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Type 1 Diabetes And Chemotherapy

How Chemotherapy Can Affect Your Diabetes

How Chemotherapy Can Affect Your Diabetes

If you're struggling to find what you need, call our Support line on 0808 808 0000 (Monday to Friday, 9am-8pm) How chemotherapy can affect your diabetes How chemotherapy can affect your diabetes Need to talk? Call us free* 0808 808 00 00 Monday to Friday, 9am-8pm Chemotherapy is often used to treat cancer. When you have chemotherapy treatment, your blood sugar level may go too high or drop too low. This can happen because of the side effects of treatment. Side effects may include sickness, diarrhoea and loss of appetite. Some chemotherapy drugs can also affect your blood sugar level. Your cancer doctor can let you know if the drugs you are taking are likely to affect you. Some chemotherapy drugs can damage the nerves in your body. This can cause pain and changes in sensation. These effects can be worse if you already have nerve damage caused by diabetes. You will need to monitor your blood sugar more often during chemotherapy treatment. You may have to adjust the way you manage your diabetes. Your diabetes team can give you advice. It is important to let your doctors know how well you are managing to control your blood sugar level when you are having chemotherapy. They may be able to change the drug you are taking. Chemotherapy uses anti-cancer (cytotoxic) drugs to destroy cancer cells. Cytotoxic means toxic to cells. Cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs disrupt the way cancer cells grow and divide, but they also affect normal cells. These healthy cells can usually repair damage caused by chemotherapy but cancer cells cant and eventually die. Chemotherapy is often used to treat cancer. It is sometimes used on its own, but is commonly used in combination with other cancer treatments. This video provides a brief overview of chemotherapy treatment, how it can be given, how it wor Continue reading >>

Overcoming Treatment-induced Diabetes

Overcoming Treatment-induced Diabetes

Good nutrition is key Betty Overfelt's oncologist back home in Missouri informed her that she had stage IV small-cell lung cancer. His prognosis was grim — "I think I can get you three months if you'll take treatment," he said. Jerry, her husband of 45 years, decided immediately to seek a second opinion, which led them to Cancer Treatment Centers of America© (CTCA). There, Jerry remembered, doctors told Betty that they couldn't promise a cure but thought they might be able to control the cancer. Subsequent blood tests at CTCA delivered unexpected news — Betty had developed treatment-induced diabetes, in a big way. "We had just visited the pulmonologist and were waiting at the scheduler's desk when my cell phone rang," Jerry recalled. It was Sue, [the pulmonologist's nurse], who said, "Don't move; stay right there." Sue came to their location and told them Betty needed an immediate infusion of insulin. Her initial lab screening indicated a blood sugar of 863. Normal range is from 80 to 110, with above 500 signaling a critical situation. The diagnosis for diabetes was confusing because Betty never had diabetes, nor did it run in her family. The Overfelts were not alone — 8 to 18 percent of all cancer patients also have diabetes, according to CTCA. Type 1 diabetes is linked to cervical cancer and stomach cancer, and type 2 diabetes is linked to breast, endometrial, pancreatic, liver, kidney and colon cancers. Treatmentinduced diabetes can be triggered by chemotherapy and steroid use. "It is very overwhelming to a patient to be diagnosed with cancer, and then be told that they have diabetes as well," said Andrea Reser, RD, LD, nutrition supervisor/diabetes program coordinator at CTCA. "People need to know how to regulate their blood sugar while on a cancer-fighting d Continue reading >>

Folfiri Chemotherapy-induced Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Folfiri Chemotherapy-induced Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Received Date: September 02, 2016; Accepted Date: September 22, 2016; Published Date: September 28, 2016 Citation: Bello CT, Fonseca RC, Duarte JS, Vasconcelos C (2016) FOLFIRIChemotherapy-Induced Diabetic Ketoacidosis. J Clin Case Rep 6:863. doi:10.4172/2165-7920.1000863 Copyright: 2016 Bello CT, et al. This is an open-access article distributedunder the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permitsunrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided theoriginal author and source are credited. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a frequently encountered medical emergency that usually develops in the setting of severe insulin deficiency. It may be the initial clinical presentation of newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus; however, it is usually triggered by a severe medical illness or insulin therapy omission in patients with previously diagnosed diabetes mellitus. FOLFIRI (FOLinic acid, 5-fluorouracil and IRInotecan) is a systemic chemotherapy regiment frequently employed in the management of advanced colorectal carcinoma. Besides the common and well known hematological toxicity, 5-fluorouracil based chemotherapy has been associated with new onset diabetes and worsening glycemic control in known diabetics. The authors report on a case of DKA in a previously well-controlled type 2 diabetic patient upon exposure to FOLFIRI chemotherapy. Diabetes; Ketoacidosis; FOLFIRI; 5-Fluorouracil Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a frequent life-threatening condition developing in the setting of severe insulin deficiency accompanied by high contrarregulatory hormone levels (glucagon, catecholamines, cortisol and growth hormone). It is characterized by a high anion gap metabolic acidosis, hyperglycemia and elevated circulating ketone bodies. In the majority Continue reading >>

Management Of Diabetes In Patients With Cancer

Management Of Diabetes In Patients With Cancer

Introduction Fuelled by rapid urbanization leading to changes in obesity, diet and physical activity on the background of genetic predisposition, rising levels of type 2 diabetes worldwide appear to show no sign of abating.1,2 Although it is widely recognized that diabetes is associated with vascular complications, it is less well known that the condition is also associated with an increased risk of cancer, independent of its association with obesity.3–6 Cancer and diabetes are both common conditions, but their co-diagnosis in the same individual occurs more commonly than might be expected. Consensus statements from the American and European Diabetes and Oncology Associations report that observational data suggest a strong link between diabetes and breast, colorectal, endometrial, liver and pancreatic cancers.7 They suggest that the likely pathogenesis of this association is through hyperinsulinaemia, hyperglycaemia, inflammation and possibly some diabetes therapies. This article aims to review the management of diabetes in patients with cancer, discussing the challenges of anti-cancer therapies in patients with diabetes, the relative importance of glucose control in such patients, and the management of diabetes at the end of life. Many cancer chemotherapeutic regimes include glucocorticoids which may induce diabetes or exacerbate pre-existing diabetes. Other therapies, such as androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists for prostate cancer, are linked with increased risk of the development of type 2 diabetes, possibly due to loss of insulin sensitivity.8 Use of ADT in patients with pre-existing type 2 diabetes and prostate cancer leads to worsening glycaemic control over 2 years, along with increased insulin requirements.9 C Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management In Cancer Patients

Diabetes Management In Cancer Patients

Hyperglycemia is a common challenge during cancer treatment and palliation. In addition, many patients with pre-existing type 1 or type 2 diabetes undergoing cancer treatment develop iatrogenic hyperglycemia with unique features. The most common example is steroid-induced hyperglycemia,[1] but several other scenarios are common and clinically important (Table 1). Special considerations are often necessary regarding standard lifestyle recommendations, optimal choice of antidiabetic drug (Table 2), and goals of therapy.[2] In patients with active cancer, the focus of hyperglycemia management shifts from preventing long-term complications toward avoiding acute and subacute outcomes, such as dehydration from polyuria, infection, catabolic weight loss, hyperosmolar nonketotic states (HNK), and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA; Table 3).[3,4] It should be noted that the truly emergent conditions HNK and DKA are rare. The more common scenario of an asymptomatic severe elevation in blood glucose level (> 400 mg/dL, for example), although requiring a treatment plan with good hydration and close follow-up, does not typically require an emergency room visit or admission. Two representative clinical cases are presented here. Clinical Vignette #1 Corticosteroid-induced hyperglycemia A 53-year-old woman with a history of pre-diabetes and peripheral blood stem cell transplant for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) presented with asymptomatic elevated random blood glucose levels. After transplant she developed graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) with liver injury, which was treated with 60 mg of prednisone daily, tapered gradually to 20 mg daily at the time of presentation 2 months later. Random serum glucose level was 396 mg/dL. Previously, all serum glucose levels had been less than 160 mg/dL u Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cancer

Diabetes And Cancer

Tweet Studies have shown that diabetes carries an increased risk for a number of different forms of cancer. Having cancer with diabetes can make achieving good diabetes control much more difficult but this can be relieved to some extent. How is type 2 diabetes linked with cancer? One theory for why a link may exist is that high levels of circulating insulin (known as hyperinsulinemia) can promote the growth of tumours. In type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance commonly causes the body to produce more insulin than normal. Another reason why a link may be present is where a harmful lifestyle may lead to obesity and therefore higher risks of both type 2 diabetes and cancer. Cancer and type 2 diabetes The risks of contracting the following cancers are shown to be doubled by the presence of type 2 diabetes: Pancreatic cancer Endometrial cancer (also known as womb cancer) A smaller increased risk, of 20% to 50% is seen for the following forms of cancer. Colorectal cancer Bladder cancer Blood cancers (non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma) The one positive is that incidences of prostate cancer are actually lower for people with type 2 diabetes. Cancer and type 1 diabetes Links between type 1 diabetes and cancer are not so well recorded but it appears there is also an increase in risk of cancers for people with type 1 diabetes. The cancers with the highest increase in risk tended to be different to those noted in type 2 diabetes. The cancers with increased risk in type 1 diabetes include: Stomach cancer Cervical cancer What are the symptoms of cancer? The symptoms of cancer vary widely depending on which part of the body the cancer strikes. What treatment options are open for cancer? The main treatment options for cancer are surgery to remove the cancers or radiotherapy (also known as radiatio Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Chemotherapy

Type 1 Diabetes And Chemotherapy

Recently diagnosed with Stage 2 breast cancer, HER2+ which will likely require chemotherapy, surgery, radiation. Have had Type 1 diabetes, on insulin pump for 41 years, stage 3A kidney disease. I am concerned about kidneys and diabetes management, both high blood sugar from drugs, and low blood sugar from nausea and vomiting after taking insulin, during cancer treatment. I would appreciate insight from anyone who also has both conditions who has gone through treatment. try calling 800-227-2345 American Cancer Society for information or research .. talk to your oncono about this, and also with your other doctors, they will monitor your kidneys why you are going through chemo. I have had no problems so far and i am a chemo lifer I have discussed with my physicians and contacted ACS which are both good. Still hope to hear about reality from a patient's viewpoint about the challenges of avoiding and treating low and high blood sugars surrounding chemo. Insulin adjustments will likely be tricky. I start on chemo in a few weeks. Thanks. You may want to try posting on breastcancer.org. It is a website totally devoted to breast cancer. There more than likely will be more women on there that have diabetes and chemo or had it. I have had type1 diabetes for 46 years, dx'd with IDCcancer, stage 3 with lymph node involvement in Sept. 2014. I had 16 rounds of chemo, 33 radiations, lumpectomy and 6 lymph nodes removed. I just finished radiation appx. 5 weeks ago. I have to be honest, controlling my diabetes was very difficult. I worked with my family doctor increasing my Lantus massively the day of chemo and checked my blood many times a day. I tested in the 500's when I received chemo. I faxed my reading to my doctor who would then call and tell me how much to increase for each chem Continue reading >>

What Is The Relationship Between Breast Cancer And Diabetes?

What Is The Relationship Between Breast Cancer And Diabetes?

What is the relationship between breast cancer and diabetes? Survivors of breast cancer, who are post-menopausal, have a higher chance of developing diabetes. Scientists are becoming increasingly aware of an association between diabetes and cancer. In this article, we discuss the link. A study, published in Diabetologia, is the largest to observe the link between surviving breast cancer and eventually developing diabetes; it also showed that whether the patient went on to develop diabetes was closely associated with having undergone chemotherapy . The opposite interaction has also been observed: females with diabetes have a 20 percent chance of developing postmenopausal breast cancer. A study from last year demonstrated that people with diabetes over the age of 60 are more likely to develop breast cancer, compared with their counterparts without diabetes. Fast facts on breast cancer and diabetes: It has been observed that having diabetes increases the likelihood of breast cancer, and that having breast cancer increases the likelihood of developing diabetes. Lifestyle changes can help reduce risk long-term. How has the connection between breast cancer and diabetes been established? There has been increased study into the correlation of breast cancer and diabetes. The connection has been made as a result of improvements in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. As more women survive breast cancer, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the long-term outcomes for survivors as they grow older. However, few studies have tried to determine what the risk of developing diabetes is for a breast cancer survivor. The study in Diabetalogia is an example of the new research that has established the connection between breast cancer and diabetes more firmly. The team, Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Chemotherapy

Diabetes And Chemotherapy

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community My daughter has been diagnosed with an aggressive breast cancer and has started chemotherapy - There seems to be very little information at her hospital regarding how chemo affects diabetes or any helpful hints so does anyone have any advice for diabetics in her situation or can recommend any publications please. I am dreadfully sorry for your daughter and you too of course what a worrying time this is for all of you, and I hope and pray for a happy outcome. More and more people survive cancer nowadays and I hope that you are getting all the help that you need, including benefits, emotional and practical support, are you in contact with cancer help organisations, such as BACUP, etc? I suggest that you email/call around for advice. I have had cancer myself but was not diabetic at that time, so have no experience of chemotherapy and diabetes together. I just did a google search for you and there seem to be plenty of sites where you may be able to get some answers, ... arch&meta= At the time of my illness I had great support from various cancer charities, including (this used to be called Bristol Cancer Help Centre) and also from - you can even ask for financial support from this organisation, eg grants to help with heating bills, etc, another one is ... withcancer so do look around, there is plenty of help for people in your daughters situation. Dont be too shy or embarrassed to ask for help and advice, you are entitled to it, and this is definitely a time when you need to Continue reading >>

How Does Having Diabetes Affect My Cancer Treatment?

How Does Having Diabetes Affect My Cancer Treatment?

More than 25 million people in the United States have been diagnosed with diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Among people 65 and older, nearly 27 percent have diabetes. The vast majority of diabetes cases are type 2 diabetes, which is associated largely with older age and being overweight as well as family history. Older age and obesity also are risk factors for developing cancer, which means that people with type 2 diabetes are diagnosed with cancer more often than those in the general population. Having diabetes can complicate cancer treatment due to a number of factors. At the same time, some treatments for cancer, including certain newer targeted therapy drugs, can spur the development of diabetes, especially in patients who already had a propensity toward developing the disease, although this effect is usually reversible. Azeez Farooki is a Memorial Sloan Kettering endocrinologist who specializes in treating cancer patients who also have diabetes. We spoke with Dr. Farooki about what special considerations are taken into account when treating this group of patients. A Disease of Blood Sugar “Diabetes is a disease in which a person has increased levels of glucose, or sugar, in the blood,” Dr. Farooki explains. “It can occur because the pancreas does not produce enough insulin — the hormone that allows glucose to be absorbed — or because cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced. Cells should normally take in sugar from the blood; if they don’t, then high blood sugar or ‘hyperglycemia’ results.” The majority of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight, which often causes the body to become resistant to the effects of insulin. Type 2 disease may be treated with insulin injections, other hormonal inject Continue reading >>

Clinical Challenges In Caring For Patients With Diabetes And Cancer

Clinical Challenges In Caring For Patients With Diabetes And Cancer

Abstract In Brief Diabetes and cancer are two diagnoses that individually overwhelm both patients and clinicians. Approximately 8–18% of people with cancer have diabetes. Together, these two diseases can pose formidable challenges to clinicians caring for this difficult patient population. Unfortunately, our knowledge of this topic is limited by insufficient evidence to determine how best to manage diabetes while simultaneously treating cancer. This article seeks to review some of the most common problems encountered by clinicians caring for these patients. Diabetes and cancer are two diagnoses that individually overwhelm both patients and clinicians. Approximately 8–18% of people with cancer have diabetes.1 Together, these two diseases can pose formidable challenges to clinicians caring for this difficult patient population. Unfortunately, our knowledge of this topic is limited by insufficient evidence to determine how best to manage diabetes while simultaneously treating cancer. This article seeks to review some of the most common problems encountered by clinicians caring for these patients. Cancer Screening and Prevention Several studies published within the past decade demonstrate that patients with a chronic disease are less likely to receive preventive services, such as cancer screenings, than their counterparts without diabetes.2–5 A recent retrospective study addressed cancer screening in patients with diabetes.6 After examining the mammography rates of 69,168 Canadian women with diabetes and 663,519 Canadian women without diabetes, the authors concluded that patients with complex chronic diseases are 32% less likely to receive this routine cancer screening, even though they see primary care and specialty physicians more frequently than their counterparts Continue reading >>

My Life With Cancer & Diabetes

My Life With Cancer & Diabetes

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. This upcoming Sunday is National Cancer Survivors Day , a worldwide observance the first Sunday in June, dedicated to "showing the world that life after a cancer diagnosis can be meaningful and productive." We almost hate to mention it, but there is some question about a possible link between cancer and diabetes and there are many people out there dealing with both. There's no real proof that one causes the other, yet there are a lot of studies linking the two . Results suggest that anywhere from 8 to 18% of people with cancer also have diabetes. One recent study published in Diabetes Care showed that 16 out of every 100 men with diabetes and 17 out of every 100 women with diabetes said they had cancer, compared to just 7 out of 100 men and 10 out of 100 women without diabetes. So maybe there is some connection...? We're not pointing this out to scare anybody, but rather to pay homage to the folks who are dealing with both illnesses. Despite the stats cited, there's hardly any available literature on treating this combination. One of the few things we found was a 2006 Diabetes Spectrum article by Helen Psarakis, a diabetes nurse practitioner at Yale New Haven Hospital. She states that cancer patients who are on glucocorticoids a steroid used in short term, high-dose chemo treatments often suffer with high blood sugar. In fact, patients at risk for diabetes who begin taking glucocorticoids during cancer treatment are often quickly diagnosed with diabetes too. Insulin is recommended to treat steroid-induced blood sugar, as patients "may require two to three times their usual dose(s) of insulin." Woah. Helen points out a f Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Chemotherapy

Diabetes And Chemotherapy

If you have diabetes, your blood sugar may need closer monitoring while you are having treatment. Chemotherapy can make you feel sick or be sick. You might not want to eat and this can be a problem. If you can't eat, your blood sugar could drop too low causing: faintness sweating coma This is called a hypoglycaemic attack. You and your doctor might need to plan chemotherapy a bit more carefully than would be necessary if you weren’t diabetic. Some chemotherapy combinations include steroids and these might upset your sugar balance. It might be a good idea for you and your cancer doctor to talk to your diabetes specialist. Types of diabetes There are 2 different types of diabetes. How you manage it depends on the type you have: type 1 – you need to have regular insulin injections or an insulin pump type 2 – you may be able to control it with either diet or with a combination of diet and tablets. There are some people with type 2 diabetes who also need to have insulin injections Type 1 diabetes If you are dependent on insulin, your doctor may suggest that you have the first course of chemotherapy in hospital so that the nurses can keep an eye on you. Then, if you need sugar quickly, you can have it through a drip rather than by mouth. It's possible for you to have insulin and a sugar solution (dextrose) given together through a drip in hospital. The insulin dose is based on hourly or 2 hourly blood sugar tests. But most people don't need this. If you are unable to eat your normal diet when you are at home, you may find you need to check your blood sugar a bit more often than you usually would. Type 2 diabetes If you control your diabetes with diet or tablets it should be possible to manage it during chemotherapy without too many problems. Discuss the options with you Continue reading >>

Chemotherapy And Glycemic Control In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes And Cancer: A Comparative Case Analysis

Chemotherapy And Glycemic Control In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes And Cancer: A Comparative Case Analysis

Chemotherapy and Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Cancer: A Comparative Case Analysis Denise Soltow Hershey , PhD, RN, FNP-BC1 and Sarah Hession 2 1College of Nursing, Michigan State University, MI, USA 2Center for Statistical Training and Consulting, Michigan State University, MI, USA Corresponding author: Denise Soltow Hershey, College of Nursing, Michigan State University, MI, USA Tel: (517) 432-8294 E-mail: [email protected] Received 2017 Feb 24; Accepted 2017 Mar 26. Copyright : 2017 Ann & Joshua Medical Publishing Co. Ltd This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Individuals with diabetes who develop cancer have a worse 5-year overall survival rate and are more likely to develop an infection and/or be hospitalized when compared to those without diabetes. Patients with diabetes and cancer receiving chemotherapy have an increased risk for developing glycemic issues. The relationship between chemotherapy and glycemic control is not completely understood. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between glycemic control, symptoms, physical and mental function, development of adverse events, and chemotherapy reductions or stoppages in adults with Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cancer. A prospective 12-week longitudinal cohort study recruited 24 adults with T2D, solid tumor cancer, or lymphoma receiving outpatient intravenous chemotherapy. Eighteen individuals completed baseline data and were included in the analysis. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Chemotherapy - Breast Cancer Care Forum - 804230

Type 1 Diabetes And Chemotherapy - Breast Cancer Care Forum - 804230

Hope everything has gone well for you with the chemo. Do you have a diabetes nurse to speak to about your treatment? It is really difficult to keep blood sugars down if you are having steroids which I expect you are. As you probably know the steroids make you insulin resistant so you need more insulin either with food or without. I was surprised how much more insulin was needed but I remember the same happened during pregnancy, that is needing much more insulin. It's very nerve racking to just give a lot more though, isn't it?Especially in a short space of time, like 6 hours after chemo and suddenly you need a large dose increase. My level went up to 18 the first time. I kept giving more insulin and nothing happened, so I kept giving more until it eventually came down and then increased the base rate. I think I'd go carefully and request an appointmnt with a diabetes specialist. My diabetes nurse said to reduce dosage after the last steroid dosage as requirements drop quite rapidly. I have found so far that I have dropped the dosage from quadruple to double24hr after the laststeroid dose, and kept a close eye and reduced basal insulin quite quickly to prevent hypos. But we're all different and I think you should have been offered some help.You can always have an extra bolus if sugars are running high. Thanks for your help. Obviously you're working during the radiotherapy so you went back really quickly, I don't think they're expecting me back until the radiotherapy is finished. I was just wondering if it might take longer than that to feel up to it, but sounds like you are feeling well enough during the process, so that's good. I'm part time anyway so should easilybe ok to go back quite soon after theradiotherapyif your experience is fairly typical. Mind you, it's diff Continue reading >>

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