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Tips For Type 1 Diabetics

Tips For Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

Tips For Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

You might think of type 1 diabetes as a young persons disease. It was once known as juvenile diabetes , and most people are diagnosed with it as children or teens . But about a quarter of people with type 1 arent diagnosed until theyre adults -- some as late as age 80 or 90. Theres no cure, but there are things you can do to make managing it as an adult easier. Every person who has diabetes needs a personal plan. Youre in charge of putting that plan into action, but you dont have to figure it out on your own. You should have a team to help you, including a general physician, an endocrinologist, a nutritionist or dietitian, and a diabetes educator to teach you how to live better with the condition. You also may need to see other specialists, like a podiatrist (for your feet and lower legs) or an ophthalmologist (for your eyes ). Talk with your health care team regularly, and keep them in the loop on your condition. High blood sugar can affect organs and tissues throughout your body. Even if you control your diabetes well, issues still may happen slowly over time. Get checked for them regularly, and watch for warning signs like tingling, numbness, or swelling in your hands and feet; blurred or double vision ; or sores that dont heal. If you catch and treat these kinds of things early, you can slow or even stop the damage. Rather than the usual three meals daily, you may need to eat small amounts of food throughout the day. Talk with your dietitian about the best choices to keep your blood sugar steady. They may include healthy fat (nuts) and protein (lean meat, fish , beans), whole grains (brown rice, oatmeal ), colorful veggies (spinach, peppers , broccoli, sweet potatoes), and low-calorie drinks like unsweetened iced tea or water flavored with fresh fruit. Regular phys Continue reading >>

My Advice To Those Newly Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

My Advice To Those Newly Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

A call to be gentle with yourself when blood glucose management goes wrong, by someone who spent years trying for perfection. This was adapted by our editor from a longer essay. To those recently diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, I have two pieces of advice: don’t be hard on yourself and let go of perfection. I spent the majority of my childhood believing I was in control of my condition, that nothing except me was the driving factor on the path to “perfectly” managing my diabetes. My family has never helped me manage my condition because, really, I never let them. I took the reigns very early in my diagnosis because I wanted control. I hid my frustrations deep inside, and masked them with my compliance. By avoiding support and refusing to ask for help, I put a lot of pressure on myself to always have good blood sugars and avoid lows. Too often my quest for perfection has disabled me from living a full life. I now know that. Perfection is a mirage. Murphy’s law will tell you that what comes up must come down. You can ride a good management wave, but you’ll end up coming to shore and having to adjust again at some point. There is no end to the process of blood sugar management, but there are always new beginnings. Ride the waves, crash on shore, get up, and do it again. Don’t try to control the things you can’t. Be a manager. Be kind to yourself. Be confident. Be brave. Be strong. Ask for help when you need it. I’m telling this to myself as much as I am telling you. You won’t always be able to control Type 1 diabetes. That’s just the cold hard truth. Once you learn to accept that, you will have more opportunity to love and accept yourself. This is what I hope for you. Do you have an idea you would like to write about for Insulin Nation? Send your pitch Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

3 Ways To Make Your Life Easier With Type 1 Diabetes

3 Ways To Make Your Life Easier With Type 1 Diabetes

How to Manage Type 1 Diabetes in a Healthy Way One of my biggest priorities is to help readers with chronic health issues thrive. And, a challenge that many of my readers (or the people they love) face is diabetes. So, last week we focused on type 2 diabetes and this week were shining a light on type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is something my team and I often talk about behind-the-scenes. Thats because our Crazy Sexy Dietitian, Jen Reilly, is mom to a very special young man with this health challenge. Her son, Jake, was diagnosed at age two. Whereas type 2 diabetes is often the result of insulin resistance and can sometimes be reversed with weight loss, exercise and a healthy diet, type 1 diabetes is the result of an autoimmune response where the body attacks and kills the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. Unfortunately, it cant be reversed. Learn how technology, planning, prepping & high-protein plant foods can help you manage type 1 #diabetes. @Kris_Carr Even though theres nothing that can prevent type 1 diabetes, Jen has made use of the amazing technology available and found some incredible plant-powered tricks to help her son thrive. And in honor of November being Diabetes Awareness Month, shes here to share her nutrition and mama bear expertise with all of you. Although, these tips apply to adults, as well. Thanks, Kris. While finding out that you or your child has a chronic health issue like diabetes is scary at first, it quickly becomes part of your daily routine. Weve found a way to make sure Jake has a normal, healthy and happy life regardless of his diagnosis. And, the same goes for anyone with type 1. But before we get to the tips thatll help you manage this health challenge, lets cover some basics. The symptoms of type 1 are very subtle at firs Continue reading >>

10 Tips To Stay Healthy With Type 1

10 Tips To Stay Healthy With Type 1

A Type 1 psychologist shares 7 guidelines from certified diabetes educators, as well as 3 mental tips of her own. Michael J. Fox once said this about living with Parkinson’s disease: “I often say now I don’t have any choice whether or not I have Parkinson’s, but surrounding that non-choice is a million other choices that I can make.” As someone who lives with Type 1, I argue that you can say the same about living with Type 1. You don’t have a choice whether or not you have Type 1 diabetes, but you can make “a million other choices” of how you will live with it. My job is to help others with diabetes make the best choices for themselves. As a cognitive behavior therapist and certified diabetes educator, I specialize in treating the emotional issues of coping with diabetes. I help my patients examine their thoughts and actions toward living with diabetes. The American Association of Diabetes Educators have developed seven key guidelines to help manage diabetes. Called the AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors, they include: -Healthy Eating – Having diabetes means learning how to count carbohydrates and how the foods you eat affect your blood sugar. A healthy meal plan also includes complex carbohydrates, protein, fiber (beans, whole grains, fruits and vegetables), lots of green, leafy vegetables, and limited amounts of heart-healthy fats. -Being Active – Physical activity can help you keep blood sugar levels normal and manage your diabetes. Being active can also improve your mood and reduce your feelings of stress and anxiety. -Monitoring – Checking your blood sugar levels regularly gives you information about your diabetes management. Monitoring helps you know when your blood sugar levels are within your target range and helps you to make choices in what you ea Continue reading >>

5 Tips For Running With Type 1 Diabetes

5 Tips For Running With Type 1 Diabetes

WRITTEN BY: Robin Arzon Editor’s Note: Robin Arzon is a part of Beyond Type Run Team, which is sponsored by Medtronic. She is participating in the 2017 TCS New York City Marathon. I’m a Type 1 diabetic. That means my pancreas stopped producing insulin one day and I need insulin to live. It mostly sucks. I was diagnosed as an adult at the age of 32, after a month-long trip to India. I felt really dehydrated, got blood work at my mom’s urging, and boom, I needed insulin forever. There’s no known cause. Approximately 90% of adult diabetics are Type 2, which is generally caused by lifestyle factors such as activity level and food choices. No matter what kind of diabetic you are, I want you to know something: you’re a f*cking bad-*ss. My immediate thought when I was diagnosed was, How can I continue to run ultras? I then remembered my friend Stephen England, who is a very accomplished marathoner, ultrarunner, and fellow Type 1 diabetic (since the age of 14). Knowing he slayed the Leadville Trail 100 Run and other 100-milers was encouraging. I decided I was going to be unstoppable. Running with diabetes hasn’t always been pretty. It’s been trial and error every single day. Within 10 days of my diagnosis, I had all the technology available to assist with diabetes management. I use an OmniPod insulin pump (the white box on my arm or waist you see in photos) and a Dexcom glucose monitor, which alerts me to my blood glucose numbers. I firmly believe technology has kept me racing. I can adjust my insulin ratios for training, especially marathons and 3-4 hour long runs, without needing to inject insulin manually. More knowledge is power. Everyone is different, but I like to reduce my insulin slightly before a long run. I can run with 50-70 percent less insulin during Continue reading >>

10 Tips For Hiking With Type 1 Diabetes

10 Tips For Hiking With Type 1 Diabetes

My boyfriend Ryan has Type 1 Diabetes. Before we met, I didn’t know anything about Diabetes, but over the last year and a half of adventuring together, I’ve learned a lot. We hike, ski, and go backpacking together, and I’m continually inspired by his athletic abilities and the fact that he doesn’t let his diabetes hold him back. With that said, there are a number precautions we take, especially when we are off-the-grid, to make sure he avoids dangerously low (and high) blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes or you know someone who does, in this blog post, I share some of the tips I’ve learned and steps Ryan takes in regards to his diabetes when we are out in the wilderness. My hope is that these tips give those of you with diabetes and your friends the confidence to go hiking and adventuring together. *Disclaimer: I am not a doctor and this should not be taken as official medical advice. What I’m sharing is all based on personal experience and tips Ryan finds useful for hiking with diabetes. If you have specific questions regarding your diabetes, I recommend consulting your doctor. 1) Tell your hiking partners about your diabetes First things first – make sure to tell the people you are hiking with that you have diabetes, what can happen (what low blood sugar looks like), and how they should respond. The first time I ever saw Ryan with low blood sugar it was scary, but because I was warned, I knew to quickly get him some sugar. Without him educating me first, I would have had no idea what to do. 2) Test your blood sugar more frequently than you do at home. The easiest way to prevent scary lows is to test your blood sugar frequently. Blood sugar can change rapidly during and long after exercise. Sometimes Ryan will eat something that would normally cause Continue reading >>

Living With

Living With

If you have type 1 diabetes, it's important to look after your own health and wellbeing, with support from those involved in your care. Your diabetes care team As type 1 diabetes is a long-term condition, you'll be in regular contact with your diabetes care team. Your GP or diabetes care team will also need to check your eyes, feet and nerves regularly because they can also be affected by diabetes. You should also be tested regularly – at least once a year – to check how well your diabetes is being controlled over the long term. A blood sample will be taken from your arm, and the HbA1c test will be carried out. It measures how much glucose is in the red blood cells, and gives your blood glucose levels for the previous two to three months. For help managing your diabetes on a day-to-day basis, check out the mumoActive app in our Digital Apps Library. Lifestyle changes Healthy eating Eating a healthy, balanced diet is very important if you have diabetes. However, you don't need to avoid certain food groups altogether. You can have a varied diet and enjoy a wide range of foods as long as you eat regularly and make healthy choices. You can make adaptations when cooking meals, such as reducing the amount of fat, salt and sugar you eat, and increasing the amount of fibre. You don't need to completely exclude sugary and high-fat foods from your diet, but they should be limited. The important thing in managing diabetes through your diet is to eat regularly and include starchy carbohydrates, such as pasta, as well as plenty of fruit and vegetables. If your diet is well balanced, you should be able to achieve a good level of health and maintain a healthy weight. Read more about healthy recipes. Diabetes UK has more dietary advice and cooking tips. Regular exercise As physical Continue reading >>

Facts And Tips About Type 1 Diabetes

Facts And Tips About Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that’s caused by your pancreas not producing enough insulin—a necessary hormone for your body to function properly. This slideshow shows you fast facts and quick tips about type 1 diabetes—some you may be familiar with and some that just might surprise you. Welcome to the Type 2 Diabetes Center! This is your launching pad for living better with type 2 diabetes. We’ve gathered all the latest type 2 diabetes information, research updates, and advances in devices and medications. And because diabetes impacts every facet of your life, you’ll also find practical advice from leading experts and other people living with type 2 diabetes featured here. That includes mouth-watering, healthy recipes; money-saving tips; advice to help navigate social, professional, and relationship issues; and inspiring personal stories from people just like you. Explore the resources here and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to be alerted to new additions. Continue reading >>

Top Ten Tips For People Newly Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

Top Ten Tips For People Newly Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

Twitter summary: Top 10 tips for the newly diagnosed with t1 #diabetes – know that it will NOT hold you back Know that type 1 diabetes will NOT hold you back. Type 1 patients have climbed Mount Everest, completed Ironman Triathlons, and competed at the highest levels of professional sports. These include Charlie Kimball – the first driver with diabetes to win a race in the IZOD IndyCar Series, Missy Foy, the only runner with diabetes ever to qualify for Olympic Marathon Trials, Olympic cross-country skier Kris Freeman, ballerina Zippora Karz of the New York City Ballet, NFL quarterback Jay Cutler, NBA small forward Adam Morrison, PGA tour golfer Scott Verplank, LPGA golfers Michelle McGann and Kelli Kuehne, Olympic gold medalist Gary Hall, Jr, tennis legend Arthur Ashe, and many more! Think of glucose readings as information and every day as an experiment - A reading of 210 mg/dl or 45 mg/dl should never be thought of as a grade that reflects the quality of your diabetes management. Your glucose meter is your compass and is one of the best tools at your disposal to help manage the disease. Studies show that testing more often is associated with better diabetes control. Exercise is a critical tool at your disposal! It's important to find forms of exercise you enjoy, whether individually or in a group. Remember that people with diabetes tend to be at higher risk for heart disease and depression, and exercise can help with both (see studies that show how exercise has benefits for both heart disease and depression). Exercise also benefits your diabetes control immediately - even something as simple as five minutes of walking can lower your blood glucose quite dramatically. Many patients are fans of activity trackers (e.g., Fitbit, UP by Jawbone, Nike Fuelband, the Moves Continue reading >>

10 Tips For Teenagers To Live Well With Type 1 Diabetes

10 Tips For Teenagers To Live Well With Type 1 Diabetes

Twitter Summary: @asbrown1 shares his top 10 tips for living w/ #T1D, straight from presentation to 100+ teens at #CWDFFL15 At the Children with Diabetes Friends For Life Conference this month, I had the incredible opportunity to speak to ~100 teenagers with diabetes. My talk, “10 Tips for Living Well with Type 1,” was a lot of fun to put together, and our team thought diaTribe readers might be interested in seeing it. I agonized over how to present this so that it wouldn’t come across as a lecture – even my teenage self would not react well to some of the advice (“Sleep seven hours a night? Hah! I have sports plus exams plus the next level to beat in Halo 3!”). I concluded that the best thing I could do was make this session a conversation, but ground it in lessons I’ve learned over time. Thankfully, I also had the amazing FFL staff by my side to help guide the discussion. The session reminded me of something that I intuitively know but often forget: each person’s diabetes is completely different, and what works for me won’t work for everyone. And equally important, what works for me may change over time – it certainly has since I was a teenager. I’m sharing the slides below in case they’re useful, but my biggest hope is that it gets you thinking about your own diabetes. What motivates you? What drags you down? What can you do better today? Who can you reach out to for support? Let us what you think by email or on Twitter. As the oldest of six kids, I had a lot of responsibility from a young age, and my Mom was also a very hands-off parent; both helped me take the reins of my diabetes from an early age. I hope everyone can find the right balance between taking care of their own diabetes, but also relying on their parents for support when needed. Continue reading >>

Improving Control: Practical Advice For People With Type 1 Diabetes

Improving Control: Practical Advice For People With Type 1 Diabetes

People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to have good control if they check blood glucose levels at least 4 times per day. Many people find it difficult to perform blood glucose checks as frequently as this and, in that situation, even a short spell of frequent monitoring just before a clinic appointment can prove very useful. A brief period of ‘Intensive blood glucose monitoring’, where glucose levels are checked several times each day, can be useful in helping improve control and avoiding dangerously low blood sugars (hypoglycaemia or ‘hypo’). For patients on multiple daily injections* (MDI, also known as basal bolus) of insulin or using an insulin pump, we have developed an ‘intensive glucose control’ diary in which to collect detailed information for a few days (we typically recommend around 6 days of ‘intensive’ monitoring). This is likely to be of use to any patients who feel their control could be fine-tuned and provides hugely useful information to the doctors and nurses in the clinic. An example of the information collected in the ‘intensive control’ diary is provided here: Intensive control diary example page Each page represents a single day. If you do not ‘carbohydrate count’ you can ignore the ‘carbohydrate portion’ entry, but the diary can still be used. You can print off blank diary pages here: or download an excel spreadsheet version here IF YOU HAVE COMPLETED AN INTENSIVE CONTROL DIARY, PLEASE FEEL FREE TO CONTACT US TO DISCUSS THIS OR, ALTERNATIVELY, SCAN OR PHOTOGRAPH THE COMPLETED DIARY AND SEND IT TO US AT: [email protected] WE WILL GET BACK TO YOU WITH ADVICE Extra blood glucose tests during 'intensive monitoring' In addition to the standard recommended blood glucose tests for people on multipl Continue reading >>

I Have Type 1 – Diabetes What Can I Eat?

I Have Type 1 – Diabetes What Can I Eat?

From the moment you are diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes you are likely to be faced with what seems like an endless list of new tasks that need to become part of everyday life – injections, testing, treating a hypo, monitoring and eating a healthy, balanced diet. No wonder it can all seem so daunting and overwhelming. One of your first questions is likely to be “what can I eat?” But, with so much to take in, you could still come away from appointments feeling unsure about the answer. Plus, there are lots of myths about diabetes and food that you will need to navigate too. If you’ve just been diagnosed and aren’t sure about what you can and can’t eat, here’s what you need to know. I've just been diagnosed with Type 1 – what can I eat? In one word... anything. It may come as a surprise, but all kinds of food are fine for people with Type 1 diabetes to eat. In the past, people were sent away after their diagnosis with a very restrictive diet plan. This was because the availability of insulin was limited and the type of insulin treatment was very restrictive. As insulin treatments have been developed to be much more flexible, the days of “do's and don'ts” are long gone. The way to go nowadays is to try and fit the diabetes and insulin around the same healthy, balanced diet that is recommended for everyone, with lots of fruit and veg and some food from all the food groups. Is there anything I should avoid? Before your diagnosis of diabetes, it is likely that you experienced an unquenchable thirst. It is a good idea to avoid sugary drinks and fruit juices as a way of quenching thirst. They usually put blood glucose levels up very high and very quickly – which is why they can be a useful treatment for a hypo (low blood glucose levels). Instead, drink water, Continue reading >>

10 Tips To Help Others Understand Type 1 Diabetes

10 Tips To Help Others Understand Type 1 Diabetes

Whether kicking off a new school year or returning to school after a new diagnosis, one of the best ways to ensure your child is safe and supported at school is to help the people around them understand Type 1 diabetes. Here are 10 talking points to share with teachers, babysitters and friends: Let’s Clear a Few Things Up… 1. Type 1 Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes are very different. Type 1 Diabetes is an autoimmune disease that shuts the pancreas down entirely. It has nothing to do with anything the person with the disease did or did not do. Type 2 Diabetes is a condition that causes the pancreas to function unreliably, but the body still produces insulin. 2. Type 1 Diabetes cannot be managed with diet and exercise. People with Type 1 Diabetes depend on insulin for survival. No exceptions. 3. There is no cure for Type 1 Diabetes. Children do not outgrow Type 1 Diabetes. There are no breaks or remissions. It is 24/7/365. That’s why researchers at BRI are working hard on new treatments for Type 1 Diabetes, including ways to prevent - and maybe someday - cure it. There is Good News… 4. People with Type 1 Diabetes can still eat anything, they just need the right amount of insulin to convert the sugars in the bloodstream into energy. 5. People with Type 1 Diabetes can do anything. Type 1 Diabetics are playing professional soccer, football, baseball, and basketball. Jordan Morris, Adam Morrison, and Brendan Morrow are just some of the athletes with northwest connections. 6. Technology is changing the way we manage Type 1 Diabetes. Not necessarily easier, but better outcomes. It is possible to track a child’s blood sugar with a cell phone and to give an insulin injection without a shot (from nearby). A Few Tips… 7. Caring for a child with Type 1 Diabetes does not req Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Facts And Tips

Type 1 Diabetes Facts And Tips

Type 1 diabetes can also be called insulin-dependent diabetes because people with type 1 must take insulin in order to live. Type 1 diabetes used to be called juvenile diabetes because it was diagnosed mainly in children. However, that name is no longer accurate because children are increasingly developing another type of diabetes—type 2 diabetes. Also, it is possible for adults to be diagnosed as type 1, so the name “juvenile diabetes” isn’t accurate. Researchers aren’t exactly sure what causes type 1 diabetes, although they have some clues, including genetics and environmental triggers. Researchers have noticed that more cases of type 1 diabetes are diagnosed in northern climates, leading them to suggest that environmental triggers play a role in the development of type 1. Specifically, viral infections (which happen more often in colder northern climates where people are in close proximity) may trigger type 1. Type 1 diabetes is far less common than type 2: about 90% of people with diabetes have type 2. With tight blood glucose control, you can avoid many of the short- and long-term complications associated with type 1 diabetes, including foot problems and nerve pain. Exercise is an important part of keeping diabetes under control. Many famous people have type 1 diabetes, including: Jay Cutler (quarterback for the Chicago Bears), Billie Jean King, Ron Santo (Chicago Cubs player), Halle Berry, Mary Tyler Moore, and Nick Jonas. Type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) is more common than type 1 diabetes. Around 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National 2014 Diabetes Statistics Report, 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the US population have diabetes. T Continue reading >>

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