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Triglycerides And Diabetes

10 Causes Of High Triglycerides In Diabetes

10 Causes Of High Triglycerides In Diabetes

It's not surprising to have high triglyceride levels if you have type 2 diabetes. About 80% of people with diabetes struggle with this problem. Elevated triglyceride levels are also a component of metabolic syndrome, a group of disorders that increase your risk of heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. Other symptoms of this syndrome include high blood sugar, high blood pressure, low HDL (good cholesterol), and excess belly fat. Definition Triglycerides are fat molecules that make up most of your body fat and the fat found in food. Along with cholesterol, they are one of the lipids that circulate in your blood. The medical term for having elevated levels of triglycerides is hypertriglyceridemia . In fasting laboratory tests, a normal triglyceride level is below 150 mg/dL. Borderline high is 150 to 199 mg/dL. High is considered 200 to 499 mg/dL. Very high is over 500 mg/dL. High triglyceride levels can increase your risk for heart disease, stroke, and nerve damage. There is a link between chronically elevated triglyceride levels and atherosclerosis , as well as insulin resistance. Causes of High Triglycerides There are many causes for high triglyceride levels. The list below includes common causes for people who have type 2 diabetes and related problems: Poorly controlled type 2 diabetes: When your diabetes is not under good control, you likely have high levels of both glucose (blood sugar) and insulin in your body. Insulin helps convert glucose into glycogen (the stored form of glucose) and helps to store glycogen in the liver. When the liver becomes too saturated with glycogen, though, glucose is instead used to create fatty acids that are released into the bloodstream. These fatty acids are used to make triglycerides, which build up in fat cells and contribute to Continue reading >>

Correlation Between Glycated Hemoglobin And Triglyceride Level In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Correlation Between Glycated Hemoglobin And Triglyceride Level In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: Abstract Dyslipidemia is quite prevalent in non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Maintaining tight glycemic along with lipid control plays an essential role in preventing micro- and macro-vascular complications associated with diabetes. The main purpose of the study was to highlight the relationship between glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and triglyceride levels. This may in turn help in predicting the triglyceride status of type 2 diabetics and therefore identifying patients at increased risk from cardiovascular events. Hypertriglyceridemia is one of the common risk factors for coronary artery disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Careful monitoring of the blood glucose level can be used to predict lipid status and can prevent most of the complications associated with the disease. This is a cross-sectional study using data collected from the outpatient diabetic clinic of Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre (JPMC) Karachi, Pakistan. Patients of age 18 years and above were recruited from the clinic. A total of consenting 509 patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus were enrolled over a period of 11 months. For statistical analysis, SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 17.0 ( IBM Corp, Armonk, New York) was used and Chi-square and Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to find the association between triglyceride and HbA1c. The HbA1c was dichotomized into four groups on the basis of cut-off. Chi-square was used for association between HbA1c with various cut-off values and high triglyceride levels. Odds-ratio and its 95% confidence interval were calculated to estimate the level of risk between high triglyceride levels and HbA1c groups. The p-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant for all the tests applied for significance. The association of Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Triglycerides

Type 2 Diabetes And Triglycerides

What is a triglyceride, and why do somephysicians refer to it as the “ugly fat”? Most people who read the news or watchtelevision know about cholesterol. There areconstant warnings about high cholesterolas a very important risk factor for heartdisease, and we are continually bombardedwith advertisements for foods and pills andexercise programs that promise to lower ourcholesterol levels. But few people have heard about orunderstand much about triglycerides.Triglycerides are bundles of fats found in theblood stream especially after we eat. Thebody manufactures triglycerides from thecarbohydrates and fatty foods that we eat.Almost 90 percent of the fat content of mostnon-lean meats is triglyceride. What are the function and importance oftriglycerides? Triglycerides account for about 99 percentof the fat stored in our bodies. Thesetriglyceride-laden fats serve as the mostimportant source of long-term energy for thebody, since they are stored in a much denserform than starches or muscle proteins.Formation of fat requires the presence ofinsulin. Triglyceride in fat is converted toenergy between meals and overnight, or anytime when we are fasting or insulin levelsare low. Fat cells have a tremendous storagecapacity, which may contribute to obesity.With extended fasting or absolute insulindeficiency, the liver converts fat breakdownproducts to ketones. High triglyceride levels in the blood tendto coexist with low levels of HDL (“good”)cholesterol, contributing to a condition calleddiabetic dyslipidemia. The third componentof this “dangerous trio” is a tendency forpatients with this condition to have thesmall, dense, undesirable (more atherogenic)type of LDL cholesterol in their blood (eventhough their LDL cholesterol level may benormal). The combination of high tri Continue reading >>

Triglycerides And Diabetes - 10 Suggestions To Help Lower Them When Elevated

Triglycerides And Diabetes - 10 Suggestions To Help Lower Them When Elevated

Triglycerides and Diabetes - 10 Suggestions to Help Lower Them When Elevated When I ask my patients if they understand their laboratory values, I get many queries about triglycerides. Some of the common questions are: What are they? How do they relate to my health? Are they associated with my diabetes? If patients have elevated triglyceride levels, they always request suggestions and help to lower them. So, lets get busy answering some of these questions! Triglycerides are fats. If you attend biochemistry class, you may hear that a triglyceride is made up of three fatty acid molecules attached to a backbone made up of one glycerol molecule. For a brief animation of this, click here . Triglycerides are very common in both food and the human body. When fats are broken down and absorbed in the small intestine, triglycerides are formed inside the body from the fatty acids and glycerol. For more information, click here . Triglycerides can also be made in the body from dietary carbohydrates. (1) After a meal is ingested, if the calories are not used by the body immediately they will be made into triglycerides and stored in fat cells. We commonly think of stored triglycerides as body fat. When energy is needed between meals, triglycerides are released from the bodys fat stores and used as energy. (2) As you can see, triglycerides are needed for life, however, too much of them is not a good thing, as you will see. Triglycerides are evaluated as part of a lipid panel when blood work is taken. These tests are ordered by your medical team. Triglyceride levels are checked after an overnight fast. Fat from a meal can artificially raise the triglyceride levels on the test, so abstaining from food before the test is absolutely necessary. (3) Consumption of alcohol and some medication Continue reading >>

Triglycerides And Diabetes

Triglycerides And Diabetes

As more research is being done in the area of triglycerides, the relationship between triglycerides and diabetes is becoming better understood. Historically, triglycerides have been put on the media back burner compared to the massive amounts of daily news about cholesterol and diabetes. However, that is now changing as more Americans than ever before are being diagnosed with high triglycerides. About a third of Americans are known to have high triglyceride levels and that number is growing daily. This is a grave situation. The seriousness of elevated triglycerides is on the same level as high cholesterol and diabetes. And when high triglycerides and diabetes strike together, the consequences can be deadly. Triglycerides and Metabolic Syndrome High triglycerides are one of the components of a condition called metabolic syndrome, which is also known as insulin-resistance syndrome or pre-diabetic syndrome. About 50 million Americans have this syndrome. Eighty percent of people with Type 2 diabetes also have metabolic syndrome. In addition to high triglycerides, the other conditions found in metabolic syndrome are High blood pressure High blood sugar Belly fat Low HDL “good” cholesterol levels Unfortunately, and sadly, metabolic syndrome is responsible for a large number of premature deaths world-wide. Triglycerides and Diabetes Control The level of triglycerides is now seen to be a good indicator of how well an individual is controlling his diabetes. A high triglyceride level may be an indication of poorly controlled diabetes. High triglycerides cause insulin to be less effective, which then leads to insulin resistance. With insulin resistance, the blood sugar will rise because the insulin is less effective in lowering it. More insulin is required to handle the rising Continue reading >>

Changes In Triglyceride Levels Over Time And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes In Young Men

Changes In Triglyceride Levels Over Time And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes In Young Men

Go to: Abstract OBJECTIVE—The association between changes in triglyceride concentrations over time and diabetes is unknown. We assessed whether two triglyceride determinations obtained 5 years apart can predict incident type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Triglyceride levels at baseline (time 1) and 5 years later (time 2), followed by subsequent follow-up of 5.5 years, were measured in 13,953 apparently healthy men (age 26–45 years) with triglycerides <300 mg/dl (<3.39 mmol/l). RESULTS—During 76,742 person-years, 322 cases of diabetes occurred. A multivariate model adjusted for age, BMI, total cholesterol–to–HDL cholesterol ratio, family history of diabetes, fasting glucose, blood pressure, physical activity, and smoking status revealed a continuous independent rise in incident diabetes with increasing time 1 triglyceride levels (Ptrend < 0.001). Men in the lowest tertile of time 1 triglyceride levels who progressed to the highest tertile over follow-up (low-high) exhibited a hazard ratio (HR) of 12.62 (95% CI 3.52–31.34) compared with those remaining in the lowest tertile at both time points (reference group: low-low). Whereas men who were at the top triglyceride level tertile throughout follow-up (high-high) had a HR for diabetes of 7.08 (2.52–14.45), those whose triglyceride level decreased to the lowest tertile (high-low) exhibited a HR of 1.97 (0.67–6.13). Alterations in triglyceride levels during follow-up were associated with changes in BMI, physical activity, and eating breakfast habit (P < 0.05), but remained an independent modifier of diabetes risk even after adjustment for such changes. CONCLUSIONS—Two measurements of fasting triglyceride levels obtained 5 years apart can assist in identifying apparently healthy young men at incre Continue reading >>

Taming Your Triglycerides

Taming Your Triglycerides

Your health care provider has probably talked to you about your cholesterol level, and if it’s high, ways to help bring your cholesterol down. Has he or she also talked with you about your triglyceride level? If so, you might be wondering just exactly what this is. What are triglycerides? The term triglyceride is a word for a specific type of fat, or lipid, found in the blood. Triglycerides are the form in which fat is found both in the food you eat and in your body. Triglycerides are the way fat is carried in your body to be either used for fuel or stored as fat. Any calories from the food you eat that aren’t used for fuel right away are packaged as triglycerides and stored in your fat cells. Your liver also makes triglycerides. Your triglyceride level is measured by a blood test and is usually measured along with your total cholesterol, and HDL and LDL cholesterol (called a lipid profile). You should not eat anything 12 hours before having your triglycerides measured. What Causes High Triglycerides? Several factors can cause high triglycerides. These include: Being overweight or obese Not being physically active Smoking Drinking too much alcohol Eating a very high carbohydrate diet Certain conditions, such as diabetes, kidney disease, liver disease and low thyroid Some medications, including diuretics (water pills), steroids and birth control pills Family history 10 Ways to Tame Triglycerdies Lose weight if you need to. Losing even a few pounds can help lower your triglycerides, as well as your blood glucose if you have diabetes. Control your blood glucose levels. If you have diabetes and your blood glucose levels have been high, work with your health care team to help bring them down. Get regular physical activity. Being physically active most days of the week no Continue reading >>

Triglycerides And Hdl Cholesterol

Triglycerides And Hdl Cholesterol

Stars or second leads in diabetes? Diabetes carries a high risk of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular disease, especially coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke, is by far the leading cause of death among patients with type 2 diabetes. Although statins reduce the risk of major vascular events by about one-fifth per millimole per liter reduction in LDL cholesterol, with similar proportional reductions in major coronary events, stroke, and the need for coronary revascularization, the residual risk remains high. In the Scandinavian Simvastatin Survival Study (4S) (1), although the relative risk reduction in diabetic patients was larger than in nondiabetic patients, simvastatin-treated diabetic patients were still at higher risk of death than the placebo-treated nondiabetic patients. Multifactorial intervention reduces the risk even further, but significant danger remains. Current guidelines call for an aggressive treatment strategy to reduce LDL cholesterol, blood pressure, and glucose levels in diabetic patients, but data concerning the management of high triglyceride (TG) levels and low HDL cholesterol levels remains inconclusive. This article reviews the data concerning diabetic dyslipidemia and its management. DIABETIC DYSLIPIDEMIA The cluster of lipid abnormalities associated with type 2 diabetes is defined by a high concentration of TG and small dense LDL and a low concentration of HDL cholesterol. Plasma LDL cholesterol levels are generally normal. Insulin resistance is believed to contribute to this atherogenic dyslipidemia by increasing the hepatic secretion of VLDL and other apolipoprotein (apo)B-containing lipoprotein particles, as a result of increased free fatty acid flux to the liver (2,3). This may also be the result of a diminished suppressive effect of i Continue reading >>

Management Of Hypertriglyceridemia In The Diabetic Patient

Management Of Hypertriglyceridemia In The Diabetic Patient

Management of Hypertriglyceridemia in the Diabetic Patient VA Medical Center and Laboratory for Atherosclerosis and Metabolic Research, Department of Pathology and Internal Medicine, UC Davis Medical Center, 4635 Second Avenue, Research 1 Building, Room 3000, Sacramento, CA 95817 USA VA Medical Center and Laboratory for Atherosclerosis and Metabolic Research, Department of Pathology and Internal Medicine, UC Davis Medical Center, 4635 Second Avenue, Research 1 Building, Room 3000, Sacramento, CA 95817 USA VA Medical Center and Laboratory for Atherosclerosis and Metabolic Research, Department of Pathology and Internal Medicine, UC Davis Medical Center, 4635 Second Avenue, Research 1 Building, Room 3000, Sacramento, CA 95817 USA VA Medical Center and Laboratory for Atherosclerosis and Metabolic Research, Department of Pathology and Internal Medicine, UC Davis Medical Center, 4635 Second Avenue, Research 1 Building, Room 3000, Sacramento, CA 95817 USA Ishwarlal Jialal, Email: [email protected] . This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The hypertriglyceridemia of diabetes can be classified into mild to moderate (triglycerides between 150499mg/dL) and severe hypertriglyceridemia (triglycerides 500mg/dL). As in any other individuals with hypertriglyceridemia, secondary causes need to be excluded. The management of severe hypertriglyceridemia (chylomicronemia syndrome) includes aggressive reduction of triglycerides with intravenous insulin, fibrates, omega-3 fatty acids, and/or niacin therapy to avert the risk of pancreatitis. In patients with mild to moderate hypertriglyceridemia, the treatment of choice is statin therapy to achieve the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) target goals. The evidence base would fa Continue reading >>

How To Lower Triglycerides & Ldl Cholesterol

How To Lower Triglycerides & Ldl Cholesterol

Many of the same lifestyle changes and medications can lower both triglycerides and LDL (bad) cholesterol and reduce your risk of a heart event or heart disease. Many of the same lifestyle changes and medications can lower both triglycerides and LDL (bad) cholesterol and reduce your risk of a heart event or heart disease. Many of the same lifestyle changes and medications can lower both triglycerides and LDL (bad) cholesterol and reduce your risk of a heart event or heart disease. Many of the same lifestyle changes and medications can lower both triglycerides and LDL (bad) cholesterol and reduce your risk of a heart event or heart disease. Continue reading >>

Triglycerides: Why Do They Matter?

Triglycerides: Why Do They Matter?

Triglycerides are an important measure of heart health. Here's why triglycerides matter — and what to do if your triglycerides are too high. If you've been keeping an eye on your blood pressure and cholesterol levels, there's something else you might need to monitor: your triglycerides. Having a high level of triglycerides, a type of fat (lipid) in your blood, can increase your risk of heart disease. However, the same lifestyle choices that promote overall health can help lower your triglycerides, too. What are triglycerides? Triglycerides are a type of fat (lipid) found in your blood. When you eat, your body converts any calories it doesn't need to use right away into triglycerides. The triglycerides are stored in your fat cells. Later, hormones release triglycerides for energy between meals. If you regularly eat more calories than you burn, particularly "easy" calories like carbohydrates and fats, you may have high triglycerides (hypertriglyceridemia). What's considered normal? A simple blood test can reveal whether your triglycerides fall into a healthy range. Normal — Less than 150 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or less than 1.7 millimoles per liter (mmol/L) Borderline high — 150 to 199 mg/dL (1.8 to 2.2 mmol/L) High — 200 to 499 mg/dL (2.3 to 5.6 mmol/L) Very high — 500 mg/dL or above (5.7 mmol/L or above) Your doctor will usually check for high triglycerides as part of a cholesterol test (sometimes called a lipid panel or lipid profile). You'll have to fast for nine to 12 hours before blood can be drawn for an accurate triglyceride measurement. What's the difference between triglycerides and cholesterol? Triglycerides and cholesterol are separate types of lipids that circulate in your blood. Triglycerides store unused calories and provide your body wi Continue reading >>

High Triglyceride Levels (hypertriglyceridemia)

High Triglyceride Levels (hypertriglyceridemia)

Tweet High triglyceride levels, also known as hypertriglyceridemia, are often the result of either an additional medical condition or having a high calorie diet. High triglyceride levels tend to be particularly common in patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes. If you have triglyceride levels that are too high, it is important to take steps to bring your triglyceride levels down. Lifestyle changes can help with reducing high triglyceride levels. Your doctor will be able to advise you on how to address the problem. What are triglycerides? Triglycerides are blood fats that are a flexible source of energy. The body can convert triglycerides into glucose and triglycerides can also be stored in adipose tissue (fat cells). The process of converting triglycerides into glucose is known as gluconeogenesis and is performed by the liver. Are there symptoms of raised triglyceride levels? High triglyceride levels will not usually result in symptoms but, if you have diabetes and live in the UK, you should be given a cholesterol test at least once each year which will test your triglycerides in addition to cholesterol. Whilst it is less common, some people may develop fat deposits under the skin called xanthomas. These are yellow lumps that can develop anywhere on the body but are more commonly found around the eyelids and around joints such as the knees, elbows and knuckles. Diagnosis - testing triglyceride levels Your health team can test your serum triglyceride levels (amount of triglycerides in the blood) through a blood test and this will usually be done as part of a cholesterol test. Recently eaten food and drink, within the last few hours, can raise triglyceride levels so to get a fair result, you need to fast before the test. If you have type 1 diabetes or are otherwise on Continue reading >>

High Blood Fats And Diabetes:

High Blood Fats And Diabetes:

By now, people who are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes – as well as many in the general population – know that the disease can lead to a host of medical issues, among them eye problems, kidney disease and nerve damage which may lead to amputations. What is perhaps less known is that there is a direct relationship between diabetes and high lipid (fat) levels in the bloodstream. This condition, commonly referred to as lipid disorders, is caused by a combination of genetic predisposition and dietary intake and is an abnormality with both good and bad cholesterol and triglycerides. Cholesterol is a soft, waxy substance not readily soluble in water and produced within all cells in the body. Cholesterol is necessary for normal cell and body function, however very high levels of it can lead to plaque buildup in arteries and eventually may cause blockage of blood flow. Cholesterol comes in two major forms: high-density lipoproteins (HDL)—often referred to as the “good cholesterol”—which removes fats and cholesterol from the serum and cells and transfers them back to the liver for reuse or excretion, and low-density lipoproteins (LDL), the “bad cholesterol,” which is the leftover cholesterol after it has provided substances to the cells to create hormones and to strengthen cell membranes (the wall of the cell). The leftover LDL is also reabsorbed by special receptors on the surface of the liver. Triglycerides (TG) are a type of primary fat which provides energy to the appropriate tissues in the body. TG are formed in the liver and are found in the blood. Excess TG are stored in fat cells to use as energy when needed. When the body needs a source of energy, the liver breaks down glucose and signals the fat cells to release fatty acids it has stored as triglycerides Continue reading >>

How Triglycerides Affect Your Risk Of Diabetes

How Triglycerides Affect Your Risk Of Diabetes

No one wants type 2 diabetes. It’s a condition that affects your whole body and gets progressively worse, possibly leading to loss of vision and feeling (especially in your feet and fingertips), as well as kidney disease and heart disease. Having high triglycerides makes it more likely that you will develop diabetes, though. Luckily, with some effort, you have a good chance of lowering your triglycerides -- which, at the same time, can help you lower your chance of getting diabetes. High triglycerides don't cause diabetes. Instead, their levels indicate that your system for turning food into energy isn't working properly. Normally, your body makes insulin, which “escorts” glucose -- the type of sugar in your blood --inside your cells. There, your body turns glucose into energy. Insulin also allows your body to use triglycerides for energy. A common cause of high triglycerides is excess carbohydrates in your diet. High TG’s signals insulin resistance; that’s when you have excess insulin and blood sugar isn’t responding in normal ways to insulin. This results in higher than normal blood sugar levels. If you have insulin resistance, you’re one step closer to type 2 diabetes. If you also are overweight, eat a lot of sugary and starchy foods, or don’t exercise, your insulin resistance can be worse. You can reverse your tracks by following the exercise and meal plan your doctor recommends to lower your triglycerides and by taking prescribed medicine. Your doctor can check your blood sugar (also called glucose) levels, by taking a sample of your blood after you’ve fasted, which means you haven’t eaten for at least 8 hours. The doctor may also test the level of glucose in your blood with a special blood test called A1c. The result shows the average level of Continue reading >>

Triglycerides - Diabetes Self-management

Triglycerides - Diabetes Self-management

The main storage form of fat in the body. Most are found in fat tissue, but some circulate in the bloodstream to provide fuel for the bodys cells. The triglyceride molecule is composed of three fatty acid chains attached to a glycerol molecule. The body can break down the triglycerides in the foods you eat and can also break down and recombine other molecules, such as fats, carbohydrates, and proteins, to make triglycerides. Having high levels of triglycerides in the blood can increase a persons risk of cardiovascular disease. Having very high triglycerides can also increase the risk of pancreatitis, or inflammation of the pancreas. Because blood triglycerides are naturally higher after a meal, they should be measured after 812 hours of fasting for meaningful results. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that people with diabetes strive to get their triglyceride levels below 150 mg/dl. The following steps can help: If lifestyle measures alone dont adequately control your triglyceride levels or if your levels are 200 mg/dl or higher to begin with your doctor may prescribe one of a class of drugs called fibric acid derivatives, such as fenofibrate (brand name TriCor and others) or gemfibrozil (Lopid). Prescription niacin (such as Niaspan) is sometimes also used to lower triglyceride levels. The class of drugs popularly known as statins, which includes atorvastatin (Lipitor, Torvast), fluvastatin (Lescol), lovastatin (Mevacor, Altocor, Altoprev), pravastatin (Pravachol, Selektine, Lipostat), rosuvastatin (Crestor), and simvastatin (Zocor, Lipex), is also sometimes used, especially when a person also has high low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or bad) cholesterol levels. This article was written by Robert S. Dinsmoor, a Contributing Editor of Diabetes Self-Managem Continue reading >>

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