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Things To Know About Type 1 Diabetes

6 Facts People With Type 1 Diabetes Want You To Know

6 Facts People With Type 1 Diabetes Want You To Know

When you hear the word “diabetes”, you likely associate the condition with the body’s inability to process sugar properly. You also probably know that factors like genetics or being overweight can put you at risk, and factors like exercise and a strict diet can help reduce symptoms and risk of diabetes. However, all of these commonly known facts actually relate to type 2 diabetes, not type 1. That’s not surprising, considering of the twenty-four million people living with diabetes in the U.S., only about 10% of them have type 1. While they share the same name, type 1 is actually pretty different than its counterpart, with varied symptoms and risk factors. Unlike type 2 diabetes in which the body has too little insulin, or can’t use it effectively, people with type 1 have little to no insulin at all. In fact, it’s classified as an autoimmune disease because the body’s immune system actually attacks insulin-producing cells. However, without any insulin, cells can’t absorb the glucose needed to produce energy. Therefore, anyone with type 1 diabetes must take insulin every day to survive, using a pen, syringe, or pump. Unfortunately, there’s no way to prevent type 1 diabetes no matter how many healthy habits you adopt, nor is there a cure. That said, lifestyle factors like diet and exercise are still useful to help manage symptoms. To learn more about the condition, watch this video to learn six important facts about type 1 diabetes. Continue reading >>

What Is Type 1 Diabetes?

What Is Type 1 Diabetes?

In this section, we will share an easy-to-understand overview of type 1 diabetes, including what it is, diagnosis, treatment and links for learning more. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. For unknown reasons, the immune system attacks the insulin producing cells in the pancreas called beta cells and destroys them. You can think of insulin as the key that unlocks your cells and enables them to access sugar. Without access to sugar, it builds up in your blood. You feel tired, your body turns to fat for energy and you lose weight, and you urinate frequently as your body tries to flush out all that excess sugar. Every human (well, all mammals, actually) need insulin to live. Everyone with diabetes needs to take some form in insulin in order to survive. Unfortunately, at this time, type 1 diabetes can’t be prevented or cured. You may have heard type 1 diabetes called juvenile diabetes. About half of people with type 1 diabetes are diagnosed in childhood, though the truth is that type 1 diabetes can develop at any age. This terminology has long since been abandoned. (See: How Many People Have Diabetes?) If left untreated, type 1 diabetes will eventually be fatal. How Do You Treat Type 1 Diabetes? Everyone with type 1 diabetes needs to take insulin to live. Insulin can come from insulin injections, insulin pump or inhaling insulin. Experimental treatments are using implanted insulin-producing cells. The primary challenge of type 1 diabetes is to take enough insulin to lower the high blood sugars but not so much that you have severe low blood sugars. This typically requires frequent checking of blood sugars or, if you have access, using a continuous glucose meter (CGM). Type 1 diabetes requires monitoring and managing all day long. (LADA, latent autoimmune diabetes in Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Facts

Type 1 Diabetes Facts

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that occurs when a person’s pancreas stops producing insulin, the hormone that controls blood-sugar levels. T1D develops when the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells are mistakenly destroyed by the body’s immune system. The cause of this attack is still being researched, however scientists believe the cause may have genetic and environmental components. There is nothing anyone can do to prevent T1D. Presently, there is no known cure. Who T1D affects Type 1 diabetes (sometimes known as juvenile diabetes) affects children and adults, though people can be diagnosed at any age. With a typically quick onset, T1D must be managed with the use of insulin—either via injection or insulin pump. Soon, people who are insulin dependent may also be able to use artificial pancreas systems to automatically administer their insulin. How T1D is managed Type 1 diabetes is a 24/7 disease that requires constant management. People with T1D continuously and carefully balance insulin intake with eating, exercise and other activities. They also measure blood-sugar levels through finger pricks, ideally at least six times a day, or by wearing a continuous glucose monitor. Even with a strict regimen, people with T1D may still experience dangerously high or low blood-glucose levels that can, in extreme cases, be life threatening. Every person with T1D becomes actively involved in managing his or her disease. Insulin is not a cure While insulin therapy keeps people with T1D alive and can help keep blood-glucose levels within recommended range, it is not a cure, nor does it prevent the possibility of T1D’s serious effects. The outlook for treatments and a cure Although T1D is a serious and challenging disease, long-term management options cont Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis And Things They Dont Tell You:

Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis And Things They Dont Tell You:

Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis and The Things They Dont Tell You This is a topic Ive wanted to write about for awhile. When receiving my Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis well over a decade agoit was all just a blur in my mind. I remember the significant parts. I remember feeling ill and being told that I had type 1 diabetes. But it was also a moment of sheer disbelief, fear, and confusion. Being in the ICU with DKA is not a place anyone wants to be. Its hard to fully process a type 1 diabetes diagnosis in just a short hospital stay. What are the questions that I need to ask? What does this all entail? The doctors and mostly nurses just spilling information and I couldnt grasp all of it, if any. At the time of my diagnosis I learned the basics. Which was how to inject myself with insulin or how to have the assistance of my mother. I learned how to check my blood sugar, how often, and what the numbers meant. But being at the hospital is like having a babysitter. Someone, a medical professional who can keep an eye on you until you leave. Its when you leave the hospitalthats when the real work comes into play. And its a lot more complex then I could have ever anticipated. Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis and Things They Dont Tell You: How Consistently Inconsistent Life Is Now After I went home I was still in the honeymoon phase and my body responded well to the insulin. But after the honeymoon phase wore off, it was chaotic for many years following. During the teen years not only was I growing but I was also combating hormones. Now I know that diabetes is constantly changing and so is my day to day insulin requirements. I soon learned how volatile my blood sugars can actually be. That even if I eat and inject myself with the same amount of insulin everyday, the results can vary. It didnt hap Continue reading >>

People In The Know: Whats It Like Having Type 1 Diabetes?

People In The Know: Whats It Like Having Type 1 Diabetes?

Brought to you by Lilly Diabetes | Disney People in the Know: Whats It Like Having Type 1 Diabetes? Q: We think were doing a good job helping our son cope with his diagnosis, but the truth is, we cant really know what its like for him. What do kids with type 1 diabetes wish their parents knew about what theyre going through? A: Having parents who want to understand things from their perspective is something almost every kid wishes for, so if it helps, you can probably consider yourselves a little ahead of the game on this one. As someone diagnosed with type 1 when I was 8, I can tell you that I would want my parents to know, first of all, how much I appreciated the hard work they put into keeping me healthy and keeping diabetes as well-managed as they could. Even though I could not verbalize this gratitude at the time, in those moments when I was resistant to their efforts and grumpy about having diabetes, it deeply helped to know that they never wavered in their efforts to keep me safe. With that said, however, most kids with type 1 (and Im including myself here, though Im now an adult) want their parents to understand that sometimes we just want to eat a doughnut, even though we know it will probably make our blood sugars go berserk. And sometimes we just want to throw our arms up in the air and scream because were so frustrated with this disease and how trapped, consumed, and held back we can feel as we strive to maintain perfect blood sugar. Sometimes we need a break from all the rules of diabetes, and a good vent may be the fastest way to get us mentally back on track in those moments. Please give us the space to do this. Another piece of the puzzle for parents to understand is that highs and lows arent things to label as bad. Lets view blood sugar as data and not Continue reading >>

What To Expect When Dating A Person With Type 1 Diabetes

What To Expect When Dating A Person With Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is an illness which is not easy to manage and it influences practically everything in life. When someone starts dating a person with type 1 diabetes, there might be some things that are good to know. Firstly, you should know the basics of type 1 diabetes. The internet has tons of very good information available. Here is a nice fact sheet about type 1 diabetes from Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). The symptoms of hypos and hypers differ amongst diabetics Now that you know the cold facts, you should know that every person with type 1 diabetes is unique. Exercise raises someone’s BG levels, whereas others have to drink sugary drinks to avoid going low. Different diabetics experience low or high blood glucose levels differently. One might get angry or anxious when approaching a low BG, whereas some just go pale and shaky. It gets worse at the grocery store if one has a hypo standing in line with a chocolate bar in hand. They would just want to pay for the candy bar so they can eat it but the queue just won’t MOVE! That for e.g. is when I feel a bit aggressive but I have learned to just eat the candy bar while standing there and pay for the wrap. Eventually you’ll probably learn to see when your significant other is acting “like in a hypo”. However, you might want to avoid suggesting a blood glucose measurement. Nothing feels as frustrating when someone invalidates a type 1 diabetic’s negative emotions by suggesting ”It’s only your diabetes doing its tricks”. I would think it is something like telling an angry woman “it’s just your hormones talking”. Tread carefully here. At high BG levels the most common symptoms are fatigue and frequent need for urination, but there are differences here too. For the first few years since Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

What You Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

Please note: This information was current at the time of publication. But medical information is always changing, and some information given here may be out of date. For regularly updated information on a variety of health topics, please visit familydoctor.org, the AAFP patient education website. What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is sometimes called juvenile diabetes, or insulin-dependent diabetes. It means that your body can't make insulin. Insulin helps your body use the sugar it makes from the food you eat. Your body uses this sugar for energy. We need insulin to live. Without insulin, your blood sugar level goes up, you get thirsty and you urinate a lot. What problems can type 1 diabetes cause? People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to get heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, high blood pressure, blindness, nerve damage and gum disease. These things happen two to four times more often in people with diabetes than in people without diabetes. When you have type 1 diabetes, blood may not move as well through your legs and feet. If left untreated, this might lead to amputation of your feet. Untreated type 1 diabetes can cause coma. It can even kill you. The good news is that treatment can help you prevent these problems. How can these problems be prevented? To help prevent these problems, keep your blood sugar under tight control, eat a healthy diet, exercise regularly, don't smoke and keep your blood pressure and cholesterol levels low. If you do all of these things, your risk of complications can be cut by more than 75 percent. How do I keep my blood sugar under tight control? Insulin helps people with type 1 diabetes keep the level of sugar in their blood at a normal level. Many people with type 1 diabetes take short-acting insulin before each meal. You Continue reading >>

9 Things Most People Dont Know About Diabetes

9 Things Most People Dont Know About Diabetes

Diabetes is one of the most widely misunderstood conditionsaround, which is surprising considering how widespread it is. Here are nine of the most common myths and misconceptions, and the truth behind each one. Eating too much sugar does not cause type 1 diabetes. 1. Type 1 diabetes isnt caused by eating sugar There are two main types of diabetes, helpfully called type 1 and type 2 . Type 1 is an autoimmune disease . It develops when the immune system attacks insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Without insulin , we cant regulate our blood sugar levels , and this can be very dangerous. We dont know exactly why the immune system kicks off like this, but we do know its not a lifestyle choice which is one of the most common misconceptions around. As far as we know, theres nothing you can do to prevent type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes can have many causes, including genetics and aging. 2. But type 2 diabetes isnt necessarily caused by diet either. Then theres type 2 diabetes. This is the one people often associate with obesity . But theyre wrong to do so. This too is a myth. Type 2 diabetes can have a wide range of causes, including genetics and the natural rise of blood sugar that occurs as we get older. At least one in five people diagnosed with type 2 are a healthy weight. Age-related type 2 diabetes is completely different to other causes of type 2. 3. There could be as many as four types of diabetes. There are many types of diabetes. Along with the big two, theres MODY , LADA , gestational diabetes , and many more. Type 3 diabetes is a proposed term for Alzheimers disease, because there are a lot of links between Alzheimers and blood glucose levels in the brain . A recent study suggested that there should be a fourth type of diabetes . Type 4 diabetes would d Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Facts And Tips

Type 1 Diabetes Facts And Tips

Type 1 diabetes can also be called insulin-dependent diabetes because people with type 1 must take insulin in order to live. Type 1 diabetes used to be called juvenile diabetes because it was diagnosed mainly in children. However, that name is no longer accurate because children are increasingly developing another type of diabetes—type 2 diabetes. Also, it is possible for adults to be diagnosed as type 1, so the name “juvenile diabetes” isn’t accurate. Researchers aren’t exactly sure what causes type 1 diabetes, although they have some clues, including genetics and environmental triggers. Researchers have noticed that more cases of type 1 diabetes are diagnosed in northern climates, leading them to suggest that environmental triggers play a role in the development of type 1. Specifically, viral infections (which happen more often in colder northern climates where people are in close proximity) may trigger type 1. Type 1 diabetes is far less common than type 2: about 90% of people with diabetes have type 2. With tight blood glucose control, you can avoid many of the short- and long-term complications associated with type 1 diabetes, including foot problems and nerve pain. Exercise is an important part of keeping diabetes under control. Many famous people have type 1 diabetes, including: Jay Cutler (quarterback for the Chicago Bears), Billie Jean King, Ron Santo (Chicago Cubs player), Halle Berry, Mary Tyler Moore, and Nick Jonas. Type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) is more common than type 1 diabetes. Around 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National 2014 Diabetes Statistics Report, 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the US population have diabetes. T Continue reading >>

11 Things Not To Say To Someone With Type 1 Diabetes

11 Things Not To Say To Someone With Type 1 Diabetes

1. There is no "mild form" of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is when the body doesn't produce any insulin, while type 2 diabetes is when the body doesn't make enough insulin or the insulin it does make doesn't work properly. There's a myth that type 2 is the milder form – but it's false. "It is a commonly held belief that type 2 is the mild form and less serious than type 1 diabetes. This is in fact not true, as both type 1 and 2 diabetes can lead to serious health problems such as blindness, amputation, kidney disease, heart disease, and stroke, if not managed well. "Type 1 diabetes can be sudden onset, where a person may become quite unwell very quickly, whereas type 2 diabetes can go undetected for a number of years. Both types of diabetes need to be treated as soon as possible to avoid diabetes-related complications." – Deepa Khatri, clinical adviser, Diabetes UK 2. You don't get it from "eating too much sugar". "I didn't get it from eating too much sugar. There's nothing I can't eat or drink. And type 1 and type 2 are two completely different conditions. There's two types, I'm talking about type 1, the autoimmune condition. There's nothing I did to get it, there's nothing I could have done to prevent it, and it's not contagious. "No, it's not because I ate too much sugar as a kid, and yes, I can still eat that bit of cake. I can eat anything I want, and I can do pretty much what I want when I want to do it – my T1 doesn't hold me back in any way. It's a lot more than just taking a couple of insulin injections though – there's a lot more to it." – Connor McHarg 3. And it's a serious illness. "One of my major frustrations is that people tend not to view diabetes as a 'serious' illness and will go as far to say that it's self-inflicted due to certain lifestyle ch Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

What You Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

An important statistic to lodge into your brain: More than 200,000 people are diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes each year. Accounting for about 10 percent of the 414 million diabetes cases globally, Type 1 is an autoimmune disease that occurs when the immune system attacks insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, inhibiting the body’s ability to regulate blood sugar—people with Type 1 diabetes are insulin-dependent for life. Type 1 is not preventable, and since, unlike Type 2 diabetes, it’s not related to lifestyle, the disease disproportionately affects children. The inspiring folks at Beyond Type 1 (not surprisingly, two of the founders are mothers of Type 1 kids) are working to increase awareness of Type 1 diabetes, and perhaps most importantly, testing, around Type 1. Although Type 1 is entirely treatable, there are an alarming number of fatalities each year. The reason: 41 percent of Type 1 diagnoses come too late, with disastrous consequences. When diabetes goes untreated, the body, unable to produce insulin, is forced to burn fat for energy, which causes a buildup of acids called ketones in the bloodstream. The patient then enters a state called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which develops rapidly and causes symptoms like nausea, vomiting, and confusion. In the worst cases, DKA can lead to diabetic comas and brain damage; it’s fatal if left untreated. The high level of missed diagnoses when it comes to Type 1 Diabetes is, in large part, due to the generality of the symptoms, which are often misdiagnosed as strep throat or the flu. Too many children experiencing symptoms like fever, nausea, weakness, weight loss, extreme thirst, and bed-wetting are sent home with an antibiotic for strep, only to enter a dangerous DKA state—often requiring hospitalization—d Continue reading >>

The Boyfriend/girlfriend Guide To Caring For Someone With Type 1

The Boyfriend/girlfriend Guide To Caring For Someone With Type 1

Congratulations! You’re dating someone amazing, funny, beautiful and strong, who also has Type 1. If you are feeling overwhelmed or worried, there is no need. Here are tips that can help you take care of your significant other and the essentials in diabetes care that are a must-know! Insulin! Our bodies do not make insulin. We need insulin to process food that we are eating. Therefore, we can use either the pump or injections via a pen and a needle to administer the insulin. Learn more about insulin delivery methods. Devices The monitors that are attached to our skin are not a smoking patch, a pager, or a prop! These monitors help us stay healthy. One of these monitors is a CGM, or continuous glucose monitor. This small device tracks our glucose day and night, and notifies us of highs and lows. The other monitor is an insulin pump. An insulin pump gives our body insulin throughout the day and during meals through the flexible plastic tube. Extra baggage And we aren’t talking about exes! We will usually always carry a few items with us wherever we go. These things help us get through the day healthy and safe. Here are a few things you can familiarize yourself with. Blood glucose meter, test strips, and a lancing device. In other words, the small device that shows us what our blood sugar is, the test strip that goes into the device, and the pricker that we use on our finger to get a drop of blood onto the test strip. Check out The Daily-diabetes Care Kit. Fast-acting sugar that we will take in case we have a low. This could be anything from glucose tablets (which strongly resemble SweetTarts), candy, or juice boxes. Depending on the type of bionic pancreas that we have, we either carry pens and pen needles or supplies for a pump. Daily care We might have to check our Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes (insulin dependent diabetes, juvenile) is a condition in which the body stops making insulin. This causes the person's blood sugar to increase. There are two types of diabetes, type 1 and type 2. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is attacked by the immune system and then it cannot produce insulin. In type 2 diabetes the pancreas can produce insulin, but the body can't use it. Causes of type 1 diabetes are auto-immune destruction of the pancreatic beta cells. This can be caused by viruses and infections as well as other risk factors. In many cases, the cause is not known. Scientists are looking for cures for type 1 diabetes such as replacing the pancreas or some of its cells. Risk factors for type 1 diabetes are family history, introducing certain foods too soon (fruit) or too late (oats/rice) to babies, and exposure to toxins. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes are skin infections, bladder or vaginal infections, and Sometimes, there are no significant symptoms. Type 1 diabetes is diagnosed by blood tests. The level of blood sugar is measured, and then levels of insulin and antibodies can be measured to confirm type 1 vs. type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is treated with insulin and lifestyle changes. Specifically, meal planning to ensure carbohydrate intake matches insulin dosing. Complications of type 1 diabetes are kidney disease, eye problems, heart disease, and nerve problems (diabetic neuropathy) such as loss of feeling in the feet. Poor wound healing can also be a complication of type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented, however, keeping blood sugar at healthy levels may delay or prevent symptoms or complications. There is currently no cure, and most cases of type 1 diabetes have no known cause. The prognosis or life-expectancy for a person with Continue reading >>

10 Things You Need To Know About People With Type 1 Diabetes

10 Things You Need To Know About People With Type 1 Diabetes

1. They’re not Diabetics anymore. They are People With Diabetes. Calling them Diabetic is akin to calling someone a retard. They’re in a lifelong struggle to define themselves in any other way but diabetic. 2. People with Type 1 Diabetes can’t make Insulin. Insulin, in people without diabetes, is a hormone made in the pancreas. It allows glucose in the bloodstream to enter red blood cells for use in the body as energy. 3. Excess glucose in the bloodstream damages body systems and is the root of diabetic complications. Having too much, or too little glucose in the blood is dangerous and can ultimately cause death. Keeping blood glucose levels within normal levels is the ultimate goal of people with diabetes but can be affected by food, exercise, illness, stress, and a whole bunch of other annoying, unpredictable events. 4. They are not allergic to sugar. They balance what they eat by testing their blood glucose levels and taking insulin through injections. Yes, injections and finger pricks often hurt. Insulin does not come from animals or other people. It is genetically engineered using the E. coli bacteria and is biosynthetic. 5. Type 1 Diabetes is occurs when the Islets of Langerhans (insulin-producing cells in the pancreas) are attacked by the body. A lot of people ask why people with diabetes can’t get Islet Transplants. This is a relatively new therapy but requires massive doses of antiretroviral medications, which often have worse effects than living with diabetes. 6. Nobody understands why their bodies attack themselves. They did not get diabetes from their mothers who gained too much weight during pregnancy, from eating too much sugar, from exercising infrequently or from any other known reason. Not to be confused with Type 2 Diabetes. 7. They hate it whe Continue reading >>

10 Things School Staff Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

10 Things School Staff Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

10 things school staff should know about type 1 diabetes 10 things school staff should know about type 1 diabetes Children will not outgrow type 1 diabetes: With type 1 diabetes, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin have been destroyed. People with type 1 diabetes will always have to take insulin injections (until there is a cure). Changes in lifestyle or diet will not improve type 1 diabetes. Insulin is not a cure: But it is the only treatment. Without insulin, people with type 1 diabetes would die. It takes a lot of work to manage diabetes: Children with type 1 diabetes usually look healthy. Thats because they and their families are working hard to keep blood sugar levels in a target range. They do this by checking levels frequently, and acting quickly when neededsuch as adding insulin to account for a special treat, or having a snack because of extra physical activity. Technology is helpful, but it doesnt work on its own: Some students wear insulin pumps to deliver insulin. A pump is another way to deliver insulin, and whether or not to use a pump is an individual choice. Other students wear continuous glucose monitors (CGMs), which take blood sugar readings every few minutes. But none of these devices works on its own. People still have to carefully monitor blood sugar, food intake, and activity, and make decisions about how much insulin to give and when. Blood sugar levels can change quickly: Its important to check blood sugar often, because there are many factors that can cause it to change from minute to minute. Low blood sugar needs immediate attention: If a student feels low, or you suspect a student is low, act right away. Do not leave the student alone. Check blood sugar, and give fast-acting sugar as needed. High blood sugar means extra trips to t Continue reading >>

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