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Tradjenta And Metformin Together

Linagliptin-metformin Side Effects

Linagliptin-metformin Side Effects

What Is Linagliptin-Metformin? Linagliptin and metformin are oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Metformin works by decreasing glucose (sugar) production in the liver and decreasing absorption of glucose by the intestines. Linagliptin works by regulating the levels of insulin your body produces after eating. Linagliptin and metformin is a combination medicine used together with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This medicine is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Linagliptin and metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. You should not use this medicine if you have severe kidney disease or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment). Some people develop lactic acidosis while taking metformin. Early symptoms may get worse over time and this condition can be fatal. Stop taking this medicine and get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea, and feeling very weak or tired. You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to metformin (Actoplus Met, Avandamet, Fortamet, Glucophage, Riomet), or: if you have ever had a severe allergic reaction (breathing problems, swelling, severe skin rash) to linagliptin (Tradjenta); if you have severe kidney disease; or if you have diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment). Some people taking metformin develop a serious condition called lactic acidosis. This may be more likely if you have liver or kidney disease, congestive heart failure, a heart attack or stroke, a severe infection, if you are 65 or older, if you are dehydrated, or if you drink a lot of alcohol. Talk with your doctor about your risk. To make sure l Continue reading >>

Trajenta (linagliptin)

Trajenta (linagliptin)

Trajenta tablets can be used on their own to improve blood sugar control in people whose blood sugar is not controlled by changes to their diet and exercise alone, and who can't take metformin. Trajenta tablets can also be used for people with type 2 diabetes whose blood sugar is not sufficiently controlled by other antidiabetic medicines. It can be added to treatment with metformin, to treatment with metformin plus a sulphonylurea such as gliclazide or glibenclamide, or to treatment with insulin either with or without metformin. Trajenta tablets contain the active ingredient linagliptin, which is a type of medicine called a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor. Linagliptin works by increasing the amount of two incretin hormones found in the body, called glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP). These hormones are normally produced naturally by the body in response to food intake. Their function is to help control blood sugar (glucose) levels. GLP-1 and GIP have two main actions that help to control blood glucose. Firstly, they stimulate the pancreas to produce insulin in response to increasing levels of glucose in the blood. (Insulin is the main hormone responsible for controlling sugar levels in the blood. It causes cells in the body to remove sugar from the blood.) GLP-1 also reduces the production of glucagon. (Glucagon is a hormone that normally increases glucose production by the liver.) GLP-1 and GIP are normally broken down by an enzyme in the body called dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4). Linagliptin works by binding to this enzyme and preventing it from breaking down the GLP-1 and GIP. This increases the levels of these hormones in the body and so increases their effect on controlling blood sugar. How do I take Trajen Continue reading >>

Interactions Between Linagliptin-metformin Oral And Metformin-iodinated-contrast-materials

Interactions Between Linagliptin-metformin Oral And Metformin-iodinated-contrast-materials

Drugs & Medications Linagliptin-Metformin Tablet Metformin/Iodinated Contrast Materials Interactions This information is generalized and not intended as specific medical advice. Consult your healthcare professional before taking or discontinuing any drug or commencing any course of treatment. Serious. These medicines may interact and cause very harmful effects. Contact your healthcare professional (e.g. doctor or pharmacist) for more information. If you are taking metformin when you have your imaging test procedure, your kidneys may not be able to properly remove metformin from your blood. The effects of metformin may increase and cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis, especially if you have kidney problems. Symptoms of lactic acidosis are: feeling very weak, tired, or uncomfortable, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual or unexpected stomach discomfort, feeling cold, dizziness or lightheadedness, suddenly developing a slow or irregular heartbeat. What you should do about this interaction: Contact your doctor about taking these two medicines together before you have any tests done that use an iodine dye. Your doctor may want to check to make sure your kidneys are working properly before and after the imaging test. In some cases, your doctor may instruct you to stop taking your metformin before the exam and not to begin using it again until 48 hours after your test.Your healthcare professionals (e.g. doctor or pharmacist) may already be aware of this drug interaction and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first. 1.Glucophage (metformin hydrochloride) US prescribing information. Bristol-Myers Squibb Company April 5, 2017. 2.Avandamet (rosiglitazone maleate-metformin HCl) Au Continue reading >>

Empagliflozin/linagliptin Combination With Metformin For Triple Therapy

Empagliflozin/linagliptin Combination With Metformin For Triple Therapy

Two pills provided greater glucose-lowering efficacy than three with low hypoglycemia risk. For the majority of patients with type 2 diabetes, the recommended first-line pharmacotherapy consists of metformin, but most will ultimately require additional therapies to help sustain glycemic control. Upholding intensive glucose control early on in the disease process is imperative and may eventually lead to benefits that continue beyond the period of treatment. Consequently, when metformin fails to attain glycemic control, add-on combination therapy with additional anti-diabetes agents may be valuable. Given their corresponding mechanisms of action, the administration of a once-daily combination of empagliflozin/linagliptin adjunct to metformin may offer certain treatment benefits compared with the addition of either empagliflozin or linagliptin individually as dual therapy. Empagliflozin—a potent and selective sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2)—helps in decreasing renal glucose reabsorption, thus increasing urinary glucose elimination and reducing incidences of hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. Since this mechanism is impartial to insulin, SGLT2 inhibition is accompanied with an overall lower risk of hypoglycemia with added benefits involving weight loss and reduction in blood pressure. Linagliptin is a very potent and selective inhibitor of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) and its use results in reduced blood glucose by inhibiting the breakdown of incretin peptides (such as GLP-1), rousing insulin release and inhibition of glucagon secretion. As DPP-4 inhibition leads to a glucose-dependent release of insulin, it is accompanied with a low risk of hypoglycemia. Particularly as an add-on therapy with metformin, dual therapy has proved for great glycemic Continue reading >>

New Study Showed Significant Reduction In Blood Glucose With Linagliptin Alone And In Combination With Metformin In Adults Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

New Study Showed Significant Reduction In Blood Glucose With Linagliptin Alone And In Combination With Metformin In Adults Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

New study showed significant reduction in blood glucose with Linagliptin alone and in combination with metformin in adults newly diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes • Study showed significant reductions of HbA1c up to 2.8 percent  in treatment-naïve adults with uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes and marked hyperglycaemia (HbA1c >8.5 percent) • Linagliptin monotherapy and in combination with metformin was well tolerated with no significant adverse events • No weight gain seen with linagliptin monotherapy; average weight loss of 1.1kg seen in combination therapy with metformin Ingelheim, Germany and Indianapolis, US, 03 December 2013 – Boehringer Ingelheim (BI) and Eli Lilly and Company today announced new data1 from a Phase IV study evaluating linagliptin (5 mg) as monotherapy and in combination with metformin (1500 or 2000 mg) in treatment-naive adults with newly diagnosed (<12 months) uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes (T2D). The result showed that linagliptin as monotherapy or in initial combination with metformin achieved clinically significant improvements in glucose control in patients with newly diagnosed T2D and marked hyperglycaemia. Results also showed both treatments provided statistically significant reductions in blood glucose levels, with the combination therapy having greater glucose reduction compared to monotherapy. The results were presented during the 2013 World Diabetes Congress, which is being held 2-6 December in Melbourne, Australia. The study randomised 316 adults with a mean average plasma glucose concentration (HbA1c) of 9.8 percent to receive linagliptin 5 mg once-daily (n = 157) and the initial combination of linagliptin 5 mg once-daily plus metformin twice-daily (uptitrated to a maximal dose of 2000 mg/d; n = 159) for 24 weeks. The results show Continue reading >>

Compare Tradjenta Vs Metformin - Iodine.com

Compare Tradjenta Vs Metformin - Iodine.com

Head-to-head comparisons of medication uses, side effects, ratings, and more. Tradjenta (linagliptin) is good add-on medicine for controlling your blood sugar, but may cause body aches. Glucophage (metformin) is the first choice medicine to control your blood sugar and lower the risk of death from diabetes, although a few people may not tolerate the stomach side effects. 3.7/ 5 average rating with 938 reviewsformetformin Good add-on medicine if your blood sugars are still not controlled Good option if you have bad liver or kidney function. Does not cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) when taken by itself. Improves sugar control and lowers A1c levels as much as 2%. One of the few diabetes medicines that lowers the risk of death from diabetes-related complications. Not first-choice anti-diabetes medicine because it doesn't lower blood sugar levels as much as others. Available as brand only and may be expensive Often causes stomach upset, like diarrhea, nausea, gas, or stomach cramping. Usually not a good choice for people with kidney problems. Your doctor will tell you if Glucophage (metformin) is right for you to take. Excessive or chronic alcohol use can increase the risk of a dangerous side effect. Continue reading >>

Metformin And Tradjenta Drug Interactions - Drugs.com

Metformin And Tradjenta Drug Interactions - Drugs.com

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider. Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum Information Services, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Copyright 2000-2018 Multum Information Services, Inc. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist. Some mixtures of medications can lead to serious and even fatal consequences. Continue reading >>

Help Your Patients Navigate The Road Ahead

Help Your Patients Navigate The Road Ahead

Postmarketing cases of metformin-associated lactic acidosis have resulted in death, hypothermia, hypotension, and resistant bradyarrhythmias. Symptoms included malaise, myalgias, respiratory distress, somnolence, and abdominal pain. Laboratory abnormalities included elevated blood lactate levels, anion gap acidosis, increased lactate/pyruvate ratio; and metformin plasma levels generally >5 mcg/mL. Risk factors include renal impairment, concomitant use of certain drugs, age ≥ 65 years old, radiological studies with contrast, surgery and other procedures, hypoxic states, excessive alcohol intake, and hepatic impairment. Steps to reduce the risk of and manage metformin-associated lactic acidosis in these high risk groups are provided in the Full Prescribing Information. If lactic acidosis is suspected, discontinue JENTADUETO or JENTADUETO XR and institute general supportive measures in a hospital setting. Prompt hemodialysis is recommended. JENTADUETO and JENTADUETO XR are contraindicated in patients with severe renal impairment (eGFR below 30 mL/min/1.73 m2), acute or chronic metabolic acidosis, including diabetic ketoacidosis, a history of hypersensitivity reaction to linagliptin, such as anaphylaxis, angioedema, exfoliative skin conditions, urticaria, or bronchial hyperreactivity, or a history of hypersensitivity reaction to metformin. There have been cases of metformin-associated lactic acidosis, including fatal cases. These cases had a subtle onset and were accompanied by nonspecific symptoms such as malaise, myalgias, abdominal pain, respiratory distress, or increased somnolence; however, hypothermia, hypotension and resistant bradyarrhythmias have occurred with severe acidosis. Additional findings included elevated blood lactate concentrations (>5 mmol/L), anion g Continue reading >>

Linagliptin And Metformin (oral Route)

Linagliptin And Metformin (oral Route)

Your doctor will tell you how much of this medicine to use and how often. Your dose may need to be changed several times in order to find out what works best for you. Do not use more medicine or use it more often than your doctor tells you to. This medicine usually comes with a Medication Guide. Read and follow these instructions carefully. Ask your doctor if you have any questions. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is the most important part of controlling your diabetes, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole. Do not crush, break, or chew it. While taking the extended-release form of this medicine, part of the tablet may pass into your stools. This is normal and is nothing to worry about. The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine. For oral dosage form (extended-release tablets): Patients taking metformin aloneThe metformin dose is the same as the dose you are already taking plus 5 milligrams (mg) of linagliptin. Your doctor may adjust your dose until your blood sugar is controlled. However, the dose is usually not more than 5 mg of linagliptin and 2000 mg of metformin once a day. Patients taking linaglipti Continue reading >>

Linagliptin-metformin Tablet

Linagliptin-metformin Tablet

Nausea , vomiting , stomach upset, diarrhea , or a metallic taste in the mouth may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly. If stomach symptoms return later (after taking the same dose for several days or weeks), tell your doctor right away. Stomach symptoms that occur after the first days of your treatment may be signs of lactic acidosis . Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects. Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: joint pain , unusual skin blisters , signs of heart failure (such as shortness of breath, swelling ankles /feet, unusual tiredness, unusual/ sudden weight gain ). Get medical help right away if you have any very serious side effects, including: signs of disease of the pancreas (such as persistent nausea / vomiting , severe stomach/ abdominal pain which may spread to the back). This medication does not usually cause low blood sugar ( hypoglycemia ). Low blood sugar may occur if this drug is prescribed with other diabetes medications , or if you do not consume enough calories from food, or if you do unusually heavy exercise . Talk with your doctor or pharmacist about whether the dose of your other diabetes medication(s) needs to be lowered. Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating , shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger , blurred vision , dizziness , or tingling hands/feet. It is a good habit to carry glucose tablets or gel to treat low blood sugar . If you don't have these reliable forms of glucose, rapidly raise your blood sugar by eating a quick source of sugar such as table sugar, hone Continue reading >>

Combination Of Linagliptin And Metformin For The Treatment Of Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Combination Of Linagliptin And Metformin For The Treatment Of Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Combination of Linagliptin and Metformin for the Treatment of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Received 2014 Sep 17; Revised 2014 Nov 16; Accepted 2014 Nov 18. Copyright 2015 the author(s), publisher and licensee Libertas Academica Ltd. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons CC-BY-NC 3.0 License. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a progressive condition requiring long-term treatment. Most patients with T2DM are unable to maintain normoglycemia using metformin alone; thus, combination therapy is a pivotal part of disease management. Addition of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor linagliptin, with its proven efficacy, low propensity for hypoglycemia, and weight neutrality, has been shown to improve glycemic control for patients who are not well controlled with metformin. As patients often have other comorbidities requiring pharmacotherapy, an increase in pill number, different prescribing frequencies, and timing of medications may adversely impact patients adherence. Studies have shown that treatment nonadherence contributes to increased morbidity, mortality, and healthcare cost. In the United States, the single-pill combination (SPC) of linagliptin/metformin is available in three strengths approved for twice-daily administration: 2.5/500 mg, 2.5/850 mg, and 2.5/1000 mg. The SPC has the potential to reduce pill burden and simplify patients treatment regimens, thereby promoting improved adherence and efficacy. Keywords: dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, combination therapy, metformin, single-pill combination Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a multifactorial disease that includes decreased pancreatic insulin secretion, increased peripheral insulin resistance, increased hepat Continue reading >>

Tradjenta Warnings And Precautions

Tradjenta Warnings And Precautions

If you are using Tradjenta for treating type 2 diabetes, it is important to know that this medication can cause potentially serious problems, such as low blood sugar levels. Other safety precautions with Tradjenta involve warnings about using this drug while pregnant or breastfeeding. In addition, it can cause negative reactions when combined with a number of other medications. What Should I Tell My Healthcare Provider? You should talk with your healthcare provider prior to taking Tradjenta™ (linagliptin) if you have: Type 1 diabetes Diabetic ketoacidosis Any allergies, including to foods, dyes, or preservatives. Also, let your healthcare provider know if you are: Pregnant or thinking of becoming pregnant Breastfeeding. In addition, tell your healthcare provider about all other medications you are taking, including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Specific Precautions and Warnings With Tradjenta Some warnings and precautions to be aware of prior to taking this diabetes medicine include the following: Tradjenta should not be used to treat type 1 diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis, as it is not effective for treating these conditions. The risk of low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) is low for Tradjenta. However, taking Tradjenta with metformin (Fortamet®, Glucophage®, Glucophage XR®, Glumetza®, or Riomet®) or pioglitazone (Actos®) can substantially increase the risk for low blood sugar levels. Combining Tradjenta with sulfonylureas increases the risk of low blood sugar levels. Your healthcare provider may need to lower the dosage of your sulfonylurea. Sulfonylureas include: Tradjenta may react with a number of other medications (see Tradjenta Drug Interactions for more information). Tradjenta is a pregnancy Category B Continue reading >>

Jentadueto Side Effects Center

Jentadueto Side Effects Center

Jentadueto (linagliptin and metformin hydrochloride) is a combination of two 2 oral antihyperglycemic drugs indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus when treatment with both linagliptin and metformin is appropriate. Common side effects of Jentadueto are: cough, upset stomach, diarrhea, and Get medical help immediately if you have severe side effects of lactic acidosis (symptoms include muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, dizziness, lightheadedness, tiredness, weakness, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, or slow or uneven heart rate. Jenadueto is available in the following strengths: tablets containing 2.5 mg linagliptin and 500 mg metformin hydrochloride or 850 mg metformin hydrochloride or 1000 mg metformin hydrochloride. The maximum recommended dose is 2.5 mg linagliptin/1000 mg metformin twice daily. Jenadueto should be taken daily with meals, with gradual dose escalation to reduce the gastrointestinal side effects due to metformin. Women should alert their doctors if they are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. It is not known if Jentadueto will harm an unborn baby. Pregnant women should talk with their doctors about the best way to control blood sugar while pregnant. Women should also talk with their doctors if they are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if Jentadueto passes into breast milk. Our Jenadueto Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. Continue reading >>

Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme

Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme

Linagliptin with metformin hydrochloride, tablets, 2.5 mg/500 mg, 2.5 mg/850 mg and 2.5 mg/1000 mg, Trajentamet - April 2013 Product: Linagliptin with metformin hydrochloride, tablets, 2.5 mg/500 mg, 2.5 mg/850 mg and 2.5 mg/1000 mg, Trajentamet The submission requested an Authority required (STREAMLINED) listing for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a patient whose HbA1c is greater than 7% prior to initiation of a gliptin, glitazone or a glucagon-like peptide-1 despite treatment with metformin and where a combination of metformin and a sulfonylurea is contraindicated or not tolerated. The PBAC had not previously considered this fixed dose combination (FDC) product. Linagliptin tablets and metformin tablets are both currently TGA registered and PBS listed. The submission was considered under the TGA/PBAC parallel process. At the time of PBAC consideration, the Clinical Evaluation Report and TGA Delegates overview were available. Linagliptin with metformin was registered by the TGA on 21 May 2013. Type 2 diabetes in a patient whose HbA1c is greater than 7% prior to initiation of a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor (gliptin), a thiazolidinedione (glitazone) or a glucagon-like peptide-1 despite treatment with metformin and where a combination of metformin and a sulfonylurea is contraindicated or not tolerated. The date and level of the qualifying HbA1c must be documented in the patient's medical records at the time treatment with a gliptin, a glitazone or a glucagon-like peptide-1 is initiated. The HbA1c must be no more than 4 months old at the time treatment with a gliptin, a glitazone or a glucagon-like peptide-1 is initiated. Blood glucose monitoring may be used as an alternative assessment to HbA1c levels in the following circumstances: (a) clinical condi Continue reading >>

Tradjenta??

Tradjenta??

I've been on Metformin for a couple years. Two tablets, twice a day. The past few months I've been very depressed and eating all the wrong foods. Yesterday my psychiatrist upped my Paxil by .5 - and I believe this will improve my moods and help me start eating better again. I saw my endo before I saw my psychiatrist, and she told me to start taking Tradjenta one tablet/day along with the Metformin. I've read so many bad things about this brand new drug, that I am hesitant to take it. Plus, with the new dosage of Paxil, if I did have side effects, I would be hard-pressed to know if it was the Tradjenta or the extra Paxil causing it. My question: does ANYONE have experience with Tradjenta? I can't find anyone or any article on-line that says anything positive about this drug! D.D. Family Getting much harder to control My first thought would be how often per day do you test, if we have high carb foods in the house we might be tempted to eat them. When my blood sugar was high I always wanted to eat and I could not stop. Since my numbers are good now I never have that issue. I have no info on tradjenta so can not help there. Continue reading >>

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