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Type 1 Diabetes And Cross Country Running

Racing With Type 1 Diabetes: Shelby Daniel

Racing With Type 1 Diabetes: Shelby Daniel

Tags: inspiration It should have been her first day of 7th grade, but instead, Shelby Daniel was in the hospital. Shelby’s life changed drastically when she was suddenly diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes at just 12 years old. She spent a week in a children’s hospital when her pancreas quit producing insulin and her immune system began attacking her own body. Her biggest concern was that she might not be able to continue living the athletic lifestyle she had grown to love. But Shelby quickly learned how to monitor her blood sugar levels 15-20 times a day and take insulin shots 4-6 times a day. Within a week, she was running cross-country and playing competitive softball again. When Shelby asked her mom Stephanie if she could run a Savage Race, Stephanie hesitated. In Stephanie’s words: All I could think about was how in the world I would be able to manage her blood sugar numbers during what was sure to be a grueling physical challenge. In a regular 2-3 mile run, her blood sugar can drop from upwards of 200 (which is her recommended blood glucose level prior to exercise) to dangerously below 40 without warning. Add in adrenaline, ice water, and physical exertion and all I could think about was a blood sugar nightmare that could take overnight to resolve itself, not to mention germs and dirt and mud and muck and scrapes and cuts – on an already compromised immune system. But… how in the world could I be the one to tell her NO? How could I tell this small, headstrong, hard working, kick-ass, yet quiet, humble, physically active little beast of an athlete that there would in fact be some limitations in her life? If she didn’t see walls, why should, why WOULD I even consider being the one to put them up? We double-checked with her endocrinologist and he saw no issues Continue reading >>

Running A Marathon With Type 1 Diabetes

Running A Marathon With Type 1 Diabetes

How to Run a Half Marathon With Type 1 Diabetes My name is Jacob Seltzer, I am 20 years old, and a Type 1 Diabetic. I was diagnosed with diabetes on my half birthday, November 21, 2011 at the ageof 15. I have had diabetes for roughly 5 years and I do not let it get in my way. I am currently going into my junior year of college at Stony BrookUniversity as an athletic training major. Recently, I decided to start up my own blog . My reasoning behind this was to spread awareness of the disease,better educate people, and most of all serve as a peer to help newly diagnosed diabetics cope with their disease. This blog, among so many others online today, will have to serve us as we work together to find a cure for this disease. I have alsoentered a contest from Runners Worldmagazine, to be featured on the cover of the December issue! Please vote for me at the Runners World website!! Running 26.2 miles sounds pleasant right? Im sure many people reading this disagree. Pleasant isnt the right word to use for long distance running. However, it is one of the most rewarding things that I have ever experienced. One thing that I have learned is training for this distance is not an easy thing to do. In fact, mentally it can be very draining. All runners experience the highs and lows of running while training for a marathon (or any other race), however, as a runner with diabetes, you literally experience highs and lows with running. There is no such thing as a perfect training strategy since everyone is different, but a beginner plan is the way to start off. My mom bought me a book consisting of three training plans for half marathons and three training plans for full marathons all of which include a taper period (shortened distances by the end of the training). In order to truly unders Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cross Country..another Try | Claire Montgomery

Diabetes And Cross Country..another Try | Claire Montgomery

I was just surfing the web looking for interesting blogs on diabetes and I found yours. I was immediately impressed by your positive attitude and matter-of-factness about having diabetes. I was recently diagnosed with Type 1 in April at 26 years old! (yeah, bummer, who gets juvenile diabetes in their 20s?!) Anyways, I had two comments: first of all, I used to run 5ks before the diabetes and Ive just started running again, too. I also have had the awful experience of going low and not feeling it.. at all! Ive learned to eat a snack high in carbs and protein about 30 mins before my run, then I test after 1.5 miles (even if I feel great!) and I carry around the goo energy gels, and if Im below 130, I eat one. If Im really low, I eat a couple. I have succumbed to the mantra of test early and test often and then eat goo!!! Secondly, I wanted to comment quickly that I thunk its amazing that your parents moved you to Mexico for a year! I used to teach 2nd grade English at an international colegio in Mexico City back in 2008. What a wonderful experience for you and your siblings. It is obvious from your posts that you learned a lot and (hopefully!) enjoyed your time there. I was back for a visit to Mexico in July, my first time back since having diabetes, and it was hard to resist all the delicious rice, tamales, tortillas, churros, flan Lets just say I bolused quite a bit while I was there. Keep up the amazing work. You sound like a fabulous young lady (and Im a teacher, so I know how to spot the good ones!!!). You inspired me tonight. Continue reading >>

How To Fuel For A Long Run With Type 1 Diabetes

How To Fuel For A Long Run With Type 1 Diabetes

We recently got reader mail asking for help with balancing long runs, fueling, and Type 1 diabetes. Keith, a longtime runner, wrote in to tell us he was recently diagnosed with rare, late-onset Type 1 diabetes. Being diagnosed with Type 1 as an adult is rare in the sense that Type 1 is typically diagnosed earlier in life; the condition was once referred to as juvenile diabetes. Keith notes that during long runs, he takes a GU energy gel every 15 minutes, and he successfully fueled for a half-marathon using this formula. While Keith tolerates the GU and has designed it so he ends up with blood sugar levels just slightly above normal, he was wondering if there was another gel that might be better for diabetics—perhaps one that lasts longer. Or, he asks, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it?" Keith, I'm so glad you asked. As you know, there are many health benefits of exercise for athletes with diabetes (and we covered many of them here when discussing Type 2 diabetes). But unlike running with Type 2, running with Type 1 (especially long-distance running) requires more planning and precautionary measures. Type 1 diabetes accounts for only 5-10% of all cases, yet most avid athletes with diabetes fall into the Type 1 category. While athletes with Type 2 often make their own insulin and rely on changes to the diet and exercise (and maybe oral meds) to manage the disease, athletes with Type 1 have absolute insulin deficiency, which means that this chronic disease is treated with diet and exercise along with insulin injections. While most runners don't need to think twice about insulin or glucagon levels—or even glucose production during exercise—for the athlete with Type 1, careful consideration must be given to these factors before, during, and after each run. Many variable Continue reading >>

Running With Diabetes As A High School Athlete

Running With Diabetes As A High School Athlete

Running with Diabetes as a High School Athlete Run Smiles: What have been some of your biggest highlights as a runner? Stewart:Some of the biggest highlights as a runner was my first cross country race that I completed after being diagnosed with Diabetes. I consider this a highlight because after completing it I knew that my diabetes wasnt going to stop me. Another one was my first race running varsity on my cross country team. When I ran varsity I knew that it was worth it to keep trying even though it was very hard from time to time. Run Smiles: What has challenged you the most? Stewart:Dealing with my diabetes has definitely been the thing that has challenged me the most. While other people are preparing for a race by thinking about how they will execute the plan, Im always busy stressing over that and trying to predict what my diabetes will do. Having to deal with all that can definitely be a struggle from time to time. Guest Writer: Stewart Sheely Lehi High School XC and Track Athlete Diagnosed with diabetes in July 2012 Amazing guy that doesnt bow to excuses Run Smiles: Whats been a life lesson youve learned from running? Stewart:A life lesson I have learned from running is to not quit. Running is hard, theres a reason its other sports punishments. But the rewards for persevering through a hard run or a hard workout definitely make it worth it. This really helps me in my daily life, like for example: when I have to do something hard, like taking a hard math test, Im able to think of how much I have gone through while running, just by sticking to it and not quitting. Upon thinking of that it makes it so much easier to get through the hard parts that are in my everyday life. Story: Running has always been a very important part of my life. I began running track when Continue reading >>

5 Tips For Running With Type 1 Diabetes

5 Tips For Running With Type 1 Diabetes

WRITTEN BY: Robin Arzon Editor’s Note: Robin Arzon is a part of Beyond Type Run Team, which is sponsored by Medtronic. She is participating in the 2017 TCS New York City Marathon. I’m a Type 1 diabetic. That means my pancreas stopped producing insulin one day and I need insulin to live. It mostly sucks. I was diagnosed as an adult at the age of 32, after a month-long trip to India. I felt really dehydrated, got blood work at my mom’s urging, and boom, I needed insulin forever. There’s no known cause. Approximately 90% of adult diabetics are Type 2, which is generally caused by lifestyle factors such as activity level and food choices. No matter what kind of diabetic you are, I want you to know something: you’re a f*cking bad-*ss. My immediate thought when I was diagnosed was, How can I continue to run ultras? I then remembered my friend Stephen England, who is a very accomplished marathoner, ultrarunner, and fellow Type 1 diabetic (since the age of 14). Knowing he slayed the Leadville Trail 100 Run and other 100-milers was encouraging. I decided I was going to be unstoppable. Running with diabetes hasn’t always been pretty. It’s been trial and error every single day. Within 10 days of my diagnosis, I had all the technology available to assist with diabetes management. I use an OmniPod insulin pump (the white box on my arm or waist you see in photos) and a Dexcom glucose monitor, which alerts me to my blood glucose numbers. I firmly believe technology has kept me racing. I can adjust my insulin ratios for training, especially marathons and 3-4 hour long runs, without needing to inject insulin manually. More knowledge is power. Everyone is different, but I like to reduce my insulin slightly before a long run. I can run with 50-70 percent less insulin during Continue reading >>

Cross Country Running And Diabetes???

Cross Country Running And Diabetes???

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Well, I had no idea my son might want to do this but when I was picking him up at school yesterday he asked to stay to practice. He didn't even have the shoes I would have sent if I had known. He had on white Asics I had read on this forum that gatorade was good. I had none. I wasn't prepared. Teacher had gatorade ad gave it to him. His Dexcom said he was 250 double down arrows(before start). We turned off pump for an hour and he had most of small gatorade after doing a warm up run. We also gave two glucose tablets. He was 160 straight down at that point. He ran almost 2 miles. Teacher dressed out and ran with him and a group of kids. She divided the group into two groups to run. Faster group and slower(new). She ran with slower group. Question - Do Cross Country diabetics ever stop to check their blood during a race? Do they carry gatorade or a fanny pack with BG meter and glucose tablets during the runs??? ANything else to do besides gatorade and turning pump off? I think I read to eat a banana but not sure. Are you familiar with the Spibelts? If not, have your son look at them online. My non-D family members love them when they run. If it were my son, I would have him carry glucose tabs, glucose gel, test strips, meter, and poker especially during practice and probably during a race too. Have you been to a XC race before? Sometimes it is very spread out and you only get to see them in a couple of spots during the race. This is why I don't like this sport. He has a spibelt but has his pump in it. He had a black fanny pack draped across his chest with his meter, tablets,liguid glucose in it. Not sure how to fit meter plus other stuff in a spibelt. Maybe if I had Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Cross Country Running

Type 1 Diabetes And Cross Country Running

swimbikerun: I've been a 30+ year T1 diabetic and my son is a T1 runner/athlete too. Honestly, your routine is not good. It sounds as though your pre-workout Humulog and probably your long-acting insulin doses are way out of whack (too high). If he was 243 before the workout then you would figure that is OK. However, based on the grams and workout, it would appear that his sugar was falling going into the workout, not leveling off. He probably has a great amount of "on-board" insulin that has not yet kicked in going into the workout. The trend (up or down) is what is important, not where he is at the moment. You should probably cut back on the Humulog by half for the lunch on workout days. Or cut off the long-acting insulin if you have a pump. Your 95g of food during the workout is probably the equivalent of 3 to 5 units of insulin. Why don't you just dial back the number of units? His sugar will be higher going into the workout, but it will drop during the workout. If it doesn't drop, it will at least level since no insulin is following but the exercise brings it down gradually. It also sounds like you are trying to be a little "too perfect" with his sugar during the workout. Are you trying to maintain something in the 100-120 range? Why? I know that a sugar of 200 for me and my son during a race or workout is golden for us. My advice is to either greatly cut back on the eating 95g of carbs during a workout cannot be helpful to anyones workout. You are pretty much feeding him another lunch during the workout. How can that be conducive to a good workout? Remember too that eating or drinking something doesn't automatically kick the blood sugar up. It has to digest since taking is not the only job a diabetic patient has. Staying fit and consuming appropriate food is just Continue reading >>

Guest Post: Running With Type 1 Diabetes

Guest Post: Running With Type 1 Diabetes

August 10th is a day I will never forget. Four years ago, at the age of 33, while I was on vacation visiting my parents, something just didnt feel right with me. I couldnt explain it but I just felt scared and sick. I had no idea what was wrong the whole, long story is here but I ended up in the hospital and was diagnosed with rare, late-onset Type 1 Diabetes. Being diagnosed with Type 1 as an adult is rare in the sense that Type 1 is typically diagnosed earlier in life; the condition was once referred to as juvenile diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes is an autoimmune disease. It has not proved to be genetic and I did nothing wrong to get it. But maybe the most important point to make is that there is no cure. In order to live, I must inject myself with insulin 5 8 times a day. While your body balances out the food you eat with the insulin you need and the energy you burn like a well oiled machine, mine is a thousand times more complicated. And thats before I thrown running into the mix of things! MY NAME IS COREY AND IM A RUNNER WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES. I started running years before I became a T1D so I never once thought about not running after getting diagnosed. I quickly learned it wouldnt be as easy as I had imagined. Learning to balance out my blood sugar with running, weather conditions, time of day, food intake and more was overwhelming to say the least. There were many, many tears of frustration but I loved running so much, I wasnt going to let it deter me from trying to figure out how to manage it all. I was living in Trinidad at the time and resources were almost non-existent. So, the first thing I started was a very detailed running journal, which I highly suggest for everyone not just those with a medical condition. I would write down everything how much sleep I got, Continue reading >>

Running With Diabetes: How To Carry All Your Stuff Around

Running With Diabetes: How To Carry All Your Stuff Around

Hi everyone! I’m back with my second blog for tips and tricks on running with diabetes. Part 1 is here. Diabetes is a very stuff-intensive condition. When you acquire it, you are automatically granted access to a treasure chest of doohickies unbeknownst to mere mortals. There’s your insulin, which comes in vials, cartridges, or pre-filled pens. Then you have your syringes, insulin pens, insulin pumps, and other devices to administer insulin to your body through some form of injection. For that you need, of course, a supply of sterile needles. Then there’s your blood glucose meter, which needs test strips that come in another vial, and a lancing device (lovingly referred to in my house as “the holenizer”) for drawing blood from your finger for glucose testing, which of course needs a fresh lancet for every use. Finally there is your list of random, but necessary things like alcohol swabs, pump tubes, dextrose tablets. To diabetics, carrying all this junk around is as vital as it is unpractical on any given day. On race day, the junk simultaneously becomes totally unpractical and exremely vital. You don’t want to carry it around, but you have absolutely no other option. The only thing left to do is make the best of a bad situation, and this is a quest I have been on ever since I started running. And now you get the benefit of all that experience. Lucky you. The golden rule for carrying stuff So, if you are a diabetic, and you wonder what to do with all your stuff while training or running a race, here are my golden rules for carrying stuff, based on years of experience: Carry as little as you can. Integration is beautiful. Technology is your friend. Below, I will explain how I applied these rules. That means inevitaby that I will be mentioning particular produ Continue reading >>

Team Type One Run

Team Type One Run

Mel biked across America with Beyond Type 1's Bike Beyond team. For someone whos always thought of themselves as not a runner, Ive done a surprising amount of events over the past few years. In 2013, I finally decided that I didnt want to let diabetes be the reason that I didnt do the things that scared me, so I made a resolution to run 2013km that year. Ive never looked back. Ive run everything from 5km to ultramarathons. Im not the fastest, and never will be. I love running, even when Im hating it. Looking for other diabadasses in Brisbane to show the world that diabetes cant hold anyone back - so if you love (or hate) running, or want to get started, or just want to hang out with other type 1s come along and join me! Sean is one of the nicest guys you'll meet. He's an engineer and is into trail running - he's done the Angeles Crest 100 miler - but is happy running easy with us mere mortals as well. Sean founded and leads the Bay Area running group in San Jose. He's also a Diabetes Sports Project Champion. I'm 46 years old, married and a father of two (an 11 year old son and 6 year old daughter), and we're living as a family in Hamburg, Germany. My type 1 showed up 16 years ago during my final exam at university (a really bad moment in time) where I studied economics and sociology. In my younger days I played water polo and later I did Karate for years. Ever since I can imagine I rode my bike, because I prefer riding my bike to driving. And this is still the case. With running I started ca 4 years ago and my favourite distance is between 5k and 10k. There are a lot of running events across Hamburg and I'll join some of them. Biggest challenges this year are a 16k around Hamburg Airport (in Sep-17) and two 12k bridge runs one in Hamburg and one in Stralsund (Eastern G Continue reading >>

Does Anyone Know Any Type 1's Running The Marathon Today ?

Does Anyone Know Any Type 1's Running The Marathon Today ?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Does anyone know any type 1's running the marathon today ? I really can't help but feel inspired watching the London marathon today, so curious to see how many type 1's are running it. I would love to start running and hope one day to do this. Well there's Shawn Forrest for one he is Type1 and will be lining up in the elite section. I really can't help but feel inspired watching the London marathon today, so curious to see how many type 1's are running it. I would love to start running and hope one day to do this. I missed it today, good luck with the running if you decide to start. My brother-in-law is a Type 1 and although he hasn't run London, he's done plenty of other marathons and half marathons. I really can't help but feel inspired watching the London marathon today, so curious to see how many type 1's are running it. I would love to start running and hope one day to do this. The runners are truly inspiring and raising money for such good causes, a quick google search and there's a couple of story's about type 1's running the marathon this year, here is one: I can't run and have never enjoyed it tbh, even at school always hated Cross Country Running in PE, much prefer a nice long walk or cycle ride. If you want to do it then start running now but also start applying for the London Marathon now.(unless you know you can raise a couple of thousand pounds and so get a charity place) I decided to do it almost straight after I was diagnosed; just to show that T1 wasn't g Continue reading >>

Running Scared: A Legitimate Concern Or Just An Excuse

Running Scared: A Legitimate Concern Or Just An Excuse

Running Scared: A Legitimate Concern or Just an Excuse In college I ran cross-country and track. In my mid- to late twenties I ran because I enjoyed it. In my thirties I havent really done much running. Oh, Ive done and will probably again do the gym thing, spinning classes , all of that, but lately and in no small part because of lovely weather and a beautiful hilly, forested cemetery two blocks from our house that has beautiful trails on which we take our dog on long walks Ive had the urge to start running. First I need to get decent running shoes. Thats an OK excuse for not getting out on the trails as soon as possible. I mean, the support in the years-old tennis shoes I have is pretty much gone, and theyre torn up from gardening, so I need to make a trip to a shoe outlet soon and pick up a discount pair. Simple enough. Second is knowing that Im not in the kind of cardiovascular shape I was when last I ran. Im older, and heavier, than in those college days and years in my twenties. That means that Im slower. Oh, and that Im slower. Did I mention Im probably not as fast as I used to be? This means I need to call upon the wisdom of my years to deal with the internal monologue, because it will do its damndest to try to shame me out of even trying to get back out there because Im not what I once was. I know this about me. I know the self-defeating inner voices will conspire to keep me inside. I need to override them, remind them that Im a much happier, more well-adjusted person now than I ever was during the cross-country days of yore. Winning doesnt matter. Pushing it to the extreme doesnt matter. There dont have to be any races; there is no clock. The third thing? Hmm. Well, it may just be the fact that two years ago I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes . Now I know, Continue reading >>

Cross Country And Type 1 Diabetes

Cross Country And Type 1 Diabetes

I've noticed that there are many newly diagnosed Type 1 Youths that are engaging in the sport of Cross Country running.This is wonderful because it must be the hardest sport to regular blood glucose (bg) for.This says a lot about our kids.My daughter is 16 yrs old and was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes last August just before the beginning of her first year of cross country.She's always excelled in sports especially those that require a lot of running and tough training.Having diabetes presented a much tougher fight for her during cross country season. Initially during her training runs, her bg would steadily drop.So we either decreased the insulin of her last meal so that she'd have carbs to burn down during the run or decrease her basal insulin in the pump by 50% or so during the period of running to avoid too much insulin being delivered to her.She's been on the insulin pump since January . . just 5 months after being diagnosed. Contrastly, during her actual cross country races which are 3.1 miles "races" not jogs, her bg would increase dramatically resulting in a bad run.She describes the pain in her legs as heavy, stiff and hard to move.I know that this is a result of the stress hormone or adrenaline released from the liver and muscles to aid in her performance however since there wouldn't be enough insulin on board to bring the hormorne/bg properly into her cells to be used as energy, it would just float around in her body until she decided to stop running.She's very competitive and would never stop running... which caused me to be more concerned as I watch her run with pain and disappointment. This 2008 season was no different.We have yet to find a way that she can complete a 3.1 mile race without being afflicted by high bg's. During the first mile of her race, Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: My Cross-country Race Breakdown - Diabeteens | Healthcentral

Type 1 Diabetes: My Cross-country Race Breakdown - Diabeteens | Healthcentral

So, today I ran in one of my last high school cross country races. You would think that I have perfected the art of managing blood sugars for this event by now, but no such luck. However, there are a few things I do as standard preparation for each race. My pre-race routine is different from my pre-practice routine because I check my blood sugar way more often and eat more carbs right before I run. Usually, for a regular practice, I will just have a 20 carb snack about an hour beforehand; I sort of nibble on peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and sip gatorade for up to 10 minutes before a race. Also, I take some insulin before the race, while I dont give any extra before running at practice. Maybe it would be better to follow the same routines for races as I do for practices, since my blood sugars are often just fine without all the extra monitoring and carbohydrate intake However, my anxiety before competitions compels me to check my bgs and do as much as possible to prevent extremes. Here is how things worked out this afternoon: 12:30 pm - During my AP Statistics class, I checked my blood sugar and it was 274. My nerves were already affecting my blood sugars, almost three hours before the meet! I gave myself a full correction bolus, and kept drinking lots of water to stay hydrated. 1 pm - I left school with the team and headed to the site of the race. 1:45 - After arriving at the race course, I checked my blood sugar again and it was 294. Time for more insulinand even though I should probably have held off on eating, I had my 1/2 peanut butter and jelly sandwich anyway. I continued to drink water. 2 pm - I munched on trail mix since I was still hungry; kept drinking water; too afraid to check my blood sugar again! 2:15 pm - Time to start warming up for the race. I to Continue reading >>

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