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Type 1 Diabetes And Memory Loss

Diabetes And Memory Loss

Diabetes And Memory Loss

Your memory can be affected in the short-term simply by your blood sugar levels being too low or too high. For example, you may find that when you’re hypoglycaemic you find it difficult to find words or to finish sentences. This isn’t necessarily the sign of a serious problem, as long as your ability to remember returns when your blood sugar levels get back to normal. Long-term memory loss Long-term memory loss becomes more common as we get older. Over 40% of people over the age of 65 experience some kind of memory difficulties, according to the NHS. However, while long-term memory issues can just be a normal part of ageing, they can also be the sign of a more serious problem. Studies show that people with diabetes are more likely to experience long-term memory loss, and there are a number of reasons for this. The first of these is that high levels of blood glucose (hyperglycaemia) can cause damage to the nerves in the brain. This means that if blood glucose levels are poorly managed over a number of years, memory loss may occur. The potential nerve damage as a result of diabetes also increases the risk of stroke. Most people who suffer a stroke will suffer cognitive impairment such as memory loss. Another potential reason for the link between diabetes and memory loss is that those with diabetes are at a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease than people who don’t have diabetes. Scientists are unsure exactly why this is, but again it may be linked to reduced blood flow to the brain. Good blood sugar management can greatly reduce your risk of developing long-term memory problems as a result of diabetes. However, if you do start to experience symptoms of memory loss which impact your day-to-day life, such as: • Being unable to remember what you just did Continue reading >>

Will Type 2 Diabetes Affect My Memory?

Will Type 2 Diabetes Affect My Memory?

Diabetes does cause memory loss. It may not be a progressive process that is clinical Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, but it can happen related to the acute symptoms of diabetes. Interestingly, Alzheimer’s disease has been called “Type 3 Diabetes” or “Alzheimer ’s disease of the Brain” lately. In this article, we will look at how your diabetes affects memory and when and why this happens. To do this, we need to understand the four different types of memory loss. Also, looking at the symptoms and causes of memory loss will be helpful as we seek to learn how our Type 2 Diabetes may affect our memory. To further break it down, we will look at the two types of memory loss that results from Type 2 Diabetes, short and long-term memory loss. Types of memory loss or amnesia There are four different types of memory loss. The two that are most common, and that you may have heard of, are short-term memory loss and long-term memory loss. The other two types of memory loss, sensory memory loss and working memory loss, may not be as well-known. However, they are important to the preservation of human memory, thought and cognitive processes. As with many parts of the human body, memory loss is a complex issue. It involves many different factors, of which Type 2 Diabetes is one. Short-term memory loss The first sign of cognitive decline and one of the first symptoms of memory loss is short-term memory loss. I see this with my mother, when she doesn’t remember my dog’s name, or anything about the story that I just told her related to when I got him, how old he is, and all those details about pets that people may ask. Forgetting where they placed everyday objects, or forgetting what they went into a room to get can become an everyday occurrence. A set of keys becomes m Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tied To Memory Loss

Diabetes Tied To Memory Loss

Previous research has linked Type 2 diabetes and memory loss. Now, new research may be closing in on some of the reasons why. The study found that people with Type 2 diabetes -- particularly those who are overweight or obese -- have thinner gray matter in several areas of the brain. These brain regions are related to memory, executive function, movement generation and visual information processing, said the study's senior author, Dr. In Kyoon Lyoo. He's director of the Ewha University Brain Institute in Seoul, South Korea. "Obesity leads to increased risk of Type 2 diabetes, metabolic dysfunction and is also associated with brain alterations independently," Lyoo said. "We aimed to investigate whether overweight/obesity influenced brain structure and cognitive function in individuals with early stage of Type 2 diabetes." The study included: 50 overweight or obese people with Type 2 diabetes; 50 normal-weight people with type 2 diabetes, and 50 normal-weight people without diabetes. The Korean study volunteers were between 30 and 60 years old. Those with diabetes had it for five years or less, and they were attempting lifestyle modifications and/or taking oral medication to lower blood sugar levels. No one was taking insulin. The normal-weight group with Type 2 diabetes had slightly better blood sugar control -- a hemoglobin A1C level of 7 percent. The overweight folks with type 2 diabetes had hemoglobin A1C levels of 7.3 percent. Hemoglobin A1C is a two- to three- month estimate of average blood sugar levels. The American Diabetes Association generally recommends an A1C of 7 percent or less. All study participants underwent MRI brain scans and tests to measure memory and thinking skills. "Cortical thickness was decreased in several regions of the diabetic brains. Further Continue reading >>

Review A Look Inside The Diabetic Brain: Contributors To Diabetes-induced Brain Aging

Review A Look Inside The Diabetic Brain: Contributors To Diabetes-induced Brain Aging

1. Introduction Diabetes mellitus is an endocrine disorder of carbohydrate metabolism resulting from inadequate insulin release (insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, or type 1 diabetes; T1D) or insulin insensitivity (non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, or type 2 diabetes; T2D), both of which result in hyperglycemia if uncontrolled. T1D is believed to occur in response to an autoimmune destruction of insulin producing pancreatic β cells, whereas T2D may be triggered or worsened by a number of factors including obesity, hypertension, and other features of the metabolic syndrome. For many years it has been well accepted that diabetes often results in microvascular and macrovascular disease, leading to complications such as retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, stroke and coronary heart disease [1]. There is now evidence illustrating that both T1D and T2D can also cause complications within the central nervous system (CNS). Manifestations of diabetes-induced CNS complications may include structural alterations or brain atrophy, as well as changes in electrophysiological properties that ultimately result in deficits in cognitive performance [2]. These diabetes-induced CNS complications may be associated with or exacerbated by cardiovascular disease, including hypertension [3,4] and cerebral vascular complications [5–8]. Additional factors that may contribute to diabetes-induced cognitive impairment include disrupted insulin signaling and glucose homeostasis in the CNS [9]. Under normal circumstances glucose is the predominant metabolic fuel source of the adult brain and is transported to the CNS from the periphery via facilitative glucose transporters [10]. Since the brain can neither synthesize nor store glucose for extended periods of time, it is essential that prope Continue reading >>

Could Diabetes Trigger Dementia? People With Type 2 Suffer 'memory Loss And Declining Decision-making Skills'

Could Diabetes Trigger Dementia? People With Type 2 Suffer 'memory Loss And Declining Decision-making Skills'

People with type 2 diabetes lose brain power as their ability to regulate blood flow drops, research suggests. A study by experts at Harvard Medical School suggests that the impact can be seen in memory and cognition tests - with the decrease in thinking skills dropping over just two years. Some 3.5 million people in Britain are thought to have type two diabetes - an increase of 62 per cent in the last nine years. The dramatic increase in the disease, which now affects one in every 16 adults in the country, is linked to spiralling rates of obesity and lack of exercise. The US researchers tracked 40 people over two years, and found a significant decrease in cognitive power, which impacted their ability to cook and bathe themselves. Study leader Dr Vera Novak, whose work was published in the journal Neurology, said: ‘Normal blood flow regulation allows the brain to redistribute blood to areas of the brain that have increased activity while performing certain tasks. ‘People with type two diabetes have impaired blood flow regulation. ‘Our results suggest that diabetes and high blood sugar impose a chronic negative effect on cognitive and decision-making skills.’ The study involved 40 people with an average age of 66. Of those, 19 had type two diabetes and 21 did not have diabetes. At the beginning of the study the participants were tested for cognition and memory, given MRI scans to look at brain volume and blood flow, and blood tests to measure control of blood sugar and inflammation. After two years, they were tested again – and those with diabetes showed marked decreases in their ability to regulate blood flow in the brain. They also had lower scores on several tests of memory and thinking skills - and found it harder to carry out daily tasks such as bathing an Continue reading >>

Li Doctor Leads Study Of Type 1 Diabetes’ Effects On The Brain

Li Doctor Leads Study Of Type 1 Diabetes’ Effects On The Brain

For nearly a century, scientists have asked how diabetes affects the aging brain. Now a Long Island medical investigator — with the help of a $4.2 million grant — is beginning the hunt for answers. Dr. Alan M. Jacobson, chief research officer at NYU Winthrop Hospital in Mineola, has been awarded the money by the National Institutes of Health. He is to lead a consortium of medical centers throughout the United States and Canada with the aim of understanding how Type 1 diabetes affects the most complex organ in the known universe — the human brain. Participants will be 60 and older, ages when the risk rises for cognitive impairments, with or without diabetes. Earlier medical investigations have shown that diabetes adversely influences the brain through a telltale triad — uncontrolled blood sugar, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. All three are part of the condition. The team will be on the lookout for key predictors of cognitive impairments as they collect information on hundreds of people over the next five years. The research is just getting organized, Jacobson said. His game plan is to delve into every possible nuance about cognitive function under the impact of a lifelong and powerful disease, and employ imaging technology to eavesdrop on each participant’s brain. “We will be using MRI and a variety of different techniques to study brain structure, brain physiology and changes in vascular blood flow,” Jacobson said. The research will attempt to answer unresolved questions about brain shrinkage, memory loss and cognitive declines in thinking and problem-solving that can occur in some diabetics. For people with any hints of problems, Jacobson said there is a key strategy to protect the brain: controlling blood sugar — the same strategy that prote Continue reading >>

Causes Of Memory Loss

Causes Of Memory Loss

Whilst most, if not all, of us will experience some degree of memory loss from time to time, if lapses in memory become common, severe or begin to cause difficulties in day to day life, it’s important to find out why. In this guide we look at some of the factors that can be commonly associated with memory loss specifically in people with diabetes. Causes of memory loss Memory loss can be brought on by a number of factors associated with diabetes, including: Low blood glucose levels (hypoglycemia) Persistent high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease Stroke Anxiety, stress and depression Poor sleep Statins Note that these factors can vary widely in terms of their effects with some factors only linked with temporary memory problems whereas others may lead to lengthy or even permanent memory trouble. The following part of this guide will look into each of these factors in more detail in terms of how they affect memory and how memory problems can be minimised or prevented. Low blood sugar (hypoyglycemia) One of the ways in which low blood sugar can affect the body is that it can lead to temporary impairment in memory. In most cases, memory should improve back to normal soon after your levels return to normal. A 2007 study, of 1,144 patients with type 1 diabetes, that reviewed hypoglycemia as a potential factor in cognitive decline (including memory loss) found no evidence of a link between episodes of severe hypoglycemia and substantial long-term decline in cognitive function. Whilst the study found no link, it is important to note that hypoglycemia, and particularly severe hypoglycemia, should be minimised where possible to reduce the risks of other health problems such as heart disease. [182] High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) By contrast Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Memory Loss

Type 2 Diabetes And Memory Loss

Researchers have long known that inflammation plays a role in the development of type 2 diabetes. This inflammation comes from substances that are produced by the body’s immune and fat cells. The result: impaired blood flow and blood vessel function— which impacts the health of the heart, kidneys and other organs and body systems. A study published in a July 2015 journal Neurology found that this reduced blood flow and blood vessel capability also affects the brain by speeding up cognitive decline and memory loss in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Measuring the Impact The researchers studied 65 men and women between the ages of 57 and 75. Thirty-five of the study participants had been treated for type 2 diabetes for more than five years at the beginning of the study. The initial assessment of all participants included testing of memory and cognitive function skills, as well as MRI scans and blood tests to determine baseline blood flow, blood pressure, markers of inflammation, and brain volume. None of the participants had any type of cognitive impairment at the time of the initial assessment. At a two-year follow-up, those with type 2 diabetes showed a significant decline in thinking and memory scores. None of the non-diabetic participants showed any decline. Blood vessel health and blood flow regulation were also seriously impaired in those with diabetes. “We ultimately concluded that diabetes-related inflammation of the small blood vessels in the brain may accelerate decline in those with type 2 diabetes,” says study author Vera Novak, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology and director of Syncope and Falls in the Elderly (SAFE) laboratory at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. “This, in turn, affects not only their overall health but also their day- Continue reading >>

Diabetic Encephalopathy

Diabetic Encephalopathy

Diabetic encephalopathy is damage to the brain caused by diabetes. A relatively unknown complication, encephalopathy is becoming more widely recognized as more people are diagnosed with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Diabetic encephalopathy presents itself both mentally and physically. It can induce an altered mental state, cognitive decline, changes in personality, memory lapses, or severe impairment like dementia. The complication can also cause tremors, lack of coordination, and even seizures. Diabetic encephalopathy is largely due to acute hypoglycemia (blood sugar levels are too low) or severe hyperglycemia (blood sugar levels are too high). The condition manifests itself differently between the two major types of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes Encephalopathy in those with type 2 diabetes increases the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia. According to a 2011 study, those with type 2 diabetes were twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s and 1.75 times more likely to develop other forms of dementia than healthy participants. This increased risk could be due to many different factors brought about from type 2 diabetes. It could be caused by the body’s resistance to insulin, which makes it difficult for the brain to break down amyloid, a protein that forms brain plaques. Brain plaques are abnormal clusters of this protein that block cell-to-cell signaling at the synapses—a symptom infamous for contributing to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Type 2 diabetic encephalopathy can also be generated from hyperglycemia or the conditions that commonly accompany type 2 diabetes like high blood pressure, obesity, or high cholesterol. Oxidative stress is another provoker of the complication. This stems from an imbalance between reactive oxyge Continue reading >>

How Does Type 1 Diabetes Affect Your Brain?

How Does Type 1 Diabetes Affect Your Brain?

Many tools and tips can help you control your type 1 diabetes. But left unchecked, it can affect several organs, including your brain. Big spikes and dips in blood sugar levels are linked to depression, shortened attention spans, and slowed reaction times, both physically and mentally. More research needs to be done for experts to figure out the exact short-term and long-term effects of diabetes on the brain -- but they're hopeful that they’ll find ways to prevent and even reverse damage. A 2014 study published by the American Diabetes Association shows that really high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) can slow the growth of a brain as it develops. The same is true when a child’s levels swing up and down a lot. Brain scans show differences between a child with diabetes and one without. Still researchers found no major differences in their IQs, mood, behavior, and learning and memory skills. It’s still unknown if the disease can affect things like their muscle movements and how fast they process information. Adults who’ve had type 1 for a long time have slower physical and mental reactions. The condition doesn’t seem to impact a person’s learning and thinking skills, researchers say. But memory and attention span can be affected. Type 1, like type 2, is linked with a high rate of depression. High blood sugar levels and the stress of managing a long-term disease are to blame. The best defense is to control your blood sugar, eat a healthy diet, and follow all of your doctor’s instructions. The longer your levels stay really high or low, or swing to extremes, the more likely your brain will be affected. Continuous glucose monitors are a great tool, since they measure blood sugar every 5 minutes. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis May Come With Brain Changes In Kids, Including Memory Loss

Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis May Come With Brain Changes In Kids, Including Memory Loss

Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of the death in the United States. A new study reveals another disturbing detail. Researchers found that type 1 diabetes in children can cause brain loss, affecting memory and attention cognition. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a harmful complication of Type 1 Diabetes that can gradually alter brain matter in newly diagnosed children. "Children and adolescents diagnosed with type 1 diabetes with diabetic ketoacidosis have evidence of brain gray matter shrinkage and white matter swelling," the study's lead author Dr. Fergus Cameron, head of diabetes services at Royal Children's Hospital in Victoria, Australia, told HealthDay. The recent study includes 36 children and teens with DKA and 59 without it. MRIs were taken over the course of six months. Those with DKA experienced a decrease in gray matter volume along with swelling of white matter. There was also evidence of memory loss and reduced sustained and divided attention. Symptoms tended to develop over time, raising a big concern for parents who might not notice any differences in their child right away. "Any decrement in attention or memory in children is a concern as children are acquiring new knowledge and learning new skills all the time," Cameron said. Cameron and his team found that 20 to 30 percent of children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes had DKA. According to the CDC, from 2002 to 2003, 15,000 youth in the United States were newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes each year. "DKA still kills people, so we need to do better. We need better tools. And we need to educate doctors more on the symptoms of type 1 diabetes," Cameron said. The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation reports that type 1 diabetes is on the rise. Each year, 30,000 U.S. adults and children are diagn Continue reading >>

Nine Tips To Keep Your Memory With Diabetes

Nine Tips To Keep Your Memory With Diabetes

First, the good news. People, in general, are living longer. And people who have diabetes can and do live long, healthy lives. Now, the not-so-good news: People who have diabetes are more likely to experience memory problems than people without the condition. According to a study out of the University of South Florida in Tampa, older adults who had diabetes and high blood sugars performed worse on memory tests at the start of the study and showed a greater decline in memory by the end of the study compared to older adult without diabetes. What’s behind the memory decline in diabetes? Previous studies have shown that people with Type 2 diabetes have an increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s is a kind of dementia that causes issues with memory, thinking, and behavior. It’s progressive and irreversible, and it eventually destroys a person’s ability to carry out even the simplest of tasks. While memory loss is a key feature of Alzheimer’s, there are differences between the memory loss that occurs with aging and memory loss due to Alzheimer’s. However, both are more likely to occur in people with Type 2 diabetes. Researchers think that damage to blood vessels, which can occur in diabetes, is what can lead to cognitive problems and vascular dementia. It’s also possible that high blood sugar levels cause damage in the hippocampus, a part of the brain that’s involved in memory. Actually, high blood sugars appear to be detrimental to brain health, in general. But even people whose diabetes is in good control are more likely to experience memory problems and impairments in cognitive function. It’s also worth noting that having too many very low blood sugars (if you’re at risk for lows) may potentially also affect your memory and cognition. The g Continue reading >>

Researchers Discover How Diabetes Affects Specific Brain Area Leading To Memory Loss

Researchers Discover How Diabetes Affects Specific Brain Area Leading To Memory Loss

Badly controlled diabetes are known to affect the brain causing memory and learning problems and even an increased incidence of dementia, although how this occurs is not clear. But now a study, by researchers from the Centre for Neuroscience and Cell Biology of the University of Coimbra in Portugal, in mice with type 2 diabetes has discovered how diabetes affects a brain area called hippocampus causing memory loss, and also how caffeine can prevents it. Curiously, the neurodegeneration that the researcher Rodrigo Cunha and his team see caused by diabetes, is the same that occurs at the first stages of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, suggesting that caffeine (or drugs with similar mechanism) could help them too. Type 2 diabetes (which accounts for about 90% of all diabetic cases) is a full blown public health disaster - 285 million people already affected worldwide (6.4% of the world population) with numbers expected to almost double by 2030. And this without counting pre-diabetic individuals. The problem is that the disease is triggered by obesity, a sedentary lifestyle and bad eating habits (although there is also a genetic predisposition), all of which are increasingly widespread. All forms of diabetes are caused by high levels of sugar in the blood, but in type 2 this occurs because the body becomes increasingly resistant to insulin - the hormone that allows the cells to take the sugar from the blood to be use it as "fuel" - leading to toxic high levels of sugar in the blood that damage nerves and blood vessels and, with time, cause severe complications In the study out now in the journal PLoS , João Duarte, Rodrigo Cunha and colleagues take advantage of a new mouse model of diabetes type 2, which like humans develops the d Continue reading >>

How Alzheimer’s Could Be Type 2 Diabetes

How Alzheimer’s Could Be Type 2 Diabetes

The link between Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes continues to grow stronger. A new study presented at the Society for Neuroscience shows that the disease may actually be the late stages of type 2 diabetes. Learn more about how Alzheimer’s could be type 2 diabetes. The Correlation Between Alzheimer’s and Type 2 Diabetes A new study done by researchers at Albany University in New York, shows that Alzheimer’s may be the late stages of type 2 diabetes. People who have type 2 diabetes produce extra insulin. That insulin can get into the brain, disrupting brain chemistry and leading toxic proteins that poison brain cells to form. The protein that forms in both Alzheimer’s patients and people with type 2 diabetes is the same protein. Researcher Edward McNay at Albany University, said: “People who develop diabetes have to realize this is about more than controlling their weight or diet. It’s also the first step on the road to cognitive decline. At first they won’t be able to keep up with their kids playing games, but in 30 years’ time they may not even recognize them.” Alzheimer’s, Brain Tangles and Diabetes In the past few years, the connection between the two diseases has grown stronger with each relevant study. People who develop type 2 diabetes often experience a sharp decline in cognitive function and almost 70% of them ultimately develop Alzheimer’s. A recent study published in the journal Neurology found that people with type 2 diabetes were more likely to develop the brain “tangles” commonly see in people with Alzheimer’s disease. They found that participants with type 2 diabetes were more likely to have the brain tangles, even if they did not have dementia or memory loss. The study evaluated over 120 older adults with type 2 diabetes and Continue reading >>

Your Risk Of Memory Loss Goes Up Because Of This…

Your Risk Of Memory Loss Goes Up Because Of This…

Diabetes is a growing problem within the United States and although it primarily affects blood sugar, new research suggests that it can also contribute to memory loss as well. Diabetes is a chronic condition where a person cannot produce enough insulin (type 1 diabetes) or does not properly use the insulin that is being produced (type 2 diabetes). Type 2 diabetes is the type of diabetes that can be prevented with a change in lifestyle factors, so it is not a normal part of aging. A person with diabetes can see spikes and drops in blood sugar, and having the condition can raise the risk for many other complications as well. Some health complications associated with diabetes include anxiety and depression, celiac disease, eye damage, kidney disease, high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke, nerve damage, and it can even affect your sexual health. The latest findings have uncovered that diabetes can also raise a person’s risk of dementia. Type 2 diabetes raises risk of dementia The study, published in Diabetics Care, found that women with type 2 diabetes are at a higher risk for dementia because diabetes damages or blocks blood vessels to the brain. The researchers analyzed data from 2.5 million participants included in 14 studies. They concluded that women with diabetes have a 20 percent higher risk of dementia – this was in comparison to men. Although women were found to have a higher risk than men, both genders saw an increased risk of developing dementia if they had type 2 diabetes – in fact, a 60 percent increase compared to people without diabetes. Study author, Dr. Rachel Huxley, said, “It’s plausible that the same mechanisms that drive the greater excess risk of heart disease and stroke in women with diabetes … are also causing the excess risk of v Continue reading >>

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