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Thiamine Lowers Blood Sugar

Thiamin (vitamin B1) Deficiency In Diabetics

Thiamin (vitamin B1) Deficiency In Diabetics

What is thiamin? Thiamin (or thiamine) is one of the water-soluble B vitamins. It is also known as vitamin B1. What does thiamin do? The body needs thiamin to convert carbohydrates into glucose, the main source of energy in the body. As thiamin is an essential co-factor in carbohydrate metabolism, low levels are thought to have an impact on glucose control in the body. What foods contain thiamin? Vegetables containing thiamin include broccoli, onions, green beans, carrots, kale, and tomatoes. More nutrient-rich and ranking as very good sources of vitamin B1 are green peas, Brussels sprouts, spinach, cabbage, aubergine and romaine lettuce. Thiamin deficiency in diabetics - the research Thiamin levels are lower in diabetics in part because the elevated blood sugar causes increased thiamin excretion by the kidney at a rate twenty-five times higher than normal. This leads to an acute deficiency of thiamin - a conditional also known as beri-beri. In diabetes the small blood vessels in the body can become damaged. When the blood vessels that supply blood to the kidneys are involved, the kidneys stop working correctly and important proteins, such as albumin, are lost from the blood into the urine. In 2007 researchers from the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Essex, UK, lead by P. J. Thornalley recruited 26 Type 1 diabetics and 48 Type 2 diabetics and 20 healthy volunteers to compare against. The study found that compared to the controls, Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics had, respectively, 76% and 75% lower blood-plasma thiamin levels. Diabetics excrete thiamin much faster Furthermore, Thornalley examined how the body processes thiamin and found that compared to the controls, Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics excreted thiamin through the urine 24 times faster and 16 Continue reading >>

Thiamine Deficiency And Diabetes

Thiamine Deficiency And Diabetes

Left Image: Spark Plug of Life which represents the role of thiamine in cellular energy production, courtesy of wikimedia commons . Pharmacist Stuart Lindsey Comes Clean Stuart Lindsey is a pharmacist with a few observations about diabetic drug treatment written in a May 2012 article . (1A ) For many years, Stuart managed a neighborhood pharmacy observing his diabetic customers faithfully taking diabetic medications, yet they had little improvement in health: Here is a quote from his article: After prolonged consumption of their diabetic medications, their health did not improve. This was disturbing to me (1A) When Stuart Lindsey himself developed diabetes, presenting as painful neuropathy in his feet, he began researching diabetes, in a self-interested attempt to understand and cure his symptoms. While researching, Stuart discovered a 2005 paper by Dr. Thornalley detailing how many of the symptoms of diabetes are due to thiamine deficiency (Vitamin B1).(7) Thiamine (B1) levels are lower in diabetics, partly because the elevated blood sugar causes increased thiamine excretion by the kidney at a rate twenty-five times higher than normal. (1,2) This leads to an acute deficiency of thiamine, also called beri-beri .(1C) In addition, other B vitamins, vitamin C and Vitamin D supplementation may also be beneficial.[1B] Thiamine Deficiency Not On The Radar Screen Stuart Lindsey reasoned that most of the symptoms of type 2 diabetes, the neuropathy, kidney damage, retinopathy (eye damage), and eventually heart failure are from thiamine deficiency (acute beriberi) (1A)(1C) Beri-Beri is thought to be rare in the US and the western world and merely of historical interest. After all, boxes of cereal at the grocery store are fortified with B vitamins to prevent beri-beri and pellagr Continue reading >>

Best Vitamins For Diabetics

Best Vitamins For Diabetics

Eating a varied diet rich in natural sources of vitamins is a good idea for diabetics. Nutritional support is critical for diabetics because diabetes tends to drain nutrients. When levels of glucose are high in the blood, the body tries to ‘wash’ the excess sugar out. This is why diabetics need to use the washroom frequently. Unfortunately, diabetics also lose nutrients via their urine. Research studies show that diabetics are repeatedly found to be deficient in important water-soluble vitamins and minerals. What’s more, the loss of these vitamins worsens the body’s ability to manage blood sugar, creating a vicious cycle. Combining a healthy diabetes diet plan and a daily exercise routine with the best vitamin supplements for diabetics goes a long way in achieving stable blood sugar levels. What Vitamins Are Diabetics Deficient In? The term vitamin is short for “Vital Amino Acid”. This means that these are vital for the proper functioning of hundreds of chemical processes in the body which the body cannot manage by itself. Proper blood sugar control is one such function for which vitamins are critical. There are 13 essential vitamins that the human body requires and they must be obtained from an external source — through food and/or supplements. Diabetics need two kinds of vitamins: Water Soluble – Vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6, B12, C, Biotin, and Folate are water-soluble and cannot be stored in the body for longer periods of time. Diabetics are often deficient in these vitamins since they pass greater amounts of urine daily. As their body tries to get rid of extra sugar, diabetics lose more water-soluble vitamins than most others. That’s why diabetics need to to get these vitamins daily in doses larger than what normal people need. Luckily, you can get all Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Thiamine: A Novel Treatment Opportunity

Diabetes And Thiamine: A Novel Treatment Opportunity

Diabetes and Thiamine: A Novel Treatment Opportunity Author: Chandler Marrs, PhD 8 Comments Share: Underlying all diabetic conditions is poor sugar control or hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia can be due to a lack of insulin as in Type 1 diabetes or insulin resistance as in Type 2 diabetes. In either case, the corresponding diabetic complications that evolve over time in many diabetics, the cardiovascular disease, retinopathy, peripheral nerve and vascular damage, represent the effects of sustained hyperglycemia. Until recently, the mechanisms by which diabetic vascular damage developed eluded researchers. Although multiple, seemingly discrete biomarkers had been identified, no single, unifying mechanism was understood. It turns out that diabetics, both Type 1 and Type 2, are severely deficient in thiamine or vitamin B1 and that thiamine is required for glucose control at the cell level. Why is thiamine deficient in diabetics and how does thiamine manage glucose control? The answers to those questions highlight the importance of micronutrients in basic cellular functioning, particularly mitochondrial functioning , and the role of excessive sugar in disease . Thiamine (thiamin) or vitamin B1 is an essential nutrient for all living organisms. The body cannot synthesize thiamine by itself and so it must be obtained from diet. Thiamine is present in yeast, pork, fish, various nuts, peas, asparagus, squash and grains (unprocessed) and because of the severity of the illnesses that thiamine deficiency evokes, many processed foods have been fortified with thiamine. Nevertheless, thiamine deficiencies thought resolved by modern nutritional technologies, are emerging once again. Modern thiamine deficits appear to be caused by diets of highly processed, carbohydrate and fat laden food Continue reading >>

Thiamine Deficiency And Diabetes Complications L... | Diabetic Connect

Thiamine Deficiency And Diabetes Complications L... | Diabetic Connect

Thiamine deficiency and diabetes complications. Lowering blood sugar with drugs doesn't prevent complications. By RosalieM Latest Reply2015-02-21 07:59:14 -0600 Abstract: "Despite the targeting of risk factors for cardiovascular disease, disease burden has not been completely eliminated. Thiamine is an essential cofactor in carbohydrate metabolism and individuals with diabetes are thiamine deficient." The pathophysiology of recognized complications of thiamine deficiency is similar to that underlying atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome, namely oxidative stress, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction" "Thiamine administration can prevent the formation of harmful by-products of glucose metabolism, reduce oxidative stress and improve endothelial function." This is just some of the research that I read that tells me that diabetic complications are not prevented by drugs alone. My analysis of all the research I read follows. If I have made a mistake, I would be happy to be corrected. 1. Diabetics excrete thiamine B1 at a 25 % higher rate than non diabetics, so they are short. 2. Thiamine (B1) is crucial for protecting the nerves from oxidative damage. 3. Research evidence shows that high doses of fat soluble thiamine in the form of Benfotiamine protects the nerves from the oxidative damage. Diabetes drugs lowers blood sugar but do not protect the nerve cells from oxidative stress. 4. Keeping blood sugar down with diet also protects the nerves from oxidative stress. 5. Doctors are not up to date with this research but you can be. It is all on line in many different places. 6. Benfotiamine (not a brand name) is available at stores that sell vitamins. It can be bought over the counter. Germany has been prescribing benfotiamine to diabetics since the 1990's. After 30 years Continue reading >>

Influence Of Thiamine On Blood Sugar Levels In Diabetic Patients

Influence Of Thiamine On Blood Sugar Levels In Diabetic Patients

In the past few years there has been considerable interest in the relationship between carbohydrate metabolism and vitamin B1. As Williams and Spies1 pointed out in their recent monograph: "There is convincing evidence of frequent disturbances of glycogen storage and blood sugar in B1 avitaminosis. Further indications of this are found in clinical experience. A hyperglycemia and glycosuria in depancreatized dogs which does not respond to insulin but is cured by thiamin plus riboflavin has been reported. The whole matter of vitamin B1 deficiency in relation to sugar disturbances requires further study, as the evidence of some association of the two is strong but still obscure." Monauni2 claimed that thiamine is a two-sided regulator of blood sugar, raising the level when it is subnormal and lowering it when it is elevated. Several authors3 have shown that thiamine lowers the level of blood sugar and improves the sugar tolerance curve. Unfortunately, Continue reading >>

Effect Of High Dose Thiamine Therapy On Risk Factors In Type 2 Diabetics

Effect Of High Dose Thiamine Therapy On Risk Factors In Type 2 Diabetics

Received date: October 13, 2012; Accepted date: November 24, 2012; Published date: November 30, 2012 Citation: Alam SS, Riaz S, Waheed Akhtar M (2012) Effect of High Dose Thiamine Therapy on Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetics. J Diabetes Metab 3:233. doi: 10.4172/2155-6156.1000233 Copyright: 2012 Alam SS, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Background: Traditional and more recently, a host of nontraditional risk factors of type 2 diabetes mellitus have adopted significance as promoters of the pathologies associated with this disease. High dose Vitamin B1 (thiamine) has been found at preclinical level to play an ameliorative role through a number of intracellular metabolic pathways. In order to demonstrate this clinically, pioneering research on the effect of high dose thiamine on associated markers of biochemical dysfunction, incipient diabetic nephropathy, hemostasis (plasminogen activation inhibitor/PAI-1), oxidative stress (plasma thiols) and second messenger signaling (protein kinase C/ PKC ) was conducted. Subjects and methods: Type 2 diabetics were enrolled in randomized, double blind placebo controlled clinical trial for 6 months. Patients were divided into two groups and administered 300 mg/day thiamine or placebo for 3 months, followed by a 2 month washout period. Normal healthy controls participated for baseline estimations only. Plasma and urinary thiamine levels, microalbuminuria, PAI-1, oxidative stress marker plasma thiols were estimated. The messenger signaling PKC profile was determined in normal controls and in type 2 diabetics. Results: Lower plasma Continue reading >>

Evidence For Altered Thiamine Metabolism In Diabetes: Is There A Potential To Oppose Gluco- And Lipotoxicity By Rational Supplementation?

Evidence For Altered Thiamine Metabolism In Diabetes: Is There A Potential To Oppose Gluco- And Lipotoxicity By Rational Supplementation?

Evidence for altered thiamine metabolism in diabetes: Is there a potential to oppose gluco- and lipotoxicity by rational supplementation? We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Evidence for altered thiamine metabolism in diabetes: Is there a potential to oppose gluco- and lipotoxicity by rational supplementation? Luk Pcal, Katarna Kuricov, and Kateina Kakov Growing prevalence of diabetes (type 2 as well as type 1) and its related morbidity due to vascular complications creates a large burden on medical care worldwide. Understanding the molecular pathogenesis of chronic micro-, macro- and avascular complications mediated by hyperglycemia is of crucial importance since novel therapeutic targets can be identified and tested. Thiamine (vitamin B1) is an essential cofactor of several enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and published data suggest that thiamine metabolism in diabetes is deficient. This review aims to point out the physiological role of thiamine in metabolism of glucose and amino acids, to present overview of thiamine metabolism and to describe the consequences of thiamine deficiency (either clinically manifest or latent). Furthermore, we want to explain why thiamine demands are increased in diabetes and to summarise data indicating thiamine mishandling in diabetics (by review of the studies mapping the prevalence and the degree of thiamine deficiency in diabetics). Finally, we would like to summarise t Continue reading >>

Using Vitamins (thiamine) For Improving Glucose Control

Using Vitamins (thiamine) For Improving Glucose Control

It was found that both supplementary CrProp and thiamine (given alone) have significant insulin-sensitizing and moderate blood-lipid-lowering properties, while the combined supplementation with these agents does not give synergistic effects in insulin-resistant rats . CrProp given separately increased kidney Cu and Cr levels, while thiamine alone increased hepatic Cu contents and decreased renal Zn and Cu contents." We previously found that thiamine mitigates metabolic disorders in spontaneously hypertensive rats, harboring defects in glucose and fatty acid metabolism. Mutation of thiamine transporter gene SLC19A2 is linked to type 2 diabetes mellitus . The current study extends our hypothesis that thiamine intervention may impact metabolic abnormalities in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats, exhibiting obesity and metabolic disorders similar to human metabolic syndrome. Male OLETF rats (4 wk old) were given free access to water containing either 0.2% or 0% of thiamine for 21 and 51 wk. At the end of treatment, blood parameters and cardiac functions were analyzed. After sacrifice, organs weights, histological findings, and hepatic pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity in the liver were evaluated. Thiamine intervention averted obesity and prevented metabolic disorders in OLETF rats which accompanied mitigation of reduced lipid oxidation and increased hepatic PDH activity. Histological evaluation revealed that thiamine alleviated adipocyte hypertrophy, steatosis in the liver, heart, and skeletal muscle, sinusoidal fibrosis with formation of basement membranes (called pseudocapillarization) which accompanied significantly reduced expression of laminin 1 and nidogen-1 mRNA, interstitial fibrosis in the heart and kidney, fatty degeneration in the pancreas, thick Continue reading >>

Protecting Against Glycation And High Blood Sugar With Benfotiamine

Protecting Against Glycation And High Blood Sugar With Benfotiamine

For decades, European doctors have prescribed diabetic patients a fat-soluble form of vitamin B1 called benfotiamine to treat neuropathies and help prevent complications such as blindness, kidney failure, heart attack, and limb amputation. Benfotiamine blocks destructive biochemical pathways that enable high blood sugar levels to damage nerves and small blood vessels. Benfotiamine also inhibits the formation of advanced glycation end products in both diabetic and normal aging organisms. Glycation not only causes kidney, nerve, and retinal damage in diabetics, but is also a significant contributory factor in cardiovascular disease and other aging disorders in adults without diabetes.1-6 Here, we’ll explore how to use benfotiamine to help protect against the dangers of elevated blood sugar and toxic glycation reactions. AGE, RAGE, and Tissue Damage Sugar molecules, in excess quantity or over long periods of time, wreak havoc on human tissues. As the number of people with type 2 diabetes has skyrocketed over the past 20 years, we’ve learned to recognize strong relationships between blood sugar levels and many chronic conditions previously thought to be purely age-related. The link seems to be the total lifetime exposure to blood sugar that’s the culprit. In other words, diabetics develop problems sooner because of their chronic higher sugar levels, but even non-diabetic people eventually suffer tissue injury related to the interaction between blood sugar and tissue proteins. Studies of diabetic patients have shown that prolonged tissue exposure to elevated glucose levels results in the production of a class of molecules called “advanced glycation end products” (AGEs).1-4 These molecules are proteins and lipids that have become bonded to some of the sugar molecule Continue reading >>

Benfotiamine | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Benfotiamine | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I have recently been diagonised as having type 2 Diabetes and since diagnosis have been taking Benfotiamine ( Vitamin B1 in fat soluble type ) , it seems to be very effective at reducing blood sugar levels ! After consuming high GI index meals my blood sugar can be as low as 4.8 ! with Benfotamine , without Benfotiamine for one day it's been up to 10.1 , It has also started reducing my pins and needles I am continuing to "experiment" with Benfotiamine and have started a blog detailing my sugar levels , you can read this if you want at Look forward to comments , I am aslo exploring B12 as Methy cobalamine to get the pins and needles even better Welcome onboard, I've never really checked Benfotamine out, but after a quick google it looks to have a beneficial effects, no doubt someone on the forum will have more info. We do have more information about Benfotiamine for those who are interested. Here is a link which has other links embedded. Take a look. I noticed the same thing with benfotiamine. It gave me hypos (I'm type 1) even at a relatively low dose (20mg per day). You might also what to check out lycopene for some similar results; although, I'd be careful if you're using it with meds/insulin. I retested my blood sugar level after starting benfotiamine again and it was lower than without at 7.2 . It's very interesting that vitamin B 1 is intrinsically involved in stopping Diabetic complications mild thiamine deficiency inhibits a metabolic pathway which reduces the activity of transketolase the above link is only an abstract , taking ordinary Vitamin B1 doesn't seem to help benfotiamine is readily taken up through the gut and thus allows this activi Continue reading >>

7 Vitamins That Help Control Blood Sugar

7 Vitamins That Help Control Blood Sugar

Vitamin deficiencies are quite common among diabetics. Given the importance of vitamins to cellular processes especially glucose metabolism and energy production in cells, low levels of certain vitamins may impair glucose utilization and lead to poor blood sugar control. This article identifies and discusses the vitamins that are most important to glycemic control and diabetes complications. The B vitamins are especially important to glucose metabolism. They usually serve as cofactors in cellular reactions utilizing glucose. Therefore, they have been extensively studied to determine their benefits for controlling blood sugar levels. Because the B vitamins are water soluble, they are easily excreted from the body along with urine. This is especially important for diabetics as they easily develop deficiencies of the B vitamins. Vitamin B1 or thiamine is a coenzyme in the metabolism of keto sugars. It is also important for the breakdown of pyruvic acid, a product released during glucose metabolism. Therefore, vitamin B1 can help improve how cells utilize glucose. This can lead to better control of blood sugar levels. However, available studies do not always agree on the importance of vitamin B1 supplementation for diabetics. Clinical data show that patients with Type 1 diabetes usually have low vitamin B1 levels and can, therefore, benefit from vitamin B1 supplements. On the other hand, Type 2 diabetes patients usually have normal blood levels of vitamin B1. However, one study demonstrated that although diabetics have normal levels of this vitamin, its transportation across tissues is impaired. Therefore, even normal levels of the vitamin may not be sufficient to effectively control blood glucose levels in diabetics. Vitamin B1 supplementation has been proven to prevent an Continue reading >>

Gut Bacteria Changes In Type 1 Diabetes Causes Vitamin B1 Deficiency

Gut Bacteria Changes In Type 1 Diabetes Causes Vitamin B1 Deficiency

Researchers in a recent study found that type 1 diabetes affects the way gut bacteria act and this can result in Vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiencies which can cause complications often seen in people with type 1 diabetes. Not only did researchers find that bacteria in the gut behaves differently when type 1 diabetes occurs but it’s effects of lower Vitamin B1 production may also be used as an early diagnostic tool for type 1 diabetes. The researchers in the study were surprised to find that there were no major differences in the species of bacteria found in the gut of patients with type 1 diabetes and those without type 1 diabetes. They did however, discover that the bacteria in the gut of type 1 patients did not act typically. The gut bacteria in those with type 1 diabetes created a deficiency of Vitamin B1 which can increase a type 1 diabetic’s risk of neuropathy, nephropathy, and retinopathy. The Mayo Clinic states that “Severe thiamine deficiency may lead to serious complications involving the nervous system, brain, muscles, heart, and stomach and intestines.” Learning From Type 1 Diabetes Gut Bacteria A press release from the University of Luxembourg explained that researchers conducted a study called the MUST study or Diabetes multiplex family study which focused on people who had type 1 diabetes for several years and who had provided stool samples. Dr. Anna Heinz-Buschart, the study lead author said, “We studied the bacteria in the stool samples from these people, and “We also analysed stool samples from healthy close relatives of the patients with diabetes.” She says they found out that between those with and without diabetes, “there are clear differences in what the bacteria do.” When type 1 diabetes is present, gut bacteria change to adapt to Continue reading >>

Vitamins To Help Lower Blood Sugar

Vitamins To Help Lower Blood Sugar

High blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, may be caused by medications, chronic illness or an imbalance in your hormones. Diabetics can develop hyperglycemia if they don't take adequate insulin or if they consume too many carbohydrates, particularly simple carbohydrates that have a high glycemic index. Some research indicates that certain vitamins may help prevent hyperglycemia by lowering your blood sugar level, though more studies are needed. Obtain the majority of the vitamins in your diet from food -- do not attempt to treat blood sugar irregularities with vitamin supplements until you've consulted your doctor. Video of the Day Effect of Biotin An article published in 2005 in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry concluded that the B vitamin biotin stimulates the production of compounds like insulin that regulate blood sugar and inhibits the synthesis of enzymes responsible for stimulating the liver to produce glucose. The article also reported that people who don't consume enough biotin are more likely to have impaired glucose tolerance and higher blood glucose levels. The recommended daily allowance of biotin for adults is 30 micrograms. A whole cooked egg supplies 10 micrograms of biotin, a 3-ounce serving of canned pink salmon contains approximately 5 micrograms and pork chops have almost 4 micrograms in every 3 ounces. Other sources include whole grains, legumes, nuts, sardines and some produce like mushrooms. Effect of Vitamin D The more vitamin D you consume, the less likely you may be to develop high blood glucose and Type 2 diabetes as you age, found a study published in the journal Diabetes in 2008. However, it's not yet known how vitamin D does this, or if increasing vitamin D intake can directly lower the levels of people who already have high blood sugar. H Continue reading >>

The Impact Of Thiamine Treatment In The Diabetes Mellitus

The Impact Of Thiamine Treatment In The Diabetes Mellitus

The Impact of Thiamine Treatment in the Diabetes Mellitus We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. The Impact of Thiamine Treatment in the Diabetes Mellitus Khanh vinh quoc Luong and Lan Thi Hoang Nguyen Thiamine acts as a coenzyme for transketolase (Tk) and for the pyruvate dehydrogenase and -ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes, enzymes which play a fundamental role for intracellular glucose metabolism. The relationship between thiamine and diabetes mellitus (DM) has been reported in the literature. Thiamine levels and thiamine-dependent enzyme activities have been reduced in DM. Genetic studies provide opportunity to link the relationship between thiamine and DM (such as Tk, SLC19A2 gene, transcription factor Sp1, -1-antitrypsin, and p53). Thiamine and its derivatives have been demonstrated to prevent the activation of the biochemical pathways (increased flux through the polyol pathway, formation of advanced glycation end-products, activation of protein kinase C, and increased flux through the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway) induced by hyperglycemia in DM.Thiamine definitively has a role in the diabetic endothelial vascular diseases (micro and macroangiopathy), lipid profile, retinopathy, nephropathy, cardiopathy, and neuropathy. Keywords: Thiamine, Diabetes Mellitus, Vitamin B1 Diabetes mellitus (DM) has emerged as a major health problem throughout the world. The prevalence of DM is increasing rapidly in all age gro Continue reading >>

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