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Type 1 Diabetes And Fatigue

Chronic Fatigue May Affect 4 Out Of 10 Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

Chronic Fatigue May Affect 4 Out Of 10 Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

Chronic fatigue may affect 4 out of 10 adults with type 1 diabetes Research from The Expert Centre for Chronic Fatigue at Radboud University in Nijmegen, Holland shows that chronic fatigue is much more prevalent than in people without diabetes. The researchers studied 214 adults with type 1 diabetes and matched them with 214 adults without type 1 diabetes. Within the control group, those without type 1 diabetes , the number of participants with chronic fatigue was 7%. Amongst the type 1 diabetes group, chronic fatigue existed in 40% of the group. Chronic fatigue was defined in the trial as having severe fatigue that has lasted 6 months or longer. The researchers found that chronic fatigue was not closely linked with HbA1c levels and in a subset of 66 individuals with type 1 diabetes that wore a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) those that had fewer hypos were more likely to be feel tired all the time despite otherwise having similar blood glucose levels. A factor that was significantly associated with increased likelihood of experiencing chronic fatigue was the presence of diabetes complications or other co-morbidities. Those with type 1 diabetes that had nerve damage (neuropathy), kidney disease (nephropathy), cardiovascular disease were notably more likely be chronically fatigued and this was even more likely in patients with symptoms of depression. 88% of those with depression and type 1 diabetes suffered chronic fatigue. This finding asks questions as to whether chronic fatigue leads to depression in people with type 1 diabetes or vice versa or whether the two develop in step with each other. Lead researcher in the study, Dr Hans Knoop, notes that "Depression can cause fatigue , butbeing fatigued can also lead to (often mild) depressive symptoms. More severe depress Continue reading >>

Extreme Tiredness (fatigue)

Extreme Tiredness (fatigue)

Tweet In the medical world, extreme tiredness and exhaustion that doesn’t disappear with rest or sleep is known as fatigue and this can be a telling symptom of diabetes. Causes of fatigue There are many things that can cause you to fell fatigued. The most common and obvious is a lack of sleep. Most adults need between 6 and 8 hours of sleep a day, but this can vary quite a lot from person to person. It's also important to remember that most people require less sleep as they get older. Other common causes of fatigue include: Anaemia - a condition that occurs when you don't have enough red blood cells Cancer - most types of cancer cause fatigue to a certain degree Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - a condition that causes unexplained exhaustion and fatigue Depression - constant tiredness is a major indicator of depression or emotional stress Diabetes - sudden and extreme tiredness is one of the main symptoms of diabetes mellitus Infections - fatigue can be brought on by various infections such as the flu (influenza) Coeliac Disease - an autoimmune condition in which inflammation in the lining of the small intestine affects the body’s ability to absorb nutrients properly. Diabetes and fatigue With diabetes, fatigue is caused by a number of factors, including: High blood sugar levels, either from a lack of the insulin horomone or from insulin resistance, can affect the body’s ability to get glucose from the blood into cells to meet our energy needs People on stronger diabetes medication such as insulin, may also experience fatigue as a symptom of low blood glucose levels. Blood glucose testing can help to determine whether high or low sugar levels may be the cause of fatigue. Recognising fatigue Symptoms of fatigue include: A lack of, or no energy Difficulty in carrying out s Continue reading >>

Severe Fatigue In Type 1 Diabetes: Exploring Its Course, Predictors And Relationship With Hba1c In A Prospective Study.

Severe Fatigue In Type 1 Diabetes: Exploring Its Course, Predictors And Relationship With Hba1c In A Prospective Study.

Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2016 Nov;121:127-134. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2016.09.011. Epub 2016 Sep 21. Severe fatigue in type 1 diabetes: Exploring its course, predictors and relationship with HbA1c in a prospective study. Expert Center for Chronic Fatigue, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: [email protected] Expert Center for Chronic Fatigue, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Department of Health Psychology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. Department of Internal Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Expert Center for Chronic Fatigue, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Department of Medical Psychology, Academic Medical Centre (AMC), University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. To prospectively identify the course of severe fatigue, its predictors and the relationship with HbA1c in patients with type 1 diabetes. 214 adult patients completed questionnaires on fatigue severity and fatigue-related factors at baseline. HbA1c was retrieved from medical records. After 43months, fatigue severity and HbA1c were reassessed in 194 patients. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine predictors of severe fatigue at follow-up with various cognitive-behavioral and clinical factors as potential predictors. The relationship between fatigue and HbA1c was investigated in a sub-analysis by differentiating between patients with suboptimal glucose control [HbA1c>7% (53mmol/mol)] and optimal glucose control [HbA1c7% (53mmol/mol)]. The prevalence of severe fatigue was 40% at baseline and 42% at f Continue reading >>

Fatigue In Type 1 Diabetes: A Systematic Review Of Observational Studies - Sciencedirect

Fatigue In Type 1 Diabetes: A Systematic Review Of Observational Studies - Sciencedirect

Fatigue in type 1 diabetes: A systematic review of Observational studies Author links open overlay panel ysteinJensenab Out of 4258 papers identified, 10 papers addressed fatigue/vitality in type 1 diabetes. Three studies assessed fatigue as the primary endpoint. Only one of the included studies were judged to be of high methodological quality. There is generally a lack of well-designed studies that investigate the influence of socio-demographic as well as clinical factors in type 1 diabetes. To systematically review the literature on fatigue in people with type 1 diabetes. In the period from April to June 2015 and with an updated search in May 2016, eight electronic databases as well as the grey literature were searched. Studies of all types of design were included if they reported data on fatigue in adult people with type 1 diabetes. All studies were assessed for quality. Out of 4259 references (including grey literature), 10 papers were reviewed in full. Three of these papers investigated fatigue as the primary endpoint, and one was assessed to be high quality. Two papers provided a definition of fatigue. Prevalence estimates ranged from 23 to 40%, dependent on the cut-off used. Six different questionnaires were used to measure fatigue/vitality and these were only validated to a limited extent in a diabetes population. Several demographic, personal and clinical factors were associated with fatigue, but the results were conflicting. Few studies have been published that investigate fatigue in type 1 diabetes and there is a large variability in findings due to different measurement methods and factors investigated. There is still an unmet need to understand what contributes to fatigue in these patients through rigorous research. Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes Fatigue?

What Causes Diabetes Fatigue?

Fatigue is one of the most common disabling diabetes symptoms. Diabetes fatigue can disrupt and interfere with all aspects of daily living. What causes diabetes fatigue, and why is it so common? We’ve written about fatigue before and received tons of great comments on those posts. But this time let’s go deeper and find the whole range of causes and solutions, even if it takes a few weeks. Hopefully, everyone will find something that might help them, because this is a serious problem. For example, Melanie wrote, “[Fatigue] really takes a toll on my family and things we can do. I just want to have the energy to play with my son and to do things around the house or with friends…I can’t drive more than 30 minutes because my husband is afraid I will fall asleep…and wreck [the car]. (I have dozed while driving before.)” Maria commented, “Fatigue is a constant and I have had to learn to do only what I can. I don’t push myself anymore as I pay for it dearly. I get tired of explaining why I don’t feel good, don’t want to do anything. Some understand and some don’t.” And Jan wrote, “I sleep from midnight to noon each day. Then I get depressed because I wasted half a day.” Because of my multiple sclerosis (MS), I live with fatigue sometimes, and I know how limiting it is. I know how difficult it can be to manage. There are more than 15 known causes for fatigue. It helps to figure out what is causing yours, so you can address it. Here are some possibilities. First, diabetes can directly cause fatigue with high or low blood sugar levels. • High blood glucose makes your blood “sludgy,” slowing circulation so cells can’t get the oxygen and nutrients they need. Margaret commented, “I can tell if my sugars are high in the morning, because ‘grogg Continue reading >>

Fatigue In Type 1 Diabetes: An Understudied Problem

Fatigue In Type 1 Diabetes: An Understudied Problem

Mounting evidence suggests that chronic fatigue is a common and understudied problem in patients with type 1 diabetes.1 In their clinical trial reported in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology,2 Juliane Menting and colleagues are the first to have rigorously tested the effectiveness of an intervention for chronic fatigue in type 1 diabetes. The blended intervention (known as Dia-Fit) was composed of face-to-face and web-based sessions of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT).2 Compared with a waiting list control group (n=60), the CBT intervention (n=60) significantly reduced fatigue severity score (assessed with the Checklist Individual Strength [CIS] fatigue severity subscale; mean difference 13·8, 95% CI 10·0–17·5; p<0·0001) and functional impairment (assessed with the total score of the Sickness Impact Profile-8; mean difference 513, 95% CI 340–686; p<0·0001) after 5 months, with large effect sizes for both. Continue reading >>

Chronic Fatigue In Type 1 Diabetes: Highly Prevalent But Not Explained By Hyperglycemia Or Glucose Variability

Chronic Fatigue In Type 1 Diabetes: Highly Prevalent But Not Explained By Hyperglycemia Or Glucose Variability

OBJECTIVE Fatigue is a classical symptom of hyperglycemia, but the relationship between chronic fatigue and diabetes has not been systematically studied. We investigated prevalence, impact, and potential determinants of chronic fatigue in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Out of 324 randomly selected T1DM outpatients, 214 participated in this cross-sectional observational study. Participants were compared with age- and sex-matched population-based controls. Chronic fatigue, functional impairments, current health status, comorbidity, diabetes-related factors, and fatigue-related cognitions and behaviors were assessed with questionnaires, and HbA1c values and comorbidity were assessed with medical records. Sixty-six patients underwent continuous glucose monitoring combined with an electronic fatigue diary for 5 days. Acute fatigue and four glucose parameters were determined: mean, variability, and relative time spent in hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. RESULTS T1DM patients were significantly more often chronically fatigued (40%; 95% CI 34–47%) compared with matched controls (7%; 95% CI 3–10%; P < 0.001). Chronically fatigued patients had significantly more functional impairments. Fatigue was the most troublesome symptom. Age, depression, pain, sleeping problems, low self-efficacy concerning fatigue, and physical inactivity were significantly associated with chronic fatigue. Chronically fatigued patients spent slightly less time in hypoglycemia (proportion 0.07 ± 0.06 vs. 0.12 ± 0.10; P = 0.025). Glucose parameters were not related to acute fatigue. CONCLUSIONS Chronic fatigue is highly prevalent and clinically relevant in T1DM. Its significant relationship with cognitive behavioral variables and weak association with blood gl Continue reading >>

Tiredness And Diabetes

Tiredness And Diabetes

Tweet Many people with diabetes will describe themselves as feeling tired, lethargic or fatigued at times. It could be a result of stress, hard work or a lack of a decent night’s sleep but it could also be related to having too high or too low blood glucose levels. Tiredness as a symptom of diabetes Regular tiredness, particularly tiredness following meals, is a common symptom of diabetes. Read more on the symptoms of diabetes What causes people with diabetes to be tired? Two common reasons for tiredness or lethargy are having too high or too low blood sugar levels. In both cases, the tiredness is the result of having an imbalance between one’s level of blood glucose and the amount or effectiveness of circulating insulin. If you feel tired during the day, despite having slept well, it could be a result of either high or low sugar levels. It is best to test your blood glucose levels to see whether the tiredness is indeed a result of having high or low sugar levels. This is particularly important for people on insulin. Read about the recommended blood glucose levels ranges Tiredness and high blood sugar levels Blood glucose levels go high when there is either insufficient insulin (typically in the case of type 1 diabetes) or the insulin is not working effectively enough (typically in type 2 diabetes). To provide us with energy, insulin is needed to transport glucose from blood into our cells to be used for energy. When there is not enough insulin, or the insulin isn’t working effectively, it means the sugar in our blood cannot get into our cells and therefore our cells do not receive the energy they need. As a result, we feel tired. Managing tiredness and high blood sugar after meals If tiredness is accompanied by high blood glucose levels after meals, it can indica Continue reading >>

Tired Of Your Diabetes? Here’s How To Keep Going

Tired Of Your Diabetes? Here’s How To Keep Going

When you have diabetes, your daily to-do list can seem like a lot. You track your blood sugar, take medicine, watch your diet, and exercise. It can make you feel overwhelmed and burned out. If you’re there: 1. Know that no one is perfect. There are no vacations from diabetes. Even the most diligent people can’t keep their blood sugar or diet or physical activity on target all the time. “Diabetes is unique because [you’re] actually making medical decisions, day-to-day, minute-to-minute,” says Alicia McAuliffe-Fogarty, PhD, a clinical health psychologist. This can be stressful, says David Nathan, MD, director of the Diabetes Center at Massachusetts General Hospital. “If people are always stressed out about diabetes, they’re miserable,” Nathan says. He says people need to forgive themselves if they miss their goals for a day, a week, or even more. “Chill a little bit,” Nathan says. “We’re going to do the best we can. We need to recognize no one is perfect.” 2. Pay attention to what stresses you out. Living with diabetes can cause fear, anger, worry, and sadness. Lawrence Fisher, PhD, director of the Behavioral Diabetes Research Group at UCSF School of Medicine, has studied what doctors call “diabetes distress” in people with type 1 and those with type 2diabetes. He learned that during any 18-month period, from a third to a half of people with diabetes will feel a good bit of it. He cites seven common sources of diabetes distress among people with type 1 diabetes. The most common is a feeling of helplessness. *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not performed, may result in hypoglycemia. Please see important risk and safety i Continue reading >>

Chronic Fatigue Plagues Type 1 Diabetics

Chronic Fatigue Plagues Type 1 Diabetics

Jewels Doskicz is a registered nurse, freelance writer, patient advocate, health coach, and long-distance cyclist. Jewels is the moderator of Diabetic Connect’s weekly #DCDE Twitter chat, and she and her daughter both live healthfully with type 1 diabetes. If you have type 1 diabetes and suffer from exhaustion you may not be alone. A recent study in the Netherlands found 40 percent of its participants with type 1 diabetes suffer from chronic fatigue. Surprisingly, researchers didn't find a tight correspondence between glucose control and this fatigue as they had hypothesized. "We think that the diabetes itself and its (medical) consequences can trigger fatigue," according to Hans Knoop, an author of this study. "Once the fatigue is triggered, other factors step in and can perpetuate the symptom. Examples of these factors are sleep problems or a lowered level of activity." As a person living with type 1 diabetes, I can attest to the fact that high blood sugars affect levels of energy, mood and concentration. In fact, symptoms of high blood sugar can serve as a key driver for many to regulate blood sugars. But unfortunately, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) shares symptoms with many other illnesses and is easily overlooked or misdiagnosed. If you're experiencing any of the symptoms below, be sure to talk to your healthcare team about it and see what might help. For example, behavioral interventionists are prescribing exercise to help alleviate symptoms of chronic fatigue. Symptoms of CFS - According to the CDC Extreme exhaustion following physical/ mental exertion Difficulty sleeping Poor concentration/ memory Muscle/ joint pain without swelling or redness Headache Sore throat Enlarged lymph nodes in neck/ armpit Brain fog, allergies, IBS, mood disturbances and other symp Continue reading >>

How To Deal With Diabetic Lethargy

How To Deal With Diabetic Lethargy

Bouts of sleepiness, especially after meals, are some of the most common and disabling symptoms of diabetes. However, there are many causes of lethargy, besides diabetes. So how do you know whether you have diabetic lethargy and, if you do have it, what can you do to combat it? Many diabetics feel, at times, extremely tired, fatigued or lethargic. Having periods when you feel so exhausted that you can only prevent yourself from falling asleep with great difficulty can seriously disrupt your daily life. This tiredness can be caused by blood glucose levels that are too high or too low. But it can also be due to a dozen or so other causes such as stress, overwork, lack of a good night’s sleep and so on. The glucose-insulin system Glucose, a simple sugar, is your body’s primary source of energy. In fact, your muscle cells need glucose all the time so you can talk, walk, run, read a book, think etc. When your food is being digested, glucose is released from your stomach into your bloodstream and carried to your muscle cells. At the same time, insulin, a hormone (type of chemical), is released into your bloodstream from your pancreas. Insulin is needed to enable the glucose to enter your muscle cells. To do this, the insulin attaches itself to receptors in the surface of the cells and causes the cell membranes to allow glucose to enter. The cells then use the glucose as fuel. Of course, if the receptors in your muscle cells are blocked by fat, the insulin will not be able to open them. This is the essential problem faced by type 2 diabetics and is the reason why the only way to beat your diabetes is to eat an extremely low-fat diet designed to unblock the cell receptors. Causes of diabetic lethargy Two common reasons for tiredness or lethargy are having blood sugar levels Continue reading >>

40% Of Type 1 Adults Have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

40% Of Type 1 Adults Have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Tiredness can seem like a chronic condition when managing Type 1 diabetes, but a new study finds Type 1s are prone to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, as well. A new study out of Holland suggests that people with Type 1 diabetes are much more likely to suffer from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) than the average population, and it apparently has nothing to do with fluctuating glucose levels. The study, conducted by the Expert Center for Chronic Fatigue at Radboud University in Holland, found that 4 in 10 adult study participants with Type 1 diabetes suffered from CFS, compared with fewer than 1 in 10 in the control group of adults. The study results were published this August in Diabetes Care, a scientific journal of the American Diabetes Association. The researchers emphasized that CFS onset had nothing to do with glucose levels or bouts of hypoglycemia. Researchers had a subset of 66 participants with Type 1 diabetes wear a continuous glucose monitor, and those with fewer events of hypoglycemia actually were more likely to have symptoms of CFS. While the researchers found that depression and complications from diabetes made CFS more likely among the Type 1 population in the study, it’s difficult to draw many conclusions about the possible causes of CFS among people with diabetes. First recognized as a syndrome in 1994, CFS is still poorly understood, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). CFS researchers are exploring everything from infection to stress as possible causes for the syndrome. Treatment is complex, as well, as doctors focus mainly on mitigating the symptoms of CFS in absence of a cure. According to the CDC, the fatigue of CFS is accompanied by at least 4 of 8 characteristic symptoms lasting at least 6 months. These symptoms incl Continue reading >>

Fatigue Is A Common Problem Among Individuals With Type 1 Diabetes Or Type 2 Diabetes

Fatigue Is A Common Problem Among Individuals With Type 1 Diabetes Or Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 1 diabetes of type 2 diabetes may experience feelings of fatigue as a symptom of their condition or a side effect of diabetes medications. Another possibility is that exhaustion may occur when these individuals have to spend much of their time learning to balance diabetes management with their everyday lives. A recent study conducted by Diabetica Research Solutions, which involved more than 8,000 diabetics, found that 85 percent of respondents experience difficulty maintaining their quality of life due to frequent feelings of fatigue. "Living with diabetes is a constant challenge. Chronic fatigue may be symptomatic of the disease and can make it difficult for someone with diabetes to be active enough to control weight and properly self-manage their disease," said Dr. Richard Corlin, chairman DRSI Diabetes Advisory Board. He noted that individuals with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes who do not practice good diabetes management are often vitamin-B deficient and can become dehydrated easily, which can contribute to feelings of fatigue. Non-diabetics who feel tired during the day may turn to caffeinated drinks like coffee or sodas to curb their fatigue, but many of these beverages contain high amounts of sugar that may cause unsafe changes in blood glucose levels for individuals with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. The study's results showed that only 6 percent of respondents used energy drinks. However, individuals with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes may also consider steering clear of diet sodas that contain caffeine and no calories or sugar. According to recent studies presented at the American Diabetes Association's Scientific Sessions in San Diego, consuming artificially sweetened sodas and beverages may contribute to increasing waistlines Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Fatigue: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes And Fatigue: Everything You Need To Know

What exactly is fatigue? Is it just being tired after working a long week or not getting enough sleep? The answer is no. Fatigue is excessive tiredness that makes carrying out simple tasks difficult and interferes with one or more life functions. Sounds terrible, doesn’t it? Well imagine having a chronic illness along with the fatigue. Diabetes and fatigue have a strong relationship, and it can make a person’s life very difficult. The following article will discuss the relationship, along with ways to beat and reduce the risk of living with diabetes and fatigue. What is diabetes fatigue? As it was mentioned above, diabetes fatigue is an extreme tiredness that individuals with diabetes can experience. It is a tiredness that disrupts a person’s life and makes it difficult to function. It is very common, and studies have shown that 85% of those with diabetes experience fatigue. Some signs of fatigue include: Dizziness Irritability Headache Inability to concentrate Problems remembering things Blurry vision Slowed reflexes and muscle weakness Is feeling fatigue a sign/symptom of diabetes? Feeling fatigued is definitely a symptom of diabetes. However, fatigue can also be a sign or symptom of many other diseases, so it is important that you talk to your doctor about any problems that you are having. I advise reading the following: Reactive hypoglycemia, a term used to define the crash that a person gets after eating a lot of sugar and carbs, can be an early sign of diabetes. In order for the body to use the sugars and carbs that are consumed for fuel, each molecule must be paired with insulin to get into the cell. If there isn’t enough insulin available, then the sugar molecules stay in the bloodstream and cause high blood sugar. What happens is that over time, eating Continue reading >>

Why Is My Diabetes Making Me So Tired?

Why Is My Diabetes Making Me So Tired?

Diabetes and fatigue are often discussed as a cause and effect. In fact, if you have diabetes, you’re more than likely going to experience fatigue at some point. However, there may be much more to this seemingly simple correlation. About 2.5 million people in the United States have chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). CFS is marked by ongoing fatigue that significantly disrupts everyday life. People with this type of extreme fatigue use up their energy sources without necessarily being active. Walking to your car, for example, can zap all your energy. It’s thought that CFS is related to inflammation that disrupts your muscle metabolites. Diabetes, which affects your blood sugar (glucose) and the production of insulin by the pancreas, can also have inflammatory markers. A wealth of studies have looked at the possible connections between diabetes and fatigue. It can be challenging to treat both diabetes and fatigue. However, there are numerous options that can help. You may first need to see your doctor to determine the exact cause of your fatigue. There are numerous studies connecting diabetes and fatigue. One such study looked at the results of a survey on sleep quality. Researchers reported that 31 percent of people with type 1 diabetes had poor sleep quality. The prevalence was slightly larger in adults who had type 2 diabetes, at 42 percent. According to another study from 2015, about 40 percent of people with type 1 diabetes have fatigue longer than six months. The authors also noted that the fatigue is often so severe that it impacts everyday tasks as well as quality of life. A 2013 study was conducted on 37 people with diabetes, as well as 33 without diabetes. This way, the researchers could look at differences in fatigue levels. The participants anonymously answer Continue reading >>

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