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Type 1 Diabetes And Pregnancy

I Was Pregnant With Type 1 Diabetes

I Was Pregnant With Type 1 Diabetes

According to experts, of the nearly one in 10 women with diabetes in the U.S., about five percent have type 1 diabetes (an inability to produce the insulin needed to process the food we eat). Moms with diabetes can deliver healthy babies, but they need to take extra precautions during pregnancy to avoid potential complications. These women endure more than most during their nine months, from constant monitoring of blood glucose levels to a seemingly endless succession of prodding-and-poking doctors. What to Expect reached out to our community members who struggled with type 1 diabetes during pregnancy to find out how these moms fared. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Pregnancy – Symptoms, Risks And Management

Type 1 Diabetes And Pregnancy – Symptoms, Risks And Management

Type 1 Diabetes and Pregnancy This article will cover everything you need to know about Type 1 diabetes and pregnancy. Deciding to have a baby is a big decision for most people, and for women with Type 1 diabetes, it’s one which means a lot of thought and planning. Taking care of your health and that of your baby is important, as it is for all pregnant women, and if you have Type 1 diabetes it’s crucial. Type 1 diabetes can be difficult to manage on its own, and a pregnancy can complicate it further. Yet many women have successfully met the challenges of diabetes during pregnancy, and have enjoyed healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. What Is Type 1 Diabetes? Previously known as insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes, Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The body’s immune system attacks and destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Insulin helps the body to process a type of sugar (glucose) to create energy. In Type 1 diabetes, the body doesn’t produce insulin, and without it the body’s cells can’t convert glucose (sugar) into energy. Science doesn’t know what causes this autoimmune condition, and there is no prevention or cure. Symptoms of Type 1 diabetes include: Excessive thirst Passing more urine Feeling tired and lethargic Constant hunger Slow healing of wounds and cuts Skin infections Blurred vision Unexplained weight loss Mood swings Headaches Feeling dizzy Leg cramps These symptoms can occur suddenly, and usually first affect people under the age of 30. People with Type 1 diabetes need to replace the insulin their bodies can’t make every day. To manage the condition, they must test their blood glucose levels several times daily, and maintain a healthy lifestyle. Getting Pregnant With Type 1 Diabetes Research has shown those Continue reading >>

How Does Type 1 Diabetes Affect Pregnancy?

How Does Type 1 Diabetes Affect Pregnancy?

Females with type 1 diabetes require very close observation and diabetic control through their pregnancy. Poorly controlled diabetes during pregnancy can cause multiple health problems for both the mother and the baby. If you are a diabetic and planning to get pregnant discuss this with your obstetrician or endocrinologist prior to getting pregnant. More intensive therapy may be warranted before you get pregnant. Type 1 Diabetes is further classified according to the age when diabetes was diagnosed.The earlier the age of diagnosis the more challenging its effects on both mother and fetus. The classifications are B with less than 10 years of diabetes and insulin. Type C has had diabetes for 10 to 19 years.Type D,F R and H as well as B and C need a high risk Obstetrician to closly follow Mother and fetus. Insulin needs are increased with each trimester of pregnancy.The fetus is closly monitored for growth and development.Mothers are placed on nutritious and closly monitored dietary intake. Preparing for pregnancy is an exciting time. It's very important to manage type 1 diabetes before, during, and after pregnancy to ensure your health and your baby's. Unstable blood sugar levels can increase the likelihood of serious complications for both the mother and child. Pregnancy also means hormonal fluctuations, which can affect blood sugar levels, so see your doctor before you become pregnant to discuss your best treatment options. Continue reading >>

Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes: Your Month-to-month Guide

Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes: Your Month-to-month Guide

WE HAVE REACHED OUR GOAL! Anything raised beyond $3000 will cover the expenses of shipping books to those who donated for a paperback copy and other shipping costs for marketing the book. Managing type 1 diabetes during pregnancy is an incredibly overwhelming pursuit. Its about so much more than just counting your carbs and getting exercise. In type 1 diabetes, pregnancy causes constant changes in your insulin needs and the tediously specific timing of your insulin doses before each meal (and sometimes even several hours after you finished eating!). The stress, arduous effort, and labor of love is something no woman with type 1 should have to endure without support and knowledge. In this book, we'll guide you through preparing for pregnancy, from conception to the birth of your child, and postpartum. Despite the obvious need for this book, traditional publishers told us the audience (women, pregnant, with type 1) is too small and thus not worth publishing a book for. We feel that you deserve this book! We are both type 1 mamas and we know first-hand just how intensely challenging and complex diabetes management during pregnancy is. So, we are self-publishing this book -- and we'll need help raising the funds to hire a graphic designer (Carmen Garza from ThinkCarmen.com ) to create the exterior and interior of the book. In fact, we've already gone ahead and written more than half of the book -- and plan to complete it and have it published by the end of 2016. Pregnancy with Type 1 Diabetes, by Ginger Vieira and Jennifer Smith, will provide women with the in-depth details of diabetes management you need for the safest and healthiest pregnancy possible! If we are unable to raise the funds needed to fully pay our graphic designer, we will pay for those funds from our own p Continue reading >>

Baby Weight Gain Linked To Type 1 Diabetes

Baby Weight Gain Linked To Type 1 Diabetes

A new study shows that the risk for type 1 diabetes could begin in the first year of life—and how much weight your baby gains in the first 12 months could be a sign. Everyone loves a chunky baby, and chubby rolls are often looked at as a sign of a well-fed, and well-developing, child. But, it turns out that the more an infant gains in the first year, the greater the risk of type 1 diabetes later on in childhood, according to a new study published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics. Unknown risk factors Researchers looked at two study groups that included over 99,000 children from Norway and Denmark, who were followed up to 13 years of age. "We found that the higher the infant weight gain [weight at 12 months minus birth weight], the higher the subsequent risk of type 1 diabetes," senior study author Lars C. Stene, Ph.D., a researcher at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in Oslo, tells Fit Pregnancy. "There seemed to be a gradual increase in risk of type 1 diabetes associated with increasing weight gain." The average weight gain in their first year was just over 13 pounds, with the more weight gained, the greater the risk—regardless of the increase in the babies' length. The study authors say their research is the first to show that weight increase in baby's first year is associated with type 1 diabetes, a disease whose cause is still a mystery. Unlike type 2, which usually begins later in life and is linked with physical inactivity and obesity, type 1 is an autoimmune disease also called "juvenile diabetes" because it starts in childhood. The immune system starts attacking the cells that allow the pancreas to produce insulin, which the body needs to manage blood sugar. But, Stene says that weight gain is actually not a symptom or a cause of type 1, but rather a m Continue reading >>

Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes

Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes

Forty five years ago when I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes I was clearly told I couldn’t have children. I didn’t. Today, thankfully that advice is no longer given. And while a woman with Type 1 diabetes needs to take precautions, she can absolutely, and safely, have a healthy baby. I sat down for an interview with Ginger Vieira, co-author,with Jennifer Smith, of the recent book, Pregnancy with Type 1 Diabetes: Your Month-to-Month Guide to Blood Sugar Management. What will people find in the book? As much information as you possibly need to understand why your blood sugars fluctuate during pregnancy and how to adjust your insulin management to keep your blood sugars as close to non-diabetic levels as possible. Also the book covers preparing for pregnancy, months one through nine of your pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum, including the challenges of breastfeeding for a woman with type 1 diabetes. My co-author Jenny is also my diabetes pregnancy coach. As a certified diabetes educator, woman with type 1 diabetes and mother, she knows this journey inside and out. What makes pregnancy for a woman with type 1 diabetes challenging? Let’s face it, a normal day with type 1 diabetes is challenging, balancing an autonomic system your body ought to balance on its own. And we’re only given insulin to do the job, while a non-diabetic body uses several different hormones to balance blood sugar. Add pregnancy to that mix and you add the insane pressure of, “Every decision you make impacts the human life growing inside of you!!!” And now you have to balance your blood sugars with constantly shifting pregnancy hormones. Plus those hormones impact your insulin needs in ways that are constantly changing and evolving. Also, there is never a break. Even when you’re sleepi Continue reading >>

The Pregnancy Journey For Women With Type 1 Diabetes: A Qualitative Model From Contemplation To Motherhood

The Pregnancy Journey For Women With Type 1 Diabetes: A Qualitative Model From Contemplation To Motherhood

The pregnancy journey for women with type 1 diabetes: a qualitative model from contemplation to motherhood Helen Edwards, Jane Speight, Heather Bridgman and Timothy C Skinner July 14, 2016 Vol 33.6 July / August 2016 The purpose of this study is to describe and develop a model of the pregnancy journey for women with type 1 diabetes. We undertook a thematic analysis of written interactions (n=200; n=2060 text excerpts) with an online counselling support service from 93 women with type 1 diabetes. Seven possible discrete phases in the pregnancy journey were revealed: Contemplation, Pregnancy planning, Conception, Pregnancy, Delivery/birth, and Motherhood or Pregnancy loss. Eight common themes were identified, varying in importance across phases. Diabetes-specific distress was most evident during Contemplation and Motherhood. During pregnancy, social identity and peer support were paramount. Negative emotions in Pregnancy, while connected to diabetes, also centred on the unborn baby. In Motherhood, diabetes-specific distress and depressed mood increased. Medicalisation was expected and offered reassurance during Pregnancy; however, some women still worried, with peer support offering the most reassurance. In conclusion, women with type 1 diabetes potentially experience seven distinct phases of the pregnancy journey, with eight themes varying in significance across phases. Contemplation begins well before Planning or Conception, and women may seek support from non-mainstream sources. Mental health and emotional well-being varies qualitatively and quantitatively across phases (focusing on pregnancy-related distress, diabetes-specific distress and general maternal well-being), indicating a need for targeted assessment and support across the pregnancy journey. Type 1 diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy: 5 Things I'll Do Differently With Baby #2

Diabetes And Pregnancy: 5 Things I'll Do Differently With Baby #2

As I write this I'm at the start of my 2nd trimester of my 2nd pregnancy. My first born is a healthy toddler and I have lived and learned from the first go round. Here are my tips for staying calm and keeping your blood sugars stable when you have type 1 diabetes and a baby on the way. Pregnancy with diabetes—any type of diabetes—is a tremendous undertaking because so much of your daily effort becomes focused on trying to be as “perfect” as possible now that another person's life is involved. Things you never thought you were capable of (like A1C results below 6.0 percent!) suddenly become achievable because blood sugar management is your ultimate priority…all day long. This pregnancy is a bit more challenging since keeping a watchful eye on my blood sugars is competing with keeping a watchful eye on my very active 2-year-old. I just can't be as numbers obsessed with this baby. That's not to say I'm going to neglect my diabetes, it's just that my approach has changed because it's been forced to. My revised plan is outlined below: #1. I won’t get stressed over over imperfect blood sugars. Prior to my 1st pregnancy, maintaining an A1C at or below 6.0 percent was a very new thing to me. I’d really never tried to get it much lower than 6.5 percent. I never felt there was a reason to do so, and didn’t really know what I’d do differently in order to achieve it. But those 9 months (and the 6 months I prepared for my 1st pregnancy) taught me so much about achieving and maintain an A1C at or below 6.0 percent that it’s now my new normal. And I don’t mean that to sound as if I’m some sort of genius—I simply changed my personal standards. It's pretty simple. I used to be content with blood sugars hovering around 140 mg/dL all day…and now I’m not. Inst Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Affect Fertility?

Does Diabetes Affect Fertility?

There was a time when women who had diabetes were strongly advised to avoid getting pregnant. Attempting to produce a biologically-related family was just too dangerous [source: Brucker]. Fortunately, diabetic women are no longer given that heartbreaking direction from caregivers. Diabetics can, and routinely do, get pregnant and give birth to healthy children. Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, however, can still be a major factor in fertility for men or women. There are challenges diabetics face in getting a partner pregnant, becoming pregnant, maintaining a pregnancy and ensuring they give birth to a healthy, full-term baby. Diabetes (Type 1 or Type 2) can harm sperm [source: Paddock]. Type 2 diabetes can make it far more difficult to become pregnant. There's an increased rate of miscarriage among diabetics in general, and women with Type 1 diabetes are somewhat more likely to have a baby with a birth defect or a child born prematurely [source: MyDr]. However, all of these challenges can largely be managed by being attentive to and responding to signals from the body. In order to understand why diabetes affects reproduction, it helps to have a general understanding of the disease in both of its forms. A healthy human body digests food and -- with the help of a hormone called insulin -- transports a form of sugar known as glucose through the bloodstream to cells for energy. Diabetics have flaws in their metabolism. A Type 1 diabetic's body doesn't make insulin. The body of a Type 2 diabetic either fails to create enough insulin, the person's cells don't react properly to the insulin or both malfunctions occur [source: Nordqvist]. Click ahead to learn the specifics of how Type 1 diabetes influences reproduction and how it can be managed. You've undoubtedly heard a pregnant wom Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes And Pregnancy

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a condition in which the body can't produce enough insulin, or it can't use it properly. Insulin is the hormone that allows glucose (sugar) to enter the cells to be used as fuel. When glucose cannot enter the cells, it builds up in the blood. This is called hyperglycemia or high blood sugar. Damage from diabetes comes from the effects of hyperglycemia on other organ systems including the eyes, kidneys, heart, blood vessels, and nerves. In early pregnancy, hyperglycemia can result in birth defects. What are the different types of diabetes? There are three basic types of diabetes including: Type 1 diabetes. Also called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system destroys, or attempts to destroy, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Type 1 diabetes usually develops in children or young adults, but can start at any age. Type 2 diabetes. A metabolic disorder resulting from the body's inability to make enough, or properly use, insulin. It used to be called noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Gestational diabetes. A condition in which the blood glucose level is elevated and other diabetic symptoms appear during pregnancy in a woman who has not previously been diagnosed with diabetes. Diabetes is a serious disease, which, if not controlled, can be life-threatening. It is often associated with long-term complications that can affect every system and part of the body. Diabetes can contribute to eye disorders and blindness, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputation, and nerve damage. What happens with diabetes and pregnancy? During pregnancy, the placenta supplies a growing fetus with nutrients and water. The placenta also makes a variety of horm Continue reading >>

Pregnancy

Pregnancy

The key to a healthy pregnancy and baby is planning. This means you should be prepared to put in a little extra work before and during pregnancy. Speak to your diabetes team about your pregnancy plans at least three months before trying to conceive. However, if like many women, you get pregnant without planning, don’t panic! Make an urgent appointment with your diabetes team to review your diabetes and general health and put a plan in place from there. Planning your pregnancy Guidance from healthcare professionals says that you should start working on the following goals about three months before conception: Try to achieve an HbA1c below 53 mmol/mol (7%), or ideally below 48 mmol/mol (6.5%) if this can be achieved without increased episodes of hypoglycaemia. The first eight to 12 weeks are when a baby’s major organs develop, so it is important to gain tight blood glucose control before you get pregnant. Persistently high blood glucose levels dramatically increase the risk of abnormal development of your baby. Work with your diabetes team to achieve the best blood glucose level you can. You will need a medical examination by your doctor prior to and during your pregnancy. They need to check blood pressure, immunity to rubella and chicken pox, and conduct a complications screen (particularly for your eyes and kidneys) Start taking a folic acid supplement and daily multivitamin. Discuss an appropriate dose with your doctor and get a prescription. High dose folic acid (5mg daily) is recommended for all women planning pregnancy. Ideally you should take it at least three months before conception and continue taking it until 12 weeks into pregnancy Visit your dietitian. They can advise you on the most appropriate foods for you during your pregnancy If you smoke or drink al Continue reading >>

Pregnancy And Type 1

Pregnancy And Type 1

Im new to the forum, because quite frankly Ive been doing crazy amounts of research on all of the risks myself and our baby are subjected to since finding out that I am pregnant. I go to the doctor tomorrow, but Im anxious to hear of others experiences having type 1 diabetes and the struggles they faced. Im especially worried because my last A1c level was tested at a 13 which is very high! Im concerned for the health of our baby. He/She was not planned, but we consider ourselves blessed nonetheless. Since testing positive, Ive been obsessed with checking my blood sugar and eating healthy diabetic meals. Ive managed to get my glucose levels back down into the mid 100s and they are steadily improving. Has anyone been through the same situation and can provide me any advice? Speaking as someone who is half way through their first pregnancy, I can definitely attest to the challenge that being diabetic and pregnant poses! Controlling your blood sugar, paying attention to what you are eating and going to the doctor (the many, many doctors) will control just about every aspect of your life. I prepared for a year before we started trying because I wanted to have my sugars perfect before stepping up to that challenge. I wanted to minimize every possible risk so that I could have as close to a normal pregnancy experience as possible and so my kid would have the best chance at being born healthy. Even still, it has been a stressful adventure. I do hope for the best for you and your baby, but I personally cant imagine starting this challenge in the same position. It sounds like you are still struggling to keep your diabetes under control for your own sake. Adding hormones and weight gain and normal insulin resistance from pregnancy on top of that is going to be incredibly difficul Continue reading >>

In Pregnant Women With Type 1 Diabetes, Continuous Glucose Monitoring Linked To Better Outcomes

In Pregnant Women With Type 1 Diabetes, Continuous Glucose Monitoring Linked To Better Outcomes

Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes is associated with better neonatal outcomes, according to a study in The Lancet. Researchers randomized 325 women — some in early pregnancy and some planning a pregnancy — to either capillary glucose monitoring alone or capillary monitoring plus CGM. Participants were given directions on how to use their measurements to adjust their insulin dose. In the early-pregnancy group, the mean glycated hemoglobin level between recruitment and 34 weeks' gestation decreased significantly more with CGM than with capillary monitoring alone (-0.54 vs. -0.35). Among women planning a pregnancy, the change in hemoglobin level between recruitment and study week 24 did not differ statistically between monitoring groups. Neonatal health (a secondary outcome) favored the CGM group. Those babies were less likely to be large-for-gestational-age and had fewer neonatal intensive care admissions than those of conventionally monitored mothers. The Lancet's commentators write that the results "support CGM use during pregnancy for all women with type 1 diabetes." Continue reading >>

Review Pre-existing (type 1 And Type 2) Diabetes In Pregnancy

Review Pre-existing (type 1 And Type 2) Diabetes In Pregnancy

Abstract The prevalence rates of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus are increasing in the UK. These rates are resulting in a higher number of women with pregnancy complicated by pre-existing diabetes being seen in maternity clinics. Specifically, there is a continuing marked increase in the number of women with type 2 diabetes and pregnancy. Confidential Enquiry into Maternal and Child Health (CEMACH) has recently reported findings from a large study of pregnancy outcome in women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. We review the current understanding of diabetes in pregnancy, and discuss the CEMACH findings and current and future developments in the delivery of pre-conception and diabetes care in established pregnancy in the UK. Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring For Pregnant Women With Type 1 Diabetes Reduces Risk Of Complications For Newborns

Continuous Glucose Monitoring For Pregnant Women With Type 1 Diabetes Reduces Risk Of Complications For Newborns

Continuous glucose monitoring for pregnant women with type 1 diabetes reduces risk of complications for newborns Authors say that continuous glucose monitoring should be offered to all pregnant women with type 1 diabetes to reduce risk of complications for newborn babies For women with type 1 diabetes, monitoring blood sugar levels continuously during pregnancy via an implanted device helps better manage the disease, and improves birth outcomes compared to traditional finger-prick tests, according to a new randomized trial published in The Lancet and presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) conference. One in two newborns of women with type 1 diabetes may face complications as a result of being exposed to maternal high blood sugar levels, and there has been limited progress, with these birth outcomes not improving in the past 3-4 decades. Complications can include congenital anomaly, premature birth, stillbirth, need for intensive care after birth, and being larger than average at birth for the baby, and higher rates of pre-eclampsia and Caesarean section for the mother. The authors of the international trial say that, as a result of these findings, this type of monitoring should now be offered to all pregnant women with type 1 diabetes to help improve outcomes for newborns. In the study, researchers trialled an implanted continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device that gives 288 glucose recordings per day, allowing users to recognise and respond to changes in blood sugar levels as they occur. They compared this with traditional monitoring used 4-8 times a day, which involves pricking the finger and putting the blood onto a test-strip to measure blood sugar levels. The study involved 214 pregnant women with type 1 diabetes aged 18-40 who ma Continue reading >>

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