diabetestalk.net

Toenail Falling Off Diabetes

Foot Gangrene: What Is It? What Does It Look Like?

Foot Gangrene: What Is It? What Does It Look Like?

Warning: The pictures you are going to view on this website are graphic and not for the faint of heart. Foot gangrene, as a part of diabetes and/or atherosclerosis management, has become a major medical problem. This website is intended to allow you to manage your own care, ask the right questions, insist on adequate management and information, and seek an optimal outcome for yourself as an informed patient. Perhaps it will even help the health professionals - vascular specialists and foot doctors (chiropodists, podiatrists) - who are giving care to better understand and, hopefully, incorporate into their practice the nutritional approach to gangrene - its prevention and treatment. Please note that this website is not intended for “most people." It is written for those who want to stand out in self-health care. If you are such a person, we strongly advise that you give serious thought to all of the suggestions about how to stop the progression of gangrene, dry foot gangrene in particular. If you are tempted to think the suggestions are too complicated or simplistic, or even biased, we assure you they are not. In most cases, foot gangrene is a result of the compromised blood circulation, an insufficient oxygen-rich and nutrient-dense blood supply usually caused by arterial - femoral, popliteal or tibial - obstruction (the human tissue dies from oxygen deficiency more rapidly than when deprived of any other nutrient). The lumen of the artery becomes progressively narrowed up to the point of complete occlusion (blockage), causing normal blood flow to stop. In other words, gangrene develops if the blood supply deteriorates to a stage where insufficient blood is available to keep the tissues alive. When gangrene develops dire calls for medical help often are too late as st Continue reading >>

Toenail Fungus (onychomycosis)

Toenail Fungus (onychomycosis)

Toenail fungus is a condition that disfigures and sometimes destroys the nail. It is also called onychomycosis Toenail fungus can be caused by several different types of fungi. Fungi are microscopic organisms related to mold and mildew. These fungi thrive in the dark, moist and stuffy environment inside shoes. As they grow, fungi feed on keratin. Keratin is the protein that makes up the hard surface of the toenails. Factors that increase the risk of developing toenail fungus include: Wearing tight-fitting shoes or tight hosiery Wearing layers of toenail polish, which doesn't allow the nail to breathe Being a military personnel, athlete or miner. This is because toenail fungi may spread from foot to foot on the floors of showers and locker rooms. Having a chronic illness, such as diabetes Having a circulatory problem that decreases blood flow to the toes However, many people with toenail fungus have no clear risk factors. Toenails on the big toe and little toe are the most likely to develop a toenail fungus. This may be partly because the big toe and little toe are constantly exposed to friction from the sides of shoes. When a toenail develops a fungal infection, it typically turns yellow or brown. It becomes thick and overgrown. Foul-smelling debris also may accumulate under the nail. As the infection continues, the nail may crumble gradually and fall off. Or, it may become so thick that the affected toe feels uncomfortable or painful inside shoes. A less common variety of toenail fungus is called white superficial onychomycosis. The nail turns white rather than yellow or brown. The surface becomes soft, dry and powdery. You will describe your foot symptoms to your doctor. He or she will ask about any factors that may increase your risk of toenail fungus. These include Continue reading >>

Aging & Health A To Z

Aging & Health A To Z

Foot Problems Causes & Symptoms As you age, your feet tend to spread and lose the fatty pads that cushion the bottom of your feet. If you are carrying extra weight, the bones and ligaments take an extra beating. Also, any abnormalities that you were born with can become more pronounced or painful as your foot joints lose their flexibility and become more rigid with age. Poorly fitting shoes make foot problems worse and actually cause many of them. The skin of your feet also gets drier with age, so that infections can occur more easily. Specific causes differ depending upon the particular foot problem, as follows: Bunions This deformity of the foot may be an inherited trait but may also result from many years of friction due to ill-fitting footwear. Flat feet, gout, and arthritis also increase your chance of developing a bunion. Corns and Calluses Corns are caused by friction from poorly fitted shoes or socks or from toes rubbing against each other. Calluses are similar to corns, but develop on the ball or heel of your foot. Hammertoes Hammertoes are caused by abnormal tension in the muscles and tendons around the toe joints, causing them to buckle or flex. Eventually the joint becomes rigid. Toenail Problems Ingrown toenails (usually on the big toe) are caused by inherited abnormalities, incorrect trimming of nails, injury to the toe, infection, or friction from poorly fitted shoes. Abnormally thick, cracked, and yellowing toenails may be caused by fungal infections, friction from shoes, injuries, or conditions such as diabetes or psoriasis. Diabetic Foot Problems You may have reduced sensation in your feet from diabetes, making it hard to realize that your foot is injured. Also, blood flow in your feet is impaired in diabetes, so infections can be harder to fight off. Continue reading >>

Thick Toenails: 5 Causes And A Bunch Of Treatments

Thick Toenails: 5 Causes And A Bunch Of Treatments

Several of my Facebook fans have asked what to do for their thick toenails. And to tell the truth, it’s not a trivial question. Thick toenails can be the starting point for bad bruises, infections, even gangrene. In a disaster situation, these problems could become more likely if you have to do a lot of walking or even just standing. If your shoes press on the toenail, the toe can become quite bruised. Then, if your toes swell from the bruising, the shoes will be tighter on them, causing a dangerous cycle, even to the point of killing some of the tissue under the nail. So it’s best to treat thick toenails before a disaster rather than during. 5 Causes of Thick Toenails 1. Fungi. A fungus is a common cause and hard to get rid of. Treatment: You can try daily application of: Tea-tree oil, an antifungal Noxema Topical antifungals bought at the drugstore; the label will say they’re for toenail fungus Other options include daily 15-minute vinegar and water soaks (one part vinegar, two parts water) or prescribed oral medicine. Whatever method you try, it usually takes a few months before you see improvement. A new (and expensive) way to treat fungus is to go to a laser treatment center. This is quick and the most likely to be effective, but the fungus often comes back no matter the treatment, especially once you stop it. 2. Poor circulation. There are many chronic diseases that affect circulation. One of the most common is diabetes. As anyone with diabetes knows, with or without thick toenails, you have to always pay particular attention to your feet by wearing shoes that fit well and keeping your toenails clipped well. Any little infection, from rubbing or whatever, can lead to a serious infection quickly. The thick toenails that come from poor circulation just add to Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care Article

Diabetic Foot Care Article

A A A Diabetes mellitus (DM) represents several diseases in which high blood glucose levels over time can damage the nerves, kidneys, eyes, and blood vessels. Diabetes can also decrease the body's ability to fight infection. When diabetes is not well controlled, damage to the organs and impairment of the immune system is likely. Foot problems commonly develop in people with diabetes and can quickly become serious. With damage to the nervous system, a person with diabetes may not be able to feel his or her feet properly. Normal sweat secretion and oil production that lubricates the skin of the foot is impaired. These factors together can lead to abnormal pressure on the skin, bones, and joints of the foot during walking and can lead to breakdown of the skin of the foot. Sores may develop. Damage to blood vessels and impairment of the immune system from diabetes make it difficult to heal these wounds. Bacterial infection of the skin, connective tissues, muscles, and bones can then occur. These infections can develop into gangrene. Because of the poor blood flow, antibiotics cannot get to the site of the infection easily. Often, the only treatment for this is amputation of the foot or leg. If the infection spreads to the bloodstream, this process can be life-threatening. People with diabetes must be fully aware of how to prevent foot problems before they occur, to recognize problems early, and to seek the right treatment when problems do occur. Although treatment for diabetic foot problems has improved, prevention - including good control of blood sugar level - remains the best way to prevent diabetic complications. People with diabetes should learn how to examine their own feet and how to recognize the early signs and symptoms of diabetic foot problems. They should also l Continue reading >>

Cheap Remedy For Toenail Fungus

Cheap Remedy For Toenail Fungus

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community A most ick-k-k-y topic to have to discuss, but I wanted to pass this info on. Some of us have strange stuff happening with our toenails (or fingernails), as a DB complication. There is a very inexpensive way to treat it. Its working for me so far, hope it works for you too. <------ link to describe ailment <------ ink for remedy I like this cure and I shall try it on someone, dont know who yet lol,I always keep tyme oil in my first aid box because ,once one of my granddaughter's knelt on a bee, after removing the sting and the screams, i massaged a little on the swelling.it went down almost instantly and removed the pain. the grandkids thought it was magic. I like this cure and I shall try it on someone, dont know who yet lol,I always keep tyme oil in my first aid box because ,once one of my granddaughter's knelt on a bee, after removing the sting and the screams, i massaged a little on the swelling.it went down almost instantly and removed the pain. the grandkids thought it was magic. I just found out that garlic also is a very good antibiotic and pain-killer. For me, it worked better than the vapo-rub/thyme. I used some sliced garlic juice directly into the affected toe-fungus area. Almost instant pain-relief. My toe is still in good shape. I like this cure and I shall try it on someone, dont know who yet lol,I always keep tyme oil in my first aid box because ,once one of my granddaughter's knelt on a bee, after removing the sting and the screams, i massaged a little on the swelling.it went down almost instantly and removed the pain. the grandkids thought it was magic. I shall get some too... I like to keep things like that in my medicine cupboard. Continue reading >>

Black Toenails—not Your Problem Any More!

Black Toenails—not Your Problem Any More!

Not now, not again! Add another black toenail to the book, which surely means another discolored, painful problem that will cause your toenail to fall off or be bruised for a while. Black toenails are often caused by a sudden injury or repeated trauma. Whatever the cause, it’s an issue that can be treated and prevented with these pointers from Dr. Brian McDowell and Dr. Gavin P. Ripp from McDowell Podiatry Group. The Black Toenail The discoloration that you’re seeing is a small amount of bleeding underneath the nail, also known as subungual hematoma. Not to fear, though. Most of these injuries are minor. However, if the issue also involves a broken bone or damage to the nail bed, you should seek a doctor’s care right away or go to the emergency room. Ouch! Causes for Bleeding Underneath Nails You may have encountered a bad shoe, a blunt object, or a fungal infection to receive this darkened color under the toenail. Very common occurrences, such as stubbing your toe, slamming your finger in a car door, or dropping a heavy object—like a TV—on your foot during moving day are often the reason for black nails. In rare cases, you might be experiencing discoloration due to a tumor underneath the nail. You may have this if the darkening doesn’t grow out as the nail grows out. Another sign of a tumor—the darkening started with no history of trauma to the nail. Please see a doctor! Throbbing, Discolored Digits You nail will throb as it fills up with substance, creating extra pressure underneath the nail bed. The blood can take on many colors, sometimes appearing purple, red, brown, or black. Inside that color, you might also see some discharge. Lastly, and reluctantly, take a whiff. It might be emitting a foul odor. If you can confirm these symptoms, you can treat y Continue reading >>

Pardon Our Interruption...

Pardon Our Interruption...

As you were browsing www.oprah.com something about your browser made us think you were a bot. There are a few reasons this might happen: You're a power user moving through this website with super-human speed. You've disabled JavaScript in your web browser. A third-party browser plugin, such as Ghostery or NoScript, is preventing JavaScript from running. Additional information is available in this support article. To request an unblock, please fill out the form below and we will review it as soon as possible. You reached this page when attempting to access from 35.202.133.99 on 2017-12-29 22:13:35 UTC. Trace: 9b08f7ef-d2d0-4e1e-9948-a7232d29d5a0 via 2b1335a7-fd22-4033-9c67-747f72b823bd Continue reading >>

Fungal Skin Or Nail Infections

Fungal Skin Or Nail Infections

The Facts There are two major causes of fungal infections of the skin and nails: yeast and dermatophytes. Yeast infections of the skin and nails are generally caused by an organism called Candida albicans. This organism normally makes a quiet home for itself on your skin and doesn't bother anyone. We all carry this organism on our skin (and in other places such as our mouth, our gastrointestinal tract (gut), and the vagina). Occasionally Candida albicans multiplies uncontrollably, causing a yeast infection (also known as candidiasis). Yeast infections of the skin can cause a red, itchy rash that may leak fluid. Yeast nail infections can lead to pain and swelling, and may cause the nail to separate from the finger or toe. Dermatophytes are fungi that only live in dead tissue, such as your nails and dead skin cells. Dematophyte infections can also be called tinea. Dermatophyte infections of the skin can cause a round, scaly rash that may also have blisters. When dermatophytes infect the nails, the nails become thick, split, become dull, and may fall off. Fungal skin infections may also be caused by a fungus called Pityrosporum orbiculare. These infections, also called tinea versicolor, lead to scaly patches that vary in colour from white to brown. Fungal infections may also affect the skin of the feet. This is also known as athlete's foot. For detailed information this condition, see the article on athlete's foot on this website. Fungal infections may also affect the vagina. This is also known as vaginitis or female yeast infection. For detailed information this condition, see the article on vaginitis on this website. You don't catch yeast infections. The yeast is already there. A number of factors can increase the chance of the yeast growing out of control: Overuse of an Continue reading >>

Toe Nail Removal - Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Toe Nail Removal - Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. my podiatrist scheduled me to come in and do a partial toenail removal. However when I went in he changed his mind. He wanted to see how I do with the antifungal and if that doesn't work, he wants to remove both big toenails. is this contraversail? I think it is. has anyone had that done? i 've never had them removed by anyone before, but my big toe on my left foot came off in february of 07, grew back about 1/2 cm and then fell off again, right now, i have no toe nail on the left big toe, but the right one grew back eventually... i was on the antifungal stuff, i can't remember the name, it's that pill with the creepy little thing that goes under the toe nail in the commercial... i took it for 6 months and even though my nails aren't cracked and broken anymore, the nail still isn't growing on the left foot... my dermo said it's because i have excessive eczema and it's reached the nail bed, i found it weird to go see a dermo for this, but my gp said that nails are part of the skin... oh well... hope it works for you... My father had ALL of his toenails removed as a treatment for a fungus he picked up when he was in Hawaii years ago. His toenails are yellow and very thick and he is very self conscious about them. A doctor suggested he try the toenail removal and he did it. His toenails grew back and the fungus was still there. He has tried every topical medication out there to no avail. There is a new treatment out there now that involves laser light. It is in the testing stages and my father was part of the clinical trial. He was never willing to damage his liver with the oral medications so h Continue reading >>

Toenail Falling Off, Injury, Cancer, No Reason, Fungus, What To Do, Causes Treatment

Toenail Falling Off, Injury, Cancer, No Reason, Fungus, What To Do, Causes Treatment

Onycholysis is the medical term used to describe toenail falling off. It simply means the separation of your nail from its bed. It can be caused by a traumatic injury or a fungal infection. Toenail falling off may result in symptoms such as possible disfigurement and bleeding. Below, we will look at what causes the toenail falling off, while still attached, for no apparent reason, and its causes, e.g., cancer, running, injury, fungus, what causes your toenail to fall off with no pain, what to do at home, and possible treatment for this condition. Your nail will initially appear to be discolored indicating that it has already started separating from its bed. It is then followed by the loosening of the naila process that can be very painfuland one that may call for first aid to be administered before proper treatment can be sought. Immediate medical attention should be sought immediately to ensure that you do not sustain permanent damage. Early treatment also helps make sure that the infection will not spread to other parts of your toe. The causes of toenail falling off include: There are different types of fungi that may cause this condition as they feed on keratin (tough protein which makes up your toenails). Around three to five percent of all Americans are affected by this condition, with eighteen percent of the global population being affected, according to CDC. The fungus can cause your toenails to: Any toenail that falls off because of a fungal infection will usually grow back with time. The new nail may, however, become infected just like the previous one. You need to talk to a medic as the condition will rarely go away on its own. The toenail fungus thrives in environments that are dark and moist. Wearing stockings, socks, thick nail polish, and tight shoes will Continue reading >>

My Toenails Are Falling Off. I Don't Know Why. Any Ideas?

My Toenails Are Falling Off. I Don't Know Why. Any Ideas?

My toenails are falling off. I don't know why. Any ideas? My toenails are falling off . I don't know why. Any ideas? Experience: 25 years of clinical experience Since when? Any changes in nail? Any skin problem? No skin problems no changes in my nails. It started about 4-6 months ago. My toenails are falling off on both great toes. The right one first and now the left one. Originally, I thought I dropped something on my right toe. It lifted from the skin and finnaly fell off.[I did "play with as it was loose} Nothing has happened to the left toe. What kind of Dr. should I see if I need one? Health Professional: Dr. Su S , Doctor (MD)replied 11 years ago The cause of falling of toe nails can be many. This can be due to repetitive trauma like if you push it against something or repetitive tapping, overzealous manicure , prolonged immersion in water. Some skin diseases may also cause it to fall like fungal or any other infection (pseudomonas, herpes simplex), psoriasis,dermatitis etc. General body diseases like hyper or hypothyroidism , diabetes, iron deficiency anemia, pellagra, sarcoidosis etc. Medicines may also be responsible like tetracyclines, fluroquinolone antibiotics, chlorpromazine etc. You can consult a dermatologist for an examination of your nail & find the concrete diagnosis. Experience: 25 years of clinical experience Dr. Su S and 87 other Health Specialists are ready to help you Describe your issueThe assistant will guide you Chat 1:1 with a health professionalLicensed Experts are available 24/7 100% satisfaction guaranteeGet all the answers you need Experience: 25 years of clinical experience 2 months ago, I started to fall coming down some garden 2 months ago, I started to fall coming down some garden steps, and the full impact of my 132 pound body falli Continue reading >>

Why Do Toenails Fall Off?

Why Do Toenails Fall Off?

Our toenails protect the delicate skin underneath them and serve as a layer of defense against the elements as we use our feet all day. In healthy feet, we expect them to stay put. However, they can become separated from the foot and fall off. If this happens, it can be quite surprising and shocking, as well as uncomfortable and embarrassing. However, if youve had a toenail fall off, dont worry Dr. Jeffery LaMour and our team are available to assist you. Our podiatry practice is here to help with all sorts of foot concerns. We can help you understand why your feet look and feel the way they do, then provide treatment options so you can enhance your podiatric and overall well-being. We are committed to answering our patients questions, so in the following blog, well respond to one of our most commonly heard queries: Why do toenails fall off? The most evident symptoms of a toenail falling off is the nail detaching from its bed, floating loose into your shoes. However, there are a variety of symptoms you can spot even before the nail begins to wriggle free from the foot. If your toenail may fall off, you might experience the following: Discharge from under the nail, as in liquid or pus. If you notice any of the above, we recommend making an appointment with Dr. LaMour as soon as possible. We may be able to prevent your toenail from falling off, saving you discomfort, effort, time, and embarrassment while maintaining your podiatric well-being. There are two main causes for a lost toenail. Go Ask Alice explains ,The loss of a toenail, also called onychoptosis (which literally means falling nail in Greek), can be largely blamed on two major culpritsfungus and injury. Toenail fungus is unfortunately common, but it can be quite devastating to the nail structure.Go Ask Alicedes Continue reading >>

The Signs Of Toenail Fungus: Do You Know If Your Feet Are Infected?

The Signs Of Toenail Fungus: Do You Know If Your Feet Are Infected?

No one likes the looks of ugly toenail fungus. Brittle, distorted and discolored toenails can be the source of insecurity for many people, as well as a real hassle to get rid of. This form of fungus is difficult to fix, as several forms of the fungus are usually present in the infected toenail simultaneously. Let's start by defining toenail fungus, listing its major causes and symptoms, as well as information on how you can naturally and effectively fight these types of infections. According to the Mayo Clinic, toenail fungus, or onychomycosis, is classified as an infection that occurs when a fungus finds its home in the toenails[ 1 ]. The fungal presence may appear as a white or yellow spot on the nail (it can also occur on fingernails, although is less common). If it's not dealt with, the spot grows larger and the nail begins to deteriorate, leaving a crumbling, thick, painful, discolored nail behind. The most common signs of toenail fungus are usually visually and painfully obvious. These symptoms may include: Dull color in the nail, lack of the "usual shine" A separation of the nail from the nail bed (onycholysis) Distortion in color of the nail, either a darker or lighter than normal Microscopic fungi can find their way into the toenails under a variety of different circumstances. Usually, nail fungal infections occur when a type of fungus called a dermatophyte inhabits the nail. They can also be caused by a general mold or yeast infection in the toenail. Whether fungus, mold or yeast, all of these infections are created in warm, wet environments. Places such as gyms, locker-rooms, hot-tubs, saunas, steam-rooms, swimming pools and showers, are hot-beds for these types of fungal infections. Just walking barefoot can cause you to get a fungal infection. The dark war Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Diabetes And Foot Problems

How can diabetes affect my feet? Too much glucose, also called sugar, in your blood from diabetes can cause nerve damage and poor blood flow, which can lead to serious foot problems. Nerve Damage Damaged nerves may stop sending signals, or they may send signals too slowly or at the wrong times. Nerve damage can cause you to lose feeling in your feet. You may not feel pain, heat, or cold in your legs and feet. You may not feel a pebble inside your sock that is causing a sore. You may not feel a blister caused by poorly fitting shoes. Sores on your feet can become infected. If your blood glucose is high, the extra glucose feeds the infection in those sores and the infection gets worse. Nerve damage can also cause pain and lead to foot deformities, or changes in the muscles, bones, and shape of your feet. Poor Blood Flow Poor blood flow means not enough blood flows to your legs and feet through your blood vessels. Poor blood flow makes it hard for a sore or an infection to heal. This problem is called peripheral artery disease, also called PAD. Sometimes, a bad infection never heals. The infection might cause gangrene. If you have gangrene, the skin and tissue around the sore die. The area becomes black and smelly. Prompt attention to any sore or infection on your toe or foot can prevent gangrene. Your doctor may decide to cut away the infected tissue or give you antibiotics. Your doctor also may perform tests to see how well blood is reaching your legs and feet. Sometimes, your doctor may be able to clear blocked blood vessels to improve the blood flow. If these treatments don’t work, or if you have severe pain or infection, a doctor may have to perform an amputation —surgery to cut off a body part—of your toe, foot, or part of your leg. A surgeon performs this oper Continue reading >>

More in diabetes