diabetestalk.net

Tsa Diabetic Supplies

How Can I Get Through Airport Security With My Diabetic Supplies?

How Can I Get Through Airport Security With My Diabetic Supplies?

How can I get through airport security with my diabetic supplies? Your diabetes equipment and medications are necessary and permitted through security checkpoints. If you use an insulin pump, you may be required to undergo more comprehensive screening, including hand and explosives checks of all of your carry-on luggage. Be aware of these new rules, and allow extra time to pass through security. Security regulations allow anyone to pass through security with 3.4 ounces or less of liquids, aerosols, or gels. These items must be put in one quart-size, sealable bag. However, larger volumes of prescription liquids and other liquids needed by people with disabilities and medical conditions are allowed through airport security. They must be declared to the TSA officer on duty. Some Allowed Prescription and Other Liquids All prescription and over-the-counter medications (liquids, gels, and aerosols), including petroleum jelly, eye drops, and saline solution for medical purposes. Liquids, including water, juice, or liquid nutrition, or gels for passengers with a disability or medical condition. Life-support and life-sustaining liquids, such as bone marrow, blood products, and transplant organs. Items used to augment the body for medical or cosmetic reasons such as mastectomy products, prosthetic breasts, bras or shells containing gels, saline solution, or other liquids. Gels or frozen liquids that are needed to cool disability-related or medically related items used to treat disabilities or medical conditions. You should notify the security agent that you have diabetes and that you are carrying diabetes medication and supplies with you. TSA-Allowed Diabetes Supplies and Equipment Insulin and insulin-loaded dispensing products (vials or box of individual vials, jet injectors, b Continue reading >>

How To Get Through Tsa With These 5 Diabetes Devices

How To Get Through Tsa With These 5 Diabetes Devices

Whether it is for business or pleasure, you have to pass through security before boarding your flight. The TSA allows for diabetes-related supplies, equipment and medication—including liquids—through the checkpoint once they have been properly screened by X-ray or hand inspection. If possible, pack all your supplies together in your carry-on bag so you have everything on hand. Before your screening begins, inform the officer conducting the screening about any supplies on you or in your carry-on. Here’s how you can fly through TSA with these 5 diabetes devices! 1. Insulin Pump/Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM) Taking an insulin pump through airport security is quite common, but it’s always a good idea to carry the Airport Information Card when traveling. You may go through the airport metal detector with your insulin pump and CGM, as these devices are designed to withstand common electromagnetic interference. However, we do not recommend going through an airport body scanner with your pump and CGM, as Medtronic has not determined advanced imaging technology to be safe for insulin pump or CGM devices. If you do go through an airport body scanner, be sure to remove your insulin pump and CGM, but do not send your devices through the x-ray machine as an alternative. If you do not wish to remove your devices, explain to the officer that you cannot remove the insulin pump as it is under your skin with a needle, and request an alternative pat-down screening process. 2. Insulin Delivery Devices Be sure to have proof a physician prescribed your insulin and needles by providing a professional, pre-printed pharmaceutical label identifying the medication. Travel with your original insulin box and glucose meter that shows the pharmaceutical label. You will need these items in Continue reading >>

Mom Says Tsa Threatened Full Body Search Over Juice Boxes For Diabetic Son

Mom Says Tsa Threatened Full Body Search Over Juice Boxes For Diabetic Son

Mom says TSA threatened full body search over juice boxes for diabetic son A mother and her diabetic son say a TSA agent at DIA treated them like criminals as they tried to bring juice boxes through a security checkpoint. Copyright 2016 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. DENVER -- A mother and her diabetic son say a TSA agent at Denver International Airport treated them like criminals as they tried to bring juice boxes through a security checkpoint. Cathi Evans spoke with the Denver7 Investigates team and explained that the juice boxes are a medical necessity -- a pre-measured, go-to line of defense whenever her son, 10-year-old Robby, experiences a blood sugar crash. He has Type 1 diabetes. She said she's taken the juice boxes through airports -- including DIA -- before and has never experienced any problems. "I feel like they made my son a security risk because he's diabetic," she said. Mother and son were returning to their home in Las Vegas when the TSA agent decided Robby's juice boxes were a possible threat. "He got extremely close to where I was like bent over because he was leaning into me," Evans said. "And he said, 'The only way I'm going to test these juices and let these juices pass is if you submit to a full body search and we get your luggage, we'll take your carry-on bags, and we're going to search every single thing you have with you. Is that what you want?'" Evans said she's so frustrated by the ordeal, which occurred in April, because the juice boxes were packed inside her son's medical bag alongside other medical supplies to treat his diabetes. She carries the bag everywhere her son goes. "A blood sugar low is a medical emergency," she said. "And he's had a medical emer Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Traveling With Diabetes

Everything You Need To Know About Traveling With Diabetes

Having diabetes does not mean you should be within the confines of your home. By doing some smart planning and thorough preparation, you can go anywhere whether it is a camping excursion, a cross-country train adventure, a relaxing cruise, or a trip to various countries. Although vacations can be fun and rewarding, you have to be aware that traveling can be stressful to your body as you stray away from your daily routine and diet plan. At the same time, foreign surrounding may also put your psychological well-being into an anxious state. All these changes can contribute to a fluctuation in your blood glucose level. To help you prepare for your upcoming trip, whether by car, air or boat, we have compiled an ultimate guide of useful information to educate you better on various topics concerning traveling with diabetes: Is it Safe to Travel as a Person with Diabetes? “Is it safe to travel?” is the first question you should ask yourself and your doctor before you start to think of planning a trip. To avoid unexpected health issues that could possibly arise during your journey, you should consider going for a medical examination to ensure your diabetes is in stable condition and you are physically well to travel. It is important for you to ask your doctor whether you are fit to travel in your current condition as it can play a crucial role when purchasing your itinerary as well as your travel and health insurance. You should always request that your doctor put his professional opinion in writing so that if you need to cancel your trip as a result of sudden health emergency situation, you have the doctor’s letter as a proof of evidence and get compensation for any incurred loss from your insurance company. For more diabetes related information: Aside from the profession Continue reading >>

Ready For Takeoff? | Accu-chek

Ready For Takeoff? | Accu-chek

At long last. That vacation you've been dreaming about is finally here. As you plan your sightseeing excursions, hone your list of must-try restaurants and break in your new walking shoes, spend a little time planning for the flight itself. A few smart steps now can help you avoid any surprises in the airport and in the air. Navigating the security rules can be pretty taxing, although a quick look at the Transportation Security Administration site will fill you in on the latest. The TSA rules make it clear that you can bring diabetes-related supplies, equipment and medications through the security checkpoint, although they will need to be X-rayed or hand inspected.1,2,3 Insulin and preloaded dispensing items such as syringes or pens Unlimited unused syringes when accompanied by insulin or another injectable medication Lancets, meters and all other testing supplies Used syringes, if they're in a hard-surface disposal container Juice, gel icing tubes or other items needed to treat or prevent hypoglycemia Any other related medication, equipment and supplies Explain to the security officer that you're carrying diabetes supplies so they can be properly screened. And if you're wearing a pump or continuous glucose monitor, check with the manufacturer. You may be able to go through the metal detector without disconnecting, and you can always ask for a pat-down and visual inspection instead.4 The TSA site asks that you inform the officer conducting the screening about your insulin pump or CGM.3 Your medically necessary liquids can be in containers larger than 3.4 ounces, and don't have to be put in a zip-top bag, but you are asked to remove them from your hand luggage to declare them.1,2 A few tips to keep you feeling your best. Bring plenty of snacksfor the airport and on the Continue reading >>

Insulin

Insulin

Please notify the TSA officer that you have diabetes and are carrying your supplies with you. Insulin pumps and supplies must be accompanied by insulin, and insulin in any form or dispenser must be clearly identified. Continue reading >>

How To Take Insulin And Needles On A Plane

How To Take Insulin And Needles On A Plane

How to Take Insulin and Needles on a Plane Kathryn Walsh, Leaf Group Updated August 29, 2018 Prepare in advance when traveling on a plane with insulin and needles. (Photo: Creatas Images/Creatas/Getty Images ) How to Get Pain Medications to My Vacation Destination Traveling is uncertain enough. Don't compound your stress levels by worrying about how your insulin and needles will fare on the flight . The TSA is good about making sure that diabetics can travel with everything they need, so being separated from those essentials isn't a likelihood. Passing through airport security with needles, medication, an insulin pump or other diabetic equipment is as simple as notifying an agent about what you're carrying. The screening process may take a few minutes longer than it would otherwise, so get to the airport early. The TSA has a strict 3-1-1 policy , which limits the quantities of liquids, gels and aerosols that passengers can pack in carry-on bags. Medications and other medically-necessary supplies are an exception. Travelers are permitted to pack insulin in either checked or carry-on bags in quantities greater than 3.4 ounces (the maximum size allowed for liquids under the 3-1-1 rule). Insulin pumps, syringes, ice packs and other equipment related to diabetes management are also exempt from the rule, provided the traveler is also carrying the insulin itself. TSA agents should also allow passengers with diabetes to carry juice or any other medically-necessary liquids through security, even in quantities exceeding 3.4 ounces. Packing Insulin, Syringes and Other Equipment While the TSA allows diabetic travelers to pack all their necessary supplies in carry-on luggage, agents are required to thoroughly screen all of these items. That means all insulin, syringes and other sup Continue reading >>

Q&a With Katharine Gordon: Tsa Diabetes Policy

Q&a With Katharine Gordon: Tsa Diabetes Policy

Q&A With Katharine Gordon: TSA Diabetes Policy This article was first posted on Feb. 5. 2014 Katharine Gordon is Director of the American Diabetes Associations Legal Advocate Program. This program provides assistance and information to people experiencing discrimination because of diabetes in schools, the workplace, jails and prisons, and other areas of daily life. Getting through airport security with diabetes can be a pain. Katharine Gordon, Director of the Legal Advocate Program at the American Diabetes Association, works with the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to make it a little easier, safer, and more pleasant for all involved. What do you do as a Legal Advocate for the ADA who works with the TSA? Since the TSAs founding [in 2001], the American Diabetes Association has been in communication with TSA because diabetes in particular really does affect airport security screening, where youre bringing on sharp objects, youre bringing liquids, you have devices that might not be familiar. So we, from the very beginning, recognized a need to be in communication with TSA. TSA actually has a disability coalition, which is a large group of people from many different disease and disability groups. We have an annual conference and quarterly phone calls, so we have regular channels of communication. One of the things that we work on is alerting TSA staff to problems, for example, if were starting to hear multiple stories about a certain airport, we would want to approach them about that. In terms of individual assistance, we ask people to go through the TSA Office for Civil Rights (OCR) complaint process, which can often, at a minimum, lead to the retraining of employees who havent followed the procedures, or who havent treated travelers with respect and dignity. Continue reading >>

Government Travel Tips

Government Travel Tips

If you are looking for information regarding travel in Canada check with the Canadian Transportation Agency . United StatesTips For Travelers With Diabetes The US Department of Transportation established the Transportation Security Agency (TSA) in response to the events of September 11th. The TSA was established to safeguard US commercial airline travel and other transportation systems. As a result of the heightened security at US airports, the following are the most recent security measures that affect diabetic travelers and the supplies and medication they carry. Check the TSA website regularly for changes to these measures or ask your airline when you book your ticket what current regulations are in place. Notify the screener that you have diabetes and are carrying your supplies with you. The following supplies and equipment are allowed through airport security checkpoints once they have been screened. You may carry: insulin and insulin loaded dispensing products (vials or a box of individual vials, jet injectors, pens, infusers, and preloaded syringes) an unlimited number of unused syringes as long as they are accompanied by insulin or other injectable medication. Used syringes are also permitted as long as they are in a sharps container or other comparable container. Other testing equipment such as lancets, blood glucose meters, blood glucose meter test strips, alcohol swabs, meter-testing solutions are also permitted. insulin pump and insulin pump supplies such as cleaning agents, batteries, plastic tubing, infusion kit, catheter and needles. Glucagon emergency kit and urine ketone test strips; Insulin in any form or dispenser must be clearly identified. Notify screeners if you are wearing an insulin pump and must be hand wanded. - Advise the screener that the in Continue reading >>

Traveling With Diabetes

Traveling With Diabetes

Having diabetes should never hold you back from doing the things you love or from embarking on new adventures. However, when it comes to traveling, especially to destinations far off the beaten path, managing all the details of your diabetes care in addition to the details of travel – tickets, itineraries, connections, and reservations, to name a few – may seem overwhelming. You may be concerned about simply getting your supplies onto the airplane, not to mention time zone changes, new climates, or counting carbohydrates in the jungle or desert. Even a simple pleasure like sightseeing can feel difficult to manage with diabetes. However, with a little forethought and planning, many obstacles can be overcome. Here are some tips to help make your travels as stress-free as possible. Getting through the airport If you’re traveling by plane, you may encounter a few hassles at the airport, where upgraded security measures and baggage restrictions have become the norm, and flight changes or delays are always a possibility. Wearing a medical ID bracelet or necklace and showing it to security personnel is a good first step toward explaining why you are carrying medicines and diabetes supplies and is sometimes sufficient since more people are becoming knowledgeable about diabetes. A letter from your doctor that includes the date, your name, your diagnosis of diabetes, and a list of all the supplies (blood glucose meter, strips, lancets, etc.) and medicines you use can also smooth your way through security. If you use insulin, make sure that the type of insulin and dosage or pump, as well as the supplies you need for administering it, are listed as well. (This list might include an insulin pen and needles, syringes, or pump infusion sets.) Personally, I made such a list, had Continue reading >>

Tsa Travel Tips: Travelers With Diabetes Or Other Medical Conditions

Tsa Travel Tips: Travelers With Diabetes Or Other Medical Conditions

If you are being treated for diabetes or some other medical condition and have concerns about TSA’s screening process, please contact the TSA Cares Helpline. Travelers or families of passengers with disabilities and medical conditions can call the helpline toll free 855-787-2227, prior to traveling with any questions about screening policies, procedures and what to expect at the security checkpoint. Helpful information for diabetic travelers: Diabetes related supplies, equipment, and medication, including liquids, are allowed through the checkpoint once they have been screened. Passengers should declare these items and separate them from other belongings before screening begins. Accessories required to keep medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols cool are permitted through the screening checkpoint and may be subject to additional screening. Liquids, gels, and aerosols are screened by X-ray and medically necessary items over 3.4 ounces will receive additional screening. A passenger could be asked to open the liquid or gel for additional screening. The TSA officer will not touch the liquid or gel during this process. If the passenger does not want a liquid, gel, or aerosol X-rayed or opened for additional screening, he or she should inform the officer before screening begins. Additional screening of the passenger and his or her property may be required, which may include a pat-down. You have the option of requesting a visual inspection of your insulin and diabetes associated supplies. Passengers who have insulin pumps can be screened using imaging technology, metal detector, or a thorough pat-down. A passenger can request to be screened by pat-down in lieu of imaging technology. Screening can be conducted without disconnecting from the pump. However, it is impor Continue reading >>

Travel Easily With Tips From Kerri Sparling

Travel Easily With Tips From Kerri Sparling

⬅ Back to feed Heading out on vacation or away for work? Traveling with diabetes can be easy and streamlined if you’re willing to do a little prep work. A well-packed bag and proper planning can make your travel experiences fun-filled…despite being islet-free. What are my rights as a person with diabetes? You have the right to travel as a person with diabetes! And you have the right to bring what is necessary for you to travel safely. This includes your insulin pump, continuous glucose monitor, insulin, glucose meter, and any other necessary medications. If you have specific questions or concerns about air travel and diabetes, contact TSA Cares directly for assistance. What should I bring in my carry-on? It’s smart to keep any necessary medications and supplies out of your checked luggage, keeping them on-hand in your carry-on instead. That way, if your checked luggage takes longer to arrive to your final destination, you still have what you need. Keep your medications in their original packaging with the prescription label attached (not required, but can make things easier), and some people with diabetes prefer to also keep a letter from their doctor on hand stating why they need to carry these medications. In addition to keeping your insulin and glucose meter, it’s a good idea to have some fast-acting glucose sources at the ready for a low blood sugar. While many people with diabetes have been permitted to bring juice boxes and other liquid glucose treatments on board while they travel, many travelers prefer glucose tabs because they withstand air pressure changes and temperature fluctuations without issue. Can my insulin pump go through the x-ray machines, or through the full body scanner? It is not recommended that your insulin pump go through x-ray machin Continue reading >>

Traveling Through Airport Security With Diabetes Devices (with Or Without #openaps)

Traveling Through Airport Security With Diabetes Devices (with Or Without #openaps)

tl;dr: Put your #OpenAPS or other artificial pancreas rigs through the x-ray machine; it’s a small computer and a battery. — I travel quite a bit these days, so it’s pretty routine for me to pack up my diabetes gear and backup supplies and whisk away to the airport and the next adventure. In fact, in 2016 I think I went through airport security 44+ times, in several countries. I have never had any issues with my #OpenAPS (DIY hybrid closed loop artificial pancreas) rigs – even when I carry multiples. Here are some tips on what gear should be put where, who should be told what during the security process, and how to further simplify (as much as is possible with diabetes!) the airport security experience when traveling with diabetes. 6 little pancreases went to the airport & had no problems in security, as usual. #OpenAPS #emergencybackuppancreases pic.twitter.com/eFfYru2Ivt — Dana #hcsm #OpenAPS (@danamlewis) February 14, 2017 A list of diabetes gear you’re probably packing for your trip: BG meter Test strips Lancet(s) Pump sites Reservoirs CGM sensors CGM receiver Tape for sites/sensors Syringes as back up Anti-nausea meds Depending on the length of your trip, backup pump/transmitter/meter/receiver/etc. Snacks Extra batteries to power your phone for uploading BGs (Uploader phone if you’re still using an uploader to Nightscout) Artificial pancreas rig (i.e. #OpenAPS rig, whether that’s a Raspberry Pi or Explorer Board setup, or a Rileylink) Insulin Extra insulin Juice for lows Out of that list? Here are the only things I would pull out of your bag. Insulin/extra insulin* Juice for lows** Everything else (yes, including your CGM receiver; yes, including your pancreas rigs) can stay in your bag and go through the x-ray. *If you have a single bottle of insul Continue reading >>

Traveling With Diabetes - Download Your Free Diabetes Travel Letter Template

Traveling With Diabetes - Download Your Free Diabetes Travel Letter Template

And right here in this article, youll find your answers to the following questions: Why should you carry a Diabetes Travel Letter? How can you download my Diabetes Travel Letter Template for free? What exact information should a Diabetes Travel Letter contain? Should you have your Diabetes Travel Letter translated when you go overseas? What happens if you dont have your Diabetes Travel Letter when traveling with diabetes supplies? Note: In this article we mostly refer to the TSA, the USA Transportation Security Administration. It is the airport security management for all American airports. However, regarding diabetic supplies, most of the airports in the world will apply the exact same rules as the TSA, and as the ones mention here. You should not have any problems passing through airport security with your diabetic supplies. Nowadays, more and more people are traveling with diabetes, and airport security staff is getting more familiar with diabetes supplies such as insulin pumps, blood glucose meters, continuous glucose monitoring sensors, glucagon kits, and other diabetic pharmaceuticals. According to the TSA requirements:Diabetes related supplies, equipment, and medication, including liquids, are allowed through the checkpoint once they have been screened. Passengers should declare these items and separate them from other belongings before screening begins. Insulin pens, vials, cartridges, insulin pumps, blood glucose meters, continuous glucose monitoring sensors, needles, syringes, diabetes tablets, lancets, and any other diabetic supplies, are all ALLOWED to pass through TSA. And more generally, this applies to any airport security in the world. But to be completely safe, you do need to have a DIABETES TRAVEL LETTER from your doctor specifying that you are a diab Continue reading >>

Tsa Guidelines For Diabetes Supplies

Tsa Guidelines For Diabetes Supplies

Some people can find it stressful with TSA airport security, so to ease the stress, I've put together a guide on TSA guidelines for diabetes supplies. Note: Some posts may contain affiliate links. Read more here Dealing with airport security is already stressful, but when you add in a medical condition, such as type 1 diabetes, it can feel even worse. Ive traveled through a wide variety of different airports, and I can honestly say I havent had any major issues abroad. However, people often say they are fearful of the TSA as they are known for being strict. So, I thought Id put together a little guide on how the TSA guidelines for diabetes supplies to help ease your mind. If it helps, Ive been through and they were probably the nicest any staff at airport security has been to me. However, Im aware there could be a lot of variation in this. This card can be downloaded and printed ahead of time and given to a transportation security officer to inform them of your type 1 diabetes. It can also inform them of the various medical supplies you will be carrying, or provide more detail on what medications/supplies you are carrying. This isnt necessary, but its good for people who are nervous, dont want to bring more attention to themselves, or simply dont like to explain themselves (me haha). When you contact the TSA Cares, you are given individual support from someone who will provide assistance. This is a good idea as it gives the TSA an indication of the type of assistance you will need (if you need it.) This is great if your traveling with a type 1 diabetic child since they can only be patted down by a supervisor agent and if its a girl, she needs to be patted down by a girl, and the same for a boy. You can help save time by calling them in advance to ensure that someone is Continue reading >>

More in diabetes