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Toujeo Diabetes Medication

(insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

(insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

If you are a patient experiencing problems with a Sanofi US product, please contact Sanofi US at 1-800-633-1610. The health information contained herein is provided for general educational purposes only. Your healthcare professional is the single best source of information regarding your health. Please consult your healthcare professional if you have any questions about your health or treatment. Continue reading >>

Now Eligible Patients Can Get Started On Toujeo® With A $0 Co-pay*

Now Eligible Patients Can Get Started On Toujeo® With A $0 Co-pay*

Toujeo® is a long-acting human insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Limitations of Use: Toujeo® is not recommended for treating diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Toujeo® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or any of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Toujeo® contains the same active ingredient, insulin glargine, as Lantus®. The concentration of insulin glargine in Toujeo® is 300 Units per mL. Insulin pens and needles must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimens cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Changes in insulin regimen may result in hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. Unit for unit, patients started on, or changed to, Toujeo® required a higher dose than patients controlled with Lantus®. When changing from another basal insulin to Toujeo®, patients experienced higher average fasting plasma glucose levels in the first few weeks of therapy until titrated to their individualized fasting plasma glucose targets. Higher doses were required in titrate-to-target studies to achieve glucose control similar to Lantus®. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Toujeo®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label bef Continue reading >>

Toujeo (insulin Glargine)

Toujeo (insulin Glargine)

Toujeo, which came to market in early 2015, is a form of man-made insulin known as insulin glargine. There are two other brands of insulin glargine on the market: Lantus (also made by Sanofi Aventis) and Basaglar (produced by Eli Lilly). Toujeo is intended to lower high blood sugar and A1c levels in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Although Toujeo and Lantus are both insulin glargine and produced by the same company, Toujeos formulation makes it a more concentrated form of this medication. One milliliter of Toujeo contains three times as much insulin as Lantus. The higher concentration means that patients can inject a lower volume of insulin. This basal insulin works by forming crystals inside the body, which gradually dissolve and release small amounts of insulin into the bloodstream over the course of 24 hours or longer (up to 36 hours). This mimics the action of the pancreas and this slow and steady release has been proven to lower A1c levels significantly. Some people have been able to reduce or eliminate other oral diabetes medications while taking Toujeo and were still able to achieve their target A1c goals. Unlike most other insulins, Toujeo has no pronounced peak and it doesnt wear off between doses. It does take several hours to take effect, however. Its onset is approximately six hours after injection, as opposed to the 1-2 hours for Lantus. This extended onset helps to lower the incidence of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Toujeo should be used once a day, at the same time every day. Its also important to note that it can take five to eight days of daily dosing to reach a functional concentration in the body, according to Healthline . Toujeo is used to treat type 1 diabetes in adults and in children no younger than six years old. It is also used to tr Continue reading >>

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What is Toujeo®? Prescription Toujeo® is a long-acting insulin used to control blood sugar in adults with diabetes mellitus. • Toujeo® contains 3 times as much insulin in 1 mL as standard insulin (100 Units/mL) • Toujeo® is not for use to treat diabetic ketoacidosis • Toujeo® should not be used in children Important Safety Information for Toujeo® (insulin glargine injection) 300 Units/mL Do not take Toujeo® if you have low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the ingredients in Toujeo®. Do NOT reuse needles or share insulin pens even if the needle has been changed. Before starting Toujeo®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Toujeo®. Your treatment with TZDs and Toujeo® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: • Shortness of breath • Swelling of your ankles or feet • Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Toujeo® should be taken at the same time once a day. Test your blood sugar levels daily while using insulin, including Toujeo®. Do not make changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your doctor. Verif Continue reading >>

Toujeo Solostar

Toujeo Solostar

Generic Name: insulin glargine (IN su lin GLAR gine) Brand Names: Basaglar KwikPen, Lantus, Lantus Solostar Pen, Toujeo SoloStar What is Toujeo? Toujeo (insulin glargine) is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin glargine is a long-acting insulin that starts to work several hours after injection and keeps working evenly for 24 hours. The Toujeo SoloStar injection pen is used to improve blood sugar control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Toujeo is used to treat type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes in adults. It is not known if Toujeo is safe and effective in children. Important information Toujeo SoloStar contains 3 times as much insulin per milliliter (mL) as regular insulin. You should not use Toujeo if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis. Never share a Toujeo SoloStar injection pen with another person, even if the needle has been changed. Sharing injection pens can allow disease such as hepatitis or HIV to pass from one person to another. Toujeo is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels. Before taking this medicine You should not use Toujeo if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). To make sure Toujeo is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia); or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatmen Continue reading >>

Toujeo (insulin Glargine) Dosage, Indication, Interactions, Side Effects | Empr

Toujeo (insulin Glargine) Dosage, Indication, Interactions, Side Effects | Empr

Give by SC inj once daily at same time each day into abdominal area, thigh, or deltoid. Rotate inj sites. Onset 6hrs, duration 24hrs5 days. Individualize; monitor and adjust as needed. Usual range: 180 Units per inj. Titrate every 34 days. Insulin-nave with type 1 diabetes: Initially of total daily insulin dose. Give remainder of the total dose as short-acting insulin divided between each daily meal. Insulin-nave with type 2 diabetes: Initially 0.2 Units/kg once daily. May need to adjust dose of other co-administered antidiabetic drugs. Switching from once-daily long-acting or intermediate acting insulin: initial dose should be the same on a unit-for-unit basis. Switching from Lantus: higher daily dose will be needed. Switching from twice-daily NPH: reduce initial insulin glargine dose by 20% from previous total daily NPH dose. Increased risk of hypoglycemia if changes in physical activity, meal patterns, renal or hepatic function, insulin regimen and if acute illness occurs: monitor glucose more frequently and may need to adjust dose. Discontinue if hypersensitivity reactions occur. Elderly. Pregnancy. Nursing mothers. Do not mix or dilute with other insulins or solutions. Caution with K+-depleting drugs or those sensitive to serum K+ concentrations; may cause hypokalemia. Concomitant thiazolidinediones (TZDs) may cause fluid retention and heart failure; consider dose reduction or discontinue TZDs. Increased risk of hypoglycemia with concomitant antidiabetics, ACEIs, ARBs, disopyramide, fibrates, fluoxetine, MAOIs, pentoxifylline, pramlintide, propoxyphene, salicylates, somatostatin analogs (eg, octreotide), sulfonamides; monitor more frequently and adjust dose as needed. Reduced efficacy with concomitant atypical antipsychotics (eg, olanzapine, clozapine), steroids, Continue reading >>

What Is Toujeo (insulin Glargine)?

What Is Toujeo (insulin Glargine)?

Toujeo is a brand name for the medicine insulin glargine, available in a prefilled injectable pen (SoloStar). It's used to treat people with type 1 diabetes (the body doesn't produce the hormone insulin) and type 2 diabetes (the body doesn't make or use insulin normally). Toujeo is a long-acting form of insulin that works by helping your body use sugar properly. For people with type 1 diabetes, Toujeo must be used with another type of insulin known as a short-acting insulin. People with type 2 diabetes may use other types of insulin or oral drugs along with Toujeo. Taking this prescription medicine along with adopting a healthy lifestyle can decrease your risk of developing serious or life-threatening complications, which may include heart disease, stroke, nerve damage from neuropathy, kidney problems, or eye issues. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Toujeo in 2015. It's marketed by Sanofi. Toujeo Warnings Toujeo shouldn't be used to treat diabetic ketoacidosis, a dangerous condition that can occur if high blood sugar is untreated. Before using Toujeo, tell your doctor if you have or have ever had: Diabetic neuropathy Heart, liver, or kidney disease Hypokalemia (low potassium levels in the blood) A severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) to any medicines, especially insulin products Toujeo shouldn't be used in children, and it should be used with caution in elderly people. Be sure to let your physician know that you're taking Toujeo before having any type of surgery, including a dental procedure. Your healthcare provider may recommend that you follow a specific diet and exercise plan while using Toujeo. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully. Illnesses, injuries, or unusual stress can affect your blood sugar levels. Talk to your physician if you experi Continue reading >>

You Have Other Sanofi Options To Help Meet Your Patients’ Blood Sugar Lowering Needs

You Have Other Sanofi Options To Help Meet Your Patients’ Blood Sugar Lowering Needs

Lantus® is a long-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lantus® should be administered once a day at the same time every day. Limitations of Use: Lantus® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Lantus® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Insulin pens, needles, or syringes must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimen cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Do not dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Lantus® via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Lantus®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection. Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Lantus®, treat and monitor until symptoms resolve. A reduction in the Lantus® dose may be re Continue reading >>

Toujeo For The Treatment Of Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Toujeo For The Treatment Of Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Toujeo was compared to once-daily Lantus, another insulin injection, in Phase III clinical trials. Image: courtesy of Sanofi. Sanofi also manufactures medical devices for diabetes including blood glucose monitoring systems. Image: courtesy of Sanofi. Toujeo (insulin glargine [rDNA origin]) is an insulin injection approved for the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes to improve glycaemic control in adult patients. The drug was discovered and developed by Sanofi. Toujeo was approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a once-daily long-acting basal insulin to improve the glycaemic index in patients suffering from type 1 and type 2 diabetes in February 2015. A new drug application (NDA) of the drug was accepted for review by the FDA in July 2014 following acceptance of the marketing authorisation application by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for EU countries in May 2014. The marketing authorisation request of Toujeo is under review with EMA and other health authorities worldwide. The drug is expected to be available in the US in the second quarter of 2015, subject to approval. Glycaemic control in type 1 and type 2 diabetics "Toujeo was approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a once-daily long-acting basal insulin to improve the glycaemic index in patients suffering from type 1 and type 2 diabetes in February 2015." In both cases, glycaemic control plays a crucial role as it involves maintaining normal blood sugar levels in patients with diabetes mellitus. Good glycaemic control is an important part of diabetes care as both hyperglycaemia (elevated blood sugar levels) and hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar) may lead to chronic complications of diabetes. Toujeo’s mechanism of action Toujeo contains an active ingredient called insulin glargine whos Continue reading >>

Toujeo Launches In The Us – The Next Generation Lantus

Toujeo Launches In The Us – The Next Generation Lantus

Update (4/3/15): New basal insulin Toujeo (insulin glargine U300) has now launched in the US, around a month after its FDA approval. In what we think is fantastic news, Toujeo will be priced around the same as Lantus (insulin glargine U100) per unit. You can find a detailed injection guide for using the updated SoloStar pen for Toujeo on the website. We’re most excited for this product in terms of “next generation” combo products (more on that below). Based on clinical trial data, for some Toujeo may lead to nighttime hypoglycemia and/or weight loss benefits, although this is not technically on the label. The product also has an impressive COACH patient support program (available free to anyone with a Toujeo prescription) that provides live one-on-one phone calls with a COACH guide, online resources, tips via text message, and even diabetes educator-led in-person sessions. We can’t wait to see how this works in real life; if you’re using Toujeo’s COACH program, please let us know your impressions by e-mailing us. A savings card also allows patients with commercial insurance (but not Medicare/Medicaid/VA patients) to pay no more than $15 per prescription for the next year. Although many criticize the high price of insulin in the US, it’s good to see the availability of saving programs for Toujeo for people with insurance. Original Article (3/5/15): Twitter summary: [email protected]_FDA approves Toujeo, more concentrated version of basal insulin Lantus – our story on data, delivery, & a promising future In late February, Sanofi announced FDA approval of its once-daily, long-acting basal insulin Toujeo. Toujeo is the same type of basal insulin (glargine) as Sanofi’s blockbuster Lantus, but a stronger version. In Toujeo, each milliliter of liquid carries 300 units of Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine Injection For Subcutaneous Use

Insulin Glargine Injection For Subcutaneous Use

Toujeo (insulin glargine) Injection is along-acting insulin indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Common side effects of Toujeo include: cold symptoms upper respiratory tract infection allergic reactions injection site reactions itching rash swelling of extremities, and weight gain The recommended starting dose of Toujeo in insulin na�ve patients with type 1 diabetes is approximately one-third to one-half of the total daily insulin dose. The remainder of the total daily insulin dose should be given as a short-acting insulin and divided between each daily meal. As a general rule, 0.2 to 0.4 units of insulin per kilogram of body weight can be used to calculate the initial total daily insulin dose in insulin na�ve patients with type 1 diabetes. The recommended starting dose of Toujeo in insulin na�ve patients with type 2 diabetes is 0.2 units per kilogram of body weight once daily. Toujeo may interact with other antidiabetic drugs, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blocking agents (ARBs), disopyramide, fibrates, fluoxetine, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), pentoxifylline, pramlintide, propoxyphene, salicylates, somatostatin analogs, sulfonamide antibiotics, antipsychotics, corticosteroids, danazol, diuretics, estrogens, glucagon, isonazid, niacin, oral contraceptives, phenothiazines, progestogens, protease inhibitors, somatropin, sympathomimetic drugs, thyroid hormones, alcohol, beta-blockers, clonidine, lithium salts, clonidine, guanethidine, and reserpine. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before using Toujeo. Insulin requirements may change during pregnancy. It is unknown if Toujeo passes into breast m Continue reading >>

Toujeo Vs. Lantus | Toujeo (insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

Toujeo Vs. Lantus | Toujeo (insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

Bill: You know I find that humor makes people feel better. As someone whos had type 2 diabetes for almost 20 years, I find it helps me get through some pretty rough spots. Bill: I guess you could say humor comes naturally to me. I remember as a kid I thought I could be pretty funny. Bill: I even did a stand-up act years ago in the late 80s, played comedy clubs all around the country. I couldnt help itI was always writing jokes, or finding the humor in things. Bill: Comedy was fun, but then I thought it was time to settle down. Bill: I work as a project manager now, but I still love to see people smiling and laughing. Bill: I dress up like Santa at Christmastime for the kids at the local hospitals. With this beard, Im pretty convincing. (chuckle) Its fun for the kids, and its good for me to see them happy. Bill: When I was first diagnosed with diabetes, it definitely changed how I went about my life. Bill: For a while, I managed diabetes with medications. My family is very supportive. My wife, Tish, gives me endless encouragement and support. She has a good sense of humor, too, and she lightens up my day. Bill: Then I went through a period where, I admit, I wasnt doing that whole due diligence thing, wasnt on top of it. Bill: After a long day at my office and commuting, I didnt have the energy to work out. Plus, I wasnt testing my blood sugar levels every day. Bill: But Ive never been one to quit. Im just not that guy. Its like someone flipped a switch. I said to myself Bill: Bill, you gotta stop ignoring the obvious. This diabetes thing isnt going to go away. Get with the program, do whatever you got to do to keep it in check. Bill: So I talked about it with my doctor, and told her about how my diabetes management was going. She explained that diabetes can change over Continue reading >>

What It's Really Like Using New Basal Insulin Toujeo

What It's Really Like Using New Basal Insulin Toujeo

News came early in the year about Sanofi’s new basal insulin called Toujeo, which is a higher concentration than the long-established Lantus. You may remember hearing rumors about this insulin years ago while it was still in development, when Sanofi execs were trying to pinpoint a final name. At the time, U-300 was the code name and many referred to it as “the son of Lantus” in diabetes water-cooler chatter. The FDA approved Toujeo in February, and as of April, you can now get the new insulin in a familiar pre-filled, disposal pen that is labeled SoloStar just like its predecessor. Except the insulin is of course different. Toujeo has that higher concentration (U-300 instead of the standard U-100 we’ve been used to for so long), so patients can inject less volume, and it has an extended onset of action (6 hours vs. Lantus' 1.1 hours) that can help reduce risk of hypoglycemia. One analogy Sanofi has suggested is to think of their two insulins like laundry detergent brands. Lantus is the traditional Tide in a pour-container, but Toujeo is like the contemporary pods that don’t require measuring for a single-wash. “Same cleaning power, but in a smaller delivery and higher concentration.” Sanofi has reworked the SoloStar pen, so that it “does the math for you," meaning it automatically translates the 300 units of insulin per millimeter vs. Lantus' 100 into the same number of pen dials as you'd see with Lantus. And their marketing boasts Toujeo's benefits: “Better than Lantus! Basal insulin lasts a full 24 hours! Fewer hypos!” Of course, they stand to win either way, since they also sell the competitor. An invite-only media webinar in mid-August included a Q&A session with Sanofi reps and diabetes educators on Toujeo. While it was mostly what you’d expec Continue reading >>

Toujeo Solostar U-300 Insulin Subcutaneous : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Toujeo Solostar U-300 Insulin Subcutaneous : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Insulin glargine is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes . Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke . Insulin glargine is a man-made product that is similar to human insulin . It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. It acts longer than regular insulin, providing a low, steady level of insulin. It works by helping blood sugar ( glucose ) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. Insulin glargine may be used with a shorter-acting insulin product. It may also be used alone or with other diabetes drugs. Read the Patient Information Leaflet and Instructions for Use if available from your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor, diabetes educator, or pharmacist. This insulin product is a concentrated form of standard insulin (3 times as much insulin in each milliliter). Learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional and the product package. Check that you are using the correct insulin before injecting this medication. Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the insulin. Insulin glargine should be clear and colorless. Before injecting each dose, clean the injection site with rubbing alcohol. Change the injection site each time to lessen injury under the skin and to avoid developing problems under the skin ( lipodystrophy ). Insulin glargine may be injected in the stomach area, the thigh, or the upper arm. Do not inject into a vein or muscle Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine Injection For Subcutaneous Use

Insulin Glargine Injection For Subcutaneous Use

TOUJEO (insulin glargine) Injection DESCRIPTION TOUJEO (insulin glargine injection) is a long-acting insulin supplied as a sterile solution for subcutaneous injection containing 300 Units/mL of insulin glargine. Insulin glargine is a human insulin analog produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli (K12) as the production organism. Insulin glargine differs from human insulin in that the amino acid asparagine at position A21 is replaced by glycine and two arginines remain at the C-terminus of the B-chain. Chemically, insulin glargine is 21A-Gly-31B -32B -Di-Arg -human insulin and has the empirical formula C267H404N72O78S6 and a molecular weight of 6063. Insulin glargine has the following structural formula: Each milliliter of TOUJEO contains 300 Units (10.91 mg) insulin glargine dissolved in a clear aqueous fluid. The 1.5 mL SoloStar disposable prefilled pen presentation contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 90 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, and water for injection. The pH is adjusted by addition of aqueous solutions of hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide. TOUJEO has a pH of approximately 4. At pH 4, insulin glargine is completely soluble. After injection into the subcutaneous tissue, the acidic solution is neutralized, leading to formation of a precipitate from which small amounts of insulin glargine are slowly released. Continue reading >>

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