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Triple Action Diabetes Drug

Diabetes Drug 'significantly Reverses Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

Diabetes Drug 'significantly Reverses Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Diabetes drug 'significantly reverses memory loss' in mice with Alzheimer's A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's after scientists found it 'significantly reversed memory loss' in mice through a triple method of action. This is the first time that a triple receptor drug has been used which acts in multiple ways to protect the brain from degeneration. It combines three growth factors. Problems with growth factor signalling have been shown to be impaired in the brains of Alzheimer's patients. A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's after scientists found it "significantly reversed memory loss" in mice through a triple method of action. The research, published in Brain Research, could bring substantial improvements in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease through the use of a drug originally created to treat type 2 diabetes. Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher of Lancaster University in the UK said the novel treatment "holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease." Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia and the numbers are expected to rise to two million people in the UK by 2051 according to Alzheimer's Society, who part- funded the research. Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research and Development at Alzheimer's Society, said: ""With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer's. It's imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. This approach Continue reading >>

Sudafed Triple Action Tablet

Sudafed Triple Action Tablet

This combination medication is used to temporarily treat symptoms caused by the common cold , flu , allergies , or other breathing illnesses (such as sinusitis , bronchitis ). The expectorant helps thin and loosen mucus in the lungs , making it easier to cough up the mucus. Decongestants help relieve stuffy nose, sinus , and ear congestion symptoms. Acetaminophen (APAP) is a non- aspirin pain reliever and fever reducer. This medication is not usually used for ongoing coughs from smoking , asthma , other long-term breathing problems (such as emphysema ), or coughs with a lot of mucus unless directed by your doctor. Cough -and-cold products have not been shown to be safe or effective in children younger than 6 years. Therefore, do not use this product to treat cold symptoms in children younger than 6 years unless specifically directed by the doctor. Some products (such as long-acting tablets/capsules) are not recommended for use in children younger than 12 years. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details about using your product safely. These products do not cure or shorten the length of the common cold and may cause serious side effects. To decrease the risk for serious side effects, carefully follow all dosage directions. Do not use this product to make a child sleepy. Do not give other cough -and-cold medication that might contain the same or similar ingredients (see also Drug Interactions section). Ask the doctor or pharmacist about other ways to relieve cough and cold symptoms (such as drinking enough fluids, using a humidifier or saline nose drops/spray). Read and follow all directions on the package label. If you have any questions, consult your pharmacist . Take this medication by mouth with or without food, usually every 4 to 6 hours as needed or as directe Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Drug Has 'significantly Reversed Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

A Diabetes Drug Has 'significantly Reversed Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

A Diabetes Drug Has 'Significantly Reversed Memory Loss' in Mice With Alzheimer's A drug developed for type 2 diabetes has " significantly reversed memory loss " in mice with Alzheimer's disease, and researchers now want to test it on humans. The treatment is exciting for scientists because it works by protecting the brain cells attacked by Alzheimer's disease in three separate ways, rather than relying on a single approach. And seeing as the drug has already been tested and approved for use in humans, it's something that could hit the market a lot faster than other experimental treatment options. The results have only been seen in mice so far, but the drug "holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease," said senior author ChristianHlscher of Lancaster University in the UK. "With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer's," said Doug Brown from UK organisation, Alzheimer's Society. "It's imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them." Previous research had already established a link between type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's - type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer's, and it also appears to make the disease progress more rapidly. This could be a result of insulin not getting to the cells properly - insulin is a growth factor which is known to protect brain cells, and insulin resistance has been observed in Alzheimer's disease brains, as well as being the biological mechanism behind type 2 diabetes. So researchers have been investigating wh Continue reading >>

(video) Researchers Find Promising Alzheimers Treatment Using Diabetes Drug

(video) Researchers Find Promising Alzheimers Treatment Using Diabetes Drug

Promising Alzheimers Treatment Using Diabetes Drug Scientists announced a drug that significantly reversed memory loss in mice with Alzheimers disease. Researchers from Lancaster University in the UK say the novel drug created to treat type 2 diabetes works through a triple method of action and also add that the medicine could provide substantial improvements in the treatment of Alzheimers disease . The drug combines three growth factors that act in multiple ways to protect the brain from degeneration. The Lancaster University scientists published their study results on January 1 in the journal Brain Research. Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher of Lancaster University said the novel treatment holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimers disease. Alzheimers disease is the most frequent cause of dementia in the United States, currently afflicting more than 5 million adults.Current drugs only treat the symptoms of the disease, however, no medicine halts or delays its progression. If a drug or lifestyle change such as diet or exercise could be found that delayed functional deterioration by as little as 1 to 2 years, it would substantially reduce suffering to Alzheimers patients as well costs to families and society. Dr. Doug Brown, the Director of Research and Development at the Alzheimers Society, said: With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimers. Its imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimers and other forms of dementia . This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them. adding Although the benefits of these triple a Continue reading >>

Triple Therapy In Type 2 Diabetes; A Systematic Review And Network Meta-analysis

Triple Therapy In Type 2 Diabetes; A Systematic Review And Network Meta-analysis

Triple therapy in type 2 diabetes; a systematic review and network meta-analysis 1Centre for Applied Health Economics, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia 2Chair of Medicine, Westmead Hospital, University of Sydney, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia Received 2015 Oct 23; Accepted 2015 Nov 11. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, reproduction and adaptation in any medium and for any purpose provided that it is properly attributed. For attribution, the original author(s), title, publication source (PeerJ) and either DOI or URL of the article must be cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Aims. The purpose was to evaluate the evidence for triple therapy regimen using medicines available in Australia for type 2 diabetes. Methods. A systematic literature review was performed to update the relevant evidence from 2002 to 2014 on triple therapy for type 2 diabetes. A multiple-treatments network meta-analysis was undertaken to summarise the comparative efficacy and harms of different triple therapies. Results. Twenty seven trials were identified, most were six months of duration. The following combinations were included in the network meta-analysis: metformin (MET) + sulfonylureas (SU) (used as reference combination); MET + SU+ dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors (DPP-4-i); MET + SU+ thiazolidinediones (TZD); MET + SU+ glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1-RA); MET + SU+ insulins; MET + TZD + DPP-4-i; and MET + SU+ sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2-i). For HbA1c reduction, all triple therapies were statistically superior to MET+SU dual therapy, except for MET + TZD + DPP-4-i Continue reading >>

Alzheimer's: 'triple-action' Diabetes Drug Shows Promise As Treatment

Alzheimer's: 'triple-action' Diabetes Drug Shows Promise As Treatment

Alzheimer's: 'Triple-action' diabetes drug shows promise as treatment Scientists in the United Kingdom and China find that a new drug for type 2 diabetes may protect the brain from damage caused by Alzheimer's disease, after testing it in mice. Could a diabetes drug help to treat Alzheimer's disease? In a new paper published in the journal Brain Research, the researchers explain how the "triple-action" drug resulted in a significant reversal of memory loss in mice that were genetically engineered to develop human-like Alzheimer's disease . The new drug "holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease," says study leader Christian Hlscher, a professor in the Faculty of Health and Medicine at Lancaster University in the U.K. Alzheimer's is a brain-wasting disease that accounts for 5075 percent of cases of dementia , which is a condition wherein people gradually lose their ability to think, remember, make decisions, hold a conversation, and look after themselves. As the disease progresses, the brain undergoes biological and chemical changes, and particular areas shrink as nerve cells, or neurons, die. The exact causes of Alzheimer's are currently unknown, but microscopic examinations of affected brain tissue have revealed two hallmarks: abnormal accumulations of protein segments known as "plaques" and "tangles." Current treatments make no real difference The number of people with Alzheimer's disease is rising rapidly as the population ages. In 2015, there were an estimated 46.8 million people worldwide living with dementia, and this number is expected to reach more than 130 million in 2050. In the United States where Alzheimer's is currently the sixth leading cause of death there are an estima Continue reading >>

Triple Drug Regimen Tops Conventional Treatment In New-onset Diabetes

Triple Drug Regimen Tops Conventional Treatment In New-onset Diabetes

Home / Resources / Articles / Triple Drug Regimen Tops Conventional Treatment In New-onset Diabetes Triple Drug Regimen Tops Conventional Treatment In New-onset Diabetes Triple-drug regimen of metformin, exenatide, and pioglitazone at the onset of type 2 diabetes decreased 2-year treatment failure rates by 84%. In an open-label study, researchers compared the conventional stepwise treatment strategy to starting a triple-drug regimen of metformin, exenatide, and pioglitazone at the onset of type 2 diabetes. The conventional therapy consisted of an escalating dose of metformin (10002000 mg/d) followed by sequential addition of sulfonylurea (glipizide, 20 mg/d) and basal insulin to maintain HbA1c < 6.5. Patients were removed from the study and censored if their blood sugar remained elevated despite being on all three drugs, including the maximum insulin dose. The triple-drug therapy used three drugs from the very beginning: metformin 1 g/day; pioglitazone 30 mg/day; and exenatide 10 mcg/day. All medications could be adjusted as necessary to avoid hypoglycemia. The triple-drug combination was chosen to combat diabetes on three pathophysiologic fronts. As stated by Dr. Ralph DeFronzo, "Metformin is a good insulin sensitizer in the liver, but has no effect on muscle and does nothing for beta cells. Pioglitazone is a powerful insulin sensitizer that works in both muscle and liver. And exenatide exerts beneficial effects on both alpha- and beta-cells, and promotes weight loss." The study randomized 169 participants with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes who were also drug-naive to either the conventional therapy (90 patients) or triple therapy (79 patients). The patients had mean disease duration of 5 months, and all had been diagnosed less than 2 years earlier. The patients wer Continue reading >>

Triple-acting Diabetes Drug Reverses Memory Loss In Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Models

Triple-acting Diabetes Drug Reverses Memory Loss In Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Models

Triple-Acting Diabetes Drug Reverses Memory Loss in Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Models Studies in a mouse model of Alzheimers disease (AD) have shown how a drug that was originally developed to treat diabetes demonstrates what researchers in the U.K. and China call clear promise as a treatment for AD and other neurodegenerative disorders in humans. The studies, led by Christian Hlscher, Ph.D., at the U.K.s Lancaster University, confirmed that AD mice treated using a triple-receptor agonist (TA) showed significantly reversed memory loss, as well as reduced neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, lower amyloid plaque load in the brain, and increased levels of brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), a key growth factor that protects synaptic function. ...these findings show that novel TAs are a promising lead for the design of future treatment strategies in AD, the researchers write in their published paper in Brain Research, which is entitled Neuroprotective Effects of a Triple GLP-1/GIP/Glucagon Receptor Agonist in the APP/PS1 Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease . Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a known risk factor for AD, and this association has motivated scientists to investigate whether antidiabetic drugs might also be effective against AD. Studies have shown that the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), which have antidiabetic properties, can play a neuroprotective role in the brain and have demonstrated promising effects in animal models of AD. Prof. Holschers team turned to a triple-receptor agonist that activates GIP-1, GIP, and glucagon receptors. The drug had previously been in development for treating diabetes, but hadnt been assessed for any neuroprotective properties. They test Continue reading >>

Triple-action Diabetes Medication Promises To Reverse Alzheimers Disease, New Study Finds

Triple-action Diabetes Medication Promises To Reverse Alzheimers Disease, New Study Finds

indicates that a type of diabetic drug, known as a GLP-1 receptor agonist, may help to reverse Alzheimers-related memory loss and provide new treatments for other chronic neurodegenerative diseases. GLP (Glucagon-Like Peptide)-1 is an important hormone that stimulates the production of insulin in the pancreas during the digestive process. GLP-1 works on many different organs in order to lower blood sugar levels. Among other functions, it slows glucose absorption in the digestive tract, raises insulin levels when glucose levels are elevated, suppresses the brains appetite center, and regulates glucose uptake in muscle tissue. Unfortunately, this hormone breaks down very quickly, so it is not effective in treating the symptoms of diabetes. GLP-1 agonists, which include medications such as Byetta and Bydureon, mimic natural GLP-1 except they dont break down as quickly, giving the medication more time to work. In the recent study, laboratory mice that were genetically engineered to develop Alzheimers were given daily injections of a GLP-1 agonist. After a time, their cognitive abilities were assessed using a spatial water maze test. The mice demonstrated significantly reduced memory loss. It turns out the medication reduced inflammation and oxidative stress in the brain while lowering the number of amyloid plaques two factors in the development of Alzheimers disease. In addition, they found that the medication increased the levels of neuroprotective molecules as well as a substance known as BDNF (Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor), a protein that helps to maintain and protect nerve cells in the brain. Treatment with GLP-1 agonists may not replace neurons that have been lost to Alzheimers but it can help to heal damaged ones. According to Dr. Christian Hoscher, lead author Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin, marketed under the trade name Glucophage among others, is the first-line medication for the treatment of type 2 diabetes,[4][5] particularly in people who are overweight.[6] It is also used in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome.[4] Limited evidence suggests metformin may prevent the cardiovascular disease and cancer complications of diabetes.[7][8] It is not associated with weight gain.[8] It is taken by mouth.[4] Metformin is generally well tolerated.[9] Common side effects include diarrhea, nausea and abdominal pain.[4] It has a low risk of causing low blood sugar.[4] High blood lactic acid level is a concern if the medication is prescribed inappropriately and in overly large doses.[10] It should not be used in those with significant liver disease or kidney problems.[4] While no clear harm comes from use during pregnancy, insulin is generally preferred for gestational diabetes.[4][11] Metformin is in the biguanide class.[4] It works by decreasing glucose production by the liver and increasing the insulin sensitivity of body tissues.[4] Metformin was discovered in 1922.[12] French physician Jean Sterne began study in humans in the 1950s.[12] It was introduced as a medication in France in 1957 and the United States in 1995.[4][13] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[14] Metformin is believed to be the most widely used medication for diabetes which is taken by mouth.[12] It is available as a generic medication.[4] The wholesale price in the developed world is between 0.21 and 5.55 USD per month as of 2014.[15] In the United States, it costs 5 to 25 USD per month.[4] Medical uses[edit] Metformin is primarily used for type 2 diabetes, but is increasingly be Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitusmedication

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitusmedication

Author: Romesh Khardori, MD, PhD, FACP; Chief Editor: George T Griffing, MD more... Pharmacologic therapy of type 2 diabetes has changed dramatically in the last 10 years, with new drugs and drug classes becoming available. These drugs allow for the use of combination oral therapy, often with improvement in glycemic control that was previously beyond the reach of medical therapy. Agents used in diabetic therapy include the following: Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-4) Inhibitors Selective sodium-glucose transporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors Traditionally, diet modification has been the cornerstone of diabetes management. Weight loss is more likely to control glycemia in patients with recent onset of the disease than in patients who are significantly insulinopenic. Medications that induce weight loss, such as orlistat, may be effective in highly selected patients but are not generally indicated in the treatment of the average patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Patients who are symptomatic at initial presentation with diabetes may require transient treatment with insulin to reduce glucose toxicity (which may reduce beta-cell insulin secretion and worsen insulin resistance) or an insulin secretagogue to rapidly relieve symptoms such as polyuria and polydipsia. These agents are considered the first choice for oral type 2 diabetes treatment. They reduce hyperglycemia by decreasing hepatic gluconeogenesis (primary effect) and increasing peripheral insulin sensitivity (secondary effect). They do not increase insulin levels or cause weight gain. Alone, they rarely cause hypoglycemia. Biguanides are absorbed from the intestines and are not bound to plasma proteins. They are not metabolized and are rapidly eliminated by the kidneys. Drug levels increase markedly in renal insufficie Continue reading >>

Alzheimer's & Dementia Weekly

Alzheimer's & Dementia Weekly

Triple-Action Diabetes Drug Fights Alzheimer's in the Lab Scientists found drug developed for diabetes significantly reversed memory loss in Alzheimer's mice, through a triple method of action. See why top researchers say this treatment "holds clear promise." A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimers through a triple method of action.The research, published in Brain Research , could bring substantial improvements in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease through the use of a drug originally created to treat type 2 diabetes. Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher of Lancaster University in the UK said the novel treatment holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimers disease. Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia and the numbers are expected to rise to two million people in the UK by 2051 according to Alzheimers Society, who part- funded the research. Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research and Development at Alzheimers Society, said: With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimers. Its imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimers and other forms of dementia. This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them. Although the benefits of these triple agonist drugs have so far only been found in mice, other studies with existing diabetes drugs such as liraglutide have shown real promise for people with Alzheimers, so further development of this work is crucial. This is the first time that a triple receptor drug has been used which acts in multiple ways to protect the brain from degeneration. It comb Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Found To Reverse Symptoms Of Memory Loss In Alzheimer's Mice

Diabetes Drug Found To Reverse Symptoms Of Memory Loss In Alzheimer's Mice

The fascinating connection between diabetes and Alzheimer's disease has been studied for several years, with some scientists going so far as to suggest the two conditions are different stages of the same disease. A team of researchers has now discovered that a drug initially developed to treat type 2 diabetes has "significantly reversed memory loss" in early animal trials. The new research led by Professor Christian Holscher of Lancaster University looked at the neuro-protective effects of a novel diabetes drug called a triple receptor agonist. This drug was initially designed to treat type 2 diabetes by activating GLP-1, GIP and Glucagon growth factor receptors in the brain. The less time you spend thinking about your cargo, the more time you can spend running your busin... The study used transgenic mice engineered to express the same mutated genes that cause Alzheimer's in humans. After exposure to the triple receptor agonist the mice displayed significant improvements in a maze-based memory test and reductions in chronic inflammation, oxidative stress and amyloid plaques in the brain. Past research has already confirmed that single agonist drugs developed for diabetes display neuroprotective effects in animal models, but this is the first time that a triple receptor drug has been studied for these effects. Professor Holscher sees clear promise in these results, and while more research needs to be done, this does point to a potential new treatment for those suffering from Alzheimer's disease. "Here we show that a novel triple receptor drug shows promise as a potential treatment for Alzheimer's but further dose-response tests and direct comparisons with other drugs have to be conducted in order to evaluate if this new drugs is superior to previous ones," says Holscher. Continue reading >>

Researchers Just Accidentally Found An Effective Alzheimer’s Treatment While Trying To Cure Diabetes

Researchers Just Accidentally Found An Effective Alzheimer’s Treatment While Trying To Cure Diabetes

Developing new treatments for ailments can be a tedious and frustrating process for scientists. Oftentimes, newly developed drugs just don’t work the way they were intended, falling short of expectations and leading to a dead end. But other times, a drug developed for one purpose turns out to be even more effective at treating something completely different. That appears to be exactly what is happening with a new class of drug originally developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, but has recently been shown to have a drastic benefit in mice with Alzheimer’s. The new drugs, which are classified as “triple agonist” (because they work in three ways), were tested on mice which were developed to express genes linked to Alzheimer’s. The animals were already exhibiting many of the symptoms associated with the disease, including compromised memory and difficulty learning, but showed dramatic improvement in their brain function after receiving the unique treatment. The treatment “holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease,” Professor Christian Holscher, lead researcher of the study, explains. The research was published in Brain Research. According to the study, the triple-acting treatment is thought to work against Alzheimer’s disease by protecting nerve cells, reducing amyloid plaques in the brain (which have been linked to Alzheimer’s), and reducing inflammation while slowing nerve cell degradation. Mice that received treatment demonstrated significant improvement in learning as well as memory formation. Discovering a potential new treatment for a devastating disease like Alzheimer’s is fantastic news, but the fact that the drug was initially intended to treat type 2 Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Shows Promise Fighting Alzheimers Symptoms

Diabetes Drug Shows Promise Fighting Alzheimers Symptoms

Diabetes Drug Shows Promise Fighting Alzheimers Symptoms A drug earmarked to treat diabetes may also be an effective treatment option for Alzheimers patients. Researchers from Lancaster University have found that a triple receptor agonist (TA), which activates glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and glucagon receptors at the same time, has significantly reversed memory loss in mice through a triple method of action. The treatment was originally created to treat type 2 diabetes. With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer's, Doug Brown, Ph.D., the director of Research and Development at the Alzheimers Society, said in a statement. It's imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them, he added. Although the benefits of these 'triple agonist' drugs have so far only been found in mice, other studies with existing diabetes drugs such as liraglutide have shown real promise for people with Alzheimer's, so further development of this work is crucial. Previous studies have shown that the incretin hormones GLP-1 and GIP that have anti-diabetic properties show very promising effects in animal models of Alzheimers. The study represents the first time a triple receptor drugwhich acts in multiple ways to protect the brain from degeneration has been used, combining GLP-1, GIP and glucagon, which are all growth factors. Growth factor signaling has shown to be impaired in the brains of Alzheimers patients. In the study, the researchers used APP/PS1 micetransgenic mice that express human mutated Continue reading >>

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