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Thin Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Paleo And Type 1 Diabetes

Paleo And Type 1 Diabetes

When most people think of “diabetes,” they think of Type 2 Diabetes – that’s the kind that you (usually) get as an adult after a lifetime of eating junk food and sitting on the couch. Type 2 is the “diabetes” that goes along with the rest of the metabolic syndrome (obesity, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol). Type 1 Diabetes is a completely different problem. It’s related to diet (more on this below), but it’s not a “lifestyle disease” and it’s not caused by a poor diet the way Type 2 is. In Type 1, an autoimmune attack on the pancreas prevents them from producing the hormone insulin. Insulin is necessary for metabolizing carbs and protein (more on insulin here), so people with Type 1 Diabetes have to inject insulin every time they eat a meal. Type 1 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes NOT part of the metabolic syndrome; patients with Type 1 Diabetes are often thin. Part of the metabolic syndrome; closely connected to obesity (although not all people with Type 2 are obese). Not enough (if any) insulin is produced, so your body can’t metabolize carbohydrates or protein on its own. Insulin is being produced (too much of it, actually), but your body is “deaf” to the insulin signal so it doesn’t work properly. Common in children Rare in children; usually develops in adults after a lifetime of bad eating. Not caused by eating junk food and not exercising. Can be caused by eating junk food and not exercising. Autoimmune disease May have an autoimmune component, but is not primarily an autoimmune disease. It’s easy to see how a Paleo approach to diet and lifestyle could be safe and effective for Type 2 Diabetes – if a disease is caused by eating too much junk food and not exercising, then eating real food and taking up a gym habit can only be hel Continue reading >>

Even Skinny People Are At Risk For Type 2 Diabetes

Even Skinny People Are At Risk For Type 2 Diabetes

With November being National Diabetes Month, there’s more than the usual focus on the epidemic in this country: 25.8 million children and adults in the United States -- 8.3% of the population -- have diabetes, with 7 million of them undiagnosed, according to the American Diabetes Association. And we have all heard the description of a typical patient with type 2 diabetes. He or she is overweight or obese and sedentary. But you may be surprised to learn that people who are slender and active can develop type 2 diabetes as well, and the symptoms for the majority of those afflicted (normal and overweight) can be subtle. Interestingly, the risk for diabetes is more about the fat you have inside your body than what is visible. What I’m talking about is visceral fat – the fat surrounding your organs. There is a condition known as Thin Outside, Fat Inside, or TOFI for short. These are people who look trim but have visceral fat, which can lead to inflammation and possibly diabetes. Are you at risk for type 2 diabetes? While normal weight men can certainly develop diabetes, the usual suspects are women who watch their calorie intake to keep their weight down, but they don’t eat quality calories. As an example, skipping breakfast, eating a small bag of potato chips for lunch, pasta for dinner and salad with regular dressing and drinking diet soda all day may be the kind of diet the aforementioned women might eat. You probably won’t gain weight on this diet, but you will increase your internal fat. The other culprit is yo-yo dieting. When you lose weight, you lose fat and muscle. When you yo-yo back up the scale, fat settles where muscle used to be. Can type 2 diabetes be prevented? Stress can also contribute to visceral fat. When a person is constantly stressed out ther Continue reading >>

Why Gestational Diabetes Is On The Rise

Why Gestational Diabetes Is On The Rise

Gestational diabetes cases are soaring, and you (as well as your baby) might be at risk without even knowing it. Find out gestational diabetes symptoms and diet. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), or high blood sugar during pregnancy, used to be relatively rare, occurring in about 3 percent to 4 percent of pregnancies. But in recent years, the rate has doubled—now, up to 6 percent to 8 percent of moms-to-be are diagnosed with this prenatal complication. And new recommendations lowering the cutoff point for diagnosis may lead to an even more dramatic increase. If these new guidelines from an international panel of 50 experts are adopted in the United States, 16 percent of pregnant women may hear the words, "You have gestational diabetes." In women with GDM, excess glucose (blood sugar) passes from the mother's bloodstream through the placenta. Serious pregnancy complications include preeclampsia (a serious high blood pressure condition that can be fatal), preterm delivery and delivery of overweight babies, often via Cesarean section. Some 70 percent to 80 percent of women diagnosed with GDM in the United States eventually develop type II diabetes. New research is showing that GDM can have long-term consequences for children as well. "Children of women with GDM are at risk for developing type II diabetes themselves," says Danielle Downs, Ph.D., an associate professor of kinesiology and obstetrics and gynecology at Pennsylvania State University who conducts research on gestational diabetes. But even normal-size babies who are born to mothers with untreated GDM are at greater risk of becoming overweight kindergarteners—and, consequently, overweight adults. Although being overweight is a major risk factor for GDM, only about half of women diagnosed with it carry excess Continue reading >>

Is It Possible To Improve A Diabetic Condition? What Is The Cause Of Diabetes And What Can Be Done About It.

Is It Possible To Improve A Diabetic Condition? What Is The Cause Of Diabetes And What Can Be Done About It.

For a simple explanation regarding Diabetic Nerve Pain 1) What is Diabetes? 2) Types of Diabetes 3) Side effects of too much sugar in the blood 4) Side effects of too much insulin 5) Diabetic Symptoms 6) 12 Signs of Diabetes 7) Complementary Natural Treatment for Diabetes What is Diabetes? Glucose is a simple sugar which serves as the body's fuel to produce heat and energy. When food is eaten and digestion occurs, the food is broken down into simple glucose molecules which then circulate in the blood to the cells where it can be used. When it is found in the human bloodstream it is referred to as "blood sugar". Carbohydrates are long chains of glucose molecules which are broken down to glucose. How does this become the condition known as diabetes? Glucose cannot penetrate the cell wall unless it is attached to molecules of insulin. The sugars and starches you eat are converted to glucose, which enters your bloodstream to be transported to the cells. This is where insulin comes in. It "unlocks" your cell walls so the glucose can enter. Insulin's job is to push the blood sugar into the cells. In order for this to work, your cells need to be sensitive to insulin. Without this, the glucose does not enter the cells but accumulates in the blood and circulates helplessly, eventually entering the kidneys and then the bladder for excretion in the urine. When your cells aren't sensitive to insulin, your body has to do something with the glucose. It converts some of it into fat, and the rest can become AGEs (advanced glycation end products) -- which can build up in the tissues, and affect cellular function. While circulating, this excess sugar will react with oxygen to form unstable molecules called free radicals which can cause havoc by stealing electrons from your body's healthy Continue reading >>

Thin Type 2s Disprove That Obesity Causes Diabetes

Thin Type 2s Disprove That Obesity Causes Diabetes

If you get your medical information from the press, you probably believe that Type 2 diabetes is a self-inflected disease caused by obesity and that it could have been prevented if the lazy gluttons who get it had only watched their weight. This makes it very easy to view people with Type 2 as greedy layabouts who caused their disease and to begrudge them their share of society's limited health care dollars. People with Type 1 often express their anger and resentment that they have to share the name of their disease with all those lazy fat people, when the Type 1s disease is not their fault. But the theory that Type 2s are greedy slobs who cause their disease, though appealing to our prejudices, is crap. There are many thousands of people who have been diagnosed as Type 2s who are not fat. Last year I attended a get together of a bunch of us who met by posting on an online bulletin board. What we had in common, besides a Type 2 diabetes diagnosis--which is what my doctor still puts on my paperwork--is that we were all of normal weight. There were quite a few overweight people in the cafe with us the afternoon we met, but they weren't the diagnosed diabetics. And more importantly, despite attaining normal weights, all of us who met that day still have seriously impaired blood sugar. Two of us, in fact, use insulin to get better control. Part of the reason for the association of diabetes with obesity is that people with diabetes often are very fat. But what gets missed is that their obesity often develops as a result of the very high blood sugars, rather than the other way around. We know now that blood sugars of 180 mg/dl or higher cause insulin resistance and there appears to be a strong relationship between insulin resistance and the tendency to pack on weight. So when Continue reading >>

Trends In Incidence, Prevalence And Prescribing In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Between 2000 And 2013 In Primary Care: A Retrospective Cohort Study

Trends In Incidence, Prevalence And Prescribing In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Between 2000 And 2013 In Primary Care: A Retrospective Cohort Study

Abstract Objective To investigate trends in incident and prevalent diagnoses of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and its pharmacological treatment between 2000 and 2013. Design Analysis of longitudinal electronic health records in The Health Improvement Network (THIN) primary care database. Outcome measures The incidence and prevalence of T2DM between 2000 and 2013, and the effect of age, sex and social deprivation on these measures were examined. Changes in prescribing patterns of antidiabetic therapy between 2000 and 2013 were also investigated. Results Overall, 406 344 individuals had a diagnosis of T2DM, of which 203 639 were newly diagnosed between 2000 and 2013. The incidence of T2DM rose from 3.69 per 1000 person-years at risk (PYAR) (95% CI 3.58 to 3.81) in 2000 to 3.99 per 1000 PYAR (95% CI 3.90 to 4.08) in 2013 among men; and from 3.06 per 1000 PYAR (95% CI 2.95 to 3.17) to 3.73 per 1000 PYAR (95% CI 3.65 to 3.82) among women. Prevalence of T2DM more than doubled from 2.39% (95% CI 2.37 to 2.41) in 2000 to 5.32% (95% CI 5.30 to 5.34) in 2013. Being male, older, and from a more socially deprived area was strongly associated with having T2DM, (p<0.001). Prescribing changes over time reflected emerging clinical guidance and novel treatments. In 2013, metformin prescribing peaked at 83.6% (95% CI 83.4% to 83.8%), while sulfonylureas prescribing reached a low of 41.4% (95% CI 41.1% to 41.7%). Both remained, however, the most commonly used pharmacological treatments as first-line agents and add-on therapy. Thiazolidinediones and incretin based therapies (gliptins and GLP-1 analogues) were also prescribed as alternate add-on therapy options, however were rarely used for first-line treatment in T2DM. Conclusions Prevalent cases of T2DM more than doubled between 2000 an Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes In Dogs

Managing Diabetes In Dogs

Dogs can have diabetes just like humans - both Type 1 and Type 2. Diabetic dogs are increasingly common, but the disease is entirely manageable unless left untreated. MY DOG HAS DIABETES: OVERVIEW 1. If your dog shows symptoms of diabetes (described below), seek veterinary care at once. 2. Work with your vet to determine the right type of insulin and the right dose for your individual dog. 3. Take your dog for frequent veterinary checkups. 4. Learn how to give insulin injections and reward your dog for accepting them. 5. Consistently feed your diabetic dog the same type of food at the same time of day. 6. Report any unusual symptoms or reactions to your vet. For years public health officials have reported a diabetes epidemic among America’s children and adults. At the same time, the rate of canine diabetes in America has more than tripled since 1970, so that today it affects about 1 in every 160 dogs. But while many human cases are caused and can be treated by diet, for dogs, diabetes is a lifelong condition that requires careful blood sugar monitoring and daily insulin injections. The medical term for the illness is diabetes mellitus (mellitus is a Latin term that means “honey sweet,” reflecting the elevated sugar levels the condition produces in urine and blood). Diabetes occurs when the body is unable to produce sufficient insulin to metabolize food for energy, or when the body’s cells fail to utilize insulin properly. The pancreas’s inability to produce insulin is known in humans as type 1 (formerly called juvenile or insulin-dependent) diabetes. This is analogous to the type that affects virtually all dogs. Dogs can also develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy. Type 2 (formerly adult onset) diabetes, which is the result of insulin resistance often l Continue reading >>

Diabetes Hair Loss

Diabetes Hair Loss

There is a definite connection between diabetes and hair loss. Some women are not even aware that they have the condition and a loss of hair can be one of the first signs. On this page I'll take a look at the symptoms of diabetes, why it causes hair loss, and what to do if it's affecting you. NOTE: This information is provided for guidance purposes only and should not be seen as medical advice. You should always discuss ANY concerns about your health with a qualified medical professional. Could Your Hair Loss Be a Sign of Diabetes? According to recent statistics, 24% of diabetes cases go undiagnosed. Data from the National Diabetes Statistics Report 2014 shows that there are 29.1 million Americans with diabetes - but only 21 million people are aware of it. There are lots of different reasons that diabetes causes hair loss, which I will cover later in this article. But it's also worth knowing that thinning hair can also indicate two other related conditions - insulin resistance pre-diabetes Insulin resistance is a precursor to pre-diabetes and BOTH conditions are precursors to type 2 diabetes. More About Insulin Resistance and Pre-Diabetes When insulin levels in the body remain sufficiently high over an extended period of time, the body's sensitivity to the hormone begins to decline. This is called insulin resistance. A difficult condition to reverse, insulin resistance causes symptoms that include high blood pressure, lethargy and hunger. It's a 'vicious circle', because the increased insulin levels and weight gain make the insulin resistance even worse. Eventually it can develop into pre-diabetes, which doctors can identify by increased glucose levels in the blood. Research supports the fact that women with insulin resistance are at risk of hair loss - so it's certainl Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In Children

Type 2 Diabetes In Children

For decades, type 2 diabetes was considered an adults-only condition. In fact, type 2 diabetes was once called adult-onset diabetes. But what was once a disease mainly faced by adults is becoming more common in children. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects how the body metabolizes sugar (glucose). Over 5,000 people under the age of 20 were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between 2008 and 2009. Until 10 years ago, type 2 diabetes accounted for less than 3% of all newly diagnosed diabetes cases in adolescents; it now comprises 45% of all such cases. It’s more common in those aged 10-19 and in non-Caucasian populations, including African Americans, Native Americans, Asian/Pacific Islanders, and Hispanics. Being overweight is closely tied to the development of type 2 diabetes. Overweight children have an increased likelihood of insulin resistance. As the body struggles to regulate insulin, high blood sugar leads to a number of potentially serious health problems. In the past 30 years, obesity in children has doubled and obesity in adolescents has quadrupled, according to the CDC. Genetics may also play a role. For instance, the risk of type 2 diabetes increases if one parent or both parents has the condition. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes are not always easy to spot. In most cases, the disease develops gradually, making the symptoms hard to detect. Many people do not feel any symptoms. In other cases, children may not show any obvious signs. If you believe your child has diabetes, keep an eye out for these signs: Excessive fatigue: If your child seems extraordinarily tired or sleepy, their body may not have enough sugar to properly fuel their normal body functions. Excessive thirst: Children who have excessive thirst may have high blood sugar levels. Frequent Continue reading >>

> Weight And Diabetes

> Weight And Diabetes

A balanced diet and an active lifestyle can help all kids maintain a healthy weight. For kids with diabetes, diet and exercise are even more important because weight can affect diabetes and diabetes can affect weight. This is true for kids and teens with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, the body doesn't use glucose properly. Glucose, a sugar, is the main source of energy for the body. Glucose levels are controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is made in the pancreas. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make enough insulin. Undiagnosed or untreated type 1 diabetes can cause weight loss. Glucose builds up in the bloodstream if insulin isn't available to move it to the muscles. When glucose levels become high, the kidneys work to get rid of it through urine. This causes weight loss due to dehydration and loss of calories from the sugar that wasn't used as energy. Kids who develop type 1 diabetes often lose weight even though they have a normal or increased appetite. Once kids are diagnosed and treated for type 1 diabetes, weight usually returns to normal. Developing type 1 diabetes isn't related to being overweight, but keeping a healthy weight is important. Too much fat tissue can make it hard for insulin to work properly, leading to both higher insulin needs and trouble controlling blood sugar. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas still makes insulin, but the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should and blood sugar levels get too high. Most kids and teens are overweight when they're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese increases the risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Also, weight gain in people with type 2 diabetes makes blood sugar levels even harder to control. People with type 2 diabetes have a condition called ins Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Increasingly Affects The Young And Slim; Here’s What We Should Do About It

Type 2 Diabetes Increasingly Affects The Young And Slim; Here’s What We Should Do About It

Type 2 diabetes increasingly affects the young and slim; here’s what we should do about it August 15, 2016 4.07pm EDT It is well recognised that increasing rates of type 2 diabetes are mainly driven by obesity and lifestyle factors. But that’s not the whole story. Genetics and epigenetics – changes in gene expression – also play an important role. We are starting to see an increase in type 2 diabetes in leaner people at a much younger age than usually associated with the disease. This means in addition to focusing on good diet and exercise, we need better awareness of groups most at risk of type 2 diabetes. These include many ethnic groups, women with a history of gestational diabetes and people with a family history of diabetes. In my clinical practice, I have seen teenagers and even children as young as seven, as well as younger patients of Asian, African and Middle Eastern origin with type 2 diabetes. Among Indigenous people in Central Australia, rates of diabetes are some of the worst in the world, at around three times that of non-Indigenous people. Studies in some remote communities suggest a prevalence of type 2 diabetes of up to 30%, compared to a rate of around 5% in the non-Indigenous population. All this indicates lifestyle decisions alone can’t be responsible. We need to stop the blame and shame for a condition that has an association with lifestyle, but for many is a consequence of the toxic mix of genetics and modern life. More than just lifestyle changes Type 2 diabetes accounts for more than 90% of all diabetes cases and affects mainly middle-aged and older people who are overweight or obese. Type 2 diabetes is thought to occur from a combination of factors: when the pancreas can’t produce enough insulin; and when the insulin is unable to do Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

Diabetes mellitus type 2 (also known as type 2 diabetes) is a long-term metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood sugar, insulin resistance, and relative lack of insulin.[6] Common symptoms include increased thirst, frequent urination, and unexplained weight loss.[3] Symptoms may also include increased hunger, feeling tired, and sores that do not heal.[3] Often symptoms come on slowly.[6] Long-term complications from high blood sugar include heart disease, strokes, diabetic retinopathy which can result in blindness, kidney failure, and poor blood flow in the limbs which may lead to amputations.[1] The sudden onset of hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state may occur; however, ketoacidosis is uncommon.[4][5] Type 2 diabetes primarily occurs as a result of obesity and lack of exercise.[1] Some people are more genetically at risk than others.[6] Type 2 diabetes makes up about 90% of cases of diabetes, with the other 10% due primarily to diabetes mellitus type 1 and gestational diabetes.[1] In diabetes mellitus type 1 there is a lower total level of insulin to control blood glucose, due to an autoimmune induced loss of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas.[12][13] Diagnosis of diabetes is by blood tests such as fasting plasma glucose, oral glucose tolerance test, or glycated hemoglobin (A1C).[3] Type 2 diabetes is partly preventable by staying a normal weight, exercising regularly, and eating properly.[1] Treatment involves exercise and dietary changes.[1] If blood sugar levels are not adequately lowered, the medication metformin is typically recommended.[7][14] Many people may eventually also require insulin injections.[9] In those on insulin, routinely checking blood sugar levels is advised; however, this may not be needed in those taking pills.[15] Bariatri Continue reading >>

7 Signs You May Have Type 2 Diabetes

7 Signs You May Have Type 2 Diabetes

Not exercising. Supersize portions. Our love affair with food has taken a drastic turn. The number of Americans with type 2 diabetes—21 million, including adults and children—has risen with the obesity epidemic. Should you or you child get tested? Yes, if you have a family history of the disease and/or any of the following: You're overweight. Even being just 10 to 15 pounds overweight can increase your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. If your child is overweight, make sure his pediatrician tests him, because type 2 diabetes is on the rise in kids. The encouraging news is that losing just 5% to 7% of your body weight can reduce your risk of diabetes, according to research from the Diabetes Prevention Program. Testing usually involves screening your blood for high glucose (sugar) levels. If they're too high, you could have either type 1 or type 2. (See box, right, for explanations of the two types.) Your doctor will most likely be able to sort it out based on your age and symptoms. In some cases, you may also need to see an endocrinologist (specialist). You're constantly running to the bathroom. "If your body doesn't make enough insulin [a hormone that carries glucose into your cells to give them energy]," which can happen with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, "glucose builds up in your bloodstream and comes out in your urine," explains Janet Silverstein, MD, chief of pediatric endocrinology at the University of Florida. Because you're urinating a lot, you'll probably also be very thirsty and drinking more than usual. Your vision is blurry. High blood sugar levels cause glucose to build up in the lens of your eyes, making it harder for you to focus. This could mean that you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. You're losing weight for no apparent reason. This is usually a sig Continue reading >>

Can A Thin Person Get Type 2 Diabetes?

Can A Thin Person Get Type 2 Diabetes?

play-rounded-fill play-rounded-outline play-sharp-fill play-sharp-outline pause-sharp-outline pause-sharp-fill pause-rounded-outline pause-rounded-fill 00:00 ShareTwitterEmbed spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreen ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% © 2017 FlowplayerAbout FlowplayerGPL based license The idea that only the seriously overweight develop type 2 diabetes is a misconception — thinner people can still have dangerous metabolic issues. Watch the video above to learn more about the factors that can lead to people in a normal weight range developing type 2 diabetes, or read the written summary below. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

Type 1 diabetes tends to start when people are under 25, although it can be diagnosed later in life. With Type 1 diabetes (also called insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes) the body's immune system destroys, or attempts to destroy, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Insulin is the hormone that allows glucose to enter the cells of the body to provide fuel. When glucose can't enter the cells, it builds up in the blood and the body's cells literally starve to death. Everyone with Type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin injections and regularly monitor their blood glucose levels. The cause of Type 1 diabetes is unknown but it is thought to be an autoimmune disease, where the body's immune system destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Not all diabetes in children and teenagers is the kind called Type 1. Type 2 diabetes is being seen increasingly in young people. Where Type 1 diabetes always requires insulin, Type 2 can require insulin but often it can be treated with other medicines such as tablets. This section deals only with young people who have Type 1 diabetes. We have talked to a range of young people who've lived with Type 1 diabetes from those who were very young when they were first diagnosed to those who were diagnosed when they were teenagers. We have also talked to some young people only recently diagnosed. In this section young people talk about the signs and symptoms that prompted them to seek medical help. Signs of diabetes Most people remembered that the first symptoms of diabetes had crept up on them over weeks or even months- most had felt thirsty all the time and said that they started to drink more and more and found that they were unable to quench their thirst. Lots of people described realising something must be wrong wi Continue reading >>

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