost positive that this is not a viable pregnancy.” The pregnancy I had been dreaming about being “viable”… well, forever. Also: “Viable.” It’s kind of a harsh word especially when talking about life, no? The pregnancy was almost a little too perfect: I’d been told from my endocrinologist and myriad other doctors that I was the picture of health for about a year. I started a new job this September that finally paid a solid, professional salary commensurate with my experience and master’s degree. We were still able to finagle our trip to Ireland, Scotland and England that we had been planning for years in October. I turned 30 on that trip and celebrated with wonderful friends. After getting home and easing into the new job, we thought, “OK. Now’s about as good as a time as any to try not trying to not get pregnant.” (That’s a whole heck of a lot of double negatives: point is, we would try not using birth control and see what happened.) We didn’t want to get all stressed about trying, so, we just let things happen without really focusing on what could conceivably (bad-dum-ching!) happen, or not happen. And, well, pregnancy happened pretty much i Continue reading >>

Having A Healthy Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes

Having A Healthy Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes

Kerri Sparling was 7 years old when she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. She grew up believing that she'd never be able to have children of her own. But by the time she became an adult, significant technological advances in managing the illness gave her hope. With two decades of blood sugar control under her belt, Sparling eventually looked around for models of a healthy pregnancy with type 1 diabetes. Aside from Julia Robert’s character in the movie Steel Magnolia, she didn’t find much. Roberts’ character had type 1 diabetes and successfully carried a child to term, only to die soon after from diabetes complications. “It wasn’t a positive image,” Sparling said. Undaunted by the Hollywood dramatization, Sparling did her own research and, in preparation for pregnancy and with the help of her endocrinologist, worked for more than a year to get her A1C — a standard test to find out average blood sugar levels over several months — below seven. Sparling, now 34, has a 3-year-old daughter and confirms that while type 1 diabetes and pregnancy might be a challenging mix, a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby are both possible. That said, pregnancy demanded a lot more insulin than she was used to taking, and she had to spend the last month of her pregnancy in the hospital with pre-eclampsia (high blood pressure in pregnancy) before her 6-pound, 13-ounce baby girl was delivered by Caesarean section. “Pregnancy has a definitive end,” Sparling said. “I felt I could make it through to the end of that. But diabetes goes on and on.” Like Sparling, other diabetic women can get pregnant. But without proper monitoring and extra precautions, the chronic illness puts both the mother and the baby at risk for various complications. Here are some of the important m Continue reading >>

11 Tips To Surviving Early Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes

11 Tips To Surviving Early Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes

Congratulations – you’re pregnant! (Or, alternatively: uh oh – you’re pregnant!) Either way, this is where your adventures in pregnant blood sugar management will truly begin. You have a challenging road ahead of you, but the good news is that there’s a lot you can do to increase your chances of a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby. (For preconception tips see here). 1. (Keep up the) work on your A1c: Hopefully by this point your HbA1c is at the target level that you and your doctor agreed upon before conception. This is important because very high blood sugar over time is associated with an increased risk of birth defects and miscarriage. (Though, on the more optimistic flip side, the closer your blood sugar is to normal, the lower the chance of problems.) If your A1c was extremely high in the months before conception, you need to have a frank conversation with your doctor about what impact these levels may have had on your developing embryo, and what this might determine about whether to continue the pregnancy (or what your risk is of losing it). If it’s a go, you need to immediately start working on bringing your blood sugar under control. 2. Test, test, test. In order to come anywhere close to the super-human blood glucose targets of pregnancy (60-99 mg/dl fasting, a peak of 100-129 mg/dl after meals, an average daily blood glucose of 110 mg/dl, and an A1c of less than 6.0%[1] ), you need to be testing your blood glucose a lot. As in, probably more than a dozen times a day. As noted in our pre-conception tips, a Continuous Glucose Monitoring System (CGMS) can be enormously helpful in tracking your pregnancy blood sugars, since it gives you a nearly real-time graph of where your blood glucose has been and where it’s heading — and having advance warn Continue reading >>

Pregnancy And Type 1 Diabetes-the First Trimester

Pregnancy And Type 1 Diabetes-the First Trimester

The first thirteen weeks/first trimester flew by (although I didn’t think so at the time). I admit I was completely unprepared for how I would feel. I thought I would just have morning sickness that would be a pain to deal with because nobody really talks about the other symptoms. For me the number one symptom I had during the first trimester was exhaustion. It wasn’t just “oh I’m tired; I’m going to take a nap today” exhaustion. It was “oh my goodness, this must be what mono feels like, I don’t want to get out of bed, is it bedtime yet” exhaustion. I don’t think I have ever felt as exhausted in my life as I felt the first 13 weeks. It was hard to get work done; it was hard to get chores done; it was hard to hang out with people or run errands. My husband and I went on a few weekends away to visit friends during my first trimester and each time we got back, I had to sleep for at least two days straight. Besides exhaustion, I also had tummy issues. I mentioned on a previous post that I was having tummy issues before I got the positive test result. In fact, I was pregnant when I went to the JDRF Research Summit in D.C. but didn’t know it. I remember meeting my first friend from the DOC in real life, Stephen from happy-medium and my tummy was a wreck. I was hoping I didn’t seem too awkward when I was talking to him because my stomach was telling me I needed to find a bathroom pronto. Over the course of the first trimester, I dealt with major constipation. Occasionally, diarrhea liked to be thrown into the mix, but the majority of the time it was the former. During the first trimester, I also peed like every five minutes. It almost reminded me of how often I had to pee before I was diagnosed with diabetes. I’m glad that has subsided some in the sec Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia In Pregnant Women With Type 1 Diabetes

Hypoglycemia In Pregnant Women With Type 1 Diabetes

Predictors and role of metabolic control Abstract OBJECTIVE—In pregnancy with type 1 diabetes, we evaluated occurrence of mild and severe hypoglycemia and analyzed the influence of strict metabolic control, nausea, vomiting, and other potential predictors of occurrence of severe hypoglycemia. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A prospective observational study of 108 consecutive pregnant women with type 1 diabetes was conducted. At 8, 14, 21, 27, and 33 weeks of gestation, patients performed self-monitored plasma glucose (SMPG) (eight/day) for 3 days and completed a questionnaire on nausea, vomiting, hypoglycemia awareness, and history of mild (managed by the patient) and severe (requiring assistance from others) hypoglycemia. RESULTS—Forty-nine (45%) women experienced 178 severe hypoglycemic events, corresponding to 5.3, 2.4, and 0.5 events/patient-year in the first, second, and third trimesters, respectively. The incidence of mild hypoglycemia was 5.5 events/patient-week in early pregnancy and decreased throughout pregnancy (P < 0.0001), regardless of presence of severe hypoglycemia. Prevalence of nausea and vomiting, mild hypoglycemia, and fraction of SMPG readings ≤3.9 mmol/l did not differ between women with and without severe hypoglycemia. A1C, median SMPG, and fluctuations in SMPG decreased during pregnancy, with no differences between women with and without severe hypoglycemia. Logistic regression analysis identified history of severe hypoglycemia the year preceding pregnancy (odds ratio 3.3 [95% CI 1.2–9.2]) and impaired awareness or unawareness (3.2 [1.2–8.2]) as independent predictors for severe hypoglycemia. CONCLUSIONS—In pregnancy with type 1 diabetes, the incidence of mild and severe hypoglycemia was highest in early pregnancy, although metabolic c Continue reading >>

Early Signs Of Pregnancy And Bs Levels

Early Signs Of Pregnancy And Bs Levels

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I know this has been touched on a bit in some of the other threads, but was hoping to get a better idea of everyone's experiences. I was just wondering if any of you noticed any patterns, highs or lows, or anything out of the ordinary with your BS levels alongside the other early signs of pregnancy. It's so difficult to find much detail on D and Pregnancy besides overviews and I was really curious about this. In my case, I didn't really notice that big of a difference at the initial stage. However, I did have some weird BG readings which went up to 20+ mmol/L after having something different than my normal diet (blame it on Chinese New Year). Those were easily corrected. I did up my basal 20% after ovulation, which I have always been doing since that period is when the progesterone hormone will mess around with the BG level. So for me, didn't really notice anything significant in the BG level during early pregnancy. All 3 pregnancies (I have 2 healthy daughters and miscarried a year ago) my biggest symptom was crazy constant lows. I was on a reduced insulin dosage and STILL having below 40 lows quite frequently. Before I was even one day late, I had a feeling cuz my bloods are never that constantly low. Hi. It was my blood sugars that tipped-me off about the 2nd pregnancy! I was not trying to get pregnant, so I certainly was not paying much attention to my cycle. Plus, I was slacking-off with my health and control: I was 6 months post-partum from my first pregnancy, completely sleep deprived, and was sick to death of the 9 months of trying to maintain "perfect" blood sugar control. One night Continue reading >>

I Was Pregnant With Type 1 Diabetes

I Was Pregnant With Type 1 Diabetes

According to experts, of the nearly one in 10 women with diabetes in the U.S., about five percent have type 1 diabetes (an inability to produce the insulin needed to process the food we eat). Moms with diabetes can deliver healthy babies, but they need to take extra precautions during pregnancy to avoid potential complications. These women endure more than most during their nine months, from constant monitoring of blood glucose levels to a seemingly endless succession of prodding-and-poking doctors. What to Expect reached out to our community members who struggled with type 1 diabetes during pregnancy to find out how these moms fared. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes (insulin dependent diabetes, juvenile) is a condition in which the body stops making insulin. This causes the person's blood sugar to increase. There are two types of diabetes, type 1 and type 2. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is attacked by the immune system and then it cannot produce insulin. In type 2 diabetes the pancreas can produce insulin, but the body can't use it. Causes of type 1 diabetes are auto-immune destruction of the pancreatic beta cells. This can be caused by viruses and infections as well as other risk factors. In many cases, the cause is not known. Scientists are looking for cures for type 1 diabetes such as replacing the pancreas or some of its cells. Risk factors for type 1 diabetes are family history, introducing certain foods too soon (fruit) or too late (oats/rice) to babies, and exposure to toxins. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes are skin infections, bladder or vaginal infections, and Sometimes, there are no significant symptoms. Type 1 diabetes is diagnosed by blood tests. The level of blood sugar is measured, and then levels of insulin and antibodies can be measured to confirm type 1 vs. type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is treated with insulin and lifestyle changes. Specifically, meal planning to ensure carbohydrate intake matches insulin dosing. Complications of type 1 diabetes are kidney disease, eye problems, heart disease, and nerve problems (diabetic neuropathy) such as loss of feeling in the feet. Poor wound healing can also be a complication of type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented, however, keeping blood sugar at healthy levels may delay or prevent symptoms or complications. There is currently no cure, and most cases of type 1 diabetes have no known cause. The prognosis or life-expectancy for a person with Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Women who have diabetes before they get pregnant have special health concerns. In addition to the new demands that a pregnancy will put on your body, it will also affect your blood sugar levels and diabetes medications. If you're thinking about having a baby, take steps to lessen the risks for both you and your child. A pre-conception counseling appointment will help you be physically and emotionally prepared for pregnancy. Meet with your doctor to find out if your diabetes is controlled well enough for you to stop your birth control method. A blood test called the glycosylated hemoglobin test (HbA1c, or just A1c) can show how well it's been going over the past 8 to 12 weeks. Other medical tests can help prevent complications during pregnancy: Eye exam to see if you have glaucoma, cataracts, or retinopathy Blood work to make sure your kidneys and liver are working Foot exam High blood sugar levels early in the pregnancy (before 13 weeks) can cause birth defects. They also can increase the risks of miscarriage and diabetes-related complications. But many women don't know they're pregnant until the baby has been growing for 2 to 4 weeks. That's why you should have good control of your blood sugar before you start trying to conceive. Keep blood glucose levels within the ideal range: 70 to 100 mg/dL before meals Less than 120 mg/dL 2 hours after eating 100-140 mg/dL before your bedtime snack Use your meals, exercise, and diabetes medications to keep a healthy balance. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes definition and facts Risk factors for gestational diabetes include a history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, There are typically no noticeable signs or symptoms associated with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause the fetus to be larger than normal. Delivery of the baby may be more complicated as a result. The baby is also at risk for developing low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) immediately after birth. Following a nutrition plan is the typical treatment for gestational diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight and following a healthy eating plan may be able to help prevent or minimize the risks of gestational diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes, or high blood sugar levels, that develops during pregnancy. It occurs in about 4% of all pregnancies. It is usually diagnosed in the later stages of pregnancy and often occurs in women who have no prior history of diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is thought to arise because the many changes, hormonal and otherwise, that occur in the body during pregnancy predispose some women to become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by specialized cells in the pancreas that allows the body to effectively metabolize glucose for later usage as fuel (energy). When levels of insulin are low, or the body cannot effectively use insulin (i.e., insulin resistance), blood glucose levels rise. What are the screening guidelines for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Most pregnant women are tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy (see Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Pregnancy

Type 1 Diabetes In Pregnancy

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition. What this means is that for reasons we don’t yet fully understand, the immune system, which is meant to protect you from foreign bodies, such as viruses and bacteria, mistakenly attacks and destroys the beta cells in the pancreas. A body that isn’t affected by type 1 diabetes has hormones that will keep blood glucose within a healthy range (4 – 7 mmol/L). Insulin is a hormone that allows glucose to move from the bloodstream into cells, which can then be used for energy. Someone with type 1 diabetes will not have enough insulin or any insulin at all, meaning that blood glucose will fall or rise outside of the normal levels. When blood glucose becomes too high the body will do whatever it can to try and remove the excess glucose from the blood. You can’t prevent type 1 diabetes by adopting a healthy diet, exercising regularly, or living a healthy lifestyle. There is currently no known cure. But JDRF is committed to funding research that will find one What are the symptoms of type 1 diabetes? The common signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes are: More frequent urination. Increased thirst. Tiredness. Weight loss. Ketones (expressed through ketotic-smelling breath). While it can take years for damage to insulin-producing cells in the pancreas to eventually lead to type 1 diabetes, the onset of type 1 diabetes symptoms is rapid, happening over a matter of days and weeks rather than months. If you, or someone you know experiences the symptoms of type 1 diabetes you should seek medical treatment immediately. Type 1 diabetes is treated by insulin injection or pump infusion. Type 1 Diabetes and Pregnancy If you have type 1 diabetes and are planning a pregnancy, you need to plan months in advance to have the best chance of having Continue reading >>

Pregnancy Symptoms And Diabetes

Pregnancy Symptoms And Diabetes

Question Originally asked by Community Member Starr Pregnancy Symptoms And Diabetes ok, I have been tryng to get pregnant and I was wondering is how to tell the difference between your average diabetic symptoms and pregnancy symptoms? I have type 2 and I take metformin.I check all the signs and they run along the lines of diabetes also? and will it make it harder to conceive being a diabetic? should there be something I should be doing or not doing? Do I still take my pills? There’s a lot of debate surrounding the pros and cons of using artificial sweeteners especially when living with diabetes. Here are some highlights of recent research. B/c I heard metformin can kill a fetus. Answer Hi Starr, I’ll echo Vicki’s advice, you’ll certainly want to talk to your doctor about the use of any medications during preganncy. I’m not familiar with metformin, but I’m sure there are standard regulations about it’s use during pregnancy. As for the symptoms of diabetes and pregnancy, in my experience they are quite distinct. Symptoms of diabetes can basically be divided into high blood sugar and low blood sugar symptoms. When you’re high you may feel thirsty, lethargic, and sleepy. Highs can also cause headaches, blurry vision, cotton-mouth, and nausea. Low blood sugar symptoms, on the other hand, include sweating, shakiness, hunger, headache, disorientation, and dizziness. The only diabetes related symptoms that may also be present during pregnancy are headaches and nausea. These are such common symptoms that could be related to any number of health conditions. Please check with your doctor if you’re experiencing high blood sugars that are causing many symptoms. You’ll want to get those under control at least a few months before conceiving. Doctors report that blo Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes During Pregnancy

Managing Diabetes During Pregnancy

Florence Brown, M.D., Co-Director, Joslin-Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Diabetes and Pregnancy Program; Instructor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Tamara Takoudes, M.D., Co-Director, Joslin-Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Diabetes and Pregnancy Program; Instructor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 1.85 million women of reproductive age have diabetes, and about 500,000 of them do not know it. As these numbers continue to rise, it is increasingly important for women with diabetes to achieve normal blood glucose levels before they become pregnant because if women have poorly controlled diabetes going into a pregnancy, they are at much higher risk for serious fetal complications. Changing hormones in the body during pregnancy cause blood glucose levels to rise, and high blood glucose levels in early pregnancy (within the first four to six weeks) can result in a 30 to 40 percent chance of having a baby with a birth defect compared to a 2 percent risk in women whose diabetes is in excellent control. Women with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes are also at higher risk for: Large birth weight babies, resulting in more Cesarean deliveries and increased complications during delivery Premature births or fetal death Pre-eclampsia: a dangerous surge in blood pressure associated with protein in the urine Diabetic retinopathy: damage to the retina caused by high glucose levels Nephropathy: diabetic kidney disease Severe hypoglycemia: episodes of low blood glucose that can result in confusion or unconsciousness Ensuring a healthy pregnancy The good news is that women with uncomplicated diabetes who keep their blood glucose levels in a normal range before and during pregnancy have about the same chanc Continue reading >>

T1d And Pregnancy: A Firsthand Account

T1d And Pregnancy: A Firsthand Account

For women with type 1 diabetes (T1D), becoming pregnant and having a healthy pregnancy raise many questions. But planning a pregnancy or adjusting to pregnant life as a person with T1D doesn’t have to be stressful. We asked Gina Capone, JDRF’s community manager for TypeOneNation and first-time mother with T1D, to share her pregnancy story with us. Gina was diagnosed with T1D at the age of 25, and has been living with the disease for 12 years. She recently gave birth to a healthy son. What were your initial thoughts of being pregnant AND having T1D? I was reading a lot of blogs about people with T1D that were or had already been pregnant and honestly, they scared me. So I stopped reading ANYTHING related to diabetes and pregnancy and decided to just live it out for myself. There were times in the early stages of pregnancy when I was extremely scared because of my higher A1c level at conception, combined with my age (36). I was afraid that it would affect the baby, but after a couple of sonograms and blood tests, my mind was put at ease. I also had a serious bout of morning sickness in the first trimester which was nerve wrenching because it was causing a bunch of scary lows all day long and I wasn’t able to keep anything in my stomach until I was put on an anti-nausea medicine. I couldn’t even eat a glucose tab! Did you have to take any planning steps when getting pregnant? Were there any issues you had to be aware of as a person with T1D? The main thing my doctors kept telling me when I first started asking about becoming pregnant was to get my A1c into “baby range,” which to them meant 6.5 or lower and to me seemed impossible! I first started my journey for the perfect “baby range” A1c shortly after I was married—but I failed at it miserably. No matte Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Pregnancy – Symptoms, Risks And Management

Type 1 Diabetes And Pregnancy – Symptoms, Risks And Management

Type 1 Diabetes and Pregnancy This article will cover everything you need to know about Type 1 diabetes and pregnancy. Deciding to have a baby is a big decision for most people, and for women with Type 1 diabetes, it’s one which means a lot of thought and planning. Taking care of your health and that of your baby is important, as it is for all pregnant women, and if you have Type 1 diabetes it’s crucial. Type 1 diabetes can be difficult to manage on its own, and a pregnancy can complicate it further. Yet many women have successfully met the challenges of diabetes during pregnancy, and have enjoyed healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. What Is Type 1 Diabetes? Previously known as insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes, Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The body’s immune system attacks and destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Insulin helps the body to process a type of sugar (glucose) to create energy. In Type 1 diabetes, the body doesn’t produce insulin, and without it the body’s cells can’t convert glucose (sugar) into energy. Science doesn’t know what causes this autoimmune condition, and there is no prevention or cure. Symptoms of Type 1 diabetes include: Excessive thirst Passing more urine Feeling tired and lethargic Constant hunger Slow healing of wounds and cuts Skin infections Blurred vision Unexplained weight loss Mood swings Headaches Feeling dizzy Leg cramps These symptoms can occur suddenly, and usually first affect people under the age of 30. People with Type 1 diabetes need to replace the insulin their bodies can’t make every day. To manage the condition, they must test their blood glucose levels several times daily, and maintain a healthy lifestyle. Getting Pregnant With Type 1 Diabetes Research has shown those Continue reading >>

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