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Type 1 Diabetes Always Hungry

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

Diabetes is sneaky. The early symptoms can go unnoticed for months or years. In fact, 1 in 3 people with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it. 1 in 3. Most actually do experience the early signs but don’t realise or understand what they are. Early detection and treatment can have a profound impact on your long-term health. A 3-year delay in diagnosis increases your relative risk of heart disease by 29% (1). Therefore by knowing what to look for, you can take control of the situation before it takes control of you. Diabetes Symptoms In Adults and Children Diabetes is the term given to blood sugar (glucose) levels that are too high for a sustained period of time. The signs or symptoms of high blood sugar are typically the same for both children and adults. Patients with type 1 diabetes usually develop symptoms over a sudden, short period of time. The condition is often diagnosed in an emergency setting. Type 2 diabetes on the other hand progresses quite slowly. Symptoms tend to come on gradually, which is why they are often overlooked. Some don’t experience any early symptoms at all. The following early signs of diabetes are the most common: 1. Increased urination is arguably the most common A significant increase in how often you urinate (Polyuria) is a tell-tale symptom of high blood sugar. As a point of reference, the average person pees 4 to 7 times in a 24-hour period. Waking up during the night to go, even though you already went right before bed, is a common red flag. Why does this happen?: Your kidneys are working overtime to expel the excess sugar in your blood. Sugar that the kidneys are unable to absorb must be urinated out. Therefore high sugar levels leads to more urination. 2. Excessive thirst is one of the classic early signs of diabetes Drinking u Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar And Hungry

High Blood Sugar And Hungry

Parents of kids with type 1 diabetes know that there are some times when you’ll have to ask your child to put off eating. But what do you do when she’s begging for that yummy treat in the cupboard just beyond her reach? Here are some of the things that have worked for us: Distraction. Usually the best option for us to keep Kaitlyn from wanting to eat when she has a high blood sugar level is to distract her with something else she wants to do. I realize that this strategy may not work forever, but for my little 5-year-old, playing with a favorite toy or watching a TV show can go a long way in keeping her from wanting to eat for a while. Water. A lot of times, giving Kaitlyn a big drink of water will do the trick. Drinking water is a healthy option, and it makes her feel a lot better too. Zero-carb or low-carb snacks. Some of Kaitlyn’s favorite snacks to have when she has a high blood sugar level are cheese, lunch meat, eggs, bacon, nuts, sugar-free Jell-O®, vegetables, and cottage cheese. A plate full of Daddy’s “cheesy eggs” are always a big hit with her and fill her tummy nicely. Save it for later. Sometimes when Kaitlyn says she’s hungry, she’s not really that hungry, but wants to eat something yummy she just saw. (I think a lot of us can relate on this one!) Usually in this case, I’ll grab a baggie for her to keep the snack for later. Sometimes I’ll put a ribbon around the top or a cute sticker on the bag, and she’ll carry it around for a while until I tell her it’s ok to eat it. As much as we try to keep Kaitlyn’s blood sugar in a good range, highs just happen sometimes. We try to be careful about getting her back in range quickly, and it’s easier when Kaitlyn cooperates! Disclaimer: The experiences and suggestions recounted in these art Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: Early Signs, Advanced Symptoms, And More

Diabetes Symptoms: Early Signs, Advanced Symptoms, And More

Diabetes symptoms may occur when blood sugar levels in the body become abnormally elevated. The most common symptoms of diabetes include: increased thirst increased hunger excessive fatigue increased urination, especially at night blurry vision Symptoms can vary from one person to the next. They also depend on which type of diabetes you have. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes tend to begin abruptly and dramatically. Type 1 diabetes is most often seen in children, adolescents, and young adults. However, type 1 diabetes can develop at any age. In addition to the symptoms listed above, people with type 1 diabetes may notice a quick and sudden weight loss. Type 2 diabetes is the most common type. Although it primarily develops in adults, it’s beginning to be seen more frequently in younger people. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include being overweight, being sedentary, and having a family history of type 2 diabetes. Many people with type 2 diabetes don’t experience any symptoms. Sometimes, these symptoms are slow to develop. Oftentimes, your symptoms may seem harmless. The most common symptoms of diabetes, such as persistent thirst and fatigue, are often vague. When experienced on their own, symptoms such as these may not be anything to worry about. If you’re experiencing one or more of these symptoms, you should speak with your doctor about being screened for diabetes. Frequent thirst You’ve had glass after glass of water, but you still feel like you need more. This is because your muscles and other tissues are dehydrated. When your blood sugar levels rise, your body tries to pull fluid from other tissues to dilute the sugar in your bloodstream. This process can cause your body to dehydrate, prompting you to drink more water. Frequent urination Drinking excessive amou Continue reading >>

What Are Your “diabetes Landmines?” The Seven Mistakes I Always Make And What I Learned Trying To Avoid Them

What Are Your “diabetes Landmines?” The Seven Mistakes I Always Make And What I Learned Trying To Avoid Them

twitter summary: Adam shares seven diabetes landmines – his mistakes that routinely lead to out-of-range blood sugars – and some solutions he’s been trying short summary: In this article, I share my own “diabetes landmines”– seven small mistakes I seem to make again and again that “explode” into out-of-range blood glucose values. These include: overcorrecting low blood sugars with too many carbs; overcorrecting a high with too much insulin (“stacking”); snacking directly out of the package; eating when I am not hungry; eating too quickly or overeating; eating too close to bedtime; and not increasing my basal rate following a night of poor sleep or on a day with little exercise. I also identify some solutions I’ve been using to try to overcome these mistakes. After writing my last column on the 22+ short-term factors that affect blood glucose, I wondered... “Even though diabetes is very unpredictable, are there some consistent reasons why my blood glucose falls out of range?” Yes. I call these my “diabetes landmines”– small mistakes I seem to make again and again that seem to “explode” into out-of-range blood glucose values. The list below highlights the seven mistakes I routinely make, and also details some solutions I’ve been trying out. Writing this list and the potential solutions was highly valuable for me; for the past few weeks, I’ve been more aware of my own “diabetes landmines” and have felt more equipped and motivated to avoid them. Try writing your own list along with some solutions, and email me at adam.brown(at)diaTribe.org or tweet me at @asbrown1 with what you find! Mistake#1: Overcorrecting low blood sugars with too many carbs, only to go high afterwards. I consider myself someone with a lot of willpower, but wi Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

The most common type of diabetes in children is type 1 diabetes. In fact, according to the American Diabetes Association, type 1 diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in children. Type 1 diabetes accounts for 5 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in the U.S. What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes may also be known by a variety of other names, including: Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) Juvenile diabetes Brittle diabetes Sugar diabetes There are two forms of type 1 diabetes: Idiopathic type 1. This refers to rare forms of the disease with no known cause. Immune-mediated diabetes. An autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system destroys, or attempts to destroy, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Immune-mediated diabetes is the most common form of type 1 diabetes and is generally referred to as type 1 diabetes. What causes type 1 diabetes? The cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown. However, it is believed that people inherit a tendency to develop diabetes, and that some outside trigger may be involved. Type 1 diabetes is the result of the body's failure to produce insulin, the hormone that allows glucose to enter the cells of the body to provide fuel. This is the result of an autoimmune process in which the body's immune system attacks and destroys the insulin producing cells of the pancreas. When glucose cannot enter the cells, it builds up in the blood, depriving the cells of nutrition. People with type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin injections and regularly monitor their blood sugar levels. What are the symptoms of type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes often appears suddenly. In children, type 1 diabetes symptoms may resemble flu symptoms. The following are the most common symptoms for type 1 diabetes. However, each ch Continue reading >>

Know The Signs Of Hypoglycemia

Know The Signs Of Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia can be a very serious condition, with extreme cases causing seizures, coma, and even death. It occurs when blood sugar levels drop too low, and it is most often experienced by people with diabetes. As you learn about diabetes management, being well versed in low blood sugar symptoms will enable you to detect the signs of impending hypoglycemia and act quickly to head it off or minimize its impact. Diabetes Type and Hypoglycemia Risk Hypoglycemia risk varies across the three different types of diabetes: Type 1 Diabetes People with type 1 diabetes experience hypoglycemia most often, as their diabetes management often requires a lot of attention and careful planning. The average person with type 1 diabetes who is attempting aggressive disease control may still experience low blood sugar symptoms frequently, and a full-blown case of hypoglycemia will require close medical attention. "When it comes to type 1 diabetes, the body can't make insulin on its own, so it must be administered," notes Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, Everyday Health contributor and author of Belly Fat for Dummies. Paying close attention to your diet is important, too. "If the correct amount of insulin is given based on the amount of carbohydrates consumed, blood sugar levels can remain in a healthy range." Type 2 Diabetes These patients experience hypoglycemia less frequently than people with type 1 diabetes; the rate of hypoglycemia for type 2 diabetes patients taking insulin is about one-third that of type 1 diabetes patients. But research shows that the frequency of hypoglycemia in people with type 2 diabetes increases as the disease becomes more advanced. "In people with type 2 diabetes, the body may produce adequate insulin, yet the cells are resistant to it, making the insulin ineffecti Continue reading >>

What Causes You To Have Constant Hunger & Still Lose Weight?

What Causes You To Have Constant Hunger & Still Lose Weight?

Seeing the needle on the scale dropping isn't always a good thing, particularly if it is accompanied by other health concerns. If you are experiencing constant hunger or eating excessive amounts of food yet are losing weight, you may have a serious medical condition. Recognizing these symptoms and consulting with your doctor as soon as possible are vital, as some of these conditions can be life-threatening. Video of the Day Type 1 Diabetes Once known as juvenile diabetes, type 1 diabetes is most commonly diagnosed in minors and young adults. The hormone insulin is involved in regulating your blood sugar. In type 1 diabetes, your body does not produce enough of this hormone to perform its vital function. As a result, the glucose, or sugar, builds up in your blood instead of being used as an energy source for the body. This dysfunction causes you to feel constantly hungry and have excessive thirst, yet still have unintentional weight loss. Other symptoms include fatigue, blurry vision, frequent urination and tingling in the feet. You will have to take insulin for the rest of your life and keep to a regular eating schedule to manage the disease. When your thyroid hormone levels are not in the normal range, it can have substantial effects on the entire body. The thyroid gland is directly involved in regulating your metabolism. If the gland produces too much hormone, a condition called hyperthyroidism, your metabolic rate increases, causing weight loss and excessive hunger. Anxiety, hair or skin changes, insomnia and an irregular heartbeat are also common signs and symptoms. If you are female, you may notice your menstrual periods lighten or even stop, according to the American Thyroid Association. Beta blockers and drugs to block hormone production are typically prescribed, Continue reading >>

Hunger Is A Symptom

Hunger Is A Symptom

Our fat-hating society has transferred all the loathing we used to feel for blatant displays of greed, lust, and pride to a single sin, gluttony. The rest of those erstwhile sins now have transformed into the characteristics of the celebrities we admire. This has had the unfortunate side effect of making people who find themselves feeling extremely hungry believe that they are suffering a moral lapse--gluttony--rather than recognizing that they are experiencing a medical symptom. But the raging muchies--the kind of hunger that leaves you at the open fridge shoveling in everything in sight--is a symptom. You can induce it in an otherwise normal person with a couple of tokes of pot. You also see it in millions of otherwise normal women a few days before they get their period. And sadly, it is a symptom that often emerges along with insulin resistance in people who have the genetic make up that leads to Type 2 diabetes because insulin resistance is a prime factor that leads to raging hunger. Exactly why isn't completely understood, but we do know that one of the main things that can cause hunger is swiftly moving blood sugar of the type that happen when blood sugar goes way up after a meal and then plummets back down as it does in hypoglyemica. People with Type 1 diabetes who are prone to severe hypos can tell you all about the hunger that comes with dropping blood sugars. In fact, someone on Tudiabetes.com recently described waking up with a very low blood sugar and attempting to eat their clock radio. This sounds funny, but it isn't, first of all because it really happened to a real person and secondly because it shows how powerful the brain's response to a hunger signal can be. Hunger is the single strongest drive in any living being, far stronger than sex, because with Continue reading >>

When 'normal Teen' Stuff Is A Warning Sign Of Illness: What Parents Should Know

When 'normal Teen' Stuff Is A Warning Sign Of Illness: What Parents Should Know

Editor's Note: This story was first published on August 15, 2016. Stacey Crescitelli is parenting her third teenager after successfully steering daughters Anna, 19, and Sophia, 18, to adulthood. So when her third child, Henry, now 14, began growing at at a fast pace, sleeping more and thinning out, she and her husband Joe thought he was just being a typical teen. As it turns out, his body was actually fighting something more sinister than teenage hormones: Type 1 diabetes. Now, Crescitelli wants other parents of teenagers to know about the symptoms of Type 1 diabetes. But how can parents tell the difference between what is normal and what is not when it comes to teens? Stacey Crescitelli Never miss a parenting story with TODAY’s newsletters! Sign up here Crescitelli, 46, noticed that since December, Henry had grown a lot, "maybe four or five inches," she told TODAY Parents, "and his body was changing. He has always been kind of a solid boy with a large frame — never one of those reed thin, gangly boys — but suddenly, he was becoming one," she said, "and of course, we thought he was simply 'leaning out,'" she said. Though Henry continued to lose weight and began to sleep more, it was not until this past March that the Doylestown, Pennsylvania, mother noticed symptoms that did not fit with what she believed was normal for teenage boys. That was when Henry suffered from a sudden bout of vertigo that "terrified him and mystified us," said Crescitelli. Related story: State legislator riles up 'army of fierce moms' with diabetes comment "One minute he was in the kitchen getting water, and the next he was asking me to help him to the couch because he couldn't walk or focus his eyes," she said. The vertigo lasted for a day, but it was the beginning of more new symptoms: f Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a disorder characterized by abnormally high blood sugar levels. In this form of diabetes, specialized cells in the pancreas called beta cells stop producing insulin. Insulin controls how much glucose (a type of sugar) is passed from the blood into cells for conversion to energy. Lack of insulin results in the inability to use glucose for energy or to control the amount of sugar in the blood. Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age; however, it usually develops by early adulthood, most often starting in adolescence. The first signs and symptoms of the disorder are caused by high blood sugar and may include frequent urination (polyuria), excessive thirst (polydipsia), fatigue, blurred vision, tingling or loss of feeling in the hands and feet, and weight loss. These symptoms may recur during the course of the disorder if blood sugar is not well controlled by insulin replacement therapy. Improper control can also cause blood sugar levels to become too low (hypoglycemia). This may occur when the body's needs change, such as during exercise or if eating is delayed. Hypoglycemia can cause headache, dizziness, hunger, shaking, sweating, weakness, and agitation. Uncontrolled type 1 diabetes can lead to a life-threatening complication called diabetic ketoacidosis. Without insulin, cells cannot take in glucose. A lack of glucose in cells prompts the liver to try to compensate by releasing more glucose into the blood, and blood sugar can become extremely high. The cells, unable to use the glucose in the blood for energy, respond by using fats instead. Breaking down fats to obtain energy produces waste products called ketones, which can build up to toxic levels in people with type 1 diabetes, resulting in diabetic ketoacidosis. Affected individuals may begin breathin Continue reading >>

Managing Type 1 Diabetes: When Everything Changed Podcast

Managing Type 1 Diabetes: When Everything Changed Podcast

Today’s guest on When Everything Changed is Lisa. As the mother of two school-age boys, she juggles the demands of a busy family life. She also helps her eldest son manage his type 1 diabetes, and empowers him to live his life to the fullest. Zane was only 3 when he began to experience common diabetes symptoms: Always hungry Feeling tired Unusually thirsty Urinating a lot Lisa knew something was wrong and took Zane to the doctor. Tests showed dangerously high blood glucose levels, and their doctor told them that Zane had type 1 diabetes. He was rushed to Seattle Children’s Hospital where he stayed for three days. Building a support system There’s currently no cure for type 1 diabetes, but with the right tools and support, families can learn to manage the condition and help their children adjust. Zane’s family formed a support system with another family going through the same experience, and received mentoring from Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) a diabetes research charity. Diabetes hasn’t prevented Zane from living life to the fullest. Lisa says they have learned to “roll with it.” “He can do anything he wants — just with a couple of added steps,” she says. Zane is now 9. He checks his blood sugar 10-12 times throughout the day, but this hasn’t stopped him from being active. He does the same things that other kids his age do, including lots of soccer. With the help of a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) that measures his blood sugar level, Zane is learning to listen to his body and monitor his needs. Thank you for listening! Did this story move you? If so, please share it. Do you have a health turning point story? Email us. When Everything Changed is a production of Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of Washington. Continue reading >>

The Dangers Of Skipping Meals When You Have Diabetes

The Dangers Of Skipping Meals When You Have Diabetes

It's tempting -- and even sounds logical -- to skip meals: You're busy, you're not hungry, you're trying to lose weight, or your blood sugar is too high. Skipping meals, however, may actually increase your blood sugar and cause you to gain weight. Here are seven rewards of eating regularly scheduled meals when you live with diabetes. Reward 1: Improve fasting blood glucose numbers. During sleep, when you're not eating, the liver sends more glucose into the blood to fuel the body. For many people during the early years of having type 2 diabetes, the liver doesn't realize there is already more than enough glucose present. "Your morning (fasting) blood sugars have much more to do with your liver and hormonal functions than what you ate for dinner last night," says Kathaleen Briggs Early, Ph.D., RD, CDE, assistant professor of biochemistry and nutrition at Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences in Yakima, Washington Get more information about why your morning blood sugar is high and tips to help control fasting blood sugar. Real-life example: Until recently, if Cheryl Simpson's blood glucose meter flashed a high reading before breakfast, she might delay eating until midafternoon in an attempt to lower that number. Now Cheryl, PWD type 2, won't leave home without eating breakfast. Her blood glucose numbers have improved. "Plus, eating breakfast makes it a whole lot easier to make good food choices later on," she says. Tip: Pack a grab-and-go breakfast with these 13 quick-fix ideas! Reward 2: Stay off the blood sugar roller coaster. Irregular eating can have you "bouncing back and forth between normal blood sugars and high blood sugars," Early says. A meager meal can give you a meager rise in blood sugar. If you take one or more blood glucose-lowering medications tha Continue reading >>

Polyphagia: The Relationship Between Hunger And Diabetes

Polyphagia: The Relationship Between Hunger And Diabetes

Is hunger a sign of diabetes? If you don’t have diabetes, could hunger be one of the signs of diabetes? Is being hungry all of the time (polyphagia) a sign that you should go get checked for diabetes? After all, polyphagia is one of the “3 Poly’s,” is part of a triad of symptoms indicating diabetes. In addition to polyphagia, or increased hunger, the symptoms of polyuria and polydipsia are also signs of diabetes. Susan’s story Susan was constantly hunger. She never seemed to feel satisfied as she snacked off and on all day long from increasing hunger pangs. Susan’s hunger had gotten progressively worse over the past year. She noticed that she had been going to the bathroom more frequently, and wasn’t sure if she might be getting a urinary tract infection. Oddly enough, she hadn’t gained any weight. She had even lost a few pounds. She visited her primary care provider, and relayed her symptoms to the nurse. The doctor recommended that Susan be checked for several different conditions, but the one that stuck out in Susan’s mind was diabetes. She had an aunt with diabetes. She remembered how sick she got, and how she’d spend her days in the dialysis unit. Susan didn’t want diabetes, at least the kind that she knew about from her aunt. When Susan contacted TheDiabetesCouncil, she was concerned that she did indeed have diabetes. She was waiting for her test results, but she was eager to find out if hunger was a sure sign that she has diabetes? I suggest reading the following articles: We decided to look into it for Susan. Let’s see what we found. Polyphagia: What is it? With polyphagia, even after having just eaten, you will feel hunger, or find that you have cravings for particular foods that monopolize your thoughts. The definition of polyphagia, wh Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes — The Best Gift In My Life

Type 1 Diabetes — The Best Gift In My Life

WRITTEN BY: Aseel Soueid Type 1 diabetes was a blessing in my life, a gift that made me the man I am today. Type 1 diabetes? A blessing? A gift? You don’t hear that every day. You probably don’t ever hear that at all. My name is Aseel Soueid, I’m 20 years old and I’ve had Type 1 diabetes for 16 years now. I was diagnosed when I was only 4 years old. Growing up with Type 1 diabetes was the hardest thing I’ve ever had to face in my life, and it was something I had to face every single day, minute and second of my life. The fact that I knew that I could never change or make my Type 1 go away was something that really bothered me as a child. Confusion, feeling lost and discouraged – I know these feelings. I’ve lived that way for so long. Growing up as the “odd one” in the group. At the time of my diagnosis, the doctor told my family and I that I would never be normal again. I was never blessed with great genetics or any talent with sports and quite frankly, I was always scared to partake in any physical activity due to my Type 1 diabetes. When I began middle school I was tired of holding myself back all the time. I began swimming and doing martial arts. I was amazed at how fast I could progress in these sports and this really grew my confidence. I trained hard no matter what my circumstances were and I got better every day. I swam for one of best teams in the state and found myself wanting more. By the time I was 16 years old, I picked up my first weightlifting/bodybuilding magazine. I looked at the people in these magazines and thought about how strong and confident they must feel with such an amazing physique and dedication to the gym. I asked myself, what’s stopping me from looking like that? My Type 1? I sure as hell wasn’t going to let that stop m Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Symptoms of usually develop quickly, over a few days to weeks, and are caused by high blood sugar. At first, symptoms may be overlooked or mistaken for another illness, like the flu. High blood sugar symptoms include: Urinating a lot, which may be more noticeable at night. The kidneys are trying to get rid of the excess sugar in the blood. To do that, they have to get rid of more water. More water means more urine. Being very thirsty. This happens if you urinate so often that you lose enough water to become dehydrated. Losing weight without trying. This happens because you are dehydrated. Weight loss may also happen if you are losing all of those sugar calories in your urine instead of using them. Increased hunger. You feel hungry because your body isn't using all the calories that it can. Many of them leave your body in your urine instead. Blurry vision. When sugar builds up in the lens of your eye, it sucks extra water into your eye. This changes the shape of the lens and blurs your vision. Feeling very tired. You feel tired for the same reason you feel hungry. Your body isn't using the calories you are eating, and your body isn't getting the energy it needs. See more about symptoms of high blood sugar. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis are: Flushed, hot, dry skin. Loss of appetite, belly pain, and vomiting. A strong, fruity breath odor. Rapid, deep breathing. Restlessness, drowsiness, difficulty waking up, confusion, or coma. Young children may lack interest in their normal activities. Common symptoms of low blood sugar include: Shakiness. Hunger. Confusion. You can pass out when your blood sugar gets very low. See more about symptoms of low blood sugar. If you aren't able to tell when your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemic unawareness), it's a good idea to test y Continue reading >>

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