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Toujeo Vs Lantus Cost

Ask D'mine: New Basal Insulin Toujeo, New Dosing Math

Ask D'mine: New Basal Insulin Toujeo, New Dosing Math

Welcome back to our weekly diabetes advice column, Ask D’Mine — with your host veteran type 1, diabetes author and educator Wil Dubois. This week, Wil looks at the newest basal insulin to hit the market: Sanofi's Toujeo (aka the Son of Lantus). It was newly approved by FDA early this year and launched in early April, and it can be a little confusing since the unit-dosing is a bit different from what we're used to. Don't worry, Wil's got this... {Have your own questions? Email us at [email protected]} Matthew, type 2 from Oregon, asks: I’m confused about the new basal insulin Toujeo, I understand that it is U-300 and therefore should be more “concentrated,” but when I went to the webpage for this product, it talked about how Toujeo is a 1:1 dosing and conversion from Lantus. I thought that the dose would actually be less as it’s more concentrated. I also read about how people actually required a higher dose of Toujeo to allow the same blood sugar control as with Lantus. How on earth does this all work?! [email protected] D’Mine answers: It’s fuzzy math, Mathew, but you chose the right person to ask. However, a warning: It’s impossible to give a concentrated answer about concentrated insulin! So OK, let’s concentrate (get it?!)… Most modern insulins are what we call U-100, which means that there are 100 units of insulin per milliliter of fluid. That’s what they mean by its concentration. Back in the day we also had U-20, U-40, and U-80 insulins. I also had it in my head that there was a U-60 at one time, but I may be wrong about that, as a quick Google search only turns up articles about the German Sub U-60, which apparently had one of the least distinctive war records of the Nazi fleet -- and no discussions of insulin. Anyway, back in the many-conce Continue reading >>

How To Find A Lantus Coupon

How To Find A Lantus Coupon

It looks like this page may be out of date. Please visit NerdWallet’s health hub for our latest content. Diabetics don’t have much of a choice when it comes to taking their insulin, and the costs can be very high, so a Lantus coupon can be invaluable. Paired with diabetic supplies like syringes and blood glucose testing equipment, diabetes is an expensive disease. But with a little bit of information and some resourcefulness, you may be able to save on your monthly prescriptions. Lantus is a long-acting insulin made by Sanofi-Aventis and prescribed to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics. Diabetics are unable to naturally produce or use insulin like most people, so they take injections of synthetic insulin to help regulate their blood sugar. Generic Lantus At this time, there is no generic form of Lantus available. However, that may soon change. The patents protecting Lantus from cheaper generic alternatives expired in February 2015, so less expensive forms of the drug may be coming. When this happens, opting for generic will likely be the best way to save on Lantus, and because of FDA requirements, you don’t have to worry about the generic version being less effective or less safe. Although some people avoid buying generics because they are afraid they won’t work as well as the name brands, those fears are largely unfounded. Lantus coupons from the manufacturer One carton of Lantus can cost close to $400 without insurance, according to GoodRx.com, though Lantus may very well be part of your insurance formulary. Currently, the maker of the drug offers a Lantus Savings Card. According to its website, the card can reduce your prescription cost to no more than $25. However, it also says there is a maximum benefit of $100 off each prescription for the duration of the pr Continue reading >>

Toujeo Solostar Prices, Coupons And Patient Assistance Programs

Toujeo Solostar Prices, Coupons And Patient Assistance Programs

Toujeo Solostar (insulin glargine) is a member of the insulin drug class and is commonly used for Diabetes - Type 1 and Diabetes - Type 2. Toujeo Solostar Prices This Toujeo Solostar price guide is based on using the Drugs.com discount card which is accepted at most U.S. pharmacies. The cost for Toujeo Solostar subcutaneous solution (300 units/mL) is around $378 for a supply of 4.5 milliliters, depending on the pharmacy you visit. Prices are for cash paying customers only and are not valid with insurance plans. Toujeo Solostar is available as a brand name drug only, a generic version is not yet available. For more information, read about generic Toujeo Solostar availability. Subcutaneous Solution Important: When there is a range of pricing, consumers should normally expect to pay the lower price. However, due to stock shortages and other unknown variables we cannot provide any guarantee. Drugs.com Printable Discount Card Print Now The free Drugs.com Discount Card works like a coupon and can save you up to 80% or more off the cost of prescription medicines, over-the-counter drugs and pet prescriptions. Please note: This is a drug discount program, not an insurance plan. Valid at all major chains including Walgreens, CVS Pharmacy, Target, WalMart Pharmacy, Duane Reade and 63,000 pharmacies nationwide. Toujeo Solostar Coupons and Rebates Toujeo Solostar offers may be in the form of a printable coupon, rebate, savings card, trial offer, or free samples. Some offers may be printed right from a website, others require registration, completing a questionnaire, or obtaining a sample from the doctor's office. Toujeo Sanofi RX Savings Card: Eligible patients may pay no more than $10 on each of up to 12 prescriptions with maximum savings of $500 off per pack; for additional inform Continue reading >>

Toujeo Vs Lantus, Toujeo Costs, Insulin Glargine

Toujeo Vs Lantus, Toujeo Costs, Insulin Glargine

Toujeo vs Lantus, Toujeo Costs, Insulin Glargine Doctablet Diabetes , Endocrinology , Everything About Insulin , Medicine Its understandable if you are wondering about the difference between Lantusand Toujeo. After all, both Lantus and Toujeo contain the same insulin , called insulin glargine. Insulin glargine was introduced in the year 2000. This was a huge advancement because it was the first long-acting basal insulin. Before the development of insulin glargine, doctors did not have many types of insulins to choose from. Glargine (the insulin in both Lantus and Toujeo) is an insulin analoguemeaning it has been modified from regular insulin to change its structure and the way it is absorbed. Insulin glargine is still available in its original formulation as Lantus, most commonly prescribed as the Lantus Solostar pen. Insulin is classically prescribed at a very specific concentration called U-100. The U stands for units. The 100 stands for the number of units present in the liquid (1 milliliter ). U-100 insulin has 100 units in 1 milliliter. U-100 is also referred to as regular insulin, but this can be confusing since many different types of insulin come in this concentration. Fast forward a decade and a half later, and insulin glargine (originally Lantus) has reinvented itself. Toujeo (U-300) insulin glargine was approved by the FDA in late February of 2015, making it the first long-acting concentrated insulin available on the market. It is available in insulin pen form only as the Toujeo SoloStar. What researchers discovered was that if they made glargine more concentrated, it lasts slightly longer in the body. Thats right, Toujeo IS GLARGINE, just in the concentrated form of U-300. This means Toujeo is three times more concentrated than Lantus. Some people think Tou Continue reading >>

Sanofi Won’t Discount Toujeo More Than Lantus Blockbuster

Sanofi Won’t Discount Toujeo More Than Lantus Blockbuster

Sanofi is caught between a rock and a hard place when it comes to promoting its new insulin. To continue reading this article you must be a Bloomberg Professional Service Subscriber. Read this article on the Terminal Request a demo to learn more If you believe that you may have received this message in error please let us know. Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine Injection For Subcutaneous Use

Insulin Glargine Injection For Subcutaneous Use

Toujeo (insulin glargine) Injection is along-acting insulin indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Common side effects of Toujeo include: cold symptoms upper respiratory tract infection allergic reactions injection site reactions itching rash swelling of extremities, and weight gain The recommended starting dose of Toujeo in insulin na�ve patients with type 1 diabetes is approximately one-third to one-half of the total daily insulin dose. The remainder of the total daily insulin dose should be given as a short-acting insulin and divided between each daily meal. As a general rule, 0.2 to 0.4 units of insulin per kilogram of body weight can be used to calculate the initial total daily insulin dose in insulin na�ve patients with type 1 diabetes. The recommended starting dose of Toujeo in insulin na�ve patients with type 2 diabetes is 0.2 units per kilogram of body weight once daily. Toujeo may interact with other antidiabetic drugs, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blocking agents (ARBs), disopyramide, fibrates, fluoxetine, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), pentoxifylline, pramlintide, propoxyphene, salicylates, somatostatin analogs, sulfonamide antibiotics, antipsychotics, corticosteroids, danazol, diuretics, estrogens, glucagon, isonazid, niacin, oral contraceptives, phenothiazines, progestogens, protease inhibitors, somatropin, sympathomimetic drugs, thyroid hormones, alcohol, beta-blockers, clonidine, lithium salts, clonidine, guanethidine, and reserpine. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before using Toujeo. Insulin requirements may change during pregnancy. It is unknown if Toujeo passes into breast m Continue reading >>

Toujeo Launches In The Us – The Next Generation Lantus

Toujeo Launches In The Us – The Next Generation Lantus

Update (4/3/15): New basal insulin Toujeo (insulin glargine U300) has now launched in the US, around a month after its FDA approval. In what we think is fantastic news, Toujeo will be priced around the same as Lantus (insulin glargine U100) per unit. You can find a detailed injection guide for using the updated SoloStar pen for Toujeo on the website. We’re most excited for this product in terms of “next generation” combo products (more on that below). Based on clinical trial data, for some Toujeo may lead to nighttime hypoglycemia and/or weight loss benefits, although this is not technically on the label. The product also has an impressive COACH patient support program (available free to anyone with a Toujeo prescription) that provides live one-on-one phone calls with a COACH guide, online resources, tips via text message, and even diabetes educator-led in-person sessions. We can’t wait to see how this works in real life; if you’re using Toujeo’s COACH program, please let us know your impressions by e-mailing us. A savings card also allows patients with commercial insurance (but not Medicare/Medicaid/VA patients) to pay no more than $15 per prescription for the next year. Although many criticize the high price of insulin in the US, it’s good to see the availability of saving programs for Toujeo for people with insurance. Original Article (3/5/15): Twitter summary: [email protected]_FDA approves Toujeo, more concentrated version of basal insulin Lantus – our story on data, delivery, & a promising future In late February, Sanofi announced FDA approval of its once-daily, long-acting basal insulin Toujeo. Toujeo is the same type of basal insulin (glargine) as Sanofi’s blockbuster Lantus, but a stronger version. In Toujeo, each milliliter of liquid carries 300 units of Continue reading >>

Prescription Discounts Up To 75% Off

Prescription Discounts Up To 75% Off

Lantus is the most commonly prescribed insulin in the US, but with its patent set to expire in 2016, manufacturer Sanofi-Aventis has released a new alternative called Toujeo. Both Lantus and Toujeo contain the same active ingredient: the long-acting insulin glargine. Long-acting insulins are prescribed to people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes to lower blood glucose levels slowly and consistently for up to 24 hours. Lantus and Toujeo are both injected subcutaneously through a special insulin pen once a day, at the same time every day. Differences in Dosage While Lantus and Toujeo are very similar drugs produced by the same manufacturer, there are some key differences. It important for patients to know that Toujeo and Lantus come in different strengths. Toujeo is more concentrated, with 300 units of insulin glargine per mL compared to the 100 units/mL of Lantus. This makes it a good option for patients who require a larger amount of insulin per daily dose. Toujeo comes in a special SoloStar pen that delivers one third of the unit that patients who use Lantus get per click, meaning that if you switch from Lantus to Toujeo, your dosage (the number of clicks on the insulin pen) won’t change, even though Toujeo is more concentrated. Similarities and Differences in Effect Lantus and Toujeo work the same way to control blood sugar levels in adults and children with diabetes. The risk of adverse effects is relatively low for both forms, with the most common side effects being hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), allergic reactions, and injection site irritation. In clinical trials, Toujeo had slightly lower rates of hypoglycemia than Lantus, meaning that it may be a good choice for people who frequently experience low blood pressure as a result of taking Lantus. However, clinical t Continue reading >>

Is Toujeo The New Lantus?

Is Toujeo The New Lantus?

Sanofi hoping to convert patients to Toujeo as Lantus is due to lose U.S. patent protection. (Find the full prescribing info for Toujeo at the bottom of this article.)…. Toujeo is a more potent follow-up to the drugmaker’s top-selling Lantus insulin product, which accounts for a fifth of Sanofi sales. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration late last week approved the once daily, long-acting basal insulin to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Analysts noted, however, that lower rates of hypoglycemia seen in clinical trials comparing Toujeo to Lantus, were not mentioned on the FDA-approved label. It also highlighted the need for higher doses to achieve the same level of blood glucose control as Lantus. The Toujeo label is probably going to be viewed as more undifferentiated than expected. Sanofi bought some patient conversion time with a patent infringement lawsuit filed last year against Eli Lilly and Co that keeps a cheaper Lantus generic off the market for 30 months. In addition to gaining patients through conversions, there are about a million new patients for basal insulin each and every year. Toujeo has the same active ingredient as Lantus, called insulin glargine, but at three times the concentration and with a design to release the insulin more gradually. Lantus is the world’s most prescribed insulin. Full Prescribing Information for Toujeo® Continue reading >>

Fda Approves New Basal Insulin Toujeo

Fda Approves New Basal Insulin Toujeo

The FDA has approved Sanofi’s once-daily basal insulin, but will it compete with Sanofi’s own Lantus? Quick Hits Sanofi, which has been bracing for increased competition for Lantus, has won the race to bring a new basal insulin to the marketplace. This week, the drug manufacturer announced the FDA has approved Toujeo, its new once-daily long-acting basal insulin. The new insulin is expected to go on sale in the U.S. by the start of the second quarter of this year. Studies found that Toujeo’s overall ability to control blood sugar levels matched that of Lantus. It also proved more effective at controlling nighttime hypoglycemia, according to a Bloomberg report. The biggest difference between the two basal insulins is that while Lantus contains 100 units/mL, Toujeo is more concentrated and triples Lantus’ capacity, yielding 300 units/mL. While Lantus is suitable for people with diabetes who are age 6 and up, Toujeo is only approved to treat patients who are 18 years and older. Interestingly, pharmaceutical market watchers weren’t overwhelmed by the news of Toujeo’s approval, according to a report in Fierce Pharma. One market analyst predicted that many Lantus users will not switch over to Toujeo because they will not see enough difference between the two insulins. Since Sanofi owns both products, you would think that would be good news, but Sanofi’s profit margin for Lantus has come under threat. Insurance payors are demanding a cut in the price of Lantus in 2015. Also, there is the pending threat of generic versions of Lantus flooding the marketplace. It’s believed that Sanofi must establish a strong foothold with Toujeo in the basal insulin marketplace if it is to maintain its profit margin. UPDATE – 3/5/15 – EU regulators have given Toujeo the green Continue reading >>

Insulin Makers Become Casualties Of Pricing War

Insulin Makers Become Casualties Of Pricing War

Tough competition between diabetes drugmakers, coupled with higher payer leverage, has sparked the question of whether formulary access has become a zero sum game: Does success for one mean failure for another? That is the current climate in the insulin market right now, pushing the leaders in the space to make bold moves. Last month, Danish diabetes drugmaker Novo Nordisk announced its veteran CEO Lars Rebien Sorensen would be stepping down at the end of the year, an expected move but several years ahead of schedule. His successor, Lars Fruergaard Jørgensen, gave some hint to the reasoning behind the leadership change, pointing to "unprecedented" competition and payer pressure. Several weeks later, Novo revealed plans to cut about 2.4% of its global workforce, trimming its R&D and headquarters staff in a move designed with that heightened competitive landscape in mind. Novo Nordisk, along with the French Sanofi and Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly, have long dominated the market for diabetes, and specifically insulin, in the U.S. Yet, a widening range of treatment options and greater leverage on the side of payers, has crimped margins and pitted the three companies in a battle for formulary access. Pricing Pressures Over the past two months, both CVS Health and United Health — two large pharmacy benefit managers — have removed Sanofi’s top-selling basal insulin Lantus (insulin glargine) from their 2017 formulary lists. In place of Lantus, CVS and United Health will give preferred placement to Eli Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim’s Basaglar (glargine injection), a cheaper, follow-on biologic of Lantus. When Basaglar launches in the U.S. this December, it will be the fifth long-acting insulin on the market, joining Sanofi’s Lantus and Toujeo (glargine) and Novo Nord Continue reading >>

You Have Other Sanofi Options To Help Meet Your Patients’ Blood Sugar Lowering Needs

You Have Other Sanofi Options To Help Meet Your Patients’ Blood Sugar Lowering Needs

Lantus® is a long-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lantus® should be administered once a day at the same time every day. Limitations of Use: Lantus® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Lantus® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Insulin pens, needles, or syringes must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimen cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Do not dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Lantus® via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Lantus®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection. Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Lantus®, treat and monitor until symptoms resolve. A reduction in the Lantus® dose may be re Continue reading >>

Should My Insulin Dose Be Lower? Toujeo Vs Lantus

Should My Insulin Dose Be Lower? Toujeo Vs Lantus

Early in 2015 the FDA approved the first concentrated long-acting insulin known as Toujeo (insulin glargine), and it’s now available in pharmacies. While Toujeo is the first of its kind, the key word is “concentrated.” It actually contains the same active ingredient (insulin glargine) as Lantus—which is currently the #1 prescribed insulin in the US. To make things even more confusing: Toujeo comes in a 300 mg/mL dosage, while Lantus is 100 mg/mL. Knowing that Toujeo is concentrated, you might think that you can take a much smaller amount of Toujeo for a similar dose compared to Lantus. Believe it or not though, that isn’t the case. Lantus and Toujeo doses are converted 1:1. This means that if you are injecting 50 units of Lantus, you can essentially be switched over to Toujeo and instructed to inject the exact same amount, 50 units. In reality, some dose adjustments can be expected (according to clinical trial data), but it isn’t a matter of converting to a three times smaller dose. Surprisingly, patients who switch over to Toujeo are actually injecting higher doses compared to what they were using for Lantus. I see a lot of confusion around the different dosages, and a few common questions: Is it normal for my dose of Toujeo to be more than my Lantus dose? Yes. Although Toujeo has three times the concentration of insulin glargine, patients treated with Toujeo during clinical trials used more insulin than patients treated with Lantus in order to maintain the same level of blood sugar control. According to the manufacturer, Sanofi-Aventis, a higher dose can be expected with Toujeo and is completely normal. Why would Sanofi-Aventis make Toujeo if Lantus is the most-prescribed insulin? There is speculation that Sanofi-Aventis came up with Toujeo due to the upco Continue reading >>

What It's Really Like Using New Basal Insulin Toujeo

What It's Really Like Using New Basal Insulin Toujeo

News came early in the year about Sanofi’s new basal insulin called Toujeo, which is a higher concentration than the long-established Lantus. You may remember hearing rumors about this insulin years ago while it was still in development, when Sanofi execs were trying to pinpoint a final name. At the time, U-300 was the code name and many referred to it as “the son of Lantus” in diabetes water-cooler chatter. The FDA approved Toujeo in February, and as of April, you can now get the new insulin in a familiar pre-filled, disposal pen that is labeled SoloStar just like its predecessor. Except the insulin is of course different. Toujeo has that higher concentration (U-300 instead of the standard U-100 we’ve been used to for so long), so patients can inject less volume, and it has an extended onset of action (6 hours vs. Lantus' 1.1 hours) that can help reduce risk of hypoglycemia. One analogy Sanofi has suggested is to think of their two insulins like laundry detergent brands. Lantus is the traditional Tide in a pour-container, but Toujeo is like the contemporary pods that don’t require measuring for a single-wash. “Same cleaning power, but in a smaller delivery and higher concentration.” Sanofi has reworked the SoloStar pen, so that it “does the math for you," meaning it automatically translates the 300 units of insulin per millimeter vs. Lantus' 100 into the same number of pen dials as you'd see with Lantus. And their marketing boasts Toujeo's benefits: “Better than Lantus! Basal insulin lasts a full 24 hours! Fewer hypos!” Of course, they stand to win either way, since they also sell the competitor. An invite-only media webinar in mid-August included a Q&A session with Sanofi reps and diabetes educators on Toujeo. While it was mostly what you’d expec Continue reading >>

Cvs Drops Lantus And Replaces It With A Biologic Insulin

Cvs Drops Lantus And Replaces It With A Biologic Insulin

CVS Health has decided to change its formulary for 2017 and stop covering Sanofi’s Lantus and Toujeo insulin in an effort to fight back against the high cost of the medications and will be replacing Lantus coverage with Eli Lilly’s follow-on biologic insulin Basaglar. CVS Stops Covering Certain High Cost Medications In their announcement, the company stated, “CVS Health is taking a stand against egregious drug price increases that unnecessarily add costs for clients and their members.” The role of CVS and other pharmacy benefit managers involves working as intermediaries by arranging deals with the drugmakers and designating the amount they will charge the insurers, companies, and how much they will reimburse drugstores for generic drugs. These companies manage the formulary, or list of drugs approved for prescription which also lists which drugs can be interchanged. Adam Fein, CEO of the Drug Channels Institute and blog author on prescription drug markets told NPR that removing drugs from the formulary helps lower costs of prescriptions. He said, “Exclusions are one reason why discounts have been growing,” NPR also reported that according to CVS, who dropped other diabetes and cancer drugs from its formulary in addition to Lantus and Toujeo, that they estimate these changes to save its customers $9 billion in the course of the next five years. Reuters reported that the US patent on Lantus expired in 2015 and that Sanofi looks to recover sales with the new Toujeo insulin which is essentially Lantus in a concentrated format. A Sanofi spokesperson said in an email to Reuters that “Sanofi is disappointed by this decision. Healthcare professionals and patients should have a choice regarding their treatment,” Reuters also noted that Citi analysts, in a resear Continue reading >>

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