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Type 1 Diabetes And Birthday Parties

Party Food For Child With Type 1 Diabetes14

Party Food For Child With Type 1 Diabetes14

Dd's best friend has recently been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and Dd's tenth birthday is coming up. She wants to have a sleepover and we want to make the whole thing as easy as possible for her friend to attend. I have spoken to her mum and we have come up with the option of staying all evening then being picked up at ten and coming back for breakfast in the morning if they don't feel spending the night is going to work (they're still getting used to lots of stuff as you can imagine). I want the party food to be easy for her to access without making her feel she is having to have anything different. So basically, any suggestions? I am a good cook and up for a challenge. I expect they still are working things out, so you are best guided by mum and them by their specialist nurse. Basically t1 diabetics can eat anything they like - they just put in insulin to Cover the carbs. The family might not even be carb counting yet, so work with mum on it. Have the usual. I would go steady on the very sugary things, as from experience my son gets high blood sugars. However, good to have some more on hand in case of hypos - there might be a few of thos with charging round, but no worry (we have not yet managed a sleepover for Ds, as his bloods plummet with the excitement and the lovely hosts can't get enough sugars into him to keep him 'up'!). Lots of my friends t1 kids have had great sleepovers, however. Would also be a good idea to have some low/ zero carb snacks on hand in case levels go high - things like sugar free jelly or meaty snacks. Have a lovely time. You are very wonderful to want this little one still to be able to be a little child. People like you help to make our worlds go round when they are starting to crash around our ears. X If her friend is on MDI she will h Continue reading >>

Our First Year With Diabetes

Our First Year With Diabetes

When my 7-year-old son was diagnosed with diabetes, I had no idea how dramatically the disease would impact our entire family. My sweet son, Malik, was 7 when he had the flu, just as our whole family did. But he didn't get better: He was extremely tired, constantly thirsty, wetting the bed, and losing weight (even though he wanted to eat all the time). I could explain away each of these problems, but when I saw how frail Malik looked, I Googled his symptoms, and they were classic signs of type 1 diabetes (T1D). I left a frantic message for my pediatrician in the middle of the night, which I instantly regretted: I was being an annoying mother, trying to diagnose my own son. But the doctor walked into the exam room the next morning, took one look at Malik, tested his urine and blood, and then called for an ambulance. Malik was admitted to the ICU, where, after a terrifying flurry of activity, doctors confirmed that he did in fact have T1D. About 3 million other Americans are living with T1D and roughly 10 percent of them are children or adolescents (it was previously known as juvenile diabetes, because it's usually diagnosed in kids). There's no cure for this autoimmune disease, which occurs when the body does not produce any insulin, the hormone needed to convert sugar in food into energy. (T1D is different from type 2 diabetes, the more common type, in which the body doesn't respond properly to insulin or doesn't produce enough of it.) When a child has T1D, his blood- glucose (sugar) levels must be checked several times a day. Based on those readings, he eats, modifies activity, or takes insulin to keep his glucose at a healthy level. Otherwise serious complications can develop. This is what landed Malik in the ICU: He had diabetic ketoacidosis, which occurs when your Continue reading >>

Birthday Cake: | Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center

Birthday Cake: | Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center

That is the question frequently asked of Berrie Center Cliniciansoften by parents of recently diagnosed children with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Many parents associate birthday parties, not as a symbol of celebration (as their children undoubtedly do), but as a carbohydrate extravaganza, and a scary sign of impending high blood sugars to come due to the food servedfrom pizza to cake with frosting. So is there a correct answer to the birthday cake question? The conventional wisdom at the Berrie Center, according to Dr. Mary Pat Gallagher , a pediatric endocrinologist, is to Let them eat cake. We want our kids to be healthy, but we also want them to have normal psychosocial development too. No one should have cake three times a day, but its OK for your child to have a piece of cake at a special occasion like a birthday party. You want your child to have normal experiences. Children with diabetes feel so different already. That is not to say that your childs blood sugar wont rise after having a piece of birthday cake. In fact, it probably will, said the Berrie Centers Kira Almeida , who is the pediatric nutritionist and a diabetes educator: One high blood sugar isnt going to do any lasting damage, she added, especially if the childs blood sugars are normally well controlled. What you really need to know, Kira said, is how many carbohydrates are in that piece of cakeand then give the appropriate amount of insulin in advance. (See belowto read the Centers informative flyer titled, Lets Eat Cake).There isnt anything, within reason, that cant be covered with more insulin, said Kira. And hopefully you can avoid highs altogether, if you hit the correct insulin dosing. Berrie Center clinicians draw the line at the willy-nilly drinking of sodas and fruit juice, which they consider em Continue reading >>

Yes. Type 1 Diabetics Can Attend Birthday Parties - Pieces Of A Mom

Yes. Type 1 Diabetics Can Attend Birthday Parties - Pieces Of A Mom

Yes. Type 1 Diabetics Can Attend Birthday Parties What? My daughter isn't invited to the party because she can't have sugar? There are a lot of misconceptions when it comes to diabetes. One of the most common is that diabetics are not permitted to have sugar. While diabetics do need to closely monitor their sugar intake and be aware of what foods cause a rise in blood sugar, they do not have to forego sugar altogether. My daughter was recently excluded from a birthday party for having diabetes. At least that's my assumption. I can think of no other logical reason since most of her other female classmates were included. While I don't expect everyone who comes in contact with my daughter to know or understand the ins and outs of dealing with this complex medical condition, I do expect everyone to have some compassion. We try very hard as a family to keep life as normal as we possibly can for Harper. Whenever possible we allow her the same freedoms that any other child has. She goes to playdates, participates in sports, enjoys ice cream on a hot day, eats cupcakes and other treats when celebrating a friend's birthday. The only difference is that she does it all with the help of insulin injections. Children with type 1 diabetes are painfully aware of how different they are from their peers. The constant monitoring of their blood sugar and the trips to the nurses office throughout the day for carb counting and insulin injections make it difficult to forget that you are not like the others. So, when my husband and daughter and I strive to create normalcy for Harper and in a matter of moments another parent rips that normalcy away and reminds my child that she is indeed not in the majority, I take offense to that kind of treatment. It's unnecessary, and it's irresponsible. A Continue reading >>

How To Throw A Diabetic-friendly Kids Birthday Party

How To Throw A Diabetic-friendly Kids Birthday Party

How To Throw A Diabetic-Friendly Kids Birthday Party How to Throw a Diabetic-Friendly Kids Birthday Party For children with diabetes, participating in birthday parties poses certain risks. Whether you're turning five or 50, birthdays are a time to celebrate. This is especially true for children, as birthday parties often become some of their favorite memories. For children with diabetes, though, participating in these festivities poses certain risks, with the customary array of carb-heavy treats and, of course, the birthday cake itself. If you have a child with diabetes, you've likely taught him or her that they can enjoy all kinds of activities if they take the proper precautions, and birthday celebrations should be no exception. Here is how you can throw a diabetic-friendly birthday party for your little one. People with diabetes can still have a certain amount of carbohydratesin fact, the body needs carbohydrates to function. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) suggests that when someone with diabetes does reach for carbs, he or she should have smaller portions of foods that are rich in nutrients. Provide kids with veggies and hummus dip as party snacks. Keep this in mind when providing party guests with meals and snacks. Serving healthy low-carb foods and diabetic-friendly recipes will not only allow your child to better manage his or her glucose levels, but it also leaves room in their diet to enjoy a little cake later. Here are a few healthy options to include on your snack table: "Ants on a log"celery sticks smeared with peanut butter and topped with raisins Turkey slices on crackers (choose crackers carefully; look for whole grains and fewer carbs) A birthday party just isn't complete without a cake. How else will the birthday boy or girl make his or her wi Continue reading >>

Ordinary Lovely: So You've Invited A Type 1 Diabetic To A Birthday Party... What Now?? (diabetes Awareness Month)

Ordinary Lovely: So You've Invited A Type 1 Diabetic To A Birthday Party... What Now?? (diabetes Awareness Month)

So You've Invited a Type 1 Diabetic to a Birthday Party... What Now?? (Diabetes Awareness Month) November is National Diabetes Awareness Month. Each week I'll be featuring a diabetes-related post. Anything specific you'd like to read about? Let me know! A blogger friend, Ann-Marie , asked a great question regarding hosting a party or event that a child with type 1 diabetes would be attending. Thanks, Ann-Marie! It was so thoughtful of you to ask for suggestions on how to help a family with this specific need! cupcake image from publicdomainpictures.net I have to be honest, if I was to give you a list of the things that are trickiest to navigate with a type 1 diabetic child, partieswould be very close to the top. Perhaps other t1d moms would answer differently, but for me, buffets and tables filled with snacks for the taking are kind of a nightmare. Snacking and drinking go hand in hand with mixing and mingling, but the carbohydrates consumed while "grazing" as it were, are very tricky to keep track of, especially when a child is running around and enjoying all that a party has to offer! But I have children, and I know what it's like to host and attend large-scale parties with lots of kiddos, so I know that buffets will never go away! Busy hostesses know that snacks and buffets are theway to serve a crowd without going crazy, right? On top of all that, children (and adults) with diabetes have to learn to live and be healthy in the real world (which includes parties and buffets!) so in my mind, there's really less that a hostess has to worry about and more that we have to do to educate and train our child. Instead of expecting a party to be catered to our diabetic's needs or turning down invitations to parties that don't have a pre-planned menu for a sit-down meal, Russ Continue reading >>

The 5 Most Common Party Foods And What It Means For Blood Sugar Management

The 5 Most Common Party Foods And What It Means For Blood Sugar Management

Note: This is part of our library of resources on Food. Learn more about dietary recommendations from nutritionists and foodies alike on our Food page! From the birthday party to the end-of-school-year pizza party, these celebratory events often come with a selection of food that is not always the healthiest. While having Type 1 diabetes does not exclude you from eating a confetti-covered cupcake or that slice of pizza that is the staple of most school gatherings; it does mean however that you’ll be presented with foods that can make managing T1D all that more challenging. We wanted to know how these five common party foods affect BGLs, so we looked at the daily nutritional value closely of the following foods: 1 frosted vanilla cupcake 1 slice of traditional pizza 1 scoop of Baskin Robin’s chocolate chip cookie dough ice cream 1 can of Sprite soda an individual bag of Lay’s original potato chips compared to 1 serving of raw carrots We found that these typical party foods can make managing Type 1 (or Type 2) diabetes more difficult because of the high amounts of the following ingredients: Sodium Saturated fats LDL Cholesterol Refined sugars Carbohydrates That is not to say, if you have Type 1 you should only eat raw veggies, while the others enjoy the common treats. You should, however, be aware of what these typical snacks do to blood sugar and why. Knowing more about how food affects physiology will aid you in adjusting insulin and help you prepare for optimal blood sugar control. Sodium Most commonly found in the form of sodium chloride or “table salt,” this element is crucial for bodily functions. The NIH explains that “The body uses sodium to control blood pressure and blood volume. Your body also needs sodium for your muscles and nerves to work properl Continue reading >>

Managing Type 1 Diabetes At Birthday Parties

Managing Type 1 Diabetes At Birthday Parties

Home Diabetes Overview Articles Diabetes and children Managing type 1 diabetes at birthday parties Managing type 1 diabetes at birthday parties Group of children celebrating birthday and blowing birthday candles together. Yes, we know the very thought of your child going off to a party at someone elses home may at first fill you with horror: away from your control, over-excited, distracted by all the fun, and surrounded by an abundance of enticing high sugar and high carb treats. But you can managing type 1 diabetes at birthday parties. Let us explain. A kid with diabetes is first and foremost a kid. And kids LOVE birthday parties! Try to relax. With a bit of planning, plus collaboration with the healthcare team, your child can safely include birthday parties as part of their childhood experiences. Call the parent host and find out what is planned for the party. Take notes as you chat. Ask what time the food will be served, and whether there will be any physical activities prior to or following the food. Check what sort of food and beverages are planned. Offer to provide a platter of snacks that you know your child loves. For example, perhaps fajita roll-ups filled with low-fat cream cheese and salsa, or a platter of sugar-free dessert snacks. You could also offer to bring a pitcher of your special homemade lemonade, with berries floating in it. This is preferable to sending special food for your child alone, which can make a child stand out and feel uncomfortable. Your child can enjoy these snacks along with their friends, without unsettling their blood glucose levels. Reassure the host that you will be close by and available by phone the entire time. If this will be your childs first birthday party, ask if it would make the host feel more comfortable to have you ther Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Challenges For Parents Of Type 1 Diabetics - Get Real Health

The Top 10 Challenges For Parents Of Type 1 Diabetics - Get Real Health

A childs type 1 diabetes diagnosis brings with it a variety of challenges for parents.From kids sneaking candy to skipping insulin injections in an effort to just be normal, the trials are numerous for parents of type 1 diabetics. According to the American Diabetes Association, more than 200,000 American children are living with juvenile diabetes, also known as type 1 diabetes. In an effort to raise awareness and ease parents minds during Juvenile Diabetes Month and all year long, we have solutions to 10 of the most common challenges parents of type 1 diabetics face. Navigating the sea of candy that flows at school events and friends birthday parties is tough, and adhering to dietary guidelines that may preclude piatas can be difficult for a kid. Especially since no parents wants their children to feel like the odd man out at celebrations. But diabetes-friendly alternatives help. We would frequently drop off low-carb-but-still-yummy alternatives for our daughter at birthday or school parties, says Red Maxwell, whose daughter Cassie, now 17, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at 18 months old. Often my wife would make enough for the whole class. Some of the moms would even make or bake a treat especially for Cassie. Kids with diabetes dont want to stand out or be perceived as different during recess, on the bus or whenever peers are around. By taking a direct approach when hurtful questions are asked, children can prevent (or stop) hurtful situations from arising. We teamed up to bring in a diabetes educator, recommended by my sons physician, to teach the whole class about type 1 diabetes, including issues like what it is, how it works and how its managed, says Robin Wiener , a Rockville, Maryland, mom whose son Ben was diagnosed at age 11. The kids saw how Ben checks h Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Party Food

Eating With Diabetes: Party Food

Birthday parties, holidays and other social events provide ample opportunity to relax and have a great time with friends and family. Attending a party when you're trying to lose weight is hard enough; for many people with diabetes, an invitation to a party can be even more stressful. The underlying cause of all the worry is usually not the people or the event itself, but the food. Good food. Food that "a diabetic shouldn't eat." As a result, something that should be fun turns into a reason to panic. Relax. By planning ahead and applying some smart strategies when making food choices, it is absolutely possible for people with diabetes to live it up at any party or social event (without giving up on your diabetes-management goals). Most people expect to indulge at a party. This is not desirable for anyone who is trying to manage their weight, but it can be especially problematic for people with diabetes since overeating can lead to high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). In the short term, high blood sugar can cause fatigue, nausea, headaches, and a host of other miserable symptoms that will put a damper on your evening. In the long term, high blood sugar damages blood vessels and nerves. This damage, with time, causes the serious complications of diabetes : blindness, kidney failure, amputations, heart attacks, and strokes. However, avoiding overeating at a party is easier said than done. Taking a few extra precautions ahead of time can help reduce temptation. Try: Doing some extra exercise before the event. Exercise lowers blood glucose levels and slightly increases the number of calories the body burns for a period of time afterward. For many, it may also help curb appetite since the digestive track slows during exercise as blood flow is diverted to other areas of the body Continue reading >>

New Resource Helps Teachers Keep Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Safe

New Resource Helps Teachers Keep Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Safe

New resource helps teachers keep kids with type 1 diabetes safe Parents of kids with type 1 diabetes live in fear of their kids blood sugar dipping too low at school. A new resource is here to help. One day, when Trudy Adams son, Dylan, was lying down for his afternoon rest period in junior kindergarten , he began convulsing and lost consciousness. Dylan has type 1 diabetes , and this was exactly the kind of crisis his parents feared when they sent him off to school: Dylans blood sugar had dropped so low he needed a life-saving injection of a medication called glucagon, which wasnt on hand, since school personnel had been reluctant to learn how to administer it. Thankfully, Dylans dad, who got to school faster than the ambulances, was able to give the shot, and Dylan bounced back. Adams is one of many parentswho worries about their diabetic kid every day. One in every 300 Canadian kids has type 1 diabetes, and according to new survey data released by the Canadian Paediatric Society, the Childrens Hospital of Eastern Ontario, and the Hospital for Sick Children, nearly one-third of Ontario parents whose kids have the condition arent confident the school staff can keep their kids safe, and nearly 13 percent have to go to school at least once a week to monitor their childs care. However, a new online resource for parents and school staff should help prevent near-misses like Dylans, while providing peace of mind for the parents of kids with type 1. Intended to ensure kids with the condition can participate fully and safely in all aspects of school life, [email protected] features accurate, easy-to-digest lessons on topics like how to recognize and treat hypoglycaemia, as well as a just-launched series of engaging animated videos . All of the content carries the authority of h Continue reading >>

Birthday Parties And Type 1 Diabetes

Birthday Parties And Type 1 Diabetes

Brought to you by Lilly Diabetes | Disney We just had a huge party at our house this last weekend. It was a ton of work, but it really paid off. We had about sixty guests, half adults and half kids, come for a birthday party and really, it couldnt have gone better. While youll have to excuse my rosy sentiments (I am writing even as we are still cleaning up!), Im just so thrilled to realize that our successful little party was very diabetes-friendly! I get asked often what makes something diabetes-friendly. Often, Ill get a question on social media about what to feed kids with diabetes or how to handle social occasions where kids with type 1 will be present. The simple answer is that, thanks in large measure to modern insulin regimens, kids with type 1 can eat and do pretty much what any other kid can do. But most of the time, the people who ask me these questions are looking for ways to make the experience easier for the kids with diabetes and their parents. And I have a hard time coming up with specifics. But I think Ive finally hit on something that might help a prospective host somewhere out there. A diabetes-friendly party is one that doesnt have to be all about the treats. One of James little friends was recently invited to a candy party. The theme was candy. The decorations were adorable hey, candy is cute and tasty. But the activity was eating candy. I cant say my kids wouldnt have loved attending that party, but it just isnt diabetes-friendly. Its all about the food, particularly a food that is inherently unhealthy. In my mind, there is a distinction between offering cupcakes and having open access to candy snacks. The parties at which weve felt most at home have always had activities that werent centered on food. In my experience, happily playing kids are too Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Is On The Rise In Kids: Here’s What Parents Need To Know

Type 1 Diabetes Is On The Rise In Kids: Here’s What Parents Need To Know

More kids are being diagnosed with juvenile diabetes. Here’s how to manage the disease and keep your kid healthy. Photo: iStockphoto “We just thought he had a stomach bug,” Rebecca Cook recalls, thinking back to the day two years ago when her only child, 10-month-old Theo, became ill. “He was throwing up, seemed really thirsty and was peeing a lot.” But then Theo took a turn for the worse. “He started doing this strange breathing pattern and he was actually borderline unconscious.” Cook and her husband called the public health nurse who got an ambulance to bring their limp, non-responsive son to Janeway Children’s Health & Rehabilitation Centre ER in St. John’s. A blood test conducted by the paramedics revealed that Theo had type 1 diabetes. His extreme thirst and vomiting were classic signs of the disease, which can also include symptoms such as extreme tiredness, frequent urination and sudden weight loss despite constant hunger. Rogers Media uses cookies for personalization, to customize its online advertisements, and for other purposes. Learn more or change your cookie preferences. Rogers Media supports the Digital Advertising Alliance principles. By continuing to use our service, you agree to our use of cookies. We use cookies (why?) You can change cookie preferences. Continued site use signifies consent. Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:00 Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE Remaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate 1 Chapters Chapters descriptions off, selected Descriptions subtitles off, selected Subtitles captions settings, opens captions settings dialog captions off, selected Captions Audio Track Fullscreen This is a modal window. Captions Settings Dialog Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Discussion: Type 1 Kids & Birthday Parties

Diabetes Discussion: Type 1 Kids & Birthday Parties

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. Ever wish there was someone to ask all those pressing, confounding, and disconcerting questions about life with diabetes? Someone who really "gets it"? Well, now there is! If you haven't discovered our diabetes advice column Ask D'Mine yet, now is your chance to jump in! This Saturday series is hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and community educator Wil Dubois. {Need help navigating life with diabetes? Email us at [email protected] } Laura from Arizona, type 3, sends us this reach-for-the-Kleenex tale: I have a question about what is the best site for foods for an 8-year-old girl who was just diagnosed last week. I am sorry, I am just so angry! I grew up caring and watching over my father who has had type 1 for 52 years (he is amazing), but when this happened to my little sweetheart niece I about died. She was doing wonderful in this past week, started giving her own injections, guessing her numbers while she checked her bloodjust amazing to see. But she just went to her first birthday party over the weekend and could not eat chips, dips, cake or drink the punch and sodas like all the other kiddos were doing. This is when it all hit her. She has changed, she has to think about what she eats, she has to plan ahead... Her 9th birthday is right around the corner and she told her mom that she does not want to have a party. I need to find a place where we can see the nutrition info; and isn't there some way to make a yummy birthday cake for her?!? I want her to have an amazing birthday, one that she deserves to have. I will be forever grateful for any information you can give me. [email protected] D'Mine answers: Your Continue reading >>

Our Best Birthday Cakes

Our Best Birthday Cakes

Diabetic Living / Diabetic Recipes / Dessert Make a wish! What better way to celebrate another year than with a delicious birthday cake? Here are some of our favorite kid-friendly diabetic birthday cakes, plus delicious treats that will bring out the kid in you. Surprise! Yes, this red velvet cupcake recipe is diabetes-friendly and makes perfect personalized cupcakes for any special occasion, including birthdays and weddings. Diabetes Recipes , Diabetes Desserts , Popular Diabetic Recipes Our cute cupcake critter is crawling by to wish your wee ones a happy birthday. Kids will love to help decorate this low-carb, low-cal treat with their birthday party guests. Diabetes Recipes , Diabetes Desserts , Popular Diabetic Recipes You'll feel like a kid again with our diabetes-friendly version of this ice cream parlor favorite. As fun as it is scrumptious, this cake is also low in calories -- even with a cherry on top. Diabetes Recipes , Diabetes Desserts , Popular Diabetic Recipes Bejeweled cookies are the key to this regal diabetic dessert. Customize the shapes and colors to please any birthday royalty, be it king, queen, prince, or princess! Diabetes Recipes , Diabetes Desserts , Popular Diabetic Recipes Surprise! Your birthday guests will be delighted to discover that concealed inside these charming sprinkle cones are actually low-carb cupcakes with a delicious strawberry filling. Diabetes Recipes , Diabetes Desserts , Popular Diabetic Recipes Brighten up a birthday with this light and fluffy cake The zesty lemon-flavored whipped topping will delight your guests and keep the party going! Diabetes Recipes , Diabetes Desserts , Popular Diabetic Recipes Juicy raspberries, rich mocha ice cream, and moist brownies stack up to create a truly decadent reduced-calorie dessert. Thi Continue reading >>

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