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Tidepool Diabetes Management

Glu : An Interview With Tidepool Ceo Howard Look

Glu : An Interview With Tidepool Ceo Howard Look

An Interview with Tidepool CEO Howard Look Howard Look, CEO of Tidepool, front, second from left We recently had an opportunity to interview Howard Look, CEO of Tidepool, an innovative, open source approach to managing data from diabetes devices. Both Howard Look and Tidepools co-founder and CTO, Steve McCanne, have daughters with type 1 diabetes, and are pursuing a groundbreaking vision that will offer a range of benefits for people with type 1 and their caregivers. In the open source system, they are developing a smart meal bolus app that remembers how you reacted to the same meal last time and recommends trying a different dose this time; the ability for parents to remotely monitor their childrens devices via cell phones; and will also help in artificial pancreas development. In addition, the cloud-based technology will learn to recognize patterns based on data collected from your devices, and provide you with the ability to communicate easily with your healthcare team through social media channels. An ambitious platform, to be sure, and we greatly enjoyed learning about it from Howard! Who owns your blood glucose and insulin pump data? Most folks, including Tidepool, believe that the patient owns their health data. Its your disease, so its your data. As the owner of that data, you should get to decide who gets access to it, and you should get decide how it gets used. If you want to give access to your doctor, your spouse, and your close friend, you should be able to do that. If you want to view it in an iPhone app that helps you with your diabetes, you should be able to. If you want to donate your data to an anonymized research database, you should be able to do that, too. Of course there is lots of nuance to the question, especially around what data is considered Continue reading >>

Apple's 12 Picks For Diabetes Management Apps, 2017 Edition

Apple's 12 Picks For Diabetes Management Apps, 2017 Edition

More than two years ago, when Apple first added a list of diabetes management apps to its app store, we covered the list of 13 top picks. A lot can change in a few years, however. And while a few of those same apps still appear on Apple’s current list of 12 diabetes management apps, there’s plenty of new names — though not all new to MobiHealthNews readers — as well. Read on for Apple’s current 12 picks for apps for managing diabetes. One Drop for Diabetes Management: An FDA-cleared app, One Drop has both a free and a pro version, the latter coming with the company’s Chrome Meter lancing device and coaching services. On the companion app, users with type 1, type 2 or pre-diabetes can log a variety of information: glucose, diet, activity and insulin. Users can share that information anonymously with a community of users, and the platform also offers users actionable insights based on their data. OneTouch Reveal: This companion app for the OneTouch Verio Flex meter, OneTouch Reveal comes from LifeScan, a Johnson and Johnson subsidiary. The meter sends readings wirelessly to the app, and users can use it to see current data and colorful charts depicting 14, 30, and 90-day summaries. Users can also share info with healthcare professionals via email or text. Dexcom G5 Mobile: The first of two Dexcom apps on Apple’s list, Dexcom G5 Mobile allows users of Dexcom’s G5 continuous glucose monitor to see their readings, which are taken every five minutes, and share them. It also forwards trend alerts when a user’s glucose level goes too high or too low. It connects to HealthKit to send that data out to other apps that might need it, and can send data to five other users via Dexcom’s follow app (which shows up further down the list). Blip Notes: Blip, from Calif Continue reading >>

Tidepool - Acquiring, Storing, And Opening Data For Improved Diabetes Care

Tidepool - Acquiring, Storing, And Opening Data For Improved Diabetes Care

Tidepool - Acquiring, Storing, and Opening Data for Improved Diabetes Care Review by John Walsh, PA, CDTC, Ruth Roberts, MA Who does your diabetes data belong to? You - obviously. You're the one who created it and needs it for diabetes management. Your glucose readings, your insulin doses, your carbs and meals consumed, your exercise events, your stress levels, your devices. How can you take charge of your data and benefit from it? If you have diabetes and are technologically savvy, and pay attention to the latest devices and features, you have an insulin pump , a CGM and one or more blood glucose meters . You gather tons and tons of useful data. You have all the cords needed to plug into your computer and download your devices into proprietary software to view that device's data. You know how to use each software program to print the charts, graphs, and other useful sheets from each program, and your physician is as savvy as you and likes to analyze all of this information. Does this sound like you? Not unless you're a rare breed. Downloading devices remains a major impediment for most users. The Helmsly Foundation estimates that only 5% of people with Type 1 diabetes even attempt to access their data. Either the systems are too difficult to use or the software to view the data is poorly designed. As a result, only a small portion of the valuable data on devices gets used to improve control. A major obstacle is that each device has its own proprietary way of doing things, so unless all your devices happen to download to Carelink you cannot get your data from your devices into a single piece of software to really analyze what's going on. It's even worse at most clinics. Your compliant and dedicated healthcare professional has to accommodate every possible system that t Continue reading >>

A Case Study In Open Source Innovation: Developing The Tidepool Platform For Interoperability In Type 1 Diabetes Management.

A Case Study In Open Source Innovation: Developing The Tidepool Platform For Interoperability In Type 1 Diabetes Management.

J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2016 Mar;23(2):324-32. doi: 10.1093/jamia/ocv104. Epub 2015 Sep 2. A case study in open source innovation: developing the Tidepool Platform for interoperability in type 1 diabetes management. Department of Medicine and Center for Digital Health Innovation, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA [email protected] [email protected] Department of Pediatrics and Madison Clinic for Pediatric Diabetes, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. Department of Medicine and Center for Digital Health Innovation, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. Develop a device-agnostic cloud platform to host diabetes device data and catalyze an ecosystem of software innovation for type 1 diabetes (T1D) management. An interdisciplinary team decided to establish a nonprofit company, Tidepool, and build open-source software. Through a user-centered design process, the authors created a software platform, the Tidepool Platform, to upload and host T1D device data in an integrated, device-agnostic fashion, as well as an application ("app"), Blip, to visualize the data. Tidepool's software utilizes the principles of modular components, modern web design including REST APIs and JavaScript, cloud computing, agile development methodology, and robust privacy and security. By consolidating the currently scattered and siloed T1D device data ecosystem into one open platform, Tidepool can improve access to the data and enable new possibilities and efficiencies in T1D clinical care and research. The Tidepool Platform decouples diabetes apps from diabetes devices, allowing software developers to build innovative apps without requiring them to design a unique back-end (e Continue reading >>

Tidepool Tackles Diabetes Care After White House Visit

Tidepool Tackles Diabetes Care After White House Visit

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. Once you shake the hand of the President of the United States and get to talk with him about your passion -- in this case technology-driven diabetes care -- it doesn't seem like much in life could trump that. But for D-Dad Howard Look, CEO of the non-profit open data group Tidepool , even more exciting times are coming on the heels of being invited to the White House Precision Medicine Initiative Summit a few months ago. This week marks Tidepool's third birthday on May 8, and Howard says a lot has been happening that the Diabetes Community can be very excited about. For sure! Here's a quick rundown of milestones in just the past six months: Tidepool's Blip product platform has been available publicly since November. It currently has 1,500+ active users and is being used in more than 30 clinics and doctor's offices. Blip is becoming a hub for researchers to use in conducting their data, including changing how one of the largest coordinating centers for T1D research conducts its studies. The company is working with closed loop tech developers to employ its open-source platform and design expertise in creating next-gen Artificial Pancreas technology like the iLet Bionic Pancreas dual-hormone system from Beta Bionics . Beta testing is under way for Tidepool's Nutshell app, focused on carb-counting and food data. Im really proud of what weve accomplished, but at thesame time I feel like were just getting started, and are just scratching thesurface of whats possible, Howard says. In short, there's a lot on the horizon with Tidepool these days. Refresher: The Blip platform that Tidepool has been developing since its inception Continue reading >>

Managing Pump And Cgm Data (not Tidepool)

Managing Pump And Cgm Data (not Tidepool)

Managing pump and cgm data (not Tidepool) We are parents of a recently diagnosed son with Type 1. Our son has just turned 4 and was diagnosed in May this year. We were lucky enough to get him on a pump (Medtronic 640) before we left the hospital 10 days after the initial diganosis and have been managing quite well. About a month ago, he got a CGM (Dexcom G5) and we went from "ok, we've got this sorted" to "omg, we don't have this under control at all" after seeing the way his blood sugars behave in between boluses. We are learning to manage him better all the time and having all the data is definitely helping. I'm finding it very frustrating to have to swap between the Medtronic Care Portal which captures the pump and finger prick data, and the Dexcom diasend to see the CGM data. It seems there is no way to view all this data together. To compound it all, the interface for Carelink looks like it has come straight from the 90's, it runs via a clunky java embedded object inside a page that demands it only be viewed in Internet Explorer. Uploading the data from the pump is a clunky process too. The meter plugs in via USB, then connects to the pump via bluetooth (the active range seems to be only a foot which makes it harder than it should be) The system then uploads the data from the pump. Surely after a decade or so of insulin pumping, there would be a less laborious way to get the data than this? We looked at Tidepool, which looks fantastic but is only available to US carelink clients (we are in Australia). Tidepool support said we may be able to set up a US Medtronic account but it seems the only way to do this is to geo spoof the carelink site (and lose access to the existing data we, and our care team have accumulated so far). I'm a bit of a tech nerd, so we've set u Continue reading >>

Tidepool A Comprehensive Platform For Diabetes Management

Tidepool A Comprehensive Platform For Diabetes Management

Tidepool A Comprehensive Platform for Diabetes Management Editors Note: Tidepool has recently added a clinician portal to helppatients upload and seamlessly share data with theircare providers. Meet Howard Look, Founder and CEO of Tidepool , a secure, open-source platform for diabetes data and the apps that use that data. Hes been VP of software of Pixar, on the founders team that developed TiVo and ran a secret software project at Amazon, harnessing cloud services. He has a Computer Engineering degree from Carnegie Mellon University and a daughter who has Type 1. Recently, he met with President Obama and spoke on the panel of the Precision Medicine Initiative Summit on February 25, 2016. Howard is an impressive and busy dude. Weve also learned here, at Beyond Type 1, that hes passionate about building technology that betters the lives of others and makes living with T1D just a little easier. Tidepool, a grant recipient of Beyond Type 1, offers comprehensive feedback on blood sugar levels for better diabetes management by streamingdata from all these different diabetes devices (such as an insulin pump and CGM or meter) and consolidating that data on a single platform that can be shared with doctors and then analyzed with the added context of food and exercise. Not only will you see when you went low or high, but youll find the reasons as to why, so you can make more informed decisions in your management. Whatsmore its free. BT1: What do you need in order to use Tidepool (apart from your diabetes devices and a computer or phone)? HL: It has to be on a Chrome web browser. We debate this all the time, but as a start up, we had to make a decision and simplify our focus. Its the most popular browser and easy to download if you dont have it.It also lets us offer the Tidepool Continue reading >>

How The Tidepool Data Integration Platform Can Ease Diabetes Management: Our Interview With Tidepool Ceo Howard Look.

How The Tidepool Data Integration Platform Can Ease Diabetes Management: Our Interview With Tidepool Ceo Howard Look.

How the Tidepool Data Integration Platform Can Ease Diabetes Management: Our Interview with Tidepool CEO Howard Look. Twitter summary: Interview w/ Tidepool CEO Howard Look on how device data will ease T1D burden; @JDRF, Insulet, Dexcom, Asante already on board! Short summary: The diaTribe team recently interviewed Tidepool CEO Howard Look. Tidepool is a diabetes non-profit organization that has developed an open-source data platform, allowing apps such as Blip to integrate data from multiple diabetes devices all into one place. Mr. Look a parent of a child with T1D discusses the need for data integration, what challenges exist for Tidepool, and its ambitions for the future. Earlier this year, we wrote a conference pearls piece about Tidepool , a non-profit organization that aims to use its open-source data platform to make diabetes management simpler and more accessible. One of Tidepools applications, Blip , is a web-based program that integrates data from all kinds of diabetes devices (CGMs, meters, pumps, etc.) on a single, sleek interface ( see more pictures of it here ). Tidepool is also developing an innovative Universal T1D Device Uploader tool to make the data import process easier, and today, announced a partnership with JDRF to accelerate development. Tidepool has already made official partnerships with Asante , Dexcom , and Insulet . The Blip program can currently integrate data from Medtronic and Animas devices as well (though these are not official partnerships). Tidepool plans to make all of its products available free of charge. Data uploading has historically been unpopular in diabetes due to the hassle it can cause, but Blip allows patients to access data from multiple products and brands (e.g., an Asante insulin pump and a Dexcom CGM) all in one easy- Continue reading >>

Interview With Tidepool Community Manager Christopher Snider

Interview With Tidepool Community Manager Christopher Snider

I recently reached out to Tidepool Community Manager, Christopher Snider, and asked a few questions about who Tidepool is and what is on the horizon. Check out the answers below. 1. In a Twitter 140, well now 280, way, tell us who Tidepool is. (Ill stick to 140) Tidepool is a nonprofit company focused on delivering great, free software that integrates data from various devices into a single location. 2. Now give us a little more in depth in to what Tidepool is. Tidepool started in 2013. Next spring will be our 5-year anniversary after receiving articles of incorporation as Green Dot Diabetes In 2011, Howard Looks daughter was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Soon after his daughters diagnosis, he learned that despite the incredible technology that was available to help manage his daughters diabetes, getting the information off of those devices to help understand the data behind the diabetes was incredibly frustrating. Software, where available, had various compatibility issues with different operating systems, user experience was not friendly to people with diabetes or their families, and there was no way to see all of the data in one place. Being a software geek, Howard sought to create the solution he felt the diabetes community deserved. Howards experience in software development at Pixar, Amazon, and TiVo were a great foundation for understanding what had to happen. Then it was just a matter of building an initial team of advisors, assembling a Board of Directors, securing financial support through donations and grants from groups like JDRF, the Helmsley Charitable Trust, and private donors. Founders of GreenDot Diabetes in 2012 were: Saleh Adi, Steve McCanne, Jenise Wong and Aaron Neinstein. Howard joined in March 2013. Then, Howard hired the initial team (Sarah, I Continue reading >>

Learning To Like Tidepool | Test Guess And Go

Learning To Like Tidepool | Test Guess And Go

Even with testing, diabetes is a guess every day. In previous blogposts I have mentioned my frustration with finding a platform where I can download and view data from all of my diabetes devices. Diasend used to be my go-to site and would still work for me if I used my Dexcom G5 receiver. But I am a hipster-oldster who uses her iPhone and Apple Watch for CGM numbers. An email to Diasend followed by a phone call to Dexcom last week indicated that there are no plans to allow G5 Mobile integration into Diasend for US users. Dexcom Clarity is great for analyzing my CGM data but it doesnt include pump or BG meter information. Tandem t:connect allows me to download my pump and Freestyle Lite meters but does not show CGM information. Maybe when the Dexcom G5 is integrated into the t:slim X2 later this year, the Tandem site will include all of my information. Although I love mySugr and the cute monsters, I dont need a day-to-day logging app. Pretty quickly I get down to Tidepool as the only platform that is compatible with all of my devices. My first experience with Tidepool was last fall when I participated in a research study through Glu. I downloaded my pump and meters weekly while my CGM synced to Tidepool through Apple Health. I was required to enter my food and carb counts through the Blip Notes app. The use of hashtags for notes initially bugged me but with practice it became quite easy. The Basics screen in the Blip dashboard was novel and my data was displayed in charts and domino dot patterns. I dont recall spending much time reviewing the Daily View screen. In general I couldnt envision how my endocrinologist would work with Tidepool because she requires printed reports. After the Glu study ended, I drifted away from Tidepool. Fast forward 7-8 months and I am becomi Continue reading >>

Tandem Diabetes Care Announces Partnership With Tidepool To Further Expand Access To Diabetes Device Data

Tandem Diabetes Care Announces Partnership With Tidepool To Further Expand Access To Diabetes Device Data

Tandem Diabetes Care Announces Partnership with Tidepool to Further Expand Access to Diabetes Device Data , Inc. (NASDAQ: TNDM), a medical device company and manufacturer of the t:slim Insulin Pump, today announced a partnership with Tidepool, a non-profit dedicated to improving diabetes therapy management by offering an open source software platform that increases diabetes data accessibility. This partnership will enable users of the Tidepool Platform, which is currently under development, to download and access data from their t:slim Insulin Pump. "Tidepool's development efforts align with our philosophy that data empowers people with diabetes and their health care providers to make more informed decisions about their care," said , president and chief executive officer of . "The partnership complements our existing t:connect Diabetes Management Application and diasend Clinic offerings, and will further enhance our customers' options for displaying data to manage their therapy with the t:slim Pump." Once the Tidepool Platform is available, healthcare providers and people with diabetes will be able to upload therapy data from their t:slim Insulin Pumps at home or in clinics using Tidepool's device uploader. Tidepool's first application in development, Blip, is designed to display data from multiple devices, including the t:slim Pump, blood glucose meters, and continuous glucose monitors. ( www.tandemdiabetes.com ) is a medical device company with an innovative, user-centric and integrated approach to the design, development and commercialization of products for people with insulin-dependent diabetes. The Company manufactures and sells the t:slim Insulin Pump, the slimmest and smallest durable insulin pump currently on the market, and the first and only insulin pump wit Continue reading >>

Connected: Diabetes Data Management Made Easy

Connected: Diabetes Data Management Made Easy

New software solutions that communicate between differing brands of meters, monitors, and pumps make downloading a patient’s glucose data less time consuming for both physician and patient. Imagine the following: you are caring from someone with a chronic, 24/7 disease where patients are asked to self-administer a potentially deadly drug every day, and you are only given twenty minutes with your patient a few times a year. Oh, that’s right — you don’t have to imagine it. It’s type 1 diabetes. The Problem A physician can only do so much for someone with type 1 diabetes in a short office visit. David Ahn, MD, a clinical instructor of endocrinology at UCLA, knows this burden well. “In my endocrinology practice, type 1 diabetes easily represents my biggest time management challenge,” he says. “Unfortunately, it’s almost a given that these visits will either run over time or end with some topics left unaddressed.” Ahn’s words capture the whirlwind of challenges confronting endocrinologists seeing patients with diabetes. For one, the patient population is growing quickly; the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has predicted that by 2035, the number of people with diabetes will near 600 million, a roughly 50% increase relative to its 2014 estimate of 400 million. Meanwhile, there is a shortage of endocrinologists. According to studies from the 2014 Center for Disease Control National Diabetes Statistic Report and The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, there is one endocrinologist for every 4,117 diabetes patients in the U.S. The cost of care has also become a huge problem for patients and the healthcare system; according to the IDF, diabetes expenditures in the U.S. reached $612 billion in 2014. In short, endocrinologists have less time Continue reading >>

Tidepool Mobile On The Appstore

Tidepool Mobile On The Appstore

Our endo recommended this app for my 13 year old son and it has been an excellent addition to our care plan. It has allowed us to track how specific things impact his blood sugar by using the search feature and he loves the # concept. We have tried countless apps and he has never stuck with using them. This has been the exception. I love Tidepool because it allows us to communicate with his endo team through the note option and they can see all of his devices. No more keeping a log and writing numbers down. Its brilliant. My son, his dad and I all three have the app as well as the school nurse which allows all to make notes. It truly allows us to work as a team in managing his T1D. I will continue to suggest the app to every T1D family I meet. Excellent job! Our endo recommended this app for my 13 year old son and it has been an excellent addition to our care plan. It has allowed us to track how specific things impact his blood sugar by using the search feature and he loves the # concept. We have tried countless apps and he has never stuck with using them. This has been the exception. I love Tidepool because it allows us to communicate with his endo team through the note option and they can see all of his devices. No more keeping a log and writing numbers down. Its brilliant. My son, his dad and I all three have the app as well as the school nurse which allows all to make notes. It truly allows us to work as a team in managing his T1D. I will continue to suggest the app to every T1D family I meet. Excellent job! Continue reading >>

Tidepool Is Made Up Of Engineers, Designers, Communicators, Data Liberators, Privacy Protectors, And Big Dreamers. Most Importantly, We Are Passionate Diabetes Advocates.

Tidepool Is Made Up Of Engineers, Designers, Communicators, Data Liberators, Privacy Protectors, And Big Dreamers. Most Importantly, We Are Passionate Diabetes Advocates.

Tidepool is an open source, not-for-profit company focused on liberating data from diabetes devices, supporting researchers, and providing great, free software to people with diabetes and their care teams. Our mission is to make diabetes data more accessible, actionable and meaningful for people with diabetes, their care teams and researchers. We believe that connected data leads to better decision-making. Tidepools free software liberates data from diabetes devices, and places it in context of the real world. Tidepool is designed to help you discover insights and bring context to your diabetes management. And, to help make your data more actionable, we allow you to share your data with anyone you choose: caregivers, clinicians, endocrinologists, friends, researchers - anyone. Our commitment is, first and foremost, to the diabetes community. Many of us live with or care for someone with diabetes. You own your data, and you always will. We are an open source platform because we want to catalyze innovation, so we make our code and designs openly available. We also believe that the healthcare industry needs more sharing and greater transparency, and being open source is one way we can make a difference. We release all of our software under a permissive open source license (BSD2) for anyone in the community to freely modify, build upon and extend. We regularly seek opportunities to collaborate with device manufacturers, nonprofit organizations in the diabetes community, and many other committed, innovative individuals to help put our software and donated data to good use. If youd like to help out, please get in touch . We believe that together, our data is stronger and more meaningful. We built the Tidepool Big Data Donation Project, a repository of donated data, and the T Continue reading >>

#wearenotwaiting: The (not So?) Brief Story Of Tidepool.

#wearenotwaiting: The (not So?) Brief Story Of Tidepool.

#WeAreNotWaiting: The (Not So?) Brief Story of Tidepool. Diabetes Advocacy , Diabetes Community , Diabetes Online Community , Diabetes Products , Guest Diabetes Blogger , Real Life Diabetes , Robot Life January 19, 2015 4 Comments Technology has scrambled forward by true leaps and bounds in the last few years, making my Clinitest urinalysis kit of 1986 seem pretty archaic. Now, people touched by diabetes can see their glucose levels with a flick of their wrist, and theres more on the horizon as far as data and diabetes management. Today Im so happy to have Howard Look, President, CEO and Founder of Tidepool, sharing his personal diabetes story on SUM, talking about why he simply cannot wait. Katie, why are you going to the bathroom again? Our story is probably familiar: We were on a weekend camping trip and all together in our family-sized tent. Katie, now 14 but 11 at the time, had gotten up THREE TIMES that night, unzipping the tent and wandering with her flashlight to the campground bathroom. The next morning, breakfast was the usual campground fare several glasses of orange juice and pancakes. It was an exciting time in our family, full of possibility. Katie had just started 6th grade at a new school. She was making new friends, trying out for the softball team, and was ready for new challenges and a new chapter in her life. Who knew. Katie one week before diagnosis. I look at this now and realize how much weight she had lost. A day later, we were at Lucille Packard Childrens Hospital at Stanford. I just wanted someone to say Dont worry, your daughter is not going to die. I wasnt so sure. After a sleepless night and a morning full of words we didnt understand (beta cells, boluses, ketoacidosis) our heads were spinning. Fortunately, our day-one angel, Jen Block, loo Continue reading >>

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