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Triple Receptor Diabetes Drug

Diabetes Drug Reverses Memory Loss In Mice Suffering From Alzheimer's

Diabetes Drug Reverses Memory Loss In Mice Suffering From Alzheimer's

Diabetes Drug Reverses Memory Loss In Mice Suffering From Alzheimer's In a breakthrough trial, scientists have discovered that a common diabetes drug significantly reverses memory loss in mice that have Alzheimers disease, a disorder thataffects 5.5 million Americans. Finding effective ways to tackle Alzheimer's is of top priority, sodiscovering that a drug normally used to treat type 2 diabetes can actually reverse the disease at least in mice, anyway is exciting. Thefindings are published in the journal Brain Research . According to lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher, the drug "holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease." "With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer's, added Dr Doug Brown from Alzheimers Society. It's imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia." The new drug is known as a triple receptor drug, meaning that it targets Alzheimers in multiple ways. People with Alzheimers have impaired growth factors substances like hormones that stimulate growth in their brains. Therefore, the treatment combines three growth factors: GLP-1, GIP, and glucagon. The drug was tested on mice genetically modified to develop Alzheimers. The animals were injected with the triple receptor drug every day for two months before being subjected to a maze test. After treatment, elderly mice in the advanced stages of Alzheimers showed better learning and memory formation when completing the test. Their rate of nerve cell loss declined, they had fewer Alzheimers-linked plaques in their brains, and they had higher levels of a brain growth factor that p Continue reading >>

Alzheimer's: 'triple-action' Diabetes Drug Shows Promise As Treatment

Alzheimer's: 'triple-action' Diabetes Drug Shows Promise As Treatment

Alzheimer's: 'Triple-action' diabetes drug shows promise as treatment Scientists in the United Kingdom and China find that a new drug for type 2 diabetes may protect the brain from damage caused by Alzheimer's disease, after testing it in mice. Could a diabetes drug help to treat Alzheimer's disease? In a new paper published in the journal Brain Research, the researchers explain how the "triple-action" drug resulted in a significant reversal of memory loss in mice that were genetically engineered to develop human-like Alzheimer's disease . The new drug "holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease," says study leader Christian Hlscher, a professor in the Faculty of Health and Medicine at Lancaster University in the U.K. Alzheimer's is a brain-wasting disease that accounts for 5075 percent of cases of dementia , which is a condition wherein people gradually lose their ability to think, remember, make decisions, hold a conversation, and look after themselves. As the disease progresses, the brain undergoes biological and chemical changes, and particular areas shrink as nerve cells, or neurons, die. The exact causes of Alzheimer's are currently unknown, but microscopic examinations of affected brain tissue have revealed two hallmarks: abnormal accumulations of protein segments known as "plaques" and "tangles." Current treatments make no real difference The number of people with Alzheimer's disease is rising rapidly as the population ages. In 2015, there were an estimated 46.8 million people worldwide living with dementia, and this number is expected to reach more than 130 million in 2050. In the United States where Alzheimer's is currently the sixth leading cause of death there are an estima Continue reading >>

Could This Type Ii Diabetes Drug Help Reverse Alzheimer's?

Could This Type Ii Diabetes Drug Help Reverse Alzheimer's?

A drug developed to help diabetes shows that it can help reverse the effects of Alzheimer’s — at least in mice. The breakthrough, published this week in the journal Brain Research, shows a “clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders” like Alzheimer’s, the researchers wrote in the report. The drug is a triple receptor of GLP-1, GIP and Glucagon, three biological molecules known as “growth factors” that help improve insulin sensitivity in people with diabetes. People with Alzheimer’s have reduced amounts of these growth factors in their brains. For the study, researchers led by Christian Holscher at Lancaster University in the U.K. implanted mice with mutated human genes that carry a hereditary form of Alzheimer’s. They then let the mice age for a couple of months so they would develop brain damage. The researchers then gave the drug to the mice and put them through a maze. The result? The showed a marked improvement in memory function and learning capabilities. “These very promising outcomes demonstrate the efficacy of these novel multiple receptor drugs that originally were developed to treat type 2 diabetes but have shown consistent neuro-protective effects in several studies," Holscher said in a press release. One in 10 Americans over age 65 show signs of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, according to the Alzheimer’s Association, and is the sixth leading cause of death — but not for lack of trying to find a cure. "With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer's. It's imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia,” Doug Brown, Director of Research and Dev Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug May Help With Memory Loss In Dementia

Diabetes Drug May Help With Memory Loss In Dementia

Diabetes drug may help with memory loss in dementia Diabetes drug may help with memory loss in dementia "Diabetes drug significantly reverses memory loss in Alzheimer's patients," The Sun reports. What the headline failed to make clear is that the "patients" were in fact mice, which had been genetically engineered to develop Alzheimer's-like symptoms. This new mouse study investigated whether a new drug developed for the treatment of diabetes, known as a triple receptor agonist (TA), could also be used to improve symptoms of Alzheimer's, such as memory loss. Previous animal research has shown TA, which targets biologic pathways in the brain to regulate blood sugar levels, may also protect against Alzheimer's. They found that mice given the modified version of TA appeared to have reduced memory loss, which was assessed by way of a water maze test. Although an interesting study with promising results, this is just early-stage animal research. Further trials in the laboratory and then in humans would be needed to see whether this drug is a safe and effective treatment for Alzheimer's. For now, maintaining a healthy and balanced lifestyle is recommended through healthy eating and exercise . This can help lower both the risk of type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease. The study was carried out by a small team of researchers from Shanxi Medical University and Shaoyang University in China, and Lancaster University in England. It was funded by the Ministry of Human Resources and Social Security, a Shanxi Scholarship Council of China and a grant from the Alzheimer's Society UK. The study was published in the peer-reviewed medical journal Brain Research. It is available on an open-access basis and is free to read online . Generally, aside from its misleading headline, The Sun's Continue reading >>

Scientists Claim They Found A Drug That Significantly Reverses Memory Loss

Scientists Claim They Found A Drug That Significantly Reverses Memory Loss

A team at Lancaster University in the U.K. has discovered that a drug designed to treat type 2 diabetes may hold the key to fighting the memory loss that accompanies Alzheimers disease. Their study has been published in Brain Research . The medication is a triple receptor drug that combines the growth factors GLP-1, GIP, and Glucagon to protect the brain from degeneration. The researchers tested the medication using transgenic mice expressing the mutated genes that cause Alzheimers in humans. These genes run in families and are responsible for a form of Alzheimers that can be inherited. The researchers observed the mice as they made their way through a water maze. They discovered that the mice treated with the diabetes compound showed an improved memory and sense of direction. Remarkably, the drug not only seemed to protect the brain, but also to reverse some of the damage caused by the amyloid plaques that progressively kill the neurons of Alzheimers patients. The way the drug works is that it can help neurons to repair and restore their functions again. It cannot bring back dead neurons once they are gone, they are gone, lead author Christian Holscher of Lancaster University told Futurism. However, there are a lot of stressed neurons that are still alive but no longer function properly. Thats where the window of opportunity lies. The first clinical trials showed the same effect in people, so it is not just some mouse artifact, added Holscher. A recent phase II clinical trial in Parkinsons patients showed some really nice results, so we are getting close! Because diabetes is a risk factor in Alzheimers, some scientists are hopeful that diabetes drugs could be effective treatments for neurodegeneration. According to the study, the link between the two could be that ins Continue reading >>

Triple-acting Diabetes Drug Reverses Memory Loss In Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Models

Triple-acting Diabetes Drug Reverses Memory Loss In Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Models

Triple-Acting Diabetes Drug Reverses Memory Loss in Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Models Studies in a mouse model of Alzheimers disease (AD) have shown how a drug that was originally developed to treat diabetes demonstrates what researchers in the U.K. and China call clear promise as a treatment for AD and other neurodegenerative disorders in humans. The studies, led by Christian Hlscher, Ph.D., at the U.K.s Lancaster University, confirmed that AD mice treated using a triple-receptor agonist (TA) showed significantly reversed memory loss, as well as reduced neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, lower amyloid plaque load in the brain, and increased levels of brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), a key growth factor that protects synaptic function. ...these findings show that novel TAs are a promising lead for the design of future treatment strategies in AD, the researchers write in their published paper in Brain Research, which is entitled Neuroprotective Effects of a Triple GLP-1/GIP/Glucagon Receptor Agonist in the APP/PS1 Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease . Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a known risk factor for AD, and this association has motivated scientists to investigate whether antidiabetic drugs might also be effective against AD. Studies have shown that the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), which have antidiabetic properties, can play a neuroprotective role in the brain and have demonstrated promising effects in animal models of AD. Prof. Holschers team turned to a triple-receptor agonist that activates GIP-1, GIP, and glucagon receptors. The drug had previously been in development for treating diabetes, but hadnt been assessed for any neuroprotective properties. They test Continue reading >>

Alzheimer's Breakthrough? Triple Receptor Diabetes Drug Shows Promise | Newsmax.com

Alzheimer's Breakthrough? Triple Receptor Diabetes Drug Shows Promise | Newsmax.com

A diabetes drug could be an Alzheimer's breakthrough, according to researchers who found that the medicine significantly reversed memory loss and brain deterioration in mice. In a report posted this week in the science journal Brain Research, researchers at England's Lancaster University said their work suggested that rodents suffering from a version of Alzheimer's disease improved greatly with the drug, Newsweek magazine reported . The drug, known as a triple receptor and which combines the growth factors GLP-1, GIP and Glucagon, was reported to have improved the memory of aged mice in maze tests after taking the drug. The mice also had a reduced buildup of plaque in the brain, chronic inflammation, and brain nerve cell loss while gaining brain nerve cell protection, Newsweek reported from the research. "With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer's," Doug Brown, director of research and development at the Alzheimer's Society, said in a statement from Lancaster University . "It's imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them." Brown said other studies with existing diabetes drugs such as liraglutide also have shown promise for people with Alzheimer's, and he encouraged continued research on the links. "These very promising outcomes demonstrate the efficacy of these novel multiple receptor drugs that originally were developed to treat Type 2 diabetes but have shown consistent neuro- protective effects in several studies," said Christian Holscher, the study's lead researcher and Lancaster professor. "Clinical studies with an Continue reading >>

Researchers Have Stumbled Upon An Old Drug That Might Treat Alzheimer’s

Researchers Have Stumbled Upon An Old Drug That Might Treat Alzheimer’s

For a group of lab mice suffering from Alzheimer’s disease, it’s a case of an old drug having new tricks—a new development that might one day help humans. A study published in the journal Brain Research shows that a drug created to treat Type 2 diabetes could slow down and even reverse memory loss when administered to mice with Alzheimer’s. The research was conducted by scientists at Lancaster University in the UK with funding from the Alzheimer’s Society. There have been several similar cases in medical history, in which a drug created for one condition has a positive implication for another. Raloxifine was originally developed for osteoporosis, but in 2007 it was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in reducing the risk of breast cancer. Thalidomide started as a sleeping pill in the 1950s that had horrific consequences for the babies of pregnant women who were prescribed the medicine to combat morning sickness. By 2006, it was approved to treat a type of bone-marrow cancer. Type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer’s are more closely linked than may be apparent, as diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer’s and has been linked to the worsening of the disease. And an impaired supply of insulin, the pancreatic hormone that allows your body to use sugar from carbohydrates in food, has been associated with cerebral degeneration. Because the two conditions are so connected, it makes sense that a drug for one might impact the other. And while current research only reflect results in mice, it could one day lead to the development of treatments for humans. That would be an exciting development in the field of study around Alzheimer’s, which has not seen a new treatment in more than 15 years. As part of the Lancaster study, the mice were given what’s ca Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Drug Shows Promise Against Alzheimer’s Disease

New Diabetes Drug Shows Promise Against Alzheimer’s Disease

A ‘triple receptor’ drug originally created to treat type 2 diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer’s disease after researchers from China and the United Kingdom found it ‘significantly reversed memory loss’ in mice. The research appears in the journal Brain Research. “The novel treatment holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease,” said co-author Professor Christian Holscher, from Lancaster University. This is the first time that a triple receptor drug has been used which acts in multiple ways to protect the brain from degeneration. It combines glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and glucagon, which are all growth factors. “With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer’s,” added Dr. Doug Brown, Director of Research and Development at Alzheimer’s Society, who was not involved in the study. “It’s imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them.” “Although the benefits of these ‘triple agonist’ drugs have so far only been found in mice, other studies with existing diabetes drugs such as liraglutide have shown real promise for people with Alzheimer’s, so further development of this work is crucial.” Professor Holscher and his colleagues from Shanxi Medical University and Shaoyang University used APP/PS1 mice, which are transgenic mice that express human mutated genes that cause Alzheimer’s. Aged transgenic mice in the advanced stages of neurodegeneration Continue reading >>

'clear Promise': Diabetes Drug Reversed Memory Loss In Mice With Alzheimer's, Researchers Find

'clear Promise': Diabetes Drug Reversed Memory Loss In Mice With Alzheimer's, Researchers Find

'Clear promise': Diabetes drug reversed memory loss in mice with Alzheimer's, researchers find FILE - In this Feb. 6, 2012, file photo, Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility in Washington, puts her hand on the arm of a resident. In a study published by the Journal of the American Medical Association on Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2013, researchers report that vitamin E might slow the progression of mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. The study of more than 600 older veterans, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, shows high doses of the vitamin delayed the decline in daily living skills, such as making meals, getting dressed and holding a conversation, by about six months over a two-year period. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File) (AP) A team of Chinese and British researchers has discovered that a drug originally created to treat diabetes shows clear promise as a treatment for Alzheimers disease, since it significantly reversed memory loss in mice. News of the potential breakthrough was published this week in Brain Research. [The drug shows a] clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease," the scientists report reads. ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE WARNING SIGNS AND PREVENTION The drug improved memory formation in a mouse model of Alzheimers disease, they said, adding that amyloid plaqueload, inflammation andoxidative stresswere all visibly reduced. The new diabetes drug is a triple receptor that combines GLP-1, GIP and Glucagon, three biological molecules known as growth factors. Once given the drug, the mice were put through a maze test and results showed a clear improvement in their learn Continue reading >>

(video) Researchers Find Promising Alzheimers Treatment Using Diabetes Drug

(video) Researchers Find Promising Alzheimers Treatment Using Diabetes Drug

Promising Alzheimers Treatment Using Diabetes Drug Scientists announced a drug that significantly reversed memory loss in mice with Alzheimers disease. Researchers from Lancaster University in the UK say the novel drug created to treat type 2 diabetes works through a triple method of action and also add that the medicine could provide substantial improvements in the treatment of Alzheimers disease . The drug combines three growth factors that act in multiple ways to protect the brain from degeneration. The Lancaster University scientists published their study results on January 1 in the journal Brain Research. Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher of Lancaster University said the novel treatment holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimers disease. Alzheimers disease is the most frequent cause of dementia in the United States, currently afflicting more than 5 million adults.Current drugs only treat the symptoms of the disease, however, no medicine halts or delays its progression. If a drug or lifestyle change such as diet or exercise could be found that delayed functional deterioration by as little as 1 to 2 years, it would substantially reduce suffering to Alzheimers patients as well costs to families and society. Dr. Doug Brown, the Director of Research and Development at the Alzheimers Society, said: With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimers. Its imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimers and other forms of dementia . This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them. adding Although the benefits of these triple a Continue reading >>

Expert Reaction To Study Investigating A Type 2 Diabetes Drug For Alzheimers Symptoms In A Mouse Model

Expert Reaction To Study Investigating A Type 2 Diabetes Drug For Alzheimers Symptoms In A Mouse Model

expert reaction to study investigating a type 2 diabetes drug for Alzheimers symptoms in a mouse model Publishing in Brain Research, researchers have looked at the role of a drug that is used in treating type 2 diabetes in memory loss in mice. DrDavid Reynolds Chief Scientific Officer, Alzheimers Research UK, said: Not only has the discovery of a link between diabetes and Alzheimers risk empowered people to take positive action around their brain health, it has also presented a promising avenue for research into better treatments. Alzheimers is a complex disease involving many different brain changes and it is important to come at these from as many different angles as possible.It is great to see encouraging findings emerging from research, and this study broadens efforts towards a treatment that could tackle damage to the brain in the disease. Both Alzheimers and diabetes involve changes in glucose metabolism and researchers are investigating whether existing diabetes drugs could improve symptoms in people with Alzheimers by boosting this process. While this triple agonist drug has been developed to improve glucose metabolism in diabetes, unfortunately this study didnt measure this effect, making it difficult to understand what the mechanism underlying potential memory improvements might be. The researchers didnt test the drug in mice without features of Alzheimers and without this important control group it is difficult to interpret these results with confidence. While the treated-mice showed signs of improvement in their ability to navigate a maze, this picture is not clear and by some measures they did not perform any better in this test than they would have due to chance. Animal studies are a vital first step in research but positive signs like these do not always Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug 'significantly Reverses Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

Diabetes Drug 'significantly Reverses Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Diabetes drug 'significantly reverses memory loss' in mice with Alzheimer's A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's after scientists found it 'significantly reversed memory loss' in mice through a triple method of action. This is the first time that a triple receptor drug has been used which acts in multiple ways to protect the brain from degeneration. It combines three growth factors. Problems with growth factor signalling have been shown to be impaired in the brains of Alzheimer's patients. A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's after scientists found it "significantly reversed memory loss" in mice through a triple method of action. The research, published in Brain Research, could bring substantial improvements in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease through the use of a drug originally created to treat type 2 diabetes. Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher of Lancaster University in the UK said the novel treatment "holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease." Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia and the numbers are expected to rise to two million people in the UK by 2051 according to Alzheimer's Society, who part- funded the research. Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research and Development at Alzheimer's Society, said: ""With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer's. It's imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. This approach Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Drug Has 'significantly Reversed Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

A Diabetes Drug Has 'significantly Reversed Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

A Diabetes Drug Has 'Significantly Reversed Memory Loss' in Mice With Alzheimer's A drug developed for type 2 diabetes has " significantly reversed memory loss " in mice with Alzheimer's disease, and researchers now want to test it on humans. The treatment is exciting for scientists because it works by protecting the brain cells attacked by Alzheimer's disease in three separate ways, rather than relying on a single approach. And seeing as the drug has already been tested and approved for use in humans, it's something that could hit the market a lot faster than other experimental treatment options. The results have only been seen in mice so far, but the drug "holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease," said senior author ChristianHlscher of Lancaster University in the UK. "With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer's," said Doug Brown from UK organisation, Alzheimer's Society. "It's imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them." Previous research had already established a link between type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's - type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer's, and it also appears to make the disease progress more rapidly. This could be a result of insulin not getting to the cells properly - insulin is a growth factor which is known to protect brain cells, and insulin resistance has been observed in Alzheimer's disease brains, as well as being the biological mechanism behind type 2 diabetes. So researchers have been investigating wh Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Halts Alzheimers

Diabetes Drug Halts Alzheimers

Illustration of beta-amyloid in the Alzheimers brain fotolia.com/Science RF A triple receptor agonist developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's after scientists found it "significantly reversed memory loss" in mice through a triple mode of action. Lead researcher Christian Holscher of Lancaster University (UK) said the drug originally created to treat type 2 diabetes "holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease." Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a well-established risk factor for Alzheimers disease (AD). Preclinically, it has been shown that the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) have anti-diabetic properties. A triple receptor agonist (TA), which activates GIP-1, GIP and glucagon receptors at the same time was injected once daily (10nmol/kg i.p.) for 60 days to APP/PS1 transgenic mice suffering from Alzheimers. The drug was originally invented by German researchers (account required) to treat type II diabetes. The results published in Brain Research suggest that the treatment significantly reversed the memory deficit in the APP/PS1 mice, as measured through a spatial water maze test. Moreover, the drug reduced levels of the mitochondrial pro-apoptotic signaling molecule BAX, increased the anti-apoptotic signaling molecule Bcl-2 and enhanced the levels of BDNF, a key growth factor that protects synaptic function. Levels of synaptophysin were enhanced, demonstrating protection from synaptic loss that is observed in AD. Neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus was furthermore enhanced as shown in the increase of doublecortin positive cells. Furthermore, the treatment reduced the total amount of beta-amyloid, Continue reading >>

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