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Tradjenta Vs Metformin

Tradjenta (linagliptin) Tablets - Why Use Tradjenta?

Tradjenta (linagliptin) Tablets - Why Use Tradjenta?

Eligible patients 18 years or older may pay as little as $10/month with a maximum savings up to $150/monthly prescription. Card valid for 12 consecutive months from activation date. Eligible patients may reenroll for additional 12 consecutivemonth periods by reactivating expired card, benefits not to exceed program expiration on May 31, 2020. If you live in Massachusetts, card expires on the earlier of June 30, 2019, or date AB-rated generic equivalent is available. One card per patient, not transferable, and cannot be combined with any other offer. Program not health insurance. Only valid for commercially insured patients in the 50 United States, DC, and Puerto Rico. Not eligible if prescriptions are paid for in part/full by state or federally funded program(s), like Medicare Part D, Medicaid, Vet. Aff., Dept. of Def., or TRICARE and where prohibited by law. Offer may change at any time, without notice. TRADJENTA is a prescription medicine that is used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. TRADJENTA is not for people with type 1 diabetes or for people with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis) in the past, it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting pancreatitis while you take TRADJENTA. What is the most important information I should know about TRADJENTA? Serious side effects can happen to people taking TRADJENTA, including inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), which may be severe and lead to death. Before you start taking TRADJENTA, tell your doctor if you have ever had pancreatitis, gallstones, a history of alcoholism, or high triglyceride levels. Stop taking TRADJENTA and call your doctor right away if you have pain i Continue reading >>

Metformin Vs Tradjenta

Metformin Vs Tradjenta

Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes (non-insulin-dependent diabetes). Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. Linagliptin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used by people with type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Linagliptin is an anti-diabetic drug that works by increasing levels of natural substances called incretins. Incretins help to control blood sugar by increasing insulin release, especially after a meal. They also decrease the amount of sugar your liver makes. This medication should not be used to treat people with type 1 diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes). Continue reading >>

Compare Metformin Vs Tradjenta - Comprehensive Analysis By Treato

Compare Metformin Vs Tradjenta - Comprehensive Analysis By Treato

Shortness of Breath Blood in My Urine Leg Cramps Cold and Flu (seasonal) Allergies Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. The side effects featured here are based on those most frequently appearing in user posts on the Internet. The manufacturer's product labeling should always be consulted for a list of side effects most frequently appearing in patients during clinical studies. Talk to your doctor about which medications may be most appropriate for you. The information reflected here is dependent upon the correct functioning of our algorithm. From time-to-time, our system might experience bugs or glitches that affect the accuracy or correct application of mathematical algorithms. We will do our best to update the site if we are made aware of any malfunctioning or misapplication of these algorithms. We cannot guarantee results and occasional interruptions in updating may occur. Please continue to check the site for updated information. Continue reading >>

Tradjenta (linagliptin) Tablets For Diabetes Type 2 Approved By Fda

Tradjenta (linagliptin) Tablets For Diabetes Type 2 Approved By Fda

Tradjenta (linagliptin) Tablets For Diabetes Type 2 Approved By FDA The FDA has approved Tradjenta (linagliptin) tablets to control blood sugar in adults with diabetes type two - to be used along with diet and exercise, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Eli Lilly announced today. Tradjenta can be used on its own or together with metformin, sulfonylurea or pioglitazone. Linagliptin was shown to reduce hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C or A1C) levels up to 0.7% when compared to a placebo . A1C gives an indication on how well the diabetes patient has been able to control blood sugar during the last two to three months. Tradjenta is not indicated for individuals with diabetic ketoacidosis or those with type 1 diabetes . The drug has not been tested in combination with insulin . Tradjenta is a DPP-4 (dipeptidyl peptidase-4) inhibitor. Boehringer Ingelheim says it is the first type of DPP-4 inhibitor to be approved at one dosage strength - which in this case is 5mg, once a day. Those with kidney or liver impairment do not need to adjust the dosage. Tradjenta tablets can be taken with or without food. They increase incretin levels, subsequently raising insulin levels after eating and throughout the day. John Gerich M.D., professor of medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine, said: "Many people with type 2 diabetes are not able to control their blood sugar with diet and exercise alone and may also require one or more medications. The FDA approval of TRADJENTA is exciting because there is only one dose to remember for all patients, regardless of kidney or liver impairment. With TRADJENTA, physicians will have another option for managing type 2 diabetes, a potentially devastating condition." The FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved Tradjenta 5mg once a day af Continue reading >>

Tradjenta (linagliptin) Drug Side Effects, Interactions, And Medication Information On Emedicinehealth.

Tradjenta (linagliptin) Drug Side Effects, Interactions, And Medication Information On Emedicinehealth.

Linagliptin is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. It works by regulating the levels of insulin your body produces after eating. Linagliptin is used together with diet and exercise to treat type 2 diabetes. Linagliptin is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Linagliptin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What are the possible side effects of linagliptin (Tradjenta)? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop taking linagliptin and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as: pancreatitis - severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, fast heart rate; or fever , sore throat , and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash . This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. What is the most important information I should know about linagliptin (Tradjenta)? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to linagliptin or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). Before you take linagliptin, tell your doctor if you have high cholesterol or triglycerides , or a history of pancreatitis. Stop taking linagliptin and call your doctor at once if you have severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, or fast heart rate. Linagliptin is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your bloo Continue reading >>

Compare Tradjenta Vs Metformin - Iodine.com

Compare Tradjenta Vs Metformin - Iodine.com

Head-to-head comparisons of medication uses, side effects, ratings, and more. Tradjenta (linagliptin) is good add-on medicine for controlling your blood sugar, but may cause body aches. Glucophage (metformin) is the first choice medicine to control your blood sugar and lower the risk of death from diabetes, although a few people may not tolerate the stomach side effects. 3.7/ 5 average rating with 938 reviewsformetformin Good add-on medicine if your blood sugars are still not controlled Good option if you have bad liver or kidney function. Does not cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) when taken by itself. Improves sugar control and lowers A1c levels as much as 2%. One of the few diabetes medicines that lowers the risk of death from diabetes-related complications. Not first-choice anti-diabetes medicine because it doesn't lower blood sugar levels as much as others. Available as brand only and may be expensive Often causes stomach upset, like diarrhea, nausea, gas, or stomach cramping. Usually not a good choice for people with kidney problems. Your doctor will tell you if Glucophage (metformin) is right for you to take. Excessive or chronic alcohol use can increase the risk of a dangerous side effect. Continue reading >>

Metformin And Linagliptin (trajenta)

Metformin And Linagliptin (trajenta)

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I have been diagnosed as diabetic during my first pregnancy 3 and half years ago (gestational then). At that time I used to take 4 metformin 500 mg tablets a day and did not have much issues except occasional diarrhea. After that pregnancy my diabetes was gone but came back soon after an year as type 2. My family has a strong history of Diabetes so I knew I would get it some day. 2 years ago, I was again prescribed Metformin and 4 tabs a day again. After 8 months of use of it, I started having very bad side effects, like Severe stomach paid all day even if I drink water or eat anything, severe gastric problem, dizziness, Severe Diarrhea and tiredness or weakness. It was so bad that if i go to toilet, I will be there ever and would have no energy to even get up and the dizziness would kill me. Worse than Hypo. The doctors said it was food poisoning first, then ulcers, hyperacidosis but none of the medication worked. I was frustrated with GP and hospital and it was so bad that I almost lost interest in my life as I did not even know what was causing this. Finally one doctor at GP mentioned that sometimes metformin could cause it. So I stopped metformin for 2 days and all my symptoms were gone by 3rd day. So the doc asked me to change to metformin extended/slow release and that too only 2 tablets a day. That improved my health for few months, but afer 3 months of its use, even the slow release became an issue. The same symptoms repeated. Then before I went to GP, I realised Continue reading >>

Effects Of Empagliflozin + Linagliptin Vs Metformin + Insulin Glargine On Renal And Vascular Changes In Type 2 Diabetes (elmi)

Effects Of Empagliflozin + Linagliptin Vs Metformin + Insulin Glargine On Renal And Vascular Changes In Type 2 Diabetes (elmi)

Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information Diabetes mellitus is a wide-spread disease accompanied by strongly increased morbidity and mortality due to micro- and macrovascular complications. However, in studies with patients suffering from diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM 2), early changes and impairments in large and small blood vessels as well as organ damage (e. g. to the kidneys) have been only insufficiently investigated (1). The newest substance class in oral antidiabetics, i. e. SGLT-2-inhibitors (such as empagliflozin) cause an increased renal excretion of glucose. In addition, the concurrent increased sodium excretion brings about an improvement of vascular function and thus a decrease in blood pressure. In the EMP-REG-OUTCOME study (2), the cardiovascular mortality rate was significantly lower in the empagliflozin group (3.7% versus 5.9%; 38% relative RR) compared to placebo.For another new substance class, the dipeptidylpeptidase-4-inhibitors, a number of pleiotropic effects have been described (3). In one of our recently conducted trials, we could demonstrate a positive effect of linagliptin on renal an inflammatory parameters compared to placebo (4). Thus, the combination of both substance classes with regard to positive effects on micro- and macrocirculation, even though not sufficiently proven as yet, suggests itself. The therapy with metformin and long-acting insulin (BOT), as well as a twofold oral medication is possible according to the recommendations of the "Deutsche Diabetes Gesellschaft (DDG)" and the positional paper of the "American Diabetes Association (ADA)". Accordingly, the aim of the present paper is the analysis of the effects of a combined therapy with em Continue reading >>

Tradjenta New Fda Drug Approval | Centerwatch

Tradjenta New Fda Drug Approval | Centerwatch

Tradjenta (linagliptin) is an orally-active inhibitor of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) enzyme. DPP-4 degrades the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP). Thus, linagliptin increases the concentrations of active incretin hormones, stimulating the release of insulin in a glucose-dependent manner and decreasing the levels of glucagon in the circulation. Tradjenta is specifically indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Tradjenta is supplied as a tablet for oral administration. The recommended dose is 5 mg once daily with or without food. The FDA approval of Tradjenta was based on eight studies involving approximately 3,800 studies. Tradjenta was evaluated as a monotherapy and in combination with metformin, glimepiride, and pioglitazone therapy. Two double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, one of 18-week and another of 24-week duration, enrolled a total of 730 subjects. In both monotherapy studies subjects with inadequate glycemic control after a six weeks washout period were randomized. In the 18-week study, 76 subjects were randomized to placebo and 151 to linagliptin 5 mg; in the 24-week study 167 subjects were randomized to placebo and 336 to linagliptin 5 mg. Treatment with Tradjenta 5 mg daily provided statistically significant improvements in A1C, FPG, and 2-hour PPG compared with placebo. In these 18- and 24-week studies, the changes from baseline in A1C were -0.4% and -0.4%, respectively, for those given Tradjenta and 0.1% and 0.3%, respectively, for those given placebo. Add-on Combination Therapy with Metformin A 24-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study enrolled 701 subjects who received either linagli Continue reading >>

A Review Of Newer Treatment Approaches For Type-2 Diabetes: Focusing Safety And Efficacy Of Incretin Based Therapy - Sciencedirect

A Review Of Newer Treatment Approaches For Type-2 Diabetes: Focusing Safety And Efficacy Of Incretin Based Therapy - Sciencedirect

Volume 22, Issue 5 , November 2014, Pages 403-410 A review of newer treatment approaches for type-2 diabetes: Focusing safety and efficacy of incretin based therapy Author links open overlay panel Regin ElsaGeorge SibyJoseph Open Access funded by King Saud University Diabetes resulting from both genetic and lifestyle factors causes high insulin deficiency or its resistance. As hyperglycemia and decreased insulin secretion and/or its sensitivity appear to be the primary defects associated with diabetes, available treatments focus on reducing those defects. A novel approach of treatment is to target the incretin mimetic hormones, which are secreted by intestinal cells in response to food intake, provoking glucose-dependent insulin secretion from the pancreas. Efficacy and safety studies of dipetidyl peptidase inhibitors (DPP-IV), sitagliptin, vildagliptin and linagliptin provide similar improvements in HbA1c levels when compared with metformin, sulfonylureas or glitazones without contributing to weight gain and hypoglycemia. Caution is required when choosing the gliptin in people with renal or hepatic impairment and with a risk of pancreatitis. The glucagon like peptide (GLP-1) analogues Exenatide and Liraglutide also have positive impact on glycemic control especially when used as a combination therapy. Another upcoming approach is using sodium-glucose co transporter two inhibitors in kidney, by exploring pathophysiology of renal glucose re absorption in the proximal tubule. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Jentadueto (linagliptin And Metformin Hydrochloride) Tablets Label Updated To Include New Data On Blood Glucose Reductions In Treatment-naive Adults With High Baseline A1c

Type 2 Diabetes: Jentadueto (linagliptin And Metformin Hydrochloride) Tablets Label Updated To Include New Data On Blood Glucose Reductions In Treatment-naive Adults With High Baseline A1c

Type 2 diabetes: Jentadueto (linagliptin and metformin hydrochloride) tablets label updated to include new data on blood glucose reductions in treatment-naive adults with high baseline A1C Type 2 diabetes: Jentadueto (linagliptin and metformin hydrochloride) tablets label updated to include new data on blood glucose reductions in treatment-naive adults with high baseline A1C /PRNewswire/ --The U.S. Prescribing Information for Jentadueto (linagliptin and metformin hydrochloride) tablets now includes clinical trial data that showed linagliptin co-administered with metformin provided statistically significant decreases in blood glucose compared with linagliptin alone in treatment-naive* adults with type 2 diabetes and high baseline A1C levels (A1C of > /=8.5 to < /=12.0 percent). Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NYSE: LLY) announced today that the data, based on results from a prospective 24-week phase IV clinical trial, have been added to the "Clinical Studies" section of the JENTADUETO U.S. Prescribing Information. "We are extremely pleased with the addition to the JENTADUETO label. These data support the use of JENTADUETO as an initial type 2 diabetes treatment option in an important patientpopulation - treatment-naive adults who have high baseline A1C levels," said , M.D., Ph.D., vice president, metabolic clinical development and medical affairs, BIPI. "In addition, these data reinforce the use of JENTADUETO, as an adjunct to diet and exercise, in helping adults with type 2 diabetes improve glycemic control." The 24-week, randomized, double-blind study assessed the efficacy and safety of linagliptin (5 mg per day) in combination with metformin (1500 to 2000 mg per day; n=159) vs. linagliptin (5 mg per day; n=157) alone in treatment-naive adults with t Continue reading >>

New Study Showed Significant Reduction In Blood Glucose With Linagliptin Alone And In Combination With Metformin In Adults Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

New Study Showed Significant Reduction In Blood Glucose With Linagliptin Alone And In Combination With Metformin In Adults Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

New study showed significant reduction in blood glucose with Linagliptin alone and in combination with metformin in adults newly diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes • Study showed significant reductions of HbA1c up to 2.8 percent  in treatment-naïve adults with uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes and marked hyperglycaemia (HbA1c >8.5 percent) • Linagliptin monotherapy and in combination with metformin was well tolerated with no significant adverse events • No weight gain seen with linagliptin monotherapy; average weight loss of 1.1kg seen in combination therapy with metformin Ingelheim, Germany and Indianapolis, US, 03 December 2013 – Boehringer Ingelheim (BI) and Eli Lilly and Company today announced new data1 from a Phase IV study evaluating linagliptin (5 mg) as monotherapy and in combination with metformin (1500 or 2000 mg) in treatment-naive adults with newly diagnosed (<12 months) uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes (T2D). The result showed that linagliptin as monotherapy or in initial combination with metformin achieved clinically significant improvements in glucose control in patients with newly diagnosed T2D and marked hyperglycaemia. Results also showed both treatments provided statistically significant reductions in blood glucose levels, with the combination therapy having greater glucose reduction compared to monotherapy. The results were presented during the 2013 World Diabetes Congress, which is being held 2-6 December in Melbourne, Australia. The study randomised 316 adults with a mean average plasma glucose concentration (HbA1c) of 9.8 percent to receive linagliptin 5 mg once-daily (n = 157) and the initial combination of linagliptin 5 mg once-daily plus metformin twice-daily (uptitrated to a maximal dose of 2000 mg/d; n = 159) for 24 weeks. The results show Continue reading >>

Oral Diabetes Medications

Oral Diabetes Medications

A list of oral diabetes medications with advantages, disadvantages, and side effects. Click on the name of a drug for more information. Biguanides Glucophage (generic name: metformin) Glucophage XR (generic name: metformin hydrochloride) extended release Fortamet (generic name: metformin hydrochloride) extended release Glumetza (generic name: metformin hydrochloride) extended release Riomet (generic name: metformin hydrochloride liquid) What are Biguanides? Metformin is the only member of the biguanides family in use today. Metformin (met-FOR-min) helps lower blood glucose by making sure your liver does not put extra glucose into the system when it is not needed. The ADA Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes recommend the inclusion of metformin (along with diet and exercise) in initial diabetes treatment. A good thing about metformin is that it does not cause blood glucose to get too low (hypoglycemia) when it is the only diabetes medicine you take. Who can take this medicine? Adults with type 2 diabetes can take metformin with their doctor’s approval and supervision. You should avoid metformin if you have liver or kidney problems, lung or heart disease, or conditions that cause low blood oxygen levels. Who should not take this medicine? People with certain types of heart problems, such as congestive heart failure, should use caution with this medicine. People with reduced kidney function or kidney disease should probably not take metformin. It should be used with caution if you regularly consume more than two to three drinks daily, so check with your doctor about that. Advantages Metformin, when used alone, is unlikely to cause low blood sugar. It is one of those medicines that always seems to help even after people have had diabetes for a while, and, for this reason Continue reading >>

Tradjenta & Jentadueto

Tradjenta & Jentadueto

Type 2 diabetes drugs Tradjenta and Jentadueto help lower blood sugar by stimulating the production of the hormone insulin. But both have been linked to an increased risk of pancreatitis and possibly pancreatic cancer. Used to Treat: High blood sugar in patients with type 2 diabetes; to be used in conjunction with proper diet and exercise Related Drugs: Byetta, Bydureon (exenatide), Victoza (liraglutide), Januvia, Janumet, Juvisync (sitagliptin), Kombiglyze XR, Onglyza (saxagliptin), Nesina, Kazano, Oseni (alogliptin) and Glyxambi (linagliptin) Manufacturer: Eli Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Black Box Warnings: Jentadueto for Lactic Acidosis FDA Approval: Tradjenta in 2011 and Jentadueto in 2012 Tradjenta and Jentadueto are two drugs used separately in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes, along with diet and exercise . Both medicines are manufactured by Eli Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim , and they belong to a class of drugs called incretin mimetics. The diabetes medications both contain the active ingredient linagliptin (Jentadueto also contains metformin), which belongs to the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor class of drugs. DPP-4 is a naturally occurring enzyme in the body that removes a hormone in the body called incretin that tells the body to release insulin after a person eats. By blocking this normal occurrence, insulin levels are increased in patients with diabetes who have trouble producing enough insulin or whose bodies cannot use it effectively. By blocking the incretin hormone, DPP-4 drugs increase insulin levels in patients with diabetes who have trouble producing insulin or whose bodies cant use it effectively. Tradjenta was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2011, with Jentadueto following with FDA app Continue reading >>

Tradjenta Side Effects Center

Tradjenta Side Effects Center

Tradjenta (linagliptin) tablets are indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Common side effects of Tradjenta include cough, weight gain, muscle or joint pain, headache, low blood sugar. Tradjenta may cause serious side effects, including: inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis, symptoms include severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, fast heart rate), fever, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash. The recommended dose of Tradjenta is 5 mg once daily. Tradjenta may interact with bosentan, dexamethasone, ketoconazole, quinidine, verapamil, rifabutin, rifampin, rifapentine, St. John's wort, phenobarbital and other barbiturates, medication to treat HIV or AIDS, medicines to treat narcolepsy, medicines used to prevent organ transplant rejection, seizure medications, probenecid, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates (including Pepto-Bismol), sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), beta-blockers, or other oral diabetes medications. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before using Tradjenta; it is not expected to harm an unborn baby. It is unknown if Tradjenta passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding. Our Tradjenta (linagliptin) Tablets Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Continue reading >>

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