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Turmeric Prediabetes

Update On Turmeric | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Update On Turmeric | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Foxy in Cyprus Type 2 Well-Known Member Good Morning All. Ref my previous message on Tumeric, I have now acquired some ginger and turmeric tablets from a friend who came from the UK. Turmeric either in dinner, or in tablet form DOES lower blood sugar, I have been experimenting now for a few days. For example my blood this morning was 88 (4.8) and I took two tablets and within half an hour it had come down to 70.(this was no other medicines at the time or food, just the tablets) I am constantly checking my blood as I know from last week when I took too much it went below 60, so do be careful. But I believe as long as I stick to a strict regime of checking my blood, I will soon have a good formular, and hopefully, soon come off the meds, as Turmeric seems to do a much better job. These tables are made by fitness Pharma, ginger with Turmeric, 500 mg of each in each tablet, and 2 a day. Mmmm interesting.. I don't do suplimental tabs. But have eaten the odd recipe with turmeric. There have been ocaisions when my bloods dropped silly. In these incidents, I put it down to over calculating the bolus? (It happens.) But the drop was a little too soon after eating in my experience.. Is it possible tumeric could stop/delay "liver dump".? Working a little like "Metformin"? (Insulin dependant T1. I don't take Metformin.) Oh maybe, yes. I know there are doubting toms on here (not you!) but I have test all week withthis and every single time it brings my blood sugar down, but a lot more than metroformin. There are many articles on the Internet on this subject too. I am also feeding it to my German Shepherd, there's a massive amount on the nett about its benefits for Continue reading >>

Curcumin Prevents Progression | Prediabetics | Life Extension

Curcumin Prevents Progression | Prediabetics | Life Extension

Stone fruits may combat metabolic syndrome The findings of research scheduled for presentation at the 244th American Chemical Society meeting, to be held August 19-23, 2012 in Philadelphia, reveal a protective effect for peaches, plums and nectarines against metabolic syndromea cluster of factors that predict obesity-related diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease. "In recent years obesity has become a major concern in society due to the health problems associated to it," noted Texas AgriLife Research food scientist Dr Luis Cisneros-Zevallos. "In the U.S., statistics show that around 30 percent of the population is overweight or obese, and these cases are increasing every year in alarming numbers." "The major concern about obesity is the associated disease known as metabolic syndrome," he observed. "Our studies have shown that stone fruits peaches, plums and nectarines have bioactive compounds that can potentially fight the syndrome, " Dr Cisneros-Zevallos reported." Our work indicates that phenolic compounds present in these fruits have antiobesity, anti-inflammatory and antidiabetic properties in different cell lines and may also reduce the oxidation of bad cholesterol LDL." "Our work shows that the four major phenolic groups--anthocyanins, chlorogenic acids, quercetin derivatives and catechins--work on different cells --fat cells, macrophages and vascular endothelial cells," he continued. "They modulate different expressions of genes and proteins depending on the type of compound. However, at the same time, all of them are working simultaneously in different fronts against the components of the disease, including obesity, inflammation, diabetes and cardiovascular disease." "Each of these stone fruits contain similar phenolic groups but in differing proportions so all Continue reading >>

8 Benefits Of Turmeric In Prediabetes

8 Benefits Of Turmeric In Prediabetes

Prediabetes is a condition where blood sugar levels are higher than normal but lower than what is observed in diabetes. However there is a high risk of progressing into diabetes. More than 100 million Americans have prediabetes or diabetes. If untreated 37% of the individuals with prediabetes develop diabetes in around 4 years. Physical inactivity, high cholesterol levels, polycystic ovarian syndrome, family history of diabetes are few of the risk factors for developing diabetes. Individuals diagnosed with diabetes have an average annual health care expenditure of $11,000 to $14,000. Treatment involves lifestyle changes such as diet changes and exercise leading to weight loss and pharmacological interventions involve usage of anti-diabetic medications or even surgery. This article explores various ways by which turmeric, a curry spice can help in preventing and reversing prediabetes. How does turmeric help in prediabetes? Turmeric is proven to prevent progression of prediabetes to diabetes. A lot of scientific evidence points towards the therapeutic potential of turmeric and its bioactive constituent, curcumin in prediabetes. 1.Turmeric can prevent progression of prediabetes to diabetes The only clinical trial that demonstrates that turmeric aids in prediabetes is ‘Curcumin Extract For Prediabetes’ by Somlak et al. This study enrolled 240 individuals diagnosed with prediabetes and they received either curcumin or placebo capsules for 9 months. High doses of curcumin were given- around 6 capsules a day with 250mg standardized curcuminoid extract per capsule. A number of biological parameters were recorded to assess progression into type 2 diabetes. After 9 months of treatment 16.4% of the individuals in placebo group developed diabetes while none in the curcumin trea Continue reading >>

Turmeric Extract 100% Effective At Preventing Type 2 Diabetes, Ada Journal Study Finds

Turmeric Extract 100% Effective At Preventing Type 2 Diabetes, Ada Journal Study Finds

A remarkable human clinical study published in the journal Diabetes Care, the journal of the American Diabetes Association, revealed that turmeric extract was 100% successful at preventing prediabetic patients from becoming diabetic over the course of a 9-month intervention.[1] Performed by Thailand researchers, the study's primary object was to assess the efficacy of curcumin, the primary polyphenol in turmeric which gives the spice its golden hue, in delaying the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a prediabetic population. The study design was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial including 240 subjects who met the American Diabetic Association's criteria for prediabetes. All subjects were randomly assigned to receive either 250 mg of curcuminoid or placebo capsules for 9 months. Type 2 diabetes progression was assessed by measuring a wide range of parameters, including changes in the insulin-producing cells within the pancreas known as β-cells, insulin resistance, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine known as adiponectin, at four different times: baseline, 3-, 6-, and 9-month visits during the course of intervention. The results were reported as follows: "After 9 months of treatment, 16.4% of subjects in the placebo group were diagnosed with T2DM, whereas none were diagnosed with T2DM in the curcumin-treated group. In addition, the curcumin-treated group showed a better overall function of β-cells, with higher HOMA-β (61.58 vs. 48.72; P < 0.01) and lower C-peptide (1.7 vs. 2.17; P < 0.05). The curcumin-treated group showed a lower level of HOMA-IR (3.22 vs. 4.04; P < 0.001) and higher adiponectin (22.46 vs. 18.45; P < 0.05) when compared with the placebo group." [emphasis added] The researchers concluded: "A 9-month curcumin intervent Continue reading >>

Turmeric Works Wonders For Pre-diabetes

Turmeric Works Wonders For Pre-diabetes

It’s fair to say that turmeric has earned its title as a functional food of unrivaled versatility. It seems to have the uncanny ability to take on any ailment, illness, or condition (including pre-diabetes)—and this claim is born out of both ancient practice and modern research. As we’ve discussed before, there’s a simple reason why this magical little root is able to target so many different health problems: turmeric treats the body as a whole, integrated system, and thus brings about overall balance that’s not achievable by pharmaceuticals and other Western medical treatments. The tools and methods of mainstream medicine fall short in this way because they are designed to target one problem at a time (or a handful of problems, at the very most). Designing a substance in a laboratory that takes into account all the countless interactions between the different systems in your body is extraordinarily difficult, if not impossible—so instead, we focus on isolated mechanisms and hope for the best. Unfortunately, the current best case scenario for many Western medical treatments is moderate success muddled with all sorts of side effects and risks—which must be addressed with more drugs and treatments…and the cycle continues. Meanwhile, nature has handed us an abundance of perfect natural medicines that have been designed by billions of years of evolution (turmeric being among the cream of the crop)—but embracing them as real medicine requires mainstream medicine to swallow its pride and admit that perhaps its laboratory tinkering hasn’t quite caught up to the awe-inspiring sophistication of evolution. One perfect illustration of turmeric’s healing prowess is the way in which it tackles pre-diabetes, a condition which affects as many as 1 out of every 3 Continue reading >>

Turmeric Curcumin For Prediabetes | Care2 Healthy Living

Turmeric Curcumin For Prediabetes | Care2 Healthy Living

Curcumin extract for prevention of type 2 diabetes is an extraordinary study published in the journal of the American Diabetes Association . In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of folks diagnosed with prediabetes, half of the subjects got supplements of curcumin, the yellow pigment in the spice turmeric and curry powder, while the other half got identical-looking placebos, and the researchers just followed them for nine months to see who ended up with diabetes. After nine months of treatment, 16 percent of subjects in the placebo group went on to get full-blown diabetes. How many in the curcumin group? None. The curcumin group saw a significant improvement in fasting blood sugars, glucose tolerance, hemoglobin A1C, insulin sensitivity, pancreatic insulin-producing beta cell function (measured two different ways), and insulin sensitivity. What if you already have diabetes? Another study found the same beneficial effectsand at a fraction of the dose. The prediabetes study mentioned above used the equivalent of a quarter cup of turmeric a day, whereas this other study used only about a teaspoons worth, which is doable through diet rather than supplements. Whats particularly interesting here is the purported mechanism: Fat in the bloodstream plays an important role in the development of insulin resistance and ultimately type 2 diabetes. Fat builds up inside your muscle cells and gums up the works, and all the inflammation interferes with insulin signaling. However, curcumin decreases fat levels in the blood, making this the first study to show that these turmeric spice compounds may have an anti-diabetic effect. So, if you are pre-diabetic, it might be a good idea to add turmeric to your diet, but its important to recognize that prediabetes is a dise Continue reading >>

Can Turmeric Prevent Prediabetes From Progressing Into Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Turmeric Prevent Prediabetes From Progressing Into Type 2 Diabetes?

If you’ve been diagnosed with pre-diabetes, then you might just want to pick yourself up some turmeric. GreenMedInfo reports on the findings being described as a “remarkable human clinical study” published in the Diabetes Care journal from the American Diabetes Association, reports that “turmeric extract was 100% successful” in preventing pre diabetes from progressing to type 2 diabetes over the course of 9 months. Performed by Thailand researchers, the study’s primary object was to assess the efficacy of curcumin, the primary polyphenol in turmeric which gives the spice its golden hue, in delaying the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a prediabetic population. The study design was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial including 240 subjects who met the American Diabetic Association’s criteria for prediabetes. All subjects were randomly assigned to receive either 250 mg of curcuminoid or placebo capsules for 9 months. The results: “After 9 months of treatment, 16.4% of subjects in the placebo group were diagnosed with T2DM, whereas none were diagnosed with T2DM in the curcumin-treated group. In addition, the curcumin-treated group showed a better overall function of β-cells, with higher HOMA-β (61.58 vs. 48.72; P < 0.01) and lower C-peptide (1.7 vs. 2.17; P < 0.05). The curcumin-treated group showed a lower level of HOMA-IR (3.22 vs. 4.04; P < 0.001) and higher adiponectin (22.46 vs. 18.45; P < 0.05) when compared with the placebo group.” Conclusion: “A 9-month curcumin intervention in a prediabetic population significantly lowered the number of prediabetic individuals who eventually developed T2DM. In addition, the curcumin treatment appeared to improve overall function of β-cells, with very minor adverse effects. Continue reading >>

Turmeric Curcumin For Prediabetes

Turmeric Curcumin For Prediabetes

Regarding bioavailability of curcumin Consumer Lab (subscription required) published a large review (updated Aug 2015) on curcumin supplement products. Nothing on CurQFen or Spiceuticals, though. Consider this interesting comment “A more recent formulation, CurcuWin (OmniActive Health Technologies), combines curcumin with a hydrophilic carrier, making it more dispersible in water. Of all the formulations, CurcuWin appears to have the most dramatic effect on bioavailability. A study funded by OmniActive found that Curcuwin increased curcuminoid levels in the blood plasma 4,490% above that achieved with standard curcumin (Jager, Nutr J 2014). The study also evaluated BCM-95 and Meriva, finding them, respectively, to increase total curcuminoid blood levels 30% and 690% above that with standard curcumin. In the study, the supplements were taken with a low-fat meal, putting standard curcumin at a slight disadvantage as its absorption may be enhanced when taken with a fatty (oily) meal. None of the products in the current Review (above) contain this new formulation. Be aware that formulations which enhance bioavailability may need to be taken at correspondingly lower doses than standard curcumin due to potentially greater potency.” As stated by another commentator earlier, Dr. Gregor discourages curcumin extract supplements, advocating instead the whole plant turmeric root (page 354 of How Not to Die). I’m doing both. BTW, for anyone using or considering supplements check out Consumer Lab. It sorts through the scientific evidence around supplements much like NF to help you make a choice about which supplements, how much, and in what formulation to buy. It tests and reports on specific brands including how much of the active ingredients are actually present, as well as u Continue reading >>

Curcumin Extract For Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes

Curcumin Extract For Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes

The impacts of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on global health care and economy are enormous (1). According to the World Health Organization, there are ∼311 million people worldwide who live with T2DM. This number continues to rise, especially in the newly developing and poorer countries in Asia and elsewhere. Because T2DM is currently incurable, a common treatment approach is to try to control the disease with lifelong use of antidiabetes drugs. Limiting the number of newly developed T2DM cases should be one of the better key strategies to restrict the global impacts of T2DM (2). In order to limit the number of new T2DM cases, the lifestyle of the prediabetic population has to be changed. However, this has been shown to be challenging (3). One of the alternative approaches to prevent development of T2DM is to intervene with the prediabetic population before disease progresses into fully developed T2DM (3). The intervention approach is appealing. It relies on timely identification of prediabetic individuals and provision of preventive treatment before the disease fully progresses. The intervention represents a chance for the diabetes-prone population to halt the disease progression and maintain a normal and healthy life. In recent years, several effective T2DM intervention regimens have been developed, with encouraging results (3–5). However, these regimens are not usually economically accessible, and they are not well-tolerated because of treatment-related toxicities (4,5). The focus now is to identify new effective therapeutic agents, with relatively low cost and low toxicity, that can be used regularly to control a progression of T2DM in the prediabetic population. Curcumin is the principal curcuminoid found in turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn.), a popular spice in Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: The Amazing Benefits Of Turmeric Curcumin

Diabetes Diet: The Amazing Benefits Of Turmeric Curcumin

Those looking for help with managing or reversing pre-diabetes may have to look no further than their kitchen’s spice rack, or a drug store’s supplement aisle. Research published in the Journal of the American Diabetes Association shows that curcumin - an active ingredient in the spice turmeric - has a significant effect on the progression of pre-diabetes. In this randomized, double-blind study half of the pre-diabetic participants took a daily curcumin supplement, and half ingested a look-a-like placebo. After nine months: Sixteen percent of those in the placebo group had progressed from pre-diabetes to a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. No one in the curcumin supplement group progressed from pre-diabetes to type 2 diabetes. Those taking the curcumin enjoyed improved glucose tolerance, A1C levels, fasting blood sugars, insulin sensitivity, and pancreatic beta cell function. Not Just For Pre-Diabetes The supplement dosage in the pre-diabetes curcumin research was quite large. However, a similar study involving type 2 diabetes participants used a curcumin dose small enough to ingest through diet—about one teaspoon daily. Even with the lesser dose, participants experienced significant insulin and glucose improvements. Researchers suspect that turmeric curcumin benefits blood sugar management by reducing the free fatty acids (FFAs) in our bloodstream. Too many FFAs lead to an accumulation of fat substances in our skeletal muscles and liver, triggering inflammation—and disrupting insulin signaling and glucose utilization. While not a magic bullet, curcumin's fat-busting power may help some individuals prevent the onset of diabetes, and help others reach their target glucose and A1C goals. Fortunately, to enlist curcumin's aid, all that may be necessary is cooking more Continue reading >>

The Prediabetes Prescription

The Prediabetes Prescription

A nutrition and supplement plan that can help to keep prediabetes from progressing Prediabetes is a wake-up call—one that does not have to be a prelude to full-blown type 2 diabetes. Most people can take steps to reverse prediabetes—wait too long and type 2 diabetes will have to be treated medically. An estimated 70–100 million Americans have prediabetes, most of them undiagnosed. Being overweight or obese, having difficulty losing weight, feeling tired much of the time, and having poor concentration are common symptoms of prediabetes. Getting Tested Having either a fasting blood sugar level between 100–125 mg/dl or a HbA1C level between 5.7 and 6.9 percent is a sign of prediabetes. A fasting blood sugar between 90 and 99 mg/dl points to looming prediabetes. It’s also important to have your fasting insulin tested—a measure of 11 mcIU/ml or higher indicates that your body is working very hard to control blood sugar. A high fasting insulin is an accurate early predictor of diabetes risk in the coming 10–15 years. The Cause In the vast majority of cases, prediabetes is a consequence of eating a diet high in refined carbohydrates, including sugary foods, for many years. These foods include candies, desserts, white bread, white rice, pizza, pasta, muffins, bagels, grits, and tortillas. Potatoes and rice wafers have a similar effect on blood sugar. Conventional Treatments A variety of drugs are commonly prescribed to people with prediabetes. Like most drugs, they have side effects. Eating Tips Improving eating habits is essential. Focus on quality protein (fish, chicken, grass-fed beef), which stabilizes and lowers blood sugar levels. Eat plenty of high-fiber vegetables as well. Fiber, particularly soluble fiber, slows the breakdown of carbohydrates and also low Continue reading >>

Can Turmeric Help Manage Diabetes? What The Evidence Says

Can Turmeric Help Manage Diabetes? What The Evidence Says

Turmeric has been used for centuries in both food and medicine. The spice is believed to have many potential benefits for the human body. But could turmeric be a new tool to help manage diabetes? Turmeric is the common name for the root Curcuma longa. It is a bright yellow-orange spice that is a staple in traditional food dishes from many Asian countries. In this article we explore the role of turmeric in alternative and Western medicine. We go on to analyze the potential benefits of the spice for diabetes management. Turmeric and medicine Turmeric plays an important role in medical practices, such as Ayurveda and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Medical science is interested in the herb, as well, due to the high levels of friendly compounds it contains. Of particular interest is a class of compounds called curcuminoids. One curcuminoid found in turmeric is curcumin. This name is sometimes loosely used to describe all of the curcuminoids in turmeric. Turmeric and curcumin are being studied for a number of human conditions such as: inflammatory bowel disease h. pylori infections Turmeric is also often added to the diet to help reduce inflammation and oxidative stress. Can turmeric help people with diabetes? Including turmeric in the diet seems to promote general wellbeing. There is also evidence that indicates turmeric may be especially beneficial for people with diabetes. It is believed that curcumin is the source of many of the medical benefits of turmeric. The focus of most research has been on curcumin itself, rather than whole turmeric. A review in the journal Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine compiled more than 13 years of research on the connection between diabetes and curcumin. The result suggests curcumin can help people with diabetes in d Continue reading >>

Why All Diabetics Should Know About Turmeric

Why All Diabetics Should Know About Turmeric

By Sayer Ji • Originally published on GreenMedInfo.com Many diabetics already know about the benefits of a low-glycemic diet, but why haven’t they heard about turmeric, one of the world’s most extensively researched anti-diabetic plants? A recent literature review published in the International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism titled, “Anti-Hyperglycemic Effect and Insulin Sensitizing Effects of Turmeric and Its Principle Constituent Curcumin,” adds promising new support to the notion that the ancient Indian spice turmeric may provide an ideal drug alternative to treating and perhaps even preventing type 2 diabetes, which has become of the world’s most prevalent diagnoses. The study reviewed research published between 1998 to 2013 that indicates the active polyphenol in turmeric known as curcumin may provide an ideal intervention for type 2 diabetes, capable of mitigating characteristic pathophysiological hallmarks of the disease such as elevated blood sugar (hyperglycemia) and insulin resistance. Nineteen of the studies reviewed were cell (in vitro) and animal (in vivo), all which showed beneficial effects. Five of the studies were human clinical trials using turmeric or curcumin, three of which were performed in those with either diabetes or prediabetes. Amazingly, the animal and cell research literature review concluded that curcumin could improve the type 2 diabetic state through 10 distinctly different mechanisms, such as: Reduction in liver glucose production Reduction in liver glycogen production Stimulation of increased glucose uptake (by increasing GLUT4, GLUT2 and GLUT3 gene expressions) Increasing the activation of AMP kinase Promoting PPAR γ ligand- binding activity Suppressing hyperglycemia-induced inflammatory state Stimulating insulin Continue reading >>

Does Turmeric Reduce Blood Sugar?

Does Turmeric Reduce Blood Sugar?

Alternative medicine systems such as Ayurveda and traditional Chinese medicine value a variety of herbs and spices for possessing proposed medicinal benefits. Both these ancient traditions use turmeric to treat a number of conditions. Scientists have shown interest in the potential blood sugar-lowering properties of turmeric and one of its active substances, curcumin. Most studies have looked at the effects of curcumin on animal models. Although few promising human studies exist, talk to your doctor before taking turmeric for therapeutic purposes. Side effects and drug interactions are possible. Promising Data for Type 2 Diabetics Researchers in China conducted a placebo-controlled trial on humans after discovering that curcuminoid compounds lowered glucose in diabetic rats. The human study involved 100 overweight and obese Type 2 diabetics who took either 300 milligrams of curcuminoids daily for 12 weeks or placebo. Researchers found curcuminoid supplementation significantly reduces fasting glucose and insulin resistance. The study was published in "Molecular Nutrition and Food Research" in September 2013. May Halt Prediabetes Insulin resistance occurs when your body fails to respond properly to insulin, resulting in elevated blood sugar. This is commonly called prediabetes because it increases the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Researchers in Thailand conducted a promising randomized, placebo-controlled study, which they published in the November 2012 edition of the journal "Diabetes Care." The study involved 240 participants with prediabetes who took curcumin extract for nine months or placebo. At the conclusion of the study, none of the participants who took curcumin developed diabetes, whereas 16 percent of the placebo group did. Mechanisms of Action The "Mole Continue reading >>

Turmeric Curcumin In Treating Prediabetes And Diabetes

Turmeric Curcumin In Treating Prediabetes And Diabetes

I am an avid supporter of the methodology the herbalist Dr. Sebi uses in reversing disease. Part of the methodology is to stay away from hybrid foods for the best chance of reversing chronic disease. Dr. Sebi doesn’t find any nutritional value in any hybrid foods and in most cases I have learned that it is best to avoid them. I do find value in the use of turmeric though and numerous studies have shown the turmeric does have many healing properties. I do limit my use of turmeric consumption, but I have found that if I stress my joints through strenuous activity turmeric curcumin does control the inflammation. Dr. Greger provides a study where curcumin, the concentrated pigment found in turmeric, was administered to a group of patients who had prediabetes and the control group was given a placebo instead. 16% of the placebo group developed developed full blown diabetes, while no one who received curcumin supplements developed diabetes. The participants in the curcumin group saw significant improvements in fasting blood sugar, glucose tolerance, beta cell function, and insulin sensitivity. The study administered a lot of turmeric every a day, 1/4 cup of turmeric a day. The same benefits were found treating full blown diabetes also using only a fraction of the turmeric, just a teaspoon of turmeric a day. It is important to note turmeric bioavailability into the bloodstream is increased when it is consumed with an oil like coconut oil. Curcumin is the concentrated compound extracted from turmeric and is much more powerful than just regular turmeric. It is always better to consume plant components in the ratio they exist in nature. For short-term medicinal purposes the use of natural concentrated components can be helpful in reversing or addressing chronic disease. The sho Continue reading >>

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