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Toenails Falling Off Diabetes

Diabetic Feet - Neglect Means Trouble

Diabetic Feet - Neglect Means Trouble

Diabetic feet need lots of attention, but the truth is we often forget them until they start complaining. For a type 2 diabetic that is a bad thing. You must take care of your feet if you want to avoid serious complications. Why are diabetic feet such a high priority? Most of the amputations related to diabetes are of toes and feet. But the surgeons who do amputations say that over half of them could have been avoided. What makes your feet so vulnerable? The cause is diabetic nerve damage from peripheral neuropathy. The longest nerves in your body run from your spine, down your legs into your feet and end at your toes. This makes them an easy target for peripheral neuropathy, one of the most common complications of diabetes. When the small blood vessels of your feet are scarred and weakened by high blood sugar, nerve damage begins. That's why diabetic feet become either numb or way too sensitive to touch. It's a sign that other complications are coming. Some of the problems you may see in your diabetic feet are foot ulcers, infections, foot and toenail fungus, numbness and tingling, foot pain, and sores that will not heal. The best thing you can do for your feet is to protect them. First, use diabetic socks, the kind that have no seams in the toes and do not bind at the ankles. Your shoes need special attention too. To give your feet real protection, you must choose comfort, support and safety over style. Here's what to look for in diabetic shoes. Dry skin is a symptom of peripheral neuropathy. Do not ignore it. You may spend a little or a lot for foot lotions, but the important thing is to apply them every day. You may not be used to caring for your feet this way. Make it part of your daily routine, like brushing your teeth. Some lotions are made especially for diabeti Continue reading >>

How Do I Fight Toenail Fungus?

How Do I Fight Toenail Fungus?

What can you tell me about the dreaded toe fungus? It seems to develop very slowly and can get vicious! I've heard it can get all through the system if not treated. Just what can happen? More important, is there a way to avoid it, besides the regular foot care, dry feet, no bare feet, etc.? Is there an over-the-counter cream that can cure the fungus before it gets so bad that oral meds are needed? Continue reading >>

? Bleeding Under Toenail. (don't Look If You Don't Like Feet!!!- Sorry!!)

? Bleeding Under Toenail. (don't Look If You Don't Like Feet!!!- Sorry!!)

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community ? Bleeding under toenail. (Don't look if you don't like feet!!!- sorry!!) Hello I'm type 2- diagnosed 4 years ago. Had a bad 'fall off wagon' at New Year but back on track now with levels below 8- low carbing & 2000 Metformin/ day. Anyway have just taken off my toe nail varnish & found a red spot on my big toe nail. Thought it was red nail varnish (but the colour I took off was silver/ grey & it won't come off. ) Also it looks to be under the nail. Don't think it's a fungal infection (I've no athletes foot or anything- although I am treating a fungal finger nail after my high blood sugars!!) I will make a GP appt asap but just wondered if anyone has seen anything like this? Hello I'm type 2- diagnosed 4 years ago. Had a bad 'fall off wagon' at New Year but back on track now with levels below 8- low carbing & 2000 Metformin/ day. Anyway have just taken off my toe nail varnish & found a red spot on my big toe nail. Thought it was red nail varnish (but the colour I took off was silver/ grey & it won't come off. ) Also it looks to be under the nail. Don't think it's a fungal infection (I've no athletes foot or anything- although I am treating a fungal finger nail after my high blood sugars!!) I will make a GP appt asap but just wondered if anyone has seen anything like this? Haven't had anything like this. Looks like a small bleed under the nail. Have you banged toe? Is the nail edge cutting into the flesh at the side? I guess you don't need me to tell you not to neglect this and see a podiatrist soon? Your fert don't look too bad though. Your warning not to look had me worried. Hi @Sunny I have to agree with @Pipp , or maybe a bruise? Saying that Im no f Continue reading >>

Cheap Remedy For Toenail Fungus

Cheap Remedy For Toenail Fungus

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community A most ick-k-k-y topic to have to discuss, but I wanted to pass this info on. Some of us have strange stuff happening with our toenails (or fingernails), as a DB complication. There is a very inexpensive way to treat it. Its working for me so far, hope it works for you too. <------ link to describe ailment <------ ink for remedy I like this cure and I shall try it on someone, dont know who yet lol,I always keep tyme oil in my first aid box because ,once one of my granddaughter's knelt on a bee, after removing the sting and the screams, i massaged a little on the swelling.it went down almost instantly and removed the pain. the grandkids thought it was magic. I like this cure and I shall try it on someone, dont know who yet lol,I always keep tyme oil in my first aid box because ,once one of my granddaughter's knelt on a bee, after removing the sting and the screams, i massaged a little on the swelling.it went down almost instantly and removed the pain. the grandkids thought it was magic. I just found out that garlic also is a very good antibiotic and pain-killer. For me, it worked better than the vapo-rub/thyme. I used some sliced garlic juice directly into the affected toe-fungus area. Almost instant pain-relief. My toe is still in good shape. I like this cure and I shall try it on someone, dont know who yet lol,I always keep tyme oil in my first aid box because ,once one of my granddaughter's knelt on a bee, after removing the sting and the screams, i massaged a little on the swelling.it went down almost instantly and removed the pain. the grandkids thought it was magic. I shall get some too... I like to keep things like that in my medicine cupboard. Continue reading >>

Complications Of Untreated Toenail Fungus In Diabetics

Complications Of Untreated Toenail Fungus In Diabetics

Even though insurance companies treat onychomycosis (toenail fungus) as a “cosmetic” issue that they don’t have to cover, it’s a different story for patients who have diabetes. According to Clinical Diabetes, the official journal of the American Diabetes Association, “The outcome from not treating onychomycosis in diabetic patients can be worse than in those without diabetes.” For this reason, some insurance companies will cover toenail fungus treatment for the approximately 22% of diabetics who have toenail fungus. Deformity & Difficulty Walking Thick nails can be burdensome while walking, as the top of the nails push against the shoe, causing bruising and pain. No one wants yellowed, deformed nails that have hardened in bizarre positions. Ingrown toenails often come as a result of fungus nails too. A nail that begins growing into the toe tissue can open the body up to infection. Secondary Infection Diabetic patients with toenail fungus have a 15% increased risk of secondary infection, compared to a 6% rate of infection among diabetic patients who do not have onychomycosis. Injuries to the skin — be it an ingrown toenail, a blister, or an opening in the nail bed — can occur without the patient’s knowledge and lead to fungal or bacterial infections like paronychia and cellulitis. In the worst case scenario, the infection may affect the bone, which is referred to as osteomyelitis. Nail Bed Erosion The thicker the nail is, the more likely the nail bed will erode. Often, over time, the nail actually separates from the bed and may fall off. The body will be more vulnerable to attack without the protective nail barrier in place. Athlete’s Foot Athlete’s foot is a fungal infection on the skin. Fissures and cracked skin provides an entry point for fungus Continue reading >>

Advise Needed! My Toenail Has Turned Black

Advise Needed! My Toenail Has Turned Black

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Advise needed! My toenail has turned black Hi, I have type 1 and my toenail has turned black and is coming off. Should I go doctors or make an app with my Podiatrist? I'm a bit worried. Is it serious? :? You wont know unless you make an appointment. Just choose the person that can see you fastest. Have you dropped something on it? This might explain the black colour. I dropped a can of soup on mine a few years ago and it went black and looked like it was coming away. Whether you have or not, go and see somebody about it. It may be infected. If it is they can sort it. Hope all goes well That's happened to me twice although I never dropped anything on my toe! Yes definatley go and get it checked out it best to be safe than sorry the chances are that maybe you bashed your toe and did'nt notice and now the nail is going to come off. But to be safe make an appointment with your doctor or podiatry. Go ASAP! I ignored an infection in my thumbnail. Result was 7 courses of different antibiotics, a week in hospital and now I may need surgery. The A&E doctor said that any doctor would rather see a diabetic and check to rule out an issue tan wait and see them through an amputation. A sobering thought... yes go check it out, but just wanted to share: have had my fair share of knocked toenails and some have gone black & come off completely. never really worried about it being connected to being T1D...until recently, where every possible ailment i'm thinking is a 'complication'. one of my toenails kept going 'loose' and i'd keep having to remove the nail, recently i automatically thought 'well that's it, the big D has started to claim my extremities'. after about 8 Continue reading >>

Why Is My Toenail Falling Off?

Why Is My Toenail Falling Off?

One of my big toe's toenails fell off and the other one is coming loose. They do not hurt, but look dead. Will new ones grow back what could have caused this? The loss of a toenail, also called onychoptosis (which literally means "falling nail" in Greek), can be largely blamed on two major culprits fungus and injury. Fungus: Several different types of microscopic fungi can cause onychoptosis by feeding on keratin, the tough protein that makes up toenails. Onychoptosis caused by fungus isn't that rare a problem three to five percent of Americans are affected, as are up to 18 percent of people worldwide. Toenail fungus can cause toenails to do the following: Nails that fall off because of fungal infection will grow back, but the new nail will probably become infected, similar to the old one. Since the condition rarely goes away on its own, it's smart to talk with a health care provider about an accurate diagnosis and then possible treatments. After examining your foot, the provider may remove a large amount of the infected nail (if there's any of it left). Depending on the extent of the infection, s/he may also give you a prescription anti-fungal toenail polish, such as Loceryl or Loprox, or oral anti-fungals, such as Sporanox and Lamisil. If a toenail resists treatment, it can also be removed surgically. The fungi that cause onychoptosis thrive in dark, moist environments, so wearing tight shoes, socks, and stockings, as well as thick nail polish, can increase your risk of developing the condition. The fungi are also easily transferred from foot to foot and from person to person, hence why locker rooms are notorious for transmitting such things as toenail fungus and athlete's foot. An inexpensive pair of sandals or shower shoes can help you avoid picking anything up the Continue reading >>

Why Do Toenails Fall Off?

Why Do Toenails Fall Off?

Our toenails protect the delicate skin underneath them and serve as a layer of defense against the elements as we use our feet all day. In healthy feet, we expect them to stay put. However, they can become separated from the foot and fall off. If this happens, it can be quite surprising and shocking, as well as uncomfortable and embarrassing. However, if youve had a toenail fall off, dont worry Dr. Jeffery LaMour and our team are available to assist you. Our podiatry practice is here to help with all sorts of foot concerns. We can help you understand why your feet look and feel the way they do, then provide treatment options so you can enhance your podiatric and overall well-being. We are committed to answering our patients questions, so in the following blog, well respond to one of our most commonly heard queries: Why do toenails fall off? The most evident symptoms of a toenail falling off is the nail detaching from its bed, floating loose into your shoes. However, there are a variety of symptoms you can spot even before the nail begins to wriggle free from the foot. If your toenail may fall off, you might experience the following: Discharge from under the nail, as in liquid or pus. If you notice any of the above, we recommend making an appointment with Dr. LaMour as soon as possible. We may be able to prevent your toenail from falling off, saving you discomfort, effort, time, and embarrassment while maintaining your podiatric well-being. There are two main causes for a lost toenail. Go Ask Alice explains ,The loss of a toenail, also called onychoptosis (which literally means falling nail in Greek), can be largely blamed on two major culpritsfungus and injury. Toenail fungus is unfortunately common, but it can be quite devastating to the nail structure.Go Ask Alicedes Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Foot problems are common in people with diabetes. You might be afraid you’ll lose a toe, foot, or leg to diabetes, or know someone who has, but you can lower your chances of having diabetes-related foot problems by taking care of your feet every day. Managing your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar, can also help keep your feet healthy. How can diabetes affect my feet? Over time, diabetes may cause nerve damage, also called diabetic neuropathy, that can cause tingling and pain, and can make you lose feeling in your feet. When you lose feeling in your feet, you may not feel a pebble inside your sock or a blister on your foot, which can lead to cuts and sores. Cuts and sores can become infected. Diabetes also can lower the amount of blood flow in your feet. Not having enough blood flowing to your legs and feet can make it hard for a sore or an infection to heal. Sometimes, a bad infection never heals. The infection might lead to gangrene. Gangrene and foot ulcers that do not get better with treatment can lead to an amputation of your toe, foot, or part of your leg. A surgeon may perform an amputation to prevent a bad infection from spreading to the rest of your body, and to save your life. Good foot care is very important to prevent serious infections and gangrene. Although rare, nerve damage from diabetes can lead to changes in the shape of your feet, such as Charcot’s foot. Charcot’s foot may start with redness, warmth, and swelling. Later, bones in your feet and toes can shift or break, which can cause your feet to have an odd shape, such as a “rocker bottom.” What can I do to keep my feet healthy? Work with your health care team to make a diabetes self-care plan, which is an action plan for how you will manage your diabetes. Your plan should inclu Continue reading >>

Nail Fungus & Diabetes

Nail Fungus & Diabetes

A common problem in diabetic patients is nail fungus. A third of all diabetics are estimated to have nail fungus, or onychomycosis, compared with approximately 10 percent of the general population. Male diabetics are three times as likely as female diabetics to have the disease, and the risk increases with age. People with other diseases that suppress the immune system, for example psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease or AIDS, are also more prone to nail fungus. Although a mild nail fungus infection can be considered mainly a cosmetic problem for a fully healthy person, the consequences of leaving it untreated can be serious for a person with diabetes. Diabetics are more likely than nondiabetics to suffer severe complications from the disease, such as gangrene, diabetic foot ulcers and other foot disorders that could lead to limb amputation. Diabetics with nail fungus also have a higher risk of contracting secondary skin infections like cellulitis and paronychia. As a diabetic, you need to watch carefully for any symptoms of nail fungus and contact your doctor immediately if your nails start to become discolored, brittle or thicker than normal. Why is There a Connection Between Nail Fungus and Diabetes? If you have diabetes you are more likely to have poor blood circulation and impaired nerve function in your hands and feet. This means that your ability to feel pain is reduced and you may be more prone to trauma, which can damage the toenails and the skin around them. Even tiny cuts and injuries can allow fungi to invade the nail, especially if you are diabetic and already have a weak immune system. Injuries that are due to the fungal infection may also go unnoticed and can cause serious diabetic foot infections. For example, thickened nails, a common symptom of onycho Continue reading >>

Toenail Falling Off: What To Do, Causes, And Recovery Time

Toenail Falling Off: What To Do, Causes, And Recovery Time

A detached toenail is a common condition, but it can be painful. Its usually caused by an injury, fungal infection, or psoriasis. However, chemicals, certain medications, and serious illness can also make your toenail fall off. Once your toenail falls off, it cant reattach itself and keep growing. Youll need to wait for the new nail to grow back in its place. Depending on the cause and how much, if any, of your toenail remains, you might need additional treatment to make sure your toenail grows back properly. Regardless of what caused your toenail to fall off, theres a few things you can do right after it happens to avoid any other problems. If only part of your toenail has fallen off, dont try to remove the rest of it. If the detached part of your toenail is still attached to your toe, use nail clippers to carefully trim it off to prevent it from catching on your sock or clothing. Your doctor can help you do this if youre not comfortable doing it on your own. Use a nail file to smooth any jagged or sharp edges. Clean your toe, making sure you remove any debris, and apply an antibiotic ointment . Cover the area where your toenail fell off with a bandage. Seek immediate treatment if your entire toenail falls off or the area around your toenail wont stop bleeding. Simple foot injuries can cause you toenail to fall off. Car accidents, sports, and dropping something on your foot can all damage your toenail. If you injure your toenail, it might look black or purple under your toenail. This is due to something called a subungual hematoma , which causes blood to collect under your injured toenail. As blood builds up under your nail, it may separate from your nail bed. It can take several weeks for your toenail to completely fall off. Contact your doctor if the subungual hemat Continue reading >>

Nail Problems

Nail Problems

Toenails often serve as barometers of our health; they are diagnostic tools providing the initial signal of the presence or onset of systemic diseases. For example, the pitting of nails and increased nail thickness can be manifestations of psoriasis. Concavity—nails that are rounded inward instead of outward—can foretell iron deficiency anemia. Any of the following nail problems or discoloration or infection on or about the nail should be evaluated by one of our podiatric doctors by calling 215-334-9900 to schedule and appointment. Ingrown Toenails is the most common nail impairment and are nails whose corners or sides dig painfully into the soft tissue of nail grooves leading to irritation, redness, swelling and sometimes painful infections. People with diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, or other circulatory disorders must avoid any form of self treatment FOR INGROWN NAILS and call our office for treatment by one of our caring and highly qualified podiatric doctors as soon as possible. Fungal Nails or onychomycosis, is a fungal infection of the nail often ignored because the infection can be present for years without causing any pain. The disease is characterized by a progressive change in a toenail's quality and color, which is most often ugly and embarrassing. The condition is an infection underneath the surface of the nail caused by tiny organisms causing the nail to become darker in color and foul smelling. Debris may collect beneath the nail plate and the infection is capable of spreading to other toenails, the skin, or even the fingernails. A secondary bacterial or yeast infection in or about the nail plate can also develop. Black Toenails or Subungual Hematoma can be caused by the toes hitting the front end or the top of the toe area of shoes or sneaker. Continue reading >>

Toe Issue - Diabetes Message Board - Healthboards

Toe Issue - Diabetes Message Board - Healthboards

Because of the numbness in my toes, when I accidentally stub one, I don't always realize how badly I've hurt myself until much later. (Yes, I'm a clutz... always kicking something!) A few months ago I noticed my little toe nail was black underneath, but didn't remember having hurt it. I kept waiting for it to start growing out so the black would disappear. But it never did. This morning I bumped the same toe again. Tonight, I was looking closely at it because it was hurting. When I touched my nail, I realized it was almost completely unattached. With little effort, the entire nail just came off. My questions: Did the nail fall off more easily because I'm diabetic, or am I just lucky I've never lost one before, given my natural clutziness? Also, when a nail comes off like this, will it grow back with time, especially with the diabetes? I didn't really want to waste money at the podiatrist over a lost toenail. Appreciate your input. You need to see a doctor about this. I was diagnosed with T1 diabetes in 1966 and despite have had many injuries through athletics, I have never had a toe nail turn black and fall off. It could be a natural process, but then again it could be something like a poor circulation issue. This is not something you want to mess around with. As I said, it could be nothing at all and heal up no problems. But then again, if it could be something more serious, it could lead you to some major issues (infection etc) if not treated. Dxd T1 1966, 2001 dialysis, 2002 kidney transplant, 2003 insulin pump, 2008 pancreas transplant Thanks for the advice, Cora. I've just all the tests for circulatory issues and all have come back negative. The black, it turns out, was bloody tissue on the underside of the nail. The toe itself, looks as healthy as a toe can look Continue reading >>

Why Do Your Toes Fall Off When You Have Diabetes?

Why Do Your Toes Fall Off When You Have Diabetes?

WARNING GRAPHIC IMAGE AHEAD!!! Because you can get diabetic foot, one of the complications of diabetes mellitus. Peripheral neuropathy (damaged nerves ==> reduced sensation of pain, heat, cold) develops and the sufferer may not feel a foot injury. This becomes a long time, unnoticed, open ulcer wound that has high infection risk.[1] Infected ulcer may result in wet gangrene ==> Putrefaction (bacterial aided decaying) separates the affected toes. Diabetes itself predisposes atherosclerosis that impairs blood circulation. Lack of blood flow to the foot gives symptoms of pain, numbness, slowed down wound healing. This is called peripheral artery disease.[2] If untreated, it ends into critical limb ischemia where resting pain, and tissue loss starts. Cell deaths occurs and dry gangrene develops. Seperation of the toes can occur if dry gangrene has developed the line of separation (autoamputation). Continue reading >>

"losing My Little Toe Nail": Diabetes Community - Support Group

I once had an issue like this. I was working in a blast freezer and I dropped a box full of frozen plasma bottles on my foot and injured the toenail (as well as a serious bruise across my foot). A few months later the nail just fell off and scared me to death. Every time it grew it would fall off again. I ended up going to the podiatrist where he said I ended up getting a fungal infection in the nail bed when I originally injured the toe. A few months of Lamisil and the nail started growing back. I would say check in with a doctor just to make sure you dont have an infection. I have had the very same problem like you for many years due to hiking. It is when your boots/shoes were not long enough or loosely fitting, when you going down hill your foot push up against the boot and caused the blood to pool under the toe nails, eventually the nail will fall off and the new nail will grow out again. Only do not try to pull the injured nail off when it is loose. If the doctor checked and found no fungus problem and the foot is healthy then it should not be much of a concern. To avoid the problem I suggest you need a pair of perfect fit boots, snug along side the foot and about 1 full number larger than your dress shoes to leave room for thick cushiony hiking socks and extra room in the toes. For the first 10 years of my hiking career, I had 3 set of new toe nails before I found the perfect boots and the black toe-nails disappeared for good. Since I found "Cresta" boot my feet were very happy and no more problems for the more than 15 years now. By the way, my husband and I are members of a volunteer trail maintenance group for a section of the AT in PA. We walked more than 1100 miles on all rocky trails per year. This is my own experiences on hiking injury. I am also diabetic t Continue reading >>

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