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Type 1 Diabetes And Exercise Guidelines

Nutrition And Insulin Management Guidelines For Exercise In Type 1 Diabetes

Nutrition And Insulin Management Guidelines For Exercise In Type 1 Diabetes

Nutrition and Insulin Management Guidelines for Exercise in Type 1 Diabetes Nutrition and Insulin Management Guidelines for Exercise in Type 1 Diabetes Patients with type 1 diabetes and their providers should recognize how the form and intensity of exercise affects glucose control, according to a recent consensus statement published in the Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. "Regular exercise has long been known to be beneficial from a cardiometabolic perspective for people living with type 1 diabetes. It has also been known to make glucose control more difficult," Michael C. Riddell, PhD, professor and graduate program director at the School of Kinesiology and Health Science at the Muscle Health Research Centre at York University in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, told Endocrinology Advisor in an interview. "This recent consensus document highlights the known beneficial effects of regular exercise in type 1 diabetes and how different forms and intensities of exercise impact immediate glucose homeostasis." Dr Riddell and colleagues performed a PubMed search of nutrition and glycemic-based terms for studies involving patients with type 1 diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes between January 1990 and July 2016 in which physical activity or exercise was involved. The review of the literature was divided into sections involving management of glycemia, exercise, and nutrition, as well as goals for exercise, contraindications of exercise, and tools for exercise management in patients with type 1 diabetes. "Acute aerobic exercise [typically causes] increases in glucose disposal that cannot be matched by increased hepatic glucose production in type 1 diabetes because circulating insulin levels do not drop rapidly enough at the time of exercise," Dr Riddell told Endocrinology Advisor . Continue reading >>

New Advice On Exercise For Those With Type 1 Diabetes

New Advice On Exercise For Those With Type 1 Diabetes

New Advice on Exercise for Those With Type 1 Diabetes A new consensus statement advises individuals with type 1 diabetes on how to exercise safely. "Regular exercise can help individuals with diabetes to achieve their blood lipid, body composition, fitness, and blood sugar goals," said lead author Michael C Riddell, PhD, of the Muscle Health Research Centre, York University, Toronto, Ontario, in a statement. But, he adds, "For people living with type 1 diabetes, the fear of hypoglycemia, loss of glycemic control, and inadequate knowledge around exercise management are major barriers....This is a big struggle for both type 1 diabetes patients and their healthcare providers." The statement was published online January 23 in Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. Type 1 Diabetes Patients Are Now Overweight and Obese In contrast to the past, about two-thirds of people with type 1 diabetes today are overweight or obese. Roughly the same proportion has hypertension, 40% have dyslipidemia, and most don't engage in enough regular physical activity, Dr Riddell and colleagues note. Their statement recommends at least 150 minutes of accumulated physical activity per week, with no more than 2 consecutive days without activity. Resistance exercise is also recommended two to three times a week. For children and young people with diabetes, the guidelines call for at least 60 minutes of physical exercise a day. Detailed recommendations are provided for glucose targets, insulin adjustments, and glucose monitoring before and after exercise, nutritional management around exercise, and cautions and contraindications including recent hypoglycemia, ketones, and diabetes complications. In general, aerobic exercise is associated with reductions in glycemia, whereas anaerobic exercise might be assoc Continue reading >>

Physical Activity/exercise And Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

Physical Activity/exercise And Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

The adoption and maintenance of physical activity are critical foci for blood glucose management and overall health in individuals with diabetes and prediabetes. Recommendations and precautions vary depending on individual characteristics and health status. In this Position Statement, we provide a clinically oriented review and evidence-based recommendations regarding physical activity and exercise in people with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes mellitus, and prediabetes. Physical activity includes all movement that increases energy use, whereas exercise is planned, structured physical activity. Exercise improves blood glucose control in type 2 diabetes, reduces cardiovascular risk factors, contributes to weight loss, and improves well-being (1,2). Regular exercise may prevent or delay type 2 diabetes development (3). Regular exercise also has considerable health benefits for people with type 1 diabetes (e.g., improved cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, insulin sensitivity, etc.) (4). The challenges related to blood glucose management vary with diabetes type, activity type, and presence of diabetes-related complications (5,6). Physical activity and exercise recommendations, therefore, should be tailored to meet the specific needs of each individual. TYPES AND CLASSIFICATIONS OF DIABETES AND PREDIABETES Physical activity recommendations and precautions may vary by diabetes type. The primary types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes (5%–10% of cases) results from cellular-mediated autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic β-cells, producing insulin deficiency (7). Although it can occur at any age, β-cell destruction rates vary, typically occurring more rapidly in youth than in adults. Type 2 diabetes (90%–95% of cases) resul Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 1 Diabetes And Exercise

During activity, injected or pumped insulin cannot be 'shut off' like the body's own insulin, so too much glucose is taken up by both muscle contractions and the high levels of insulin, says Sheri R. Colberg, Ph.D., professor of exercise science at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. To avoid hypoglycemia when doing physical activity, monitor your blood sugar before and after exercise. Here are some other guidelines from Colberg and the American Diabetes Association: Eat a small carbohydrate-containing snack before exercising if your blood glucose is 100 mg/dl or lower. Wait about 10 to 15 minutes before starting your activity. Eat a snack if you plan to exercise for more than 60 minutes, plan to do a more intense workout than usual, or if the weather is warmer or cooler than usual. Always carry a small snack that's high in sugar or carbohydrate. The average 150-pound adult needs 20 grams of carbohydrate for every half-hour of moderate exercise. Some snack choices include sports drinks and gels and easily absorbed carbohydrate sources, such as jelly beans and energy bars. Watch for symptoms of hypoglycemia during exercise. If you feel weak, lightheaded, cold, or clammy, stop and check your blood glucose. If it's low, treat it with a pure source of glucose, such as glucose tablets or gel. Become familiar with the ways different activities affect your blood sugar levels. Measure blood sugar before and after exercise. Keep a written record of what the activity was, how long you did the activity, what you ate, and blood glucose levels before and after. Over time, you'll better understand how activity affects your blood sugar levels and insulin doses. For insulin pump users, lower basal insulin if you're planning more than 90 minutes of activity. Shorter bouts of e Continue reading >>

Guidelines On Safe Exercise For People With Type 1 Diabetes

Guidelines On Safe Exercise For People With Type 1 Diabetes

Exercising safely with type 1 diabetes can be quite a challenge. A paper from JDRF funded experts has acknowledged these challenges and published useful exercise guidelines for type 1 diabetes patients and providers. These JDRF experts are part of an international team of 21 researchers and clinicians led by York University Professor Michael Riddell. The paper, called “Exercise management in type 1 diabetes: a consensus statement” which has been published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology provides guidelines on how to exercise safely and effectively with type 1 diabetes. Aaron Kowalski, Ph.D., JDRF Chief Mission Officer and report contributor said in a press release, “Exercise has tremendous benefits for people with T1D, but it can be hard to predict how it will affect their blood glucose and how they feel during and following physical activity,” and that “The lack of reliable information on how to exercise safely has created obstacles for people with T1D who want to maintain a healthy lifestyle. These consensus guidelines, as well as JDRF’s new PEAK program, are breaking down those barriers.” The T1D PEAK program (Performance in Exercise and Knowledge) is an initiative by JDRF to help educate people with type 1 as well as their caregivers and healthcare providers on how to exercise safely. Riddell, the lead author speaks to some of these benefits and barriers of exercise, “Regular exercise can help individuals with diabetes to achieve their blood lipid, body composition, fitness and blood sugar goals, but for people living with type 1 diabetes, the fear of hypoglycemia, loss of glycemic control, and inadequate knowledge around exercise management are major barriers,” In order to create the guidelines, Riddell and team reviewed observational studi Continue reading >>

25 Facts To Know On Exercise On Type 1 Diabetes

25 Facts To Know On Exercise On Type 1 Diabetes

This past month, researchers from more than a dozen leading diabetes and exercise research teams published guidelines on how to exercise with Type 1 diabetes. These guidelines, published in the Lancet, represent the current international consensus of the best methods for maintaining blood sugar control with exercise. From the report, we’ve pulled out 25 important findings: Why You Really Should Exercise 1. Some 60 percent of people with Type 1 diabetes are overweight or obese 2. Some 40 percent of people with Type 1 have hypertension, and 60 percent have dyslipidemia, a condition which increases the chance of clogged arteries, heart attacks, and strokes. Read “JDRF Rolls Out its PEAK Program on Exercise and Type 1.” sponsor 3. Children and young people with Type 1 all see improved cardiorespiratory fitness and blood lipid levels with regular physical activity. 4. Adults with Type 1 diabetes who are physically active had lower rates of retinopathy Read “5 Tips for Exercise and Type 1.” 5. Regular exercise decreases total daily insulin needs. How Much Exercise Should You Do 6. Adults with diabetes should aim for a total of 150 minutes of accumulated physical activity each week. 7. Resistance exercise is recommended two to three times a week. What Happens to Your Blood Sugar Levels During Exercise 8. During aerobic exercise, insulin secretion decreases and glucagon secretion increases. 9. During anaerobic activities and high-intensity interval training, circulating insulin levels do not decrease as much as they do in aerobic activities. 10. Trained athletes with Type 1 diabetes experience greater drops in blood sugar levels during aerobic exercise than do those who aren’t that physically fit. 11. Resistance exercise can provide better blood sugar stability than Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: First-ever Exercise Guidelines

Type 1 Diabetes: First-ever Exercise Guidelines

Type 1 Diabetes: First-Ever Exercise Guidelines A new set of guidelines compiled by JDRF will help people with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) exercise safely to avoid fluctuations in blood sugar, according to a team of international researchers and clinicians. Regular exercise can help individuals with diabetes to achieve their blood lipid, body composition, fitness and blood sugar goals, but for people living with type 1 diabetes, the fear of hypoglycemia, loss of glycemic control, and inadequate knowledge around exercise management are major barriers, said lead author Michael C Riddell, PhD, of the Muscle Health Research Centre, York University, Toronto, Ontario. This is a big struggle for both type 1 diabetes patients and their healthcare providers. This first-ever set of consensus guidelines from leading experts will help them. The new guidelines were published online in Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. The review of observational studies and clinical trials on exercise management conducted by 21 international experts provides an up-to-date consensus on exercise management for individuals with T1DM who exercise regularly, including glucose targets for safe and effective exercise, and nutritional and insulin dose adjustments to protect against exercise-related glucose excursions. The experts note that about 60% of people with T1DM are overweight or obese, about 40% have hypertension, about 60% have dyslipidemia, and most do not engage in enough regular physical activity. They recommend that adults with T1DM garner at least 150 minutes of accumulated physical activity per week, with no more than two consecutive days without activity. Resistance exercise is also recommended two to three times a week. For children and young people with diabetes, the guidelines call fo Continue reading >>

First-ever Guidelines On Safe Exercising With Type 1 Diabetes!

First-ever Guidelines On Safe Exercising With Type 1 Diabetes!

As a person with type 1 diabetes who exercises regularly, I can tell you it's pretty much of a guessing game. I have some strategies that I use to keep my glucose in range for my spin class, aerobics, kick box, hiking and other workouts, but they are far from fool-proof -- and I've yet to find any really solid advice on BG management during these sweat-fests. So I for one am really intrigued to see the first-ever official guidelines on managing exercise with T1D published in The Lancet journal last week as a 14-page report titled “Exercise management in type 1 diabetes: a consensus statement.” This comes on the heels of the ADA's sweeping 2017 Standards of Diabetes Care, which we just reviewed yesterday. The new info-packed paper honing in on exercise was compiled by an international team of 21 researchers and clinicians, including some familiar names like JDRF's Artificial Pancreas lead Aaron Kowalski, and Drs. Bruce Bode of Atlanta Diabetes Associates, Anne Peters of USC Keck School of Medicine, and Lori Laffel of Joslin Diabetes Center. It offers "guidelines on glucose targets for safe and effective exercising with T1D, as well as nutritional and insulin dose adjustments to prevent exercise-related fluctuations in blood sugar." So what did these experts come up with? Well, let me just say that it's a comprehensive and informative paper -- explaining everything from the physiology of diabetes and exercise and the body's differing metabolic responses to aerobic vs. anaerobic activity, to sports energy drinks and the relative benefits of a low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) diet. Disclaimers, and a Green Light The authors are careful to make a few important disclaimers, first and foremost that one-size recommendations do not fit all, so strategies should be built around exer Continue reading >>

5 Tips For Exercise With Type 1

5 Tips For Exercise With Type 1

A diabetes life coach shares her secrets for good blood glucose control while working out. Throughout July, we’re featuring excerpts from Ginger Vieira’s new book, Dealing with Diabetes Burnout. In this final edited excerpt from the book, the longtime life coach and diabetes advocate shares the lessons she’s learned from years of exercise with Type 1 diabetes. There is no doubt that exercising with diabetes is about one million times more challenging than exercising without diabetes, particularly if you take insulin. Low blood sugars and high blood sugars are major party-poopers in the middle of a walk, yoga, spinning class, tai chi, or strength-training. I’m here to tell you that it can be done and you can enjoy exercise, but it takes a little work, a little more effort, and a bunch of self-study. sponsor When I personally started to become really active and committed to exercising regularly, I was working really hard to balance my blood sugar during things like Ashtanga yoga, strength-training, and various forms of cardio like power-walking and the stairmaster. And it wasn’t easy, but at the very same time I was learning with the help of my trainer, Andrew, about what was literally going on in my body during different types of exercise. Learning about this basic science, taking a deep breath, and viewing my body as a science experiment is the only reason I am able to exercise happily and confidently today. Read “25 Facts to Know About Exercise and Type 1 Diabetes.” Here are five lessons I’ve learned on balancing blood sugars during exercise: 1. Understand What Type of Exercise You’re Doing Jogging and strength-training will both have very different impacts on your blood sugar, even though your heart rate may rise during both. Cardiovascular or aerobi Continue reading >>

Key Points From The Updated Guidelines On Exercise And Diabetes

Key Points From The Updated Guidelines On Exercise And Diabetes

Key Points from the Updated Guidelines on Exercise and Diabetes 1Human Movement Sciences Department, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, USA Edited by: Jonathan Peter Little, University of British Columbia, Canada Reviewed by: Normand Boule, University of Alberta, Canada; Jamie F. Burr, University of Guelph, Canada *Correspondence: Sheri R. Colberg, [email protected] Specialty section: This article was submitted to Diabetes, a section of the journal Frontiers in Endocrinology Received 2017 Jan 14; Accepted 2017 Feb 7. Keywords: physical activity, exercise, diabetes, guidelines, American Diabetes Association This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. No doubt remains that the adoption and maintenance of physical activity is important for overall health and blood glucose management in individuals with diabetes and prediabetes. Recently, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) published updated recommendations and precautions about physical activity and exercise in people with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes ( 1 ). Given the importance of these topics, it is worth discussing the key changes and updates included in this ADA position statement (PS). Pre-Exercise Health Screening and Evaluation This PS reiterates that pre-exercise medical clearance is not necessary for asymptomatic, sedentary individuals who wish to begin low- or moderate-intensity physical activi Continue reading >>

Jdrf Peak Experts Develop First-ever Consensus Guidelines On Safe Exercise For People With Type 1 Diabetes

Jdrf Peak Experts Develop First-ever Consensus Guidelines On Safe Exercise For People With Type 1 Diabetes

JDRF PEAK Experts Develop First-Ever Consensus Guidelines on Safe Exercise for People with Type 1 Diabetes New paper published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology recommends exercise guidelines for type 1 diabetes patients and healthcare providers NEW YORK, January 24, 2017 Experts from JDRF , the leading global organization focused on type 1 diabetes (T1D) research, as part of an international team of 21 researchers and clinicians led by York University Professor Michael Riddell, published first-of-its-kind guidelines to help people with type 1 diabetes exercise safely. The report, Exercise management in type 1 diabetes: a consensus statement , published this week in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, offers guidelines on glucose targets for safe and effective exercising with T1D, as well as nutritional and insulin dose adjustments to prevent exercise-related fluctuations in blood sugar. Exercise has tremendous benefits for people with T1D, but it can be hard to predict how it will affect their blood glucose and how they feel during and following physical activity, said Aaron Kowalski, Ph.D., JDRF Chief Mission Officer and contributor to the report. The lack of reliable information on how to exercise safely has created obstacles for people with T1D who want to maintain a healthy lifestyle. These consensus guidelines, as well as JDRFs new PEAK program, are breaking down those barriers. For two years, the team of experts reviewed observational studies and clinical trials on exercise management for people with T1D who exercise regularly. As a result, the JDRF-funded report identifies how different types of exercise can reduce or increase glucose levels, to help inform changes to an exercise routine to ensure safe and effective glycemic management. Regular exercise c Continue reading >>

Exercise Guidelines

Exercise Guidelines

Find exercise guidelines for your type: In this section, you will find: Self-assessment Quiz Self assessment quizzes are available for topics covered in this website. To find out how much you have learned about Diabetes and Exercise, take our self assessment quiz when you have completed this section. The quiz is multiple choice. Please choose the single best answer to each question. At the end of the quiz, your score will display. If your score is over 70% correct, you are doing very well. If your score is less than 70%, you can return to this section and review the information. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 1 Diabetes And Exercise

Exercise is an absolutely vital part of type 1 diabetes treatment. Staying fit and active throughout your life has many benefits, but the biggest one for people with diabetes is this: it helps you control diabetes and prevent long-term complications. Exercise makes it easier to control your blood glucose (blood sugar) level. Exercise benefits people with type 1 because it increases your insulin sensitivity. In other words, after exercise, your body doesn't need as much insulin to process carbohydrates. If your child has type 1 diabetes, making sure he or she gets enough exercise is not only a great way to help manage his or her diabetes but also instill healthy habits from an early age. To learn more about how to safely incorporate exercise into your child's routine, read our article about physical activity for children with type 1 diabetes. Exercise can also help people with type 1 diabetes avoid long-term complications, especially heart problems. As you can read about this in our article on type 1 diabetes complications, people with diabetes are susceptible to developing blocked arteries (arteriosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack. Exercise helps keep your heart healthy and strong. Plus, exercise helps you maintain good cholesterol—and that helps you avoid arteriosclerosis. Additionally, there are all the traditional benefits of exercise: Lower blood pressure Better control of weight Leaner, stronger muscles Stronger bones More energy One person who certainly understands the benefits of exercise in managing type 1 diabetes is Jay Cutler, quarterback for the Chicago Bears. He was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2008, but the disease hasn't interfered with his football career. To learn more, read our article about Jay Cutler's experience with type 1 diabete Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Exercise Often Raises Blood Glucose In Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes: Exercise Often Raises Blood Glucose In Type 1 Diabetes

Regular physical activity and exercise are recommended for the general population for overall improved health. However, exercise of moderate intensity increases the risk of hypoglycemia during and following exertion in those with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Accordingly, exercise guidelines for T1DM focus on prevention of exercise-induced hypoglycemia. The risk of hypoglycemia may discourage some with T1DM from exercising. Children and youth may be embarrassed by the temporary reduction in coordination and physical performance associated with hypoglycemia and by the fear of letting teammates down while playing. Some parents may discourage their children from normal participation in physical activity and from playing competitive sports because of concern about severe hypoglycemia. However, this fear may reduce a child’s physical activity, which may lead to reduced overall health, reduced enjoyment from exercise, and restricted confidence in meeting the demands imposed by living with a chronic health condition like diabetes. As a result, long-term exercise habits as well as personal growth and psycho-social development may be blunted. Concern with hypoglycemia from exercise is probably even more heightened in those with hypoglycemia unawareness, or the absence of symptoms during hypoglycemia. However, some of these concerns might be allayed by the realization that vigorous exercise tends to raise blood sugars rather than lower it. The fact that vigorous exercise tends to raise blood sugar appears to be relatively unknown to many with T1DM. However, the effect has been confirmed in a number of studies. These studies have identified an exercise threshold that elicits this response. The threshold exercise intensity occurs at or above 80% of a person’s maximum exercis Continue reading >>

Jdrf Effort Creates Exercise Guidelines For Type 1 Diabetes

Jdrf Effort Creates Exercise Guidelines For Type 1 Diabetes

Newsroom Published on: January 25, 2017 JDRF Effort Creates Exercise Guidelines for Type 1 Diabetes Too often, experts say, fear of hypoglycemia causes those with T1D to forgo exercise, despite the benefits. For those with type 1 diabetes (T1D), exercise can be a double-edged swordits long-term health benefits are clear, but its short-term effect on blood glucose levels can be tough to navigate. To help those with T1D to exercise safely, a team of experts, funded by JDRF (formerly the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation), has created the first-ever guidelines for this population, which appeared Tuesday in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. Exercise has tremendous benefits for people with T1D, but it can be hard to predict how it will affect their blood glucose and how they feel during and following physical activity, Aaron Kowalski, PhD, chief mission officer for JDRF, said in an announcement from the group. The lack of reliable information on how to exercise safely has created obstacles for people with T1D who want to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Guideline development was a 2-year process, in which leading diabetes researchers, physicians, and other experts reviewed observational studies and clinical trials to create a consensus report on how different types of exercise affect blood glucose levels. Kowalski said the guidelines, along with JDRFs new PEAK program (Performance in Exercise and Knowledge), are removing barriers for those living with T1D. Too often, said Michael Riddell, PhD, a professor in the School of Kinesiology and Health Science at Torontos York University, fear outweighs better health. Regular exercise can help individuals with diabetes to achieve their blood lipid, body composition, fitness, and blood sugar goals, but for people with type 1 dia Continue reading >>

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