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Type 1 Diabetes And Personality Disorders

How Diabetes Impacts Your Mental Health

How Diabetes Impacts Your Mental Health

WRITTEN BY: Mark Heyman, PhD, CDE How Diabetes Impacts Your Mental Health is part of our Mental Health series. Type 1 isn’t just about counting carbs, checking BGLs and administering insulin. The disease takes an emotional and psychological toll as well. Check out other clinical information and personal stories about Mental Health. When I tell people I am a psychologist who specializes in diabetes, they usually look confused. Most people think of diabetes as a physical condition and have never really thought about the mental aspects with living with the condition. Even some people with diabetes are surprised that there are organizations like CDMH that focus on diabetes and mental health. They know that living with diabetes is hard for them, but often they are surprised to hear that their concerns are actually (and unfortunately) quite common. What is it about diabetes that is so hard? I tend to think about diabetes and mental health issues very broadly. While some people with diabetes have a mental health condition (that may or may not be related to having diabetes), there are many others who struggle with issues that are very real, but which may not meet the (sometimes arbitrary) criteria for a mental health diagnosis. Psychology is the study of how situations, emotions and relationships in our lives interact and impact our behavior. I think that this definition provides us with a framework we can use to talk about how diabetes impacts mental health. Situation Diabetes is a self-managed condition. This means that it is the person with diabetes, not their doctor, who is responsible for taking care of him or herself on a daily basis. Diabetes involves making frequent, sometimes life or death decisions under sometimes stressful and physically uncomfortable circumstances Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Bpd

Type 1 Diabetes And Bpd

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I'm after some advice. I have had diabetes since the age of 12 and have never come to terms with the condition. I have have first stages of blindness (probably 2nd stages by now) In 2006/2007 I have a very bad mental health episode. Where I got diagnosed with depression and have been on various medication for depression. Although none of these have really helped. Between 2013 and now I've had yet another mental health breakdown. This time they have diagnosed me with BPD (Borderline Personality Disorder) For anyone who doesn't know what this is. Basically, I don't deal with stress very well at all. It is virtually impossible for me to control my own emotions. I'm constantly fighting my own thoughts, and don't think I'm good enough for anything. Self harm and a number of attempted suicides. (This is only half of the story) My consultant is a nasty person and didn't give a damn when I had "depression" I think he is one of these that think mental health is all made up. On my last visit to him. I wanted to commit suicide in that very building. Basically when I had "depression" I stated that I would not be able to put my mind to my diabetes until my personal life was looked into and fixed. Although, now I have found out it is a personality disorder. I'm just wondering if anyone has BPD and Type 1 diabetes, and how do you find managing your diabetes with this condition? As I said (above) I'm constantly on a fighting battle with myself and hate everything. People with BPD are well known for Drink/Drug abuse as well as crime, reckless driving, binge eating and other things. The alcohol and binge eating I can confirm. I admit I drink a fair bit because it is an Continue reading >>

I Have Type 1 Diabetes And Borderline Personality Disorder

I Have Type 1 Diabetes And Borderline Personality Disorder

Welcome to an exclusive club: In 2012, between 1.6%-5.9% of the US population was estimated to have BPD . Meanwhile roughly 0.4% of the population had diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes (using 2012 total population). That number is actually higher when accounting for undiagnosed cases. Having Type 1 Diabetes is easier if your mental health is in order. Likewise, as difficult as BPD is, having good physical health improves treatment outcomes. Both at the same time? Well, now you have an epic silent struggle on your hands. While the stigma of Type 1 Diabetes is decreasing, it is still quite high for those with BPD. Having BPD is hell on earth. Suicide rates approach 10% . Few people will care to help you. Like Type 1, it is a self-managed condition, in conjunction with a superb therapist. Marsha Linehans DBT (Dialectical Behavioral Therapy) is noted as efficacious psychotherapy, while some meds can decrease comorbid feelings of anxiety, depression and poor mood regulation. Is Mental Illness Common with Type 1 Diabetes? First, its important to note many Type 1 diabetics will experience depression and anxiety in their lives. That doesnt mean they have BPD. Rather, it is collateral damage from the stress and demands of managing chronic illness. Incidence of depression, in particular, is more common among those with poor glucose control. That said, these conditions are fully treatable and beatable. Throwing BPD into the mix complicates things: the sadness, rage and emptiness of BPD make managing Type 1 a herculean task. Why bother pricking fingers, taking insulin and eating healthily if your world is falling apart? If you just want to die? If you feel misunderstood, alone, dejected and miserable? In 18 years with Type 1 and 14 years with BPD, I will admit it: I pondered overdosing on Continue reading >>

On The Association Between Diabetes And Mental Disorders In A Community Sample

On The Association Between Diabetes And Mental Disorders In A Community Sample

Results from the German National Health Interview and Examination Survey Abstract OBJECTIVE—To determine the relationship between mental disorders and diabetes in a representative community sample. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—This was a cross-sectional study. Data on diabetes and HbA1c values were obtained by structured questionnaires and by laboratory assessments. Current psychiatric disorders were diagnosed by a modified version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). RESULTS—People with diabetes (PWD) were not more likely to meet Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Psychiatric Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV) criteria for at least one mental disorder than were individuals without diabetes. However, a different diagnostic pattern occurred compared with the general population: odds ratios (ORs) for anxiety disorders in PWD were higher (OR 1.93, 95% CI 1.19–3.14). Although PWD had higher prevalence rates of affective disorders, the relationship between diabetes and affective disorders was not statistically significant after controlling for age, sex, marital status, and socioeconomic status. In contrast, the relationship between diabetes and anxiety disorders remained significant after controlling for these variables. In contrast to individuals without mental disorders, PWD with affective or anxiety disorders more frequently had adequate glycemic control. CONCLUSIONS—Diabetes was associated with an increased likelihood of anxiety disorders. The association between mental disorders, diabetes, and glycemic control should be evaluated carefully in terms of potentially confounding sociodemographic variables, sample characteristics, and definitions of the disorders. During the last years, the comorbidity of mental disorders with chronic health co Continue reading >>

Psychiatric Issues In Children And Adolescents With Diabetes

Psychiatric Issues In Children And Adolescents With Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is one of the most common chronic, unremitting medical conditions that develops in childhood or adolescence.1 There is a bimodal age of onset, with the first peak at 4 to 6 years and the second peak in early adolescence.2 Classic T1DM is an autoimmune disease that occurs because of loss of insulin production by the pancreas as a result of destruction of the beta cells. Ideal treatment requires close monitoring of blood glucose levels by finger pricks 5 to 10 times daily and insulin injections with all carbohydrate intake and as often as every 2 hours for corrections of blood glucose levels. Basal insulin injections are also needed once or twice daily. A subcutaneous insulin pump can substitute for multiple injections in some cases. Children with T1DM are at increased risk for other autoimmune diseases, such as celiac disease, autoimmune thyroid disease, and adrenal insufficiency. First-degree relatives of those with TIDM are at increased risk for this disease. For those afflicted with celiac disease, dietary modifications necessitate a gluten-free diet in addition to the recommended restrictions for simple sugars and the need to avoid grazing. Needless to say, for the child or teen with both T1DM and celiac disease, the dietary modifications can significantly affect the quality of their lives (eg, no pizza with friends, no cake and ice cream at birthday parties, and no on-the-go diet favored by teens). Poorly controlled T1DM can lead to potentially life-threatening short- and long-term conditions that range from subtle neurocognitive changes to organ-destroying macrovascular and microvascular damage (Table 1).3 The age at onset of the illness has implications for complications that can arise from hypoglycemia (tremor, confusion, seizures) Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Psychological Care

Diabetes And Psychological Care

People with diabetes experience disproportionately high rates of mental health problems such as depression, anxiety and eating disorders. All people with diabetes should have access to psychological treatment and support to reduce psychological distress and improve self-management. Use the following resources and tools to improve psychological care for people with diabetes. This reportpresents the 3DFD service at Kings College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, a UK first model of care that integrates diabetes, psychological and social interventions for people with complex psychological needs. London's care pathway for diabetes: commissioning recommendations for psychological support, London Mental Health Strategic Clinical Network website (September 2014) This guidance provides recommendations to support commissioners to deliver accessible and effective psychological support for diabetes care pathways. It also provides a directory of good practice case studies from across England.This guidance provides recommendations to support commissioners to deliver accessible and effective psychological support for diabetes care pathways. It also provides a directory of good practice case studies from across England. Investing in emotional and psychological wellbeing for people with long-term conditions, NHS Confederation website (April 2012) This report provides service design and productivity improvement guidance for commissioners, clinicians and managers in primary care, secondary care and mental health. The guide also presents nine case studies where local areas have improved access to psychological support for people with diabetes.This report provides service design and productivity improvement guidance for commissioners, clinicians and managers in primary care, secondary care a Continue reading >>

Diabetic Personality Changes And Disorder?

Diabetic Personality Changes And Disorder?

QUESTION: Does Diabetes cause patient's personality to change or cause person to be agitated? ANSWER: Yes, it does. Why? When you have diabetes, your blood sugar balance is impaired. And, you will run into oscillations, sometimes your blood sugar will raise up and you will feel dizzy, uncomfortable, with a feeling of being hot, etc. Some other times, you will experience low blood sugar (especially when you administer insulin or have your diabetic pills). So, you will feel tired, or faint, or shaking, etc. As a consequence, during this up and down blood sugar, your brain is not having the glucose it needs for normal activity. Therefore, it will respond with altered activity (that you call diabetes personality changes or mental disorder) that you experience like agitation or personality changes. That is why, diabetics are recommended to strictly control their blood glucose (especially after meals, in between meals or after having their diabetes medication). Once the blood sugar gets stabilized, everything will be back to normal again. However, in cases when the blood sugar changes will be consistent, the personality changes will also consistently occur. All the best! Dr.Alba Ask the Doctor now? Simply click here to return to Complications from diabetes. Mood changes - Type 1 Diabetes Side Effect? by Mira (Australia) QUESTION: What happens when someone diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, suffer from mood changes :sometimes happy, then other times very angry? What happens that make the mood to change so often? Is there anything to do to help? ANSWER: Hi Mira, Type 1 diabetics have imbalanced blood glucose levels, which make our body cells thrive for energy, especially when it comes to brain cells that utilize only glucose for normal living. At this point, we can address the moo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms

Diabetes Symptoms

People with diabetes are always at risk for swings in blood sugar and other related complications. The serious health consequences of these risks can be minimized through careful attention to blood sugar management. If you or a loved one have diabetes it is very important that you become aware of the symptoms of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia so that you know when to self-administer medication, or to seek immediate professional medical care. If you have multiple risk factors for diabetes, be aware of the symptoms and visit your physician if you believe you exhibit them. The classic symptoms of hyperglycemia (too much blood sugar) are Additional symptoms that can accompany hyperglycemia are: loss of appetite which may be accompanied by weight loss skin changes (infections, slowed healing) nerve problems/pain (tingling, shooting or stabbing sensations) If left untreated, hyperglycemia can progress into ketoacidosis. Warning signs associated with ketoacidosis include the following: Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is accompanied by a similar set of symptoms: While it is likely that people with diabetes will experience one or more of these symptoms during the course of their illness, it is possible for people to have diabetes and experience only mild symptoms if any are noticeable at all. The above symptoms can be signs that a person has developed diabetes. It is worth consulting with a doctor if you experience any of the symptoms associated with diabetes described above. This is especially true if you are at a higher risk for diabetes (e.g., you are older, overweight, and have a family history of diabetes). Continue reading >>

Borderline Personality Disorder, Depression And Type 1

Borderline Personality Disorder, Depression And Type 1

I also had gestational diabetiesbut was lucky enough to be told, and 5 yrs later was dx with type 2 in 2003. In 98' I was diagnosed with Depression and Anxiety, and then 5 yrs ago with Bi-Polar Disorder believe me I know how difficult it is it's something you never get over. There are times I go into a deep depression and it hard to get out of the rut, but only you can pull yourself out. I thank the Dr. for the meds that he has me on to help control the symptoms and depression those are meds I know I'll be on the rest of my life like my Diabetic meds. Please don't ever feel alone, I'm here if you ever need to talk just send me a friend request I'm here anytime and I have a big shoulder. I have had 4 kids and they were all big babies. I wasn't told that I had gestational diabetes until my 4th one. They only told me that I could become fullblown diabetes within 7 years of his birth. They didn't tell me anything else. Sure enough 7 years later I was diagnosed Type 2 insulin dependant. I also have Borderline Personality Disorder, BiPolar Disorder and Anxiety Disordr. So I know what you are going through. I've had Diabetes for 16 years now and am just now getting a grip on it. When you are ready to get a grip on it, you will. Just be patient. Good Luck!! It is normal to go through what I call the roller coaster of diabetes. We do great at first, then we get tired of it as it sets in that this is for life. It does suck. It does suck a lot. But you have a baby and a family. You have a right to be pissed, but I would not stay there. Diabetes is something that will bring you enough mood swings on it's own, so don't hold on to those feelings for too long or they will eat you alive. You are not alone at all. We all feel the same things, to different degrees, but we do understand. Continue reading >>

Helping Diabetics With Borderline Personality Disorder

Helping Diabetics With Borderline Personality Disorder

Helping Diabetics with Borderline Personality Disorder Karie was admitted to an adolescent residential treatment facility to treat her self-harm, depression, and borderline personality disorder. She also suffered from diabetes, a disease that requires careful and consistent dietary and medication management. Karie had a history of being unmanageable at home and tended to cut herself when upset. Through the course of treatment it became obvious that she also used her diabetes as a way to self-harm-intentionally failing to comply with her dietary and medication protocol. The staff watched her very carefully, keeping her within sight and away from objects that she could cut with. But it was harder to control her eating. She manipulated her blood sugar by overeating, sneaking food, and not giving herself enough insulin. Consequently her hemoglobin levels were dangerously high on a regular basis. If Karie had a difficult interaction during the day, she may later overestimate how much insulin she needed at bedtime, causing her blood sugar to plummet while she slept. Consequently she would wake up in the middle of the night trembling with a blood sugar of 38 (dangerously low). It was easy for her to pass this off as an accident, but over time a pattern developed and it was clear that she used her diabetes as a way to self harm. Patients with borderline personality disorder are notorious for manipulation. They are very good at making others feel responsible for their choices, and for finding a way around the rules. When combined with the normal adolescent tendency to feel indestructible, it is hard to convince them that taking care of their diabetes is important. Parents and medical professionals do well to remember that addressing the borderline personality disorder tendencie Continue reading >>

Are Children With Type 1 Diabetes At Increased Risk For Mental Illness?

Are Children With Type 1 Diabetes At Increased Risk For Mental Illness?

Are Children With Type 1 Diabetes at Increased Risk for Mental Illness? Risks of psychiatric disorders and suicide attempts in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: a population-based cohort study, by Butwicka and colleagues. Diabetes Care 2015;38:453459 What is the problem and what is known about it so far? For many years, people have assumed that children with type 1 diabetes have a greater risk of mental illness and behavioral problems. These assumptions have mostly been based on clinical observations and small studies of other childhood diseases. Children with diabetes and their caregivers often worry about the complications from diabetes and feel pressured/stressed by the complex care plans they must follow. Despite these concerns, there have been no large studies focusing on the issue of mental health in children with type 1 diabetes, and previous small studies have had mixed findings. Some have reported that children with type 1 diabetes are two to three times more likely to have mental health problems, whereas others found no higher risk. It is important to learn more about the possible links between type 1 diabetes and mental illness in children. Such information could improve the care and support provided to these children and their families. Why did the researchers do this particular study? The researchers wanted to find out whether children with type 1 diabetes are more likely than others to develop mental health problems. They also wanted to find out whether recent advances in diabetes care have influenced this risk. Additionally, they wanted to know whether the risk was higher in newly diagnosed children or those with a family history of mental illness. The study included more than 17,000 children with type 1 diabetes and more than 18,800 of thei Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes is a condition that impacts the way a person's body uses sugar for energy. However, diabetes affects much more than blood sugar. It can impact nearly every body system and have an effect on a person's mood. Stress associated with managing diabetes as well as concerns about potential side effects can all contribute to changes in mood. In addition, the actual highs and lows of blood sugar levels may also cause nervousness, anxiety, and confusion. It is important for people to recognize their own individual symptoms of high or low blood sugar. They must also ensure they seek support for any concerning mental health symptoms they might experience. Watching these mood swings can often be difficult for friends and family to understand. However, learning why a person may experience mood changes related to diabetes and being supportive can help to promote a stronger, healthier relationship. Contents of this article: How do diabetes and mood swings go together? Diabetes can have many effects on a person's mood. For example, managing diabetes can be stressful. A person may be constantly worried about their blood sugar and whether it is too high or too low. Adjustments to their diet and constantly checking their blood sugar can also add to a person's stress and enjoyment of life. As a result, they are more likely to experience feelings of anxiety and depression. Blood sugar swings can cause rapid changes in a person's mood, such as making them sad and irritable. This is especially true during hypoglycemic episodes, where blood sugar levels dip lower than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Hyperglycemic episodes where levels spike higher than 250 mg/dL may cause confusion in people with type 1 diabetes, but are much less likely to in those with type 2 diabetes. When a pe Continue reading >>

Diabetes Can Take A Toll On Your Emotions

Diabetes Can Take A Toll On Your Emotions

And this psychological component may make it harder to control the blood-sugar disorder, experts say Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional. HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, May 17, 2012 (HealthDay News) -- Many people know diabetes -- both type 1 and type 2 -- can take a serious toll on physical health. But these blood-sugar disorders also can affect your emotions and, in turn, your emotions can wreak havoc on your diabetes control. Extremes in blood-sugar levels can cause significant mood changes, and new research suggests that frequent changes in blood-sugar levels (called glycemic variability) also can affect mood and quality of life for those with diabetes. Depression has long been linked to diabetes, especially type 2. It's still not clear, however, whether depression somehow triggers diabetes or if having diabetes leads to being depressed. More recent research in people with type 1 diabetes has found that long periods of high blood-sugar levels can trigger the production of a hormone linked to the development of depression. People with type 1 diabetes no longer can make their own insulin; people with type 2 diabetes need insulin treatment because their bodies can no longer produce it in sufficient quantities. "Diabetes gives you so much to worry about that it's exhausting. It can make you feel powerless," said Joe Solowiejczyk, a certified diabetes educator and a manager of diabetes counseling and training at the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute in Milpitas, Calif. "I think it's important to ackno Continue reading >>

My Wife Is Type 1 Diabetic... I Am Not Coping

My Wife Is Type 1 Diabetic... I Am Not Coping

HealthBoards > Immune & Autoimmune > Diabetes > My wife is Type 1 Diabetic... I am not coping My wife is Type 1 Diabetic... I am not coping My wife is Type 1 Diabetic... I am not coping My wife and I have been married for 16 years. We have 2 beautiful adopted daughters. My wife has had Type 1 diabetes since she was aged 9. We are both aged 42. Trouble is that I am not coping with her mood swings, violent temper tantrums, uncontrolled sugars (on average about 300, 16mmol/L) and continual depression. She sleeps when not at work and leaves the household to me. I do not mean to moan but I really do want to be there for her. However it is getting out of control. I cannot leave the house, invite people around or pursue any activities that get me to leave the house. Recently her screaming has become so loud and violent that the neighbors have called the police out of concern for our children. When the police arrived she ended up screaming at them! I am a peace loving guy who simply wants to build a solid and lasting family. I have read these forums and see that there are many diabetics here who might be able to give me some guidelines. Yes.... we have been for counseling. Only thing it does is cost money and helps for a couple of weeks. Yes.... she is closely monitored by doctors...... but her depression gets her eating packets of sweets and chips out of some kind of spite! I am genuinely afraid of her mood swings. I do not want to leave her. I promised forever! Re: My wife is Type 1 Diabetic... I am not coping Has your wife always had such poor blood sugar control? Does she see a doctor frequently? Has she had extreme lows in the past which may be making her afraid to achieve good control because she's afraid of going low? Can you go with her to the doctor and discuss how to Continue reading >>

Kids With Type 1 Diabetes At Risk For Mental Health Problems

Kids With Type 1 Diabetes At Risk For Mental Health Problems

(Reuters Health) – In a new Swedish study, kids diagnosed with type 1 diabetes were more likely than their healthy siblings to develop a psychiatric disorder or to attempt suicide. “We suspected that we would find higher risk of common psychiatric disorders such as depression or anxiety, as observed among adults with diabetes,” said lead author Agnieszka Butwicka of the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. “What was surprising was that risk was high for many different psychiatric disorders,” which may mean that applying the results of adult studies to kids is too simplistic, she told Reuters Health by email. More than 200,000 kids in the U.S. had diabetes in 2012, according to the National Diabetes Education Program, and most of them had type 1, which results from the body not producing enough insulin. The condition, previously known as juvenile diabetes, is often diagnosed early in life. People with type 1 diabetes must use insulin injections every day to regulate their blood sugar, and past research has shown that managing the disease is stressful for kids, especially in the period right after they are diagnosed. Butwicka and her colleagues used a national register to compare more than 17,000 children with diabetes born in Sweden between 1973 and 2009 with more than 1,000,000 similar but healthy kids, as well as with the healthy siblings of the diabetic group. They looked in medical records for diagnoses of common psychiatric disorders, such as depression, suicide attempt, anxiety, eating disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism or other behavioral problems. About 8 percent of kids with type 1 diabetes were diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder. Those with diabetes were twice Continue reading >>

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