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Tips For Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes: Tips For A Healthy Mom And Baby

Gestational Diabetes: Tips For A Healthy Mom And Baby

Double board-certified physician in OB/GYN and Maternal-Fetal Medicine Dr. Kecia Gaither explains an increasingly common pregnancy condition and offers tips on control. August 2017 – Of all the medical tests expectant mothers undergo in the months before childbirth, perhaps one of the most important evaluates for gestational diabetes. This pregnancy-related condition – in which hormonal changes cause blood sugar levels to rise dangerously – is increasingly common, but moms-to-be can still take key steps to protect their health and that of their babies, according to perinatal consultant and women’s health expert Kecia Gaither, MD. According to a 2016 report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as many as 9% of pregnant women are diagnosed with gestational diabetes. The condition used to be relatively uncommon, but the rate has risen dramatically in recent years, Dr. Gaither notes. To evaluate for gestational diabetes, women between the 24th and 28th week of pregnancy undergo a routine screening. This test is performed earlier in pregnancy if certain risk factors are present inclusive of: African American, American Indian, Asian American Hispanic or Pacific Islander ethnicity Prior history of gestational diabetes Presence of obesity Prior delivery of a large infant (10 pounds or greater) History of stillbirth Strong family history of diabetes The test involves drinking a bottle of a glucose solution (called Glucola), and having blood drawn an hour later to analyze glucose levels. If a woman’s blood sugar is higher than 135 mg/dL, she’s referred for what’s called an oral glucose tolerance test – a more stringent screening involving an overnight fast, consuming another glucose solution and having blood drawn 4 times over 3 hours. A Continue reading >>

Tips For Consuming A Healthy Gestational Diabetes Diet

Tips For Consuming A Healthy Gestational Diabetes Diet

Gestational diabetes causes the blood sugar of one in 10 women to rise during her pregnancy. While it usually goes away after the baby's born, a woman's risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life increases if she has gestational diabetes. This happened to a friend of mine, and she adapted a gestational diabetes diet that helped her stay healthy both during and after her pregnancy. Carbohydrates Your body's main energy source, carbohydrates raise blood sugar. Carefully track your carbs to keep your sugar in check. You can also stabilize your sugar when you spread your carb consumption throughout the day. Eat a little bit of carbs with each meal or snack instead of eating a single meal loaded with carbs. Consider eating whole grain carbs that are high in fiber, too, since your body will digest these carbs more slowly. Examples include quinoa, brown rice, black and kidney beans, and starchy veggies like potatoes or corn. Vegetables Certain vegetables, such as potatoes and corn, contain higher amount of carbs than broccoli and other greens, so check each vegetable's carb content before you eat it. Try to consume a wide variety of vegetables, too, as you get a variety of vitamins and nutrients. Proteins Eat at least two to three servings of protein daily. A serving includes one egg, 1/2 cup beans or 3 ounces of cooked meat. Because certain proteins contain carbs, check eat food item as you plan your daily menu. Fats Fats don’t contain carbs and won't raise your blood sugar, but their caloric content can make you gain weight. Be sure to eat healthy fats such as avocado, nuts, seeds and olive and canola oils, but limit trans fats and saturated fats from lard and bacon. A gestational diabetes diet is a good idea for anyone who's worried about their blood sugar levels. M Continue reading >>

I've Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes – What Can I Eat?

I've Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes – What Can I Eat?

From the moment you are diagnosed with gestational diabetes you are likely to be faced with what seems like an endless list of new tasks: more clinic appointments, more blood tests, taking medications, being more active and eating a healthy, balanced diet. No wonder it can all seem so daunting and overwhelming. One of your first questions is likely to be, “what can I eat?” But, with so much to take in, you could still come away from appointments feeling unsure about the answer. And then, there are lots of myths about diabetes and food that you will need to navigate, too. If you’ve just been diagnosed and aren’t sure about what you can and can’t eat, here’s what you need to know. This may come as a surprise, but you don’t have to go on a special diet when have gestational diabetes. Depending on your current diet, you may have to eat less of some foods and more of others. In the past, people were sent away after their diagnosis with a list of foods they weren't allowed to eat, or often told to simply cut out sugar. Nowadays, you may need to make some changes to your diet, but it’s not a case of cutting things out. Rather, you’ll need to follow the same healthy, balanced diet that’s recommended to everyone. The main aim for managing gestational diabetes is ensuring that your blood glucose levels are under control, so your healthcare team will discuss targets that are right for you. Achieving the targets will increase your chances of having a healthy pregnancy and your food choices play a vital role in this. It is important to enjoy your meals while making changes to your food choices that are realistic and achievable. This will help control your blood glucose levels, and help prevent excessive weight gain during your pregnancy. All carbohydrates will ha Continue reading >>

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

I have gestational diabetes. Why do I have to watch what I eat? Eating well is an important way to stay healthy for all women in pregnancy. But if you have gestational diabetes (GD), choosing the right food is especially important. When you eat, your digestive system breaks most of your food down into a type of sugar called glucose. Glucose is one of your body’s main sources of energy. Glucose enters your bloodstream and then, with the help of insulin (a hormone made by your pancreas), your cells use the glucose as fuel. However, if your body doesn't produce enough insulin – or your cells have a problem responding to the insulin – too much glucose stays in your blood, instead of moving into the cells and getting converted to energy. Pregnancy hormones reduce the effect of insulin, so your body has to make more of it. If your body can't keep up with the demands for insulin, your blood sugar levels can get too high. That's when GD happens. It's important to control it, as it can lead to problems for your baby. You may be able to control GD by changing what you eat and combining a healthy diet with regular exercise. Learn all about gestational diabetes, including risk factors, symptoms to watch out for, and how it's managed. How will I have to change my diet? If you’ve been diagnosed with GD, your doctor should refer you to a dietitian who can work out a special diet for you. Every pregnancy is different, so what works for one woman may not work for you. You’ll probably need to experiment with different foods and combinations of foods before you work out what’s best for your body. Your dietitian will be able to help you with this. Women with GD say the foods they can tolerate often change as their pregnancy progresses, which can be frustrating. Others say their Continue reading >>

3 Tips For Managing Gestational Diabetes

3 Tips For Managing Gestational Diabetes

Diabetes is not an easy-breezy subject. Many of us know someone who lives with the condition and about 10% of expectant mothers may be diagnosed with gestational diabetes. It means you have abnormally high levels of sugar in your blood, which can be potentially dangerous to you and your baby. The placenta supports the baby as it grows. Hormones from the placenta help the baby develop. But these hormones also block the action of the mother’s insulin in her body. This often results in insulin resistance. Insulin resistance makes it hard for the mother’s body to use insulin. When you eat, your digestive system breaks down most of your food into glucose. The glucose enters your bloodstream and then, with the help of insulin, is absorbed as fuel by your cells. If, however, your body doesn’t produce enough insulin—or your cells have a problem responding to it—that glucose remains in your blood instead of being converted to energy by your cells. The result is unusual fatigue (because the cells are being starved of energy), increased or rapid weight gain, and increased blood pressure, related to high levels of insulin in the bloodstream. When you’re pregnant, hormonal changes can make your cells less responsive to insulin—meaning they need more of it. For most moms-to-be, this isn’t a problem: when the body needs additional insulin, the pancreas dutifully secretes it. But if your pancreas can’t keep up with the increased insulin demand, your blood glucose levels rise too high. The result is gestational diabetes. Insulin is a hormone which is excreted by the pancreas and allows glucose to pass into cells to be utilized as fuel. Simple sugars are rapidly absorbed by the small intestine, and once they’re flowing into the bloodstream, the brain signals the pancr Continue reading >>

9 Gestational Diabetes Dos And Don’ts

9 Gestational Diabetes Dos And Don’ts

1 / 10 Tips for a Healthy Pregnancy With a Gestational Diabetes Diet Pregnancy already comes with a long list of things that you should and shouldn’t do to achieve the best outcomes for you and your baby. But if you’ve been diagnosed with gestational diabetes (diabetes that develops during pregnancy), then you need to learn some more dos and don’ts to keep your blood sugar under control and make sure that diabetes doesn’t harm your pregnancy. You will need to learn about a gestational diabetes diet — foods and lifestyle habits that help stabilize your blood sugar — as well as, possibly, gestational diabetes treatment. This may include diabetes medications your doctor prescribes during pregnancy to keep your blood glucose under control. It is possible to have a healthy pregnancy with gestational diabetes, but you must take care of yourself to reduce your risk of the following: An overly large baby Cesarean delivery (C-section) Miscarriage Preeclampsia (pregnancy-related high blood pressure) Preterm delivery Stillbirth Other poor health outcomes for your baby Long-term health effects for you Controlling your blood glucose is important for everyone, young and old. But for pregnant women, good blood sugar control is important before, during, and after pregnancy to reduce the chance of diabetes complications. According to the Mayo Clinic, good blood sugar control during pregnancy can help prevent or reduce these risks: Prevent complications for the baby Prevent complications for the mother Reduce the risk of birth defects Reduce the risk of excess fetal growth Reduce the risk of miscarriage and stillbirth Reduce the risk of premature birth To keep blood glucose under control during pregnancy, it’s important to check your blood sugar level frequently. If you are Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For Gestational Diabetes

Diet Tips For Gestational Diabetes

Diabetes Mellitus is a chronic disorder in which the blood sugar levels are very high due to inadequate production of insulin by the pancreas (insulin deficiency) or resistance to the action of insulin (insulin resistance). There are two major types of diabetes; Type 1 Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. In addition to these forms of diabetes, Gestational diabetes is another common form of diabetes found in woman during the period of pregnancy. Women are more prone to pregnancy related complications due to many reasons. In most cases, women are not aware of Diabetes during pregnancy. The condition causes high blood sugar levels that can adversely affect the health of the woman and her child. Gestational Diabetes is often a phase and a woman’s blood sugar level returns to normal post the pregnancy. However, this also puts a woman at the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Insulin is a hormone that breaks down the food into sugar or glucose. The glucose is then used as energy. The way your body uses insulin changes during pregnancy because you become insulin resistant, in order to provide your baby with more glucose. However, in some women their body stops producing insulin or doesn’t produce sufficient amounts of insulin, resulting in excess amounts of sugar in the blood, hence causing gestational diabetes. Pregnancy is a phase when women generally tend to read a lot about ways to keep the body healthy and have a healthy pregnancy. On being diagnosed with gestational diabetes, a lot of questions regarding what to eat and what not to eat may put you in a dilemma. In gestational diabetes, the calorie requirements remain the same but you may need to plan small and frequent meals, usually a 6-7 meal pattern can be considered. The calorie intake should focus majorly on complex Continue reading >>

Managing Gestational Diabetes Naturally

Managing Gestational Diabetes Naturally

The incidence of gestational diabetes (carbohydrate intolerance that is first identified during pregnancy) is increasing. With up to 10% of pregnancies affected this is becoming a major health concern in North America. Diagnosing Gestational Diabetes It is standard practice in North America to screen all women for gestational diabetes using the oral glucose challenge test (GCT) While this universal screening is controversial (the benefits of screening all pregnant women are not established, and there is a high rate of women testing positive for gestational diabetes who do not, in fact, have this condition) it is still common practice for women to be screened between 24 and 28 weeks. Not every pregnant woman needs to be screened for gestational diabetes. You have the option to decline this screening test. However, all pregnant women with risk factors for developing gestational diabetes should be screened with the GCT. Risk factors include: Glucose in the urine (found on routine urinalysis) Diabetes in a first-degree relative (parent, sibling or child) History of glucose intolerance, including gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy Obesity Previous infant with high birth weight A high blood sugar level (greater than 7.8mmol/L or 140mg/dL) after the GCT is not diagnostic and does not mean you have gestational diabetes. A diagnosis can only be made after a 100g three-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). In Canada, to be diagnosed with gestational diabetes following the 100g three-hour OGTT you must exceed two or more of the following blood sugar values: Fasting: 95mg/dL or 5.3mmol/L One hour after glucose load: 180mg/dL or 10.0mmol/L Two hours after glucose load: 155mg/dL or 8.6mmol/L Three hours after glucose load: 140mg/dL or 7.8mmol/L Complications of Gestation Continue reading >>

How To Treat Gestational Diabetes Naturally – 7 Tips

How To Treat Gestational Diabetes Naturally – 7 Tips

Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy and affects pregnancy women. This is a common condition where the glucose level in the blood is high. Insulin which transports glucose from the blood stream into parts of the body for energy is one of the hormone responses for lowering blood glucose level. While there is no treatment for gestational diabetes, pregnancy mothers can control the levels of their blood sugar to have healthy pregnancy. Tips On How To Treat Gestational Diabetes Naturally – 7 Best Treatments: In pregnancy, the babies grow and develop thanks to placenta which produces hormones. The action of mother’s insulin is decreased by these hormones. So the demand for using insulin in pregnancy is 2 or 3 times higher than normal. If the mother’s body cannot produce more insulin to response her needs, gestational diabetes increases. About three to eight percent of women pregnancy gets gestational diabetes. These women who: Are over 30 years old. Are overweight or obese (the mass index is higher than 30). Have type 2 diabetes in her history family. Have previously had a greater than 4.5 kg baby. Take antipsychotic or steroid treatments. Have had diabetes in pregnancy before. Have sugar in their urine. However, some pregnant women without any factors above also get risk of developing gestational diabetes. You need to begin treatment gestational diabetes immediately because it can hurt you and your baby and even lead to several complications. Here are some tips on how to treat gestational diabetes naturally at home that will help pregnant mothers deal with this disease: 1. Scheduling Your Diet: Eating irregularly schedule is the main cause of all forms of diabetes. Your body is taught to get influxes of sugar and calories with long p Continue reading >>

Managing Gestational Diabetes

Managing Gestational Diabetes

I have gestational diabetes. Will I see my doctor more often? Once you know you have gestational diabetes, you'll probably see your healthcare provider at least every two weeks. If you take insulin or another medication, you may need to see your provider once a week. In your third trimester, you may have one or more ultrasound exams to check how your baby is growing. If you take medications to control your diabetes, you may also have a fetal nonstress test once or twice a week. This is a safe test which measures your baby's movements and heartbeat. It's important to go to all your prenatal appointments, even if you're feeling well. Your provider will need to monitor you and your baby regularly and may adjust your treatment plan based on the results of your tests. What will I need to do if I have gestational diabetes? The key to managing your condition is tracking your blood sugar levels. This helps you take control of your condition and be sure that your treatment plan is working. Your healthcare provider will show you how to test your own blood sugar using a special device. This involves pricking your finger with a small surgical blade called a lancet. Although some women find it unpleasant at first, it isn't usually painful. Your provider will tell you how often to test your blood sugar. Usually, you need to test yourself first thing in the morning before you eat or drink anything, and then one or two hours after each meal. If you have trouble controlling your blood sugar, you may need to test more often. If your blood sugar is normal most of the time, you may be able to test less often. Your provider will also recommend lifestyle changes to help you to manage your gestational diabetes. Your blood sugar levels will show if these changes are working. What lifestyle cha Continue reading >>

Sick Day Tips

Sick Day Tips

If you become ill or get an infection, your blood glucose levels will often rise. If you are taking insulin, continue your insulin as prescribed. Check your blood glucose levels as directed by your educator or health care provider. If a blood glucose level is higher than recommended for two readings in a row, check your urine ketones. If your ketone reading is moderate or large, call your health care provider and provide your blood glucose and ketone readings. If you can't eat your regular foods, try these foods in place of carbohydrate foods (starches, fruits and milk). Replace one carbohydrate food (15 grams) with one of the following: 4 ounces fruit juice 4 ounces regular pop 6 saltine crackers ½ cup regular gelatin (Jell-O®) 8 ounces soup ½ cup unsweetened applesauce 1 slice bread If you can't tolerate the replacement foods, try to eat one serving of a carbohydrate-containing food every one to two hours to prevent low blood glucose and dehydration. Drink a total of six to eight 8-ounce glasses of fluids during the day to avoid dehydration . Take small sips. After three to four hours without vomiting, gradually return to your normal meal plan. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Diet Tips And Tricks

Gestational Diabetes Diet Tips And Tricks

If you have just received a diagnosis of gestational diabetes, the first thing that you need to know is that you are not to blame. That sinking sensation, the feelings of guilt and shame – let them go. It is not your fault. Finding out that you are at risk of sugar levels spiking during pregnancy is absolutely the best thing that could have happened for you and your baby. Chances are, it is almost entirely down to your genetics and not something you could have prevented. If you would like to read more about gestational diabetes in pregnancy, and my experience of it during two pregnancies and two stress-free labours, take a look at the post ‘Why you shouldn’t refuse this test in pregnancy.’ To learn more about the tricks I learned when coping with a low-carb gestational diabetes diet for a combined time of ten months, read on. Please note, I am not a dietitian or a medical professional and these tips are based entirely on my personal experiences. You should consult your doctors, nutritionist, or diabetes team about changes to your diet while suffering from diabetes in pregnancy. Gestational Diabetes Diet – Tips and Tricks Sugar and Carbohydrate Most people realise that high sugar foods like cakes, chocolate and biscuits need to be eliminated on a gestational diabetes diet. However, being careful about starchy foods is just as important. That slice of bread or bowl of pasta may seem like it shouldn’t contain sugar, but that carbohydrate turns straight to sugar when it is broken down in your blood stream. If the cereal that you thought was low sugar and oh so healthy is spiking your post-breakfast reading, it is because of carbohydrate. Check out the labels on all food and focus on the carbohydrate and ‘of which sugars’ part. Low sugar is important, and a l Continue reading >>

9 Efficient Home Remedies For Gestational Diabetes

9 Efficient Home Remedies For Gestational Diabetes

nucific.com Visit Site Some of the most effective home remedies for gestational diabetes include the use of vitamin D, vitamin C, astragalus, dietary scheduling, protein, whole food carbs, a sugar-free diet, flaxseed, and exercise. What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes is the least common type of diabetes and affects pregnant women, normally in their third trimester, and is characterized by high blood sugar levels, just like other forms of diabetes. The symptoms of gestational diabetes are generally minimal or mild, but can still cause complications for both mother and child, so should not be ignored. Although the symptoms typically fade after pregnancy, it still increases an individual’s risk of developing Type 2 diabetes later in life. The cause of diabetes, including gestational, is the insulin receptors in the body not functioning properly, which causes massive spikes and plunges of blood sugar, which can be very inconvenient, and even fatal in severe situations. Children born to a mother who suffered from gestational diabetes without treatment is much more likely to experience childhood obesity and is a likely candidate for diabetes, jaundice, or other health concerns. As with other forms of diabetes, there is no formal cure for gestational diabetes, merely treatment options like a G.I. diet, exercise, or insulin therapy. However, due to the complications of having an infant in the womb, many people steer away from insulin therapy and instead choose natural or herbal remedies to treat gestational diabetes. These remedies can either be used alone or in conjunction with other more traditional treatment methods of gestational diabetes. Below are some of the most popular and effective home remedies for gestational diabetes. Please consult a medical profe Continue reading >>

What Can I Eat If I Have Gestational Diabetes? Food List And More

What Can I Eat If I Have Gestational Diabetes? Food List And More

Gestational diabetes is diabetes that only occurs in pregnant women. That means you can't get gestational diabetes unless you’re pregnant. You may develop gestational diabetes for the first time during pregnancy or you might have a mild undiagnosed case of diabetes that gets worse when you’re pregnant. During pregnancy, the way your body uses insulin changes. Insulin is a hormone that breaks the foods you eat down into glucose, or sugar. You then use that glucose for energy. You’ll naturally become more resistant to insulin when you’re pregnant to help provide your baby with more glucose. In some women, the process goes wrong and your body either stops responding to insulin or doesn't make enough insulin to give you the glucose you need. When that happens, you’ll have too much sugar in your blood. That causes gestational diabetes. If you have recently been diagnosed with gestational diabetes, or are curious about what will happen if you are diagnosed with it, keep reading to learn more about maintaining a healthy pregnancy. Eat protein with every meal. Include daily fruits and vegetables in your diet. Thirty percent or less of your diet should be made up of fat. Limit or avoid processed foods. Pay attention to portion sizes to avoid overeating. If you have gestational diabetes, maintaining a healthy, balanced diet may help you manage your symptoms without needing medication. In general, your diet should include protein plus the right mix of carbohydrates and fats. Once you are diagnosed with gestational diabetes, ask your doctor about working with a registered dietitian or nutritionist. They can help you plan your meals and come up with an eating plan that will keep you and your baby healthy. Aim to base your meals around protein. Include lots of fresh foods a Continue reading >>

5 Basic Tips With Gestational Diabetes

5 Basic Tips With Gestational Diabetes

About 18 percent of pregnant women develop high levels of blood sugar during pregnancy. This condition is referred to as gestational diabetes (GDM). It usually occurs around the 24th week of pregnancy and it involves elevated blood sugar levels due to pregnancy hormones. Learn the basics about gestational diabetes and what it means to you and your baby. Find out if you could be prone to developing gestational diabetes. Most women diagnosed with gestational diabetes never had diabetes. A number of experts believe pregnancy hormones play a role. Increased hormone levels may interfere with the effects of insulin which is the hormone that regulates blood sugar. A lack of insulin causes blood sugar levels to increase. Risk factors for gestational diabetes include a family history of diabetes, being overweight prior to pregnancy and giving birth to babies over 9 pounds in the past. Other risk factors are being over 25 years old, increased blood pressure and being of Hispanic, African American or Indian descent. Having sugar in the urine or a diagnosis of polycystic ovarian syndrome can also be risk factors in gestational diabetes. Know the symptoms and schedule regular medical and lab appointments for timely diagnosis of gestational diabetes. Most women do not experience symptoms of gestational diabetes or simply attribute them to being pregnant. Symptoms may include fatigue, excessive urination and feeling thirsty as well as nausea, bladder infections and blurred vision. You may gain or lose weight even when you eat properly. Early diagnosis is important to protect your health and the health of your baby. Most obstetricians screen pregnant patients for high blood sugar between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. You are advised not to eat for eight hours before the test. The lab t Continue reading >>

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