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Tomato Juice Benefits For Diabetes

Tomatoes And Type 2 Diabetes

Tomatoes And Type 2 Diabetes

low carb vegetable at less than 5 grams per serving Tomatoes are low in calories at only 32 per 1 cup serving Tomatoes supply many other vitamins (especially vitamin E) and minerals (especially manganese) as well as antioxidants (such as lycopene) Calories: 22 | Total Fat: 0.25 g | Sat Fat: 0.03 g | Poly: 0.10 g | Mono: 0.03 g | Total Carbs: 4.7 g | Fiber: 1.5 g | Net Carbs: 3.2 g | Protein: 1.0 g Calcium: 12 mg | Iron: 0.3 mg | Magnesium: 14 mg | Phosphorus: 30 mg | Potassium: 292 mg | Zinc: 0.2 mg Vitamin C: 16.9 mg | Thiamin: 0.04 mg | Riboflavin: 0.02 mg | Niacin: 0.7 mg | Vit B6: 0.09 mg | Folate: 18 ug | Vit B12: 0 mg | Vit A: 1025 IU | Vit E: 0.66 mg | Vit D: 0 IU | Vit K: 9.7 ug Research on Tomato Specific to T2 Diabetes lower a1c, intake of tomatoes has been shown to improve associated outcomes through reducing associated heart health benefits through decreasing LDL (‘bad’) cholesterol, and triglycerides as well as preventing platelet aggregation, which leads to clumping in the blood, increasing risk of heart attack. study measuring the addition of 200 grams tomato daily in diabetics showed reduction in blood pressure and improvement in lipid (cholesterol) profile with a reduction in cardiovascular risk. Adding olive oil has been shown to enhance those benefits. anti-inflammatory effect, even reducing pain in those with diabetes and obesity. Finally there is evidence that tomato consumption has a positive (lowering) effect on both Tomatoes are great for heart health, inflammation and blood glucose. 1 cup tomato juice, canned without salt is 8.5 g total carbs, 1 g fiber, 7.5 g net carbs. Compared to something like apple juice, at approximately 28 g per cup, tomato juice is obviously a better option. Interestingly, there have been a few studies done on tomat Continue reading >>

Juicing For Diabetics – Just A Myth Or Can It Really Help You?

Juicing For Diabetics – Just A Myth Or Can It Really Help You?

Juicing works amazingly well for all sorts of conditions. It can help add nutrients, increase overall caloric intake, and helps stomach problems. But, can juicing really help diabetes? This is a question that we’re going to answer. For most people, they don’t have to worry too much about the finer details of juicing. They don’t have to worry about how many carbohydrates they take in, and can juice whatever they want to. Diabetics, on the other hand, have to be very concerned with a number of sugars they take in. And unfortunately, juicing tends to concentrate sugars. So, diabetics really need to pay attention to the type of juices they use and the quantity. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition that causes the person to lose their pancreas function because of the autoimmune system attacks and destroys the islet cells that produce insulin. Type 1 diabetes most often occurs between the ages of 4 and 10, but anyone can be affected by type 1 diabetes. This type of diabetes cannot be cured. Because type 1 diabetics do not have pancreas function or have very minimal pancreas function that’s declining, they have to rely on an external source of insulin. For every sugar molecule they take in, they have to inject a corresponding amount of insulin. We won’t go into how much insulin it takes because every person is different. So, when juicing, type 1 diabetics have to know how many sugars they will be taking in. That way, they can take an appropriate amount of insulin to metabolize the sugars. Type 2 diabetes is a lifestyle condition that is caused by a person consuming too many sugars for too long. The pancreas has worked so hard for so long, that it is worn out. The over-consumption of sugars has also caused the body to become resistant to its own insulin and this Continue reading >>

12 Fabulous Foods To Beat Diabetes

12 Fabulous Foods To Beat Diabetes

Eating for Type 2 Diabetes En español l For years, experts recommended a low-fat diet, but new research finds that low-carb diets are better at reducing high blood sugar. The American Diabetes Association encourages people to work with a nutrition professional on a personalized diet plan. These tasty foods will enhance any plan. Berries Blueberries, blackberries, strawberries and their richly colored cousins are all high in fiber and brimming with vitamins and antioxidants. They don't have much in the way of carbs, so they're low on the glycemic index (GI). Still, they contain a lot of sugar, so limit your serving size. Cheese Cheese is a satisfying food. It has practically no carbs, which means it won't significantly influence blood sugar levels, and because it's high in protein, a little will go a long way in controlling hunger pangs. Continue reading >>

"new To Type 2..tomato Juice?": Diabetes Community - Support Group

Report Problems With Your Medications to the FDA You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088. The opinions expressed in WebMD Communities are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. Communities are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service or treatment. Do not consider Communities as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource, but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a qualified health care provider. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or dial 911 immediately. Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Recipe For Tomato Juice | Diabetic Connect

Recipe For Tomato Juice | Diabetic Connect

Does anyone have a basic tomato juice recipe? My first wife and I grew a lot of tomatoes and we canned a lot of tomatoes as sauce and juice. But the juice we put up was not the red tomato juice as campbells or other juice you see in the stores. We put up a juice which was kinda translucent with a red tinge to it. We were able to do this without a lot of cooking down the tomatoes, and we found we needed that juice if we wanted to make home made tomato soup or mix it with the sauce to make tomato juice. To learn how we did that you can go here ~ But to get a tomato juice more like a campbells juice look here ~ my grandmother used to can and all that but I have yet to can anything I freeze alot of stuff and freeze tomatoes, when you need them just drop them in boiling water for a few sec and take out and you can take the skin off and use in soups etc. I need to start canning but just have a fear of blowing my kitchen up, lol yes, and I would still be canning today except my first wife became my ex and she would not part with one of our two pressure canners nor with many of the dozens of canning jars we had accumulated in 25 yrs of marriage. The sad thing of it is, I don't think she ever used those things again. I know she didn't garden any more in this hot Las Vegas summers, and now she is an over the road trucker with her new hubby. Quite sad I think that all that is not being used. But I cannot garden in my situation either since I have an apartment in a downtown area and there is no room for a garden space, PLUS the street people would chow down on my produce (if they didn't trample it first). But with tomatoes you won't need a pressure canner, but simply a water bath canner. You can Google water bath canning and see what you might need. Water bath canning only works f Continue reading >>

Daily Tomato Juice Eases Diabetic Symptoms

Daily Tomato Juice Eases Diabetic Symptoms

They found significant lowering of platelet aggregation - the blood's ability to clot - after a daily dose of juice for three weeks, according to the research letter in this week's JAMA​ (Aug 18;292(7):805-6). Diabetic patients are more prone to blood clots, which contributes to their increased risk of developing cardiovascular complications, according to the authors. Blood clots can cause strokes, heart attacks and other life-threatening problems. In the trial, 20 patients (aged 43-82) with type 2 diabetes drank either 250 ml of tomato juice or a placebo - tomato-flavoured drink - everyday for three weeks. They had no prior history of clotting problems and were not taking aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or other medications that might influence clotting. Platelet aggregation turned out to be significantly lower at the end of the trial for the group drinking tomato juice. There was no significant difference in platelet aggregation in the placebo group. The researchers from the University of Newcastle in Australia do not yet understand why tomato juice reduces platelet aggregation, although other groups have reported similar results. In the UK, nutraceutical firm Provexis is currently developing a water-soluble, concentrated tomato extract that can be added to drinks to make them beneficial for heart health. Trials on the extract, which contains none of the antioxidant lycopene, also reported to improve heart health, suggest that its different compounds inhibit blood platelet aggregation.Nobody at the company was available to comment on the Australian research. Diabetes has already increased by one-third during the 1990s, due to the prevalence of obesity and an ageing population. There are currently more than 194 million people with diabetes worldwide but Continue reading >>

Healthy Fellow

Healthy Fellow

Are you diabetic? I’m not. But I approach my health care as if I were and I think most people should as well. By this, I don’t mean that the majority of you should start popping medications that help manage blood sugar. Far from it. Why do that when you can most likely attain healthy glucose control via exercise, stress management and a whole food diet? That’s the game plan I advocate for most of my clients. However there’s more to supporting diabetic health than simply sustaining optimal blood sugar levels. One of the other pieces of the puzzle involves restoring oxidative balance within the body. Eating or supplementing with foods rich in antioxidants may very well reduce the risk of health threats that are commonly associated with adult-onset diabetes and beyond. Tomatoes are an abundant source of antioxidant pigments known as carotenoids. In fact, the characteristic red hue is largely brought about by one member of this phytochemical family known as lycopene. Several studies spanning the past few decades are providing clues that eating various tomato-based foods may afford significant cardiovascular support in men and women with type 2 diabetes. This is the most common variety of the disease and is also the most responsive to natural interventions. ( 1 , 2 , 3 ) The current edition of the Journal of the Neurological Sciences reports that diabetics with hypertension are 48% more likely to suffer from age-related cognitive changes than those who are normotensive. Fortunately, another publication appearing in the December 2010 issue of the International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition reveals that achieving healthy blood pressure may be as simple as eating more tomatoes. The latter paper notes that tomatoes contain nutrients that extend beyond just the Continue reading >>

Can Tomatoes Raise Blood Sugar In Diabetics?

Can Tomatoes Raise Blood Sugar In Diabetics?

If you are have diabetes, attaining near-normal blood sugars is a goal of therapy. Diet is an essential component of blood sugar management, so it’s important to learn how specific foods affect your numbers. A food’s carbohydrate content is closely linked to its blood sugar impact, and many vegetables -- including tomatoes -- are low enough in carbohydrates that they can be enjoyed without too much concern about portions. However, certain tomato products may have a more pronounced blood sugar impact. Video of the Day Controlling your carbohydrate intake is a cornerstone of diabetes management, and carbohydrate counting is a common approach to diabetes meal planning. Fortunately, whole tomatoes are fairly low in carbohydrates, and for most people this means tomatoes have a minimal impact on blood sugars. According to the nutrition recommendations of the American Diabetes Association (ADA), published in the January 2014 supplement of “Diabetes Care,” even higher carbohydrate foods such as whole grains, legumes and fruit can be included daily, although everyone is different, and specific carbohydrate goals should be individualized. One medium tomato contains about 5 grams of carbohydrates, and 1 cup of diced raw tomato contains about 7 grams of carbohydrates. This is similar to the levels found in most vegetables and much lower than the carbohydrates naturally found in bread, pasta, fruit, and starchy vegetables such as potatoes or corn. Some people with diabetes tolerate carbohydrates well enough to eat tomatoes and other low carbohydrate vegetables freely with no blood sugar impact. Others may need to factor the carbohydrate grams from tomatoes into their plan, particularly if large portions are consumed or if insulin needs to be dosed according to carbohydrate g Continue reading >>

Juices That Are Good For Type 2 Diabetics

Juices That Are Good For Type 2 Diabetics

Living with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) involves limiting foods that could raise blood sugar to high levels. Juice can be a part of an overall healthy diet in limited amounts. Keeping serving sizes to 4 ounces or less -- about 1/2 cup -- limits the carbohydrate load. Fruit juice is sometimes helpful to treat low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, due to the fast absorption of the sugar. The nutrient quality of juices varies, so it's helpful to know which juices are healthier choices. There are also alternatives to drinking plain juice that can help limit your carbohydrate intake. Video of the Day Vegetable juice is a lower-carbohydrate alternative to fruit juice. For example, a 4-ounce glass of a tomato-based vegetable juice contains 5.5 g of carbohydrate. However, a 4-ounce serving of a similar vegetable-fruit juice blend typically has 13.7 g of carbohydrate. Low-level inflammation is a contributing factor to insulin resistance and T2DM, particularly in people who are overweight. The authors of a June 2013 "British Journal of Nutrition" study report found that overweight and obese women experienced reduced inflammation after drinking about 1.5 cups of tomato juice daily for 3 weeks. These findings suggest that tomato-based vegetable juice and tomato juice can be good, low-carbohydrate juice options -- and might assist in reducing inflammation. When choosing a fruit juice, the American Diabetes Association recommends 100 percent fruit juice with no added sugar. Pomegranate, cranberry and grape juice all contain a high concentration of antioxidants, according to research published in January 2010 in "Nutrition Journal." Foods rich in antioxidants might help prevent or limit damage caused by an overabundance of free radicals, chemicals that can injure cells. Excess accumulation of Continue reading >>

Top 10 Diabetes Superfoods

Top 10 Diabetes Superfoods

Not all healthy foods are created equal. Greens may be good for you, but the nutrients in iceberg lettuce may not be as plentiful as those in kale, spinach, and Swiss chard. Besides nutrient content, the glycemic index (GI) of a food may also help you make healthy choices. The GI measures how quickly a food will raise blood sugar. Low GI foods have a score of 55 or less, while high GI foods have a score of 70 or more. In general, lower GI foods are a better choice for people with diabetes. Foods that are both nutritious and have a low GI are helpful in managing health and blood glucose levels. Here are 10 superfoods that are especially good for those with diabetes. 1. Non-Starchy Vegetables Non-starchy vegetables have fewer carbs per serving. They include everything from artichokes and asparagus to broccoli and beets. This category of veggies goes a long way in satisfying your hunger and boosting your intake of vitamins, minerals, fiber, and phytochemicals. These vegetables are also low in calories and carbohydrates, making them some of the few foods that people with diabetes can enjoy almost with abandon. In fact, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) identifies most non-starchy vegetables as low GI foods with a ranking of 55 or less. A small study of 11 people found that a low-calorie diet consisting of non-starchy vegetables may successfully reverse type 2 diabetes. 2. Non-Fat or Low-Fat Plain Milk and Yogurt Vitamin D is essential for good health. One of its roles is to keep bones healthy, yet many of us don’t get as much as we need. Non-fat dairy foods, including milk and yogurt, are fortified with vitamin D. These dairy products are smart choices for diabetics because they have low GI scores: Skim milk has a GI score of 32 while reduced fat yogurt has a GI sco Continue reading >>

Tomato Juice For Cardiovascular Health?

Tomato Juice For Cardiovascular Health?

Australian Study Shows Benefits in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Aug. 17, 2004 -- Could a daily glass of tomato juice help people with type 2 diabetes improve their cardiovascular health? Three Australian researchers explored that possibility in a small study of 20 people and reported their findings in a research letter to The Journal of the American Medical Association. It's well recognized that the risk of death as a result of cardiovascular disease is threefold higher for people with diabetes than those without the disease. In the study, 14 men and six women with type 2 diabetes aged 43 to 82 were given either tomato juice or a placebo . Two participants were smokers and none of them were taking aspirin or other medications that might be considered a blood thinner such as antiplatelet medications or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Low-dose aspirin therapy is recommended for people with diabetes as a blood thinner and is a preventive measure also used to treat people who have had a heart attack or a stroke . The study focused on people with type 2 diabetes because they have an increased risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications (such as strokes caused by blood clots ), write the researchers, who are based at the dietetics and nutrition department of the University of Newcastle and Royal Newcastle Hospital's Diabetes Education Centre. Half the group drank 1 cup of clarified tomato juice daily for three weeks; the rest took a tomato-flavored placebo. That was the only dietary change the participants made. At the end of the three weeks, the juice drinkers had a reduction in platelet clumping or aggregation, one of several steps thought to be important in the formation of blood clots that may lead to heart attacks and strokes. Platelet aggregation di Continue reading >>

Tomato Juice Looks Good For Diabetics

Tomato Juice Looks Good For Diabetics

There's a particular kind of juice that may prove helpful for diabetics. Early research indicates that tomato juice may reduce blood platelet clumping in people with type 2 diabetes. Blood platelet clumping could contribute to heart attack or stroke under certain conditions, and diabetics are at increased risk for such heart problems. If you add tomato juice to your diet, go for low-sodium varieties. More research is needed to confirm the link between tomato juice consumption and decreased platelet aggregation. In a small study of approximately 20 patients with type 2 diabetes, drinking a small amount of clarified tomato juice daily appeared to inhibit platelet aggregation. Approximately 65% of people with diabetes die from complications of cardiovascular disease (CVD) such as heart attack and stroke. High blood glucose in diabetics damages blood vessels and contributes to high cholesterol and other lipid abnormalities. This, in turn, promotes clogged arteries, a condition otherwise known as atherosclerosis. Typical dietary guidelines for people with diabetes include eating antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables, whole unrefined grains, low-fat dairy, and lean protein. Exercise is critical for blood sugar control and the prevention of cardiovascular disease as well. Continue reading >>

Tomato Juice May Help Type 2 Diabetics

Tomato Juice May Help Type 2 Diabetics

Tomato juice may be the key to decreasing hyperactive platelet aggregation, which can lead to heart disease, according to the latest nutrition and dietetics study by HMRI researchers based at the University of Newcastle . Research conducted by Sherri Lazarus and Associate Professor Manohar Garg, published in an August edition of the Journal of American Medical Association, has found that over a three week period, the platelet activity in people with type 2 diabetes decreased when they took a dietary supplement of tomato juice. Study: Hot spots of type 1 diabetes found in food swamps "Diabetes is a multi-faceted disease with problems such as glucose intolerance, hypertension ( high blood pressure ), dislipidaemia (high cholesterol and high triglycerides) and the less talked about hyperactive platelets," says Sherri. "Aggregation is the clumping together and clotting of platelets. We looked at how susceptible the platelets were to clotting before and after the people with type 2 diabetes had taken tomato juice." "Platelets are the parts of blood responsible for the preservation of healthy blood vessels. When the health of blood vessels is impaired, as in the case of diabetes, platelets stick to the lining of the vessel wall and over time can lead to the development of cardiovascular disease." "Dietary strategies have been developed to address known cardiovascular risk factors, however, currently there is no dietary strategy aimed at reducing high platelet activity and this is the first time that tomato juice has been used in humans to reduce platelet activity." "We are looking for dietary solutions for people with type 2 diabetes rather than just popping pills. Larger randomised controlled trials are needed to determine whether the consumption of tomato juice can improve Continue reading >>

Tomato Juice Reduces Clotting In Diabetics

Tomato Juice Reduces Clotting In Diabetics

For people with type 2 diabetes, tomato juice may help stave off the heart troubles that often complicate the disease. Researchers have found that drinking tomato juice for three weeks had a blood-thinning effect in people with the disease. The juice reduced "platelet aggregation" — the blood’s ability to clot. If corroborated by larger studies, the finding may one day also help "individuals with increased clotting tendency such as smokers, long-distance air travelers (deep vein thrombosis), etcetera," said Manohar L. Garg, one of the authors of the letter detailing the results. Garg is an associate professor of nutrition and dietetics at the University of Newcastle in Australia. "When platelets aggregate, they form the plug that clots the vessels," explained Dr. Stuart Weiss, a clinical assistant professor of medicine at New York University School of Medicine. "In diabetes patients, platelets are more sticky." Platelets are responsible for the blood’s ability to clot which, in the case of an injury, is a good thing. Clotting can go too far, however, and cause strokes, heart attacks and other life-threatening problems. As a result of this excessive "stickiness," for instance, people with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular problems, such as heart attack and stroke. Anti-clotting medications have been shown to reduce this risk. "In diabetes, there are a lot of pro-inflammatory markers that contribute to increasing platelet aggregation, so if there’s something we can do that can reverse or limit that, that would be a very positive thing," Weiss added. Consumption of tomato products has been shown to reduce the incidence of various heart ailments, so the researchers behind the research letter decided to test the hypothesis i Continue reading >>

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