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Thyroid And Diabetes

Removal Of Thyroid In Diabetes

Removal Of Thyroid In Diabetes

(B) Epidural or spinal hematomas may occur in patients treated with ELIQUIS who are receiving neuraxial anesthesia or undergoing spinal puncture. These hematomas may result in long-term or permanent paralysis. Consider these risks when scheduling patients for spinal procedures. Factors that can increase the risk of developing epidural or spinal hematomas in these patients include: Increased Risk of Thrombotic Events after Premature Discontinuation: Premature discontinuation of any oral anticoagulant, including ELIQUIS, in the absence of adequate alternative anticoagulation increases the risk of thrombotic events. An increased rate of stroke was observed during the transition from ELIQUIS to warfarin in clinical trials in atrial fibrillation patients. If ELIQUIS is discontinued for a reason other than pathological bleeding or completion of a course of therapy, consider coverage with another anticoagulant. Concomitant use of drugs affecting hemostasis increases the risk of bleeding, including aspirin and other antiplatelet agents, other anticoagulants, heparin, thrombolytic agents, SSRIs, SNRIs, and NSAIDs. Advise patients of signs and symptoms of blood loss and to report them immediately or go to an emergency room. Discontinue ELIQUIS in patients with active pathological hemorrhage. Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia or Puncture: Patients treated with ELIQUIS undergoing spinal/epidural anesthesia or puncture may develop an epidural or spinal hematoma which can result in long-term or permanent paralysis. The risk of these events may be increased by the postoperative use of indwelling epidural catheters or the concomitant use of medicinal products affecting hemostasis. Indwelling epidural or intrathecal catheters should not be removed earlier than 24 hours after the last administr Continue reading >>

Thyroid Disease | Natural Treatment Remedies

Thyroid Disease | Natural Treatment Remedies

Author's Perspective: When I was running one of the diabetic support groups for the American Diabetes Association, I met quite a few diabetics who were having problems with an underactive thyroid. At that time, I didn't really understand the connection between the thyroid and diabetes and why it appeared that so many people with diabetes were having problems with their thyroid. After doing some research, I discovered that thyroid disorders are very common, affecting at least 30 million Americans. Thyroid disorders are second only to diabetes as the most common condition to affect the endocrine system — a group of glands that secrete hormones that help regulate growth, reproduction, and nutrient use by cells. As a result, it is common for an individual to be affected by both thyroid disease and diabetes. Since the thyroid gland plays a central role in the regulation of metabolism, abnormal thyroid function can have a major impact on the control of diabetes. In addition, untreated thyroid disorder can increase the risk of certain diabetic complications and can aggravate many diabetes symptoms. Consequently, periodic screening for thyroid disorder should be considered for all people with diabetes. Unfortunately, most of the medical approaches and even the alternative approaches to treating thyroid problems are haphazard at best. Because so many of my clients came to me for help, I designed a structured 10-step autoimmune diseaseswellness program and customizable nutritional program to improve the health of the thyroid along with treating several other common autoimmune diseases. Then, I documented the program and my findings along with my research in the DTD How to treat Autoimmune Diseases Naturally book. The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland located in the neck, just Continue reading >>

Thyroid Disease And Diabetes

Thyroid Disease And Diabetes

My name is Dana and I have heard that women with diabetes have an increased risk of thyroid disease. I heard you wrote a book about thyroid disease and are also a certified diabetes educator. Can you tell me more? Hello Dana, You are correct on both points. I am the author of “The Everything Thyroid Diet Book” which was published in 2011. In my book I point out that as many as 31 percent of women with type 1 diabetes also have thyroid disease. It is thought that hypothyroidism occurs in 10-15% of people with type 2 diabetes. (1) People with type 2 diabetes who have the metabolic syndrome may develop more problems with subclinical hypothyroidism. Many patients with type 2 diabetes take the drug Metformin. In people with hypothyroidism and type 2 diabetes who are on Metformin, may have a Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) level that is lowered because of Metformin. The drug Metformin is not associated with any other changes in thyroid function (FT4, FT3, TT4, and TT3). (1) When TSH levels are higher than recommended, physicians usually increase levels of thyroid hormone medication. If the metformin is lowering the TSH level but not any other levels of thyroid function, and if the other levels are not tested, the patient may get a prescription for thyroid mediation that is not correct. Patients that take both thyroid medication for hypothyroidism and metformin should discuss this concern with their doctor. People with type 1 diabetes should discuss with their doctor having their thyroid panel tested at the time of diagnosis and then yearly or every other year. This is due to the high rate of having both type 1 diabetes and thyroid disease. (2) When a person is diagnosed with hypothyroidism ( this is indicated by a high TSH level), they are commonly put on a thyroid horm Continue reading >>

Type 1, Celiac, And Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Go Together

Type 1, Celiac, And Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Go Together

A recent study found that people with celiac disease and Type 1 diabetes have a higher risk of developing autoimmune thyroid disease. Unfortunately, researchers are finding that people with one autoimmune condition are prone to others. For example, a recent study has found that people with celiac disease and Type 1 diabetes have a higher risk of also developing autoimmune thyroid disease. The study, published in Diabetes Care, looked at patients in the Swedish National Patient Register. Researchers searched for people with both Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease, a condition where the body cannot correctly digest nutrients in the lower intestine after a patient has ingested gluten. The researchers found 947 patients with both conditions. These patients were then compared to a control group of 4,584 patients with Type 1, but not celiac. The results found that those with Type 1 and celiac disease were almost twice as likely to have autoimmune thyroid disease. sponsor Both celiac and Type 1 diabetes are autoimmune disorders, which means they are caused by the body’s immune system attacking healthy cells of the body. Autoimmune thyroid disease, also known as autoimmune thyroiditis, is an autoimmune disorder which causes chronic inflammation of healthy cells in the thyroid. Damage to these cells leads to an underactive thyroid, which can lead to problems like goiter, heart conditions, and mental health issues. Researchers are unsure as to exactly why celiac disease in conjunction with Type 1 diabetes leads to a higher likelihood of autoimmune thyroiditis. D. Dr. Noel R. Rose of the American Autoimmune Related Disease Association explains that all autoimmune diseases, regardless of their anatomical outcome, are related. Understanding the connection between these different c Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Linked To Low Thyroid Function, New Study Suggests

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Linked To Low Thyroid Function, New Study Suggests

A low thyroid function has been found to be a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Researcher Dr. Layal Chaker said, “Low thyroid function is associated with a higher risk of developing diabetes and also of progression from prediabetes to diabetes. Of course, we’ve always screened for thyroid disorders in patients with type 1 diabetes, because of the autoimmune association…But there’s overlap between the symptoms of hypothyroidism and type 2 diabetes.” The study included 8,452 individuals over the age of 45 without diabetes, but with low thyroid hormone levels. After an average 7.9-year follow-up, 1,100 developed prediabetes and 798 developed type 2 diabetes. Low hormone levels were found to be a risk factor for diabetes and higher T4 hormone levels were associated with a lower risk of diabetes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 29.1 million Americans have diabetes of which 8.1 million cases are undiagnosed. With such high numbers, diabetes prevention should really be on the forefront of health. We currently know and understand many causes of type 2 diabetes. Being overweight, eating a poor diet, not getting enough sleep, and not exercising can all contribute to the onset of type 2 diabetes. But did you know your thyroid could also be a cause of diabetes? The relation between thyroid disease and diabetes Thyroid disorders affect nearly as many Americans as diabetes – about 27 million. Both diabetes and thyroid disorders affect the endocrine system – glands that secrete hormones useful for bodily functions. So it is not surprising that those with diabetes may also have a thyroid disorder, and vice versa. In diabetes, the body has a difficult time using insulin, and since the thyroid is responsible for the metabolism, it then gr Continue reading >>

A Prospective Study Of Thyroid - Dysfunction In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes In General Population

A Prospective Study Of Thyroid - Dysfunction In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes In General Population

Dr. Ravishankar, S.N1*, Dr. Champakamalini2, Dr. Venkatesh3, Dr. Mohsin4 1MVJ Medical college& Research Hospital, Hosakote, Bangalore 2Prof. 3Postgraduate. 4Postgraduate. *Corresponding Author: Dr. Ravishankar, S.N MVJ Medical college& Research Hospital, Hosakote, Bangalore E-mail: [email protected] Abstract Aims and objectives: The study was undertaken with an objective to know the thyroid functions in Type 2 diabetics and to know the spectrum of thyroid dysfunction in Type 2 DM. Methods: A total of 100 patients with Type 2 DM who were diagnosed on the basis of ADA criteria or who were taking treatment for Diabetes were included in the study. All patients in the study underwent thyroid profile tests for the thyroid status and also target organ evaluation for Diabetes. TPO-Ab, thyroid USG and FNAC where done where ever required. A detailed history and examination was done on these patients. Results: A total of 100 Type 2 DM patients were included in the study. Thyroid disorders were present in 29%. Hypothyroidism in 1, hyperthyroid in 13 and subclinical hypothyroidism in 15 cases. In this study 50 patients were males and 50 were females. Females (36%) had high incidence of thyroid disorders than males (22%). Sub- clinical hypothyroidism was more common among elderly (31.25%). Elderly females had high incidence of sub- clinical hypothyroidism (18.2%). Clinical features were present in 8 patients, all of them were diagnosed hyperthyroid. Other patients did not have any sings and symptoms. Patients with hyperthyroidism had a poor glycemic control 55.5% duration of diabetes had no relation with incidence of thyroid disorders. Patients with severe diabetic micro vascular complication had sub- clinical hypothyroidism. Conclusion: prevalence of thyroid disorders in D Continue reading >>

The Relationship Between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Related Thyroid Diseases

The Relationship Between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Related Thyroid Diseases

Go to: 1. Introduction The role of hyperthyroidism in diabetes was investigated in 1927, by Coller and Huggins proving the association of hyperthyroidism and worsening of diabetes. It was shown that surgical removal of parts of thyroid gland had an ameliorative effect on the restoration of glucose tolerance in hyperthyroid patients suffering from coexisting diabetes [1]. There is a deep underlying relation between diabetes mellitus and thyroid dysfunction [2]. A plethora of studies have evidenced an array of complex intertwining biochemical, genetic, and hormonal malfunctions mirroring this pathophysiological association [2, 3]. 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a central target for modulation of insulin sensitivity and feedback of thyroid hormones associated with appetite and energy expenditure [3]. Hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis) or thyroid over activity (Graves' disease) has been investigated to be associated with diabetes mellitus. A meta-analysis reported a frequency of 11% in thyroid dysfunction in the patients of diabetes mellitus [4]. Autoimmunity has been implicated to be the major cause of thyroid-dysfunction associated diabetes mellitus [5–7]. Unmanaged pro diabetes, both type 1 and type 2, may induce a “low T3 state” characterized by low serum total and free T3 levels, increase in reverse T3 (rT3) but near normal serum T4 and TSH concentrations [8]. The relation between T2DM and thyroid dysfunction has been a less explored arena which may behold answers to various facts of metabolic syndrome including atherosclerosis, hypertension, and related cardiovascular disorders. T2DM owes its pathological origin to inappropriate secretion of insulin, due to defective islet cell function or beta cell mass. Continuous consump Continue reading >>

Thyroid Disease In Insulin-treated Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Retrospective Study

Thyroid Disease In Insulin-treated Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Retrospective Study

Abstract Diabetes mellitus and thyroid diseases frequently coexist. In order to evaluate how thyroid disorders interfere with glycemic control, we analysed insulin-treated type 2 diabetes patients with thyroid disease. Diabetes patients (n = 1.957) were retrospectively investigated. We focused on type 2 diabetes patients who had been admitted for insulin-treatment and diagnosed thyroid diseases (n = 328). Patients were divided into three groups according to thyroid disease manifestation in relation to diabetes onset: prior to (group 1), same year (group 2) and thyroid disease following diabetes (group 3). Out of all diabetes patients 27.3% had a thyroid disorder with more women (62.2%) being affected (p < 0.001). Thyroid disease was predominantly diagnosed after diabetes onset. Patients with type 2 diabetes and prior appearance of thyroid disease required insulin therapy significantly earlier (median insulin-free period: 2.5 yrs; Q1 = 0.0, Q3 = 8.25) compared to patients who had thyroid dysfunction after diabetes onset (median insulin-free period: 8.0 yrs; Q1 = 3.0, Q3 = 12.0; p < 0.001). Age at diabetes onset correlated with insulin-free period (p < 0.001). Thyroid disease may be a marker of a distinct metabolic trait in type 2 diabetes potentially requiring earlier insulin treatment. Introduction Thyroid diseases have been described to be more common in diabetes than expected. In the general population their prevalence range between 6.6% in the UK [1] and 5.9% in the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) [2]. In contrast, diabetes mellitus shows a higher prevalence - 10.8% in the community and up to 13.4% in a hospital diabetic clinic [3, 4]. These endocrinopathies influence each other in multiple ways. Poorly controlled diabetes mellitus ma Continue reading >>

Diabetes/thyroid Conditions

Diabetes/thyroid Conditions

In our modern and busy world, we face a variety of health risks. Hillary’s Health utilizes an array of contemporary medical methods to help restore your mind and body, allowing them to heal naturally and better cope with the stress of daily life. “A healthy body and soul come from an unencumbered mind and body.” – Ymber Delecto A SPOONFUL OF SUGAR Diabetes mellitus occurs when the pancreas does not create sufficient or any of the hormone insulin, or when the insulin produced does not work efficiently. Thus, this causes the level of glucose in the blood to be higher than normal levels. Type 1 diabetes develps when the cells in the pancreas that make insulin are attacked and destroyed by the body’s own immune system, causing a severe lack of insulin. Type 2 diabetes develops when the receptors on the human cells in the body that respond to the action of insulin fall short of being stimulated by it – known as insulin resistance. If you are diagnosed with diabetes it can be a daunting experience. However, identifying the diabetes is one of the first positive steps. Once you know you have diabetes you can start treating it. While it may be necessary to continue to use some conventional meds, doses can sometimes be minimized with additional strategies that include: CONTROLLING DIET USING NATURAL SUPPLEMENTS MONITORING BLOOD SUGAR MANAGING WEIGHT WHO YOU CALLIN’ THYROID? An estimated 27 million Americans have thyroid disease, and more than half are undiagnosed. Frequently misunderstood, and too often overlooked and misdiagnosed, thyroid disease affects almost every aspect of health, so understanding more about the thyroid, and the symptoms that occur when something goes wrong with this small gland, can help you protect or regain good health. Women are at the grea Continue reading >>

Thyroid Disease And Diabetes: Are They Related?

Thyroid Disease And Diabetes: Are They Related?

I am often asked about the relationship between thyroid disease and diabetes. The unfortunate truth: Patients with diabetes do have a higher incidence of thyroid disorders. The Relationship Between Thyroid Disorders and Diabetes Just to get some perspective, up to 30 percent of female type 1 patients with diabetes have thyroid disorders of some type. The cause is thought to be related to the fact that thyroid disease and diabetes are both autoimmune disorders. An autoimmune disorder occurs when our bodies create antibodies that mistakenly destroy or injure normal body tissue, such as the pancreas in the case of diabetes or the thyroid. In other words, one autoimmune disorder makes you more prone to getting others. Type 1 diabetes has more of an autoimmune component than type 2 diabetes, so it is probably more likely to be associated with thyroid issues. In general, people with type 1 diabetes have a one in three chance of developing a thyroid disorder. The thyroid is the largest gland in the endocrine system, producing important hormones that regulate energy and metabolism in the body. But the body can overproduce thyroid hormones, leading to hyperthyroidism, or more commonly, not produce enough thyroid hormone, leading to hypothyroidism. It is important that patients with diabetes watch for signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism especially, as it is more commonly seen in this patient population. Signs of Thyroid Disorders Signs of hypothyroidism can include fatigue, edema, pallor and weight gain just to name a few. Sometimes symptoms of thyroid disorders overlap with symptoms of poor diabetes control, making it hard for clinicians to tell what is going on with a patient based solely on symptom complaints. This is why blood tests for thyroid disorders are routinely done a Continue reading >>

The Relationship Between Diabetes And Thyroid Disorder

The Relationship Between Diabetes And Thyroid Disorder

At the clinic today, a patient came in for an initial assessment for Diabetes Self-Management Education. She was taking thyroid medication along with her diabetes and other medications. She was not the first patient that I have seen lately who is taking thyroid medication. I was aware of the link between diabetes and thyroid disease, and had some basic information. I thought it would be interesting to look into the dynamics a little further. After all, the pancreas and the thyroid both fall within the endocrine system. Now let’s take a look at why people with diabetes often seem to have thyroid disorder, and the reasons behind it. What is thyroid disease? In order to understand the relationship between diabetes and thyroid disease, it is helpful to understand what thyroid disease is. At the front of your neck, just under your Adam’s apple is where you will find the thyroid gland. Thyroid disease is a problem that happens when the thyroid gland either under produces or over produces the thyroid hormones. Thyroid hormones are responsible for regulating the body’s metabolism. From research, the percent of the population that will develop thyroid disease is 7 percent. The percentage of people with diabetes who have thyroid disease is greater than the general population. We will dig in a little deeper to find the reasons why, and examine the link between the two. Note from Kirk and Health Institute: A high percentage of low thyroid is “Hashimoto’s”, which like Graves disease is an auto-immune in origin and most often creates low thyroid symptoms. To address Hashimoto’s and Graves affectively you must focus on the immune system, medication can be supportive but does not address the cause. Autoimmune conditions are best managed by change in diet and reducing infl Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Patients At Greater Risk Of This Potentially Life-threatening Condition

Type 2 Diabetes Patients At Greater Risk Of This Potentially Life-threatening Condition

Experts have also revealed people with type 2 diabetes are more likely to develop problems with their thyroid. Diabetes UK, a charity which helps people living with diabetes, said: “There are two types of thyroid disorder: hypothyroidism (where the body doesn’t produce enough thyroid hormones) and hyperthyroidism (where it produces too much). “Thyroid problems are more common in people with diabetes than those without diabetes, especially those with Type 1, because the body’s cells can attack the thyroid and destroy the cells as they do the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. “Adults and children can be affected, and hypothyroidism is more common in people with Type 1. “People with Type 2 are more likely to develop thyroid problems too, but it’s not clear why this is. “Neither hypothyroidism nor hyperthyroidism can be cured, but both can be treated successfully with tablets.” A study by Professor Patricia Wu, from the University of California, said: “A number of reports have also indicated a higher than normal prevalence of thyroid disorders in type 2 diabetic patients, with hypothyroidism being the most common disorder.” An underactive thyroid gland - hypothyroidism - occurs when the thyroid gland doesn't produce enough hormones. The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland at the front of the neck, just below the Adam's apple. It makes a hormone called Thyroxine which is carried around the body and its affects work on nearly every single cell in the body. Type 2 diabetes has been linked to a condition called frozen shoulder. The condition is also known as adhesive capsulitis or shoulder contracture and can occur in people who have had previous shoulder surgery. They said the condition is more common among people with diabetes, than those without Continue reading >>

Low Thyroid? Low Function. Hypothyroidism And Type 2 Diabetes

Low Thyroid? Low Function. Hypothyroidism And Type 2 Diabetes

A recent study confirmed an under-active thyroid and a “low normal” thyroid, puts people at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Unfortunately, this news isn’t a surprise. All too often, I meet patients being treated for a low thyroid as well as many who are undiagnosed or bypassed by routine testing, go on to develop disease states like type 2 diabetes, heart disease and a whole host of chronic health conditions. A low thyroid can drastically alter the normal function of every system of the body. This study validates what I as a physician have been seeing and saying for many years. How is the thyroid connected? The thyroid produces hormones and messenger molecules necessary to activate cells, produce energy and regulate biochemistry. T4 and the more active T3 are thyroid hormones that act as regulators for the body. Without them, cellular function is compromised including the ability to take in and use other hormones like insulin. Insulin resistance is a state where adequate amounts are released yet cells are unable to use it effectively causing glucose levels to build up in the blood. This process can go undetected for many years until ultimately, type 2 diabetes ensues. Having the right amount of thyroid hormone is incredibly important. Low levels — even those within a normal reference range — may not be optimal or adequate to properly regulate the body. Is the reference range a reliable indicator of health? In diagnosing thyroid conditions, the reference range is the determining factor that delineates a healthy person from one requiring intervention and medication. Sadly, there are flaws with this system that often lead to people being missed and bypassed for needed treatment. Reference ranges are created by studying seemingly healthy people and t Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Your Thyroid And Diabetes

The Connection Between Your Thyroid And Diabetes

If you have hard-to-treat adult diabetes, this is important information about your thyroid and diabetes. Your problem might not be insulin and your pancreas. It could be your thyroid! A research team knew that both humans and animals exposed to cold temperatures get high blood pressure. They wondered if diabetic mice would get the problem faster in the cold than normal mice. So the researchers placed diabetic and control mice in a box and kept them at a constant 41 degrees F. The normal mice survived, while the diabetic mice died in just two hours. The team figured that the diabetic animals couldn’t maintain their body heat. The researchers decided to take it to the next step. They wondered if giving the animals thyroid hormone might help them withstand the cold. They gave the diabetic mice an injection of thyroid hormone. Those mice increased their body temperature. But more, they also had a significant drop in their blood sugar within two hours, and by 50% within four hours. The researchers then looked at blood sugar levels at the start of the study. In the diabetic animals, they found the level was five times normal! They found that the thyroid levels in these animals were also low. Diabetes affects 150 million worldwide, and that’s an understatement. In Oklahoma, where the researcher conducted this study, there are over 268,500 cases. Most are obese or overweight. And, most can cure it with diet alone. But, I’ve seen a number of people resistant to a simple dietary fix. And, there is a group of adult diabetics who are thin. You can be thin and be hypothyroid. You can be heavy with low thyroid as a contributing factor. If you have adult diabetes, please check your thyroid level by blood, to include a “free T3, free T4,” and TSH. Now we know that these tests Continue reading >>

Thyroid & Diabetes. The Focus Of An Endocrinologist

Thyroid & Diabetes. The Focus Of An Endocrinologist

From an interview on Good Morning Pee Dee with Aundrea Loftley, MD McLeod Endocrinology Associates An endocrinologist is a specialist dealing with hormone imbalances in the body – primarily thyroid issues and diabetes. THYROID ISSUES – TOO MUCH, TOO LITTLE “The thyroid is a powerful gland,” says McLeod Endocrinologist Aundrea Loftley, MD. “It sits at the center of our neck and it’s tiny. Yet, the thyroid controls everything from the way we think to our metabolism and how our heart contracts.” Many people spend their lives barely aware that they have a thyroid. Yet, a large portion of the population has to deal with a gland that’s overactive (hyperthyroidism) or underactive (hypothyroidism). “Sometimes, the thyroid irregularity is triggered by your body’s own immune system,” says Dr. Loftley. “Other times it can be induced by medications or exposures (such as exposure to contrast used for radiology scans/procedures and exposure to radiation). There are a number of symptoms, although none are unique to the thyroid gland. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, see your personal physician for initial testing and a referral can be made if lab abnormalities are detected.” Signs of thyroid trouble include: Sudden weight gain or loss. Sudden onset of diarrhea or constipation. Hand tremor. Memory problems in someone who is a highly functioning individual. Other, less common symptoms, include: Chest pain, heart palpitations and unusual anxiety. DIABETES There are several types of diabetes. The three types that we see most often are: Type 1, also known as auto-immune diabetes and is usually seen in a child or young adult. This type of diabetes results from a direct attack by your body’s immune cells on the cells in your pancreas. This leads to l Continue reading >>

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