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Theresa May Diabetes Patch

Diabetes Patients Facing A Postcode Lottery For Life-changing' Device Used By Prime Minister Theresa May

Diabetes Patients Facing A Postcode Lottery For Life-changing' Device Used By Prime Minister Theresa May

Diabetes patients facing a postcode lottery for life-changing' device used by Prime Minister Theresa May PATIENTS with diabetes are facing a postcode lottery for a kit described as "life changing" which constantly monitors blood sugar levels. From November 1, the Freestyle Libre screening device will be made available on the NHS for a "select" number of patients with Type 1 diabetes. A patch is worn on the arm and a small sensor automatically measures and continuously stores glucose readings. Prime Minister Theresa May was recently pictured wearing one of the patches. The starter pack costs around 160, then patients must pay 50 for a patch that lasts two weeks and many patients are already paying for the kit privately. One in 20 people in Scotland is estimated to have diabetes. Type 1 occurs when the body is unable to produce insulin, which controls the amount of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Over time, complications can affect major organs including heart, blood vessels, nerves, eyes and kidneys. Maintaining a normal blood sugar level can dramatically reduce the risks. The charity Diabetes Scotland said the kit would not be suitable for every patient but called for it to be made available to, as many people as possible. NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde said consideration would be given to the patient groups who were most likely to benefit from the device. Craig Nielsen, 29, from Maryhill , who works as a sales assistant at Marks and Spencer, has been paying for the kit privately for two years at a cost of 100 a month. He said: Before, I was doing do pin prick tests. I had to find a discreet area to do it at work. It shows your patterns throughout the day so I can adjust my sugar intake if I need to. Its made a big difference in the day to day care of my diabetes. When I Continue reading >>

Wearable Sensor To Replace Blood Sugar Needle Tests Available Soon On Nhs

Wearable Sensor To Replace Blood Sugar Needle Tests Available Soon On Nhs

A wearable sensor that monitors blood sugar levels will soon be available on the NHS for people living with type 1 diabetes. The Freestyle Libre patch uses flash glucose monitoring technology to ease the task of checking blood glucose levels, by replacing finger-prick testing. The £2 coin-sized device, which is placed on the back of users’ arms, sits just under the skin and stores blood sugar levels throughout the day. Users can access their readings with an accompanying scanner, which is used to “flash” the sensor. Alternatively, users can download an app to display the readings. Campaigners say the technology will revolutionise the way people with type 1 diabetes manage their condition, but they urged local NHS commissioners to make the device accessible nationwide to avoid a “postcode lottery”. “Today’s announcement is good news for people living with type 1 diabetes. But it is vital that the technology actually reaches those who want it and would benefit,” said Karen Addington, chief executive of JDRF UK, a type 1 diabetes charity. She added: “There is a postcode lottery of NHS provision of type 1 diabetes technology. This is despite such devices making daily life with type 1 diabetes much easier. Each and every person with type 1 diabetes who wants this technology, and would benefit, should receive it.” “Flash glucose monitoring can free people living with diabetes from the pain and rigour of frequent finger-prick testing, and puts them in greater control of their condition. In doing so, it has the potential to help prevent a host of devastating long-term complications. “The challenge now will be that everyone who could benefit from this technology is able to access it where they live; Diabetes UK will be looking to local decision-makers to Continue reading >>

Diabetic Theresa May Reveals Patch Which Monitors Her Blood Sugar

Diabetic Theresa May Reveals Patch Which Monitors Her Blood Sugar

Diabetic Theresa May reveals patch which monitors her blood sugar THERESA MAY was seen with a diabetes monitoring patch on her arm as she trod the red carpet at a glitzy awards show last night. The Prime Minister, who was diagnosed with diabetes five years ago, had the small patch visible upper on her upper arm while shaking hands with well-wishers outside the Pride of Britain ceremony. Mrs May uses the device to monitor her blood sugar, which warns her when she has to inject insulin. The PM rarely shows any outward sign of her medical condition, although in interviews she has always been open about her diagnosis and the way she treats her diabetes. At last nights ceremony in Mayfair, Central London, Mrs May joined rivals Jeremy Corbyn and Vince Cable on stage in a striking show of unity. The trio together paid tribute to PC Keith Palmer, who was killed by a terrorist while protecting Parliament during the Westminster Bridge terror attack in March this year. The PM said: As he stood in defence of Parliament, facing down and tackling that evil terrorist unarmed, he stood for Britain, he gave his life for Britain, he was quite simply the pride of Britain. Mrs May has previously spoken about the burden that her diabetes places on her, revealing earlier this year that she has to inject insulin up to five times a day. The monitoring patch she wore last night is a technological breakthrough which replaces the finger-prick blood tests of the past. It inserts an ultra-thin needle into the users skin and constantly monitors the level of sugar in the blood, sending a reading digitally using wireless technology. A source close to the PM told The Sun today: Shes been very open about her diabetes diagnosis. Mrs May is not the only senior politician to live with diabetes - shadow ho Continue reading >>

What Is On Theresa May’s Arm? The Prime Minister’s Clever Patch Helps Deal With Diabetes

What Is On Theresa May’s Arm? The Prime Minister’s Clever Patch Helps Deal With Diabetes

Theresa May has an awful lot on her plate at the moment, but away from her political troubles she also has to deal with diabetes. The Prime Minister was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in November 2012 and has taken daily insulin injections ever since to combat the illness. May said earlier this year: ‘I am a type one diabetic. That means when I eat, I have to inject insulin, which I do. ‘I will be injecting myself four or five times a day… You just get into a routine. You depend on that insulin and you just build that routine into your daily life. The crucial thing to me is being a diabetic doesn’t stop you from doing anything.’ Part of her way of dealing with the condition is wearing a diabetes monitoring patch, which is sometimes visible on her upper-arm, depending on what she is wearing. It is a small, white, circular patch which monitors blood sugar levels and will warn her when she has to inject insulin. The patch is an update on the finger-prick blood tests which were used previously, as it involves a tiny needle under the skin which tracks blood sugar levels and sends the results digitally to a phone or smartwatch. Diabetes Monitoring patches, such as the FreeStyle Libre are now available on prescription via the NHS. The reader is not available via prescription but can be provided free of charge via a Health Care Professional. For more information on how the product works and how to get one, click here. MORE: Homeless left with nowhere to sleep after gates are put up in doorways to deter them Continue reading >>

Theresa May's Diabetes Patch Not Available To All Patients | Daily Mail Online

Theresa May's Diabetes Patch Not Available To All Patients | Daily Mail Online

May sported the diabetes patch the size of a 2 coin on TV a few weeks ago But people like George Hakes, from Cambridge, London, denied same device Around 350,000 people in the UK have type 1 diabetes and need tests every day Theresa May sporting a diabetes patch the size of a 2 coin on TV a few weeks ago giving a speech to the Lord Mayor's Banquet Catching sight of Theresa May sporting a diabetes patch the size of a 2 coin on TV a few weeks ago, George Hakes saw it as a hopeful sign hed soon be able to get one on the NHS . The device, worn on the upper arm, continuously monitors glucose levels. Results can be read using a device which scans through clothing, reducing the need for finger-prick blood tests. For 350,000 people in the UK who have type 1 diabetes these tests must be done throughout the day, before and after eating and exercising and before driving, to monitor for dangerously low or high blood sugar levels. George, who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when he was 11, needs to inject himself with insulin around six times a day and was measuring his blood sugar up to ten times a day with a finger-prick test. Its time-consuming and painful and doesnt give you an accurate picture of your blood sugar over time, just at that moment, says George, 27, a local government officer, who lives in Cambridge. The device he spotted on Mrs May, the FreeStyle Libre, is the first of its kind. It monitors glucose in fluid between cells via sensor filaments the width of two hairs. A device roughly half the size of a mobile phone takes readings. The patches last two weeks and store up to eight hours of data, displaying it on a graph so people can see if their blood sugar is on an upward or downward trend and can adjust their insulin dose, or food intake, accordingly. Aimed at t Continue reading >>

'i Inject Five Times A Day,' Theresa May Reveals As She Talks Openly About Living With Diabetes

'i Inject Five Times A Day,' Theresa May Reveals As She Talks Openly About Living With Diabetes

'I inject five times a day,' Theresa May reveals as she talks openly about living with diabetes Theresa May answered questions in a 'Facebook Live' interview Christopher Hope ,Chief Political Correspondent Theresa May has revealed that she injects herself with insulin up to five times a day to treat her diabetes. The Prime Minister suffers from type one diabetes and urged fellow sufferers not to allow the illness to hold them back from doing what they want in life. In a 45 minute question and answer session broadcast on the internet, the Prime Minister refused to rule out axing free bus passes for pensioners, and hinted that the Conservatives will commit more cash for the National Health Service in its manifesto this week. She discussed her views on a range of issues from on fox hunting and being a victim of fake news on social media to benefits cuts and what women should wear in the workplace.... Register or log in to view this and other Politics articles. It's free and easy to do. Join regular debates with our journalists by commenting on articles Sign up to exclusive newsletters that give you the inside track on Westminster and Brexit Continue reading >>

Why Wasn’t Theresa May’s Type 1 Diabetes An Issue?

Why Wasn’t Theresa May’s Type 1 Diabetes An Issue?

Candidates love to sling mud at each other, but no one brought up May’s diabetes. Why? Charlie Bard / Shutterstock.com Commentary When Theresa May became prime minister of the United Kingdom this past week, it represented a major milestone for the Type 1 community. Whether you agree with May’s politics or not, her appointment as head of state for a major democracy is a validation that people with Type 1 are capable of anything. I should be completely happy about this. Instead, I’m a bit confused. That’s because I can’t shake the feeling that it shouldn’t have been this easy for her to win over her political party and gain the post of prime minister – and Type 1 diabetes should have been the reason. Let me clarify – I’m glad her diabetes wasn’t an issue; I’m just surprised it wasn’t. There are countless stories of people with Type 1 being barred from employment or fired from jobs, justly or unjustly, because of their diabetes. Despite this, Theresa May has ascended to arguably the most important job in the UK. Elections, even British elections, aren’t polite – they’re more like a bloodless version of Game of Thrones. Usually, if there is any hint of a medical condition that could impair a candidate’s ability to govern, it will be used against that candidate. Here are some recent examples in U.S. politics: In 1972, George McGovern was already facing an uphill battle to unseat Richard Nixon when it was revealed that his first choice for vice-president, Tom Eagleton, had been hospitalized for depression several times. Eagleton eventually was removed from the ticket, and McGovern lost. In 1984, Ronald Reagan had to fend off questions of his age as he campaigned for a second term, and he famously used those doubts as a punchline during a debate Continue reading >>

Theresa May: The First Prime Minister With A Discreet Need For Jelly Babies

Theresa May: The First Prime Minister With A Discreet Need For Jelly Babies

To say that British politics is in a state of flux is rather like saying an otter’s pocket is a little bit wet. As Theresa May walks into Downing Street as Prime Minister for the first time this week, she becomes the first to do so as someone who has type-1 diabetes and who will undoubtedly be carrying insulin, needles and blood testing equipment in whichever handbag she chooses to display to the public. Her story is an interesting one in that she was diagnosed in 2012, when she went to her GP feeling run down and with all the symptoms of a heavy cold. On questioning she admitted she had lost some weight, was feeling thirsty all the time and was passing more urine than normal. She put much of this down to her hectic schedule but a simple blood test showed that she was suffering from diabetes. Initially diagnosed as type-2 diabetes — which occurs in about 90 per cent of people with the problem — the tablet treatment she was given failed to work and she was subsequently found to have the less common type-1 diabetes, which is an autoimmune condition rather than one triggered by weight or lifestyle. She was started on insulin injections and she now injects herself four times a day while keeping a close watch on her blood sugar levels and what she is eating — not always easy when you’re a politician on the global stage. She has said that she is inspired by our greatest ever Olympian Sir Steve Redgrave, who also has type-1 diabetes and who says he ‘made the decision that diabetes was going to live with me — I wasn’t going to live with diabetes’. Both of them are excellent examples of why having the condition need be no barrier to achieving the very highest positions in life and should serve as an inspiration to younger people diagnosed with it who may be afr Continue reading >>

Diabetes Breakthrough? New Skin Patch Could End Misery Of Daily Insulin Injections

Diabetes Breakthrough? New Skin Patch Could End Misery Of Daily Insulin Injections

Scientists have created the special patch which stimulates the body’s own insulin production - and is completely pain-free. The new device could revolutionise treatment of the condition, which affects around four million people in the UK. Researchers say the game-changing invention delivers a natural substance extracted from brown algae - completely removing the need for painful and unpleasant daily injections. They claim the pain-free weekly ‘smart’ patch only releases the active ingredients when needed. It stimulates the body’s own insulin production and control blood sugar levels. The biochemically formulated treatment does this by delivering a natural substance, which is extracted from brown algae and mixed with therapeutic agents, through dissolvable microneedles which penetrate the skin. Dr Richard Leapman, scientific director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) in Maryland, US, where the patch has been developed, said: “This experimental approach could be a way to take advantage of the fact that persons with type 2 diabetes can still produce some insulin. “A weekly microneedle patch application would also be less complicated and painful than routines that require frequent blood testing.” About four million people in the UK now have diabetes, with 90 per cent suffering from Type 2. Type 1 is an auto-immune disease which cannot currently be cured. Type 2 can be avoided by making lifestyle changes such as taking more exercise and eating a healthy diet. An estimated 549,000 people have it but are unaware. The condition is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation. Wed, June 21, 2017 Living with diabetes - ten top tips to live normally with the condition. And experts Continue reading >>

Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Painful Injections For Diabetes

Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Painful Injections For Diabetes

Painful insulin injections could become a thing of the past for the millions of Americans who suffer from diabetes, thanks to a new invention from researchers at North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, who have created the first “smart insulin patch.” Though it has thus far only been tested in an animal model, the patch has been shown to detect increases in blood sugar levels and secrete doses of insulin into the bloodstream whenever needed. The patch – a thin square no bigger than a penny – is covered with more than one hundred tiny needles, each about the size of an eyelash. These “microneedles” are packed with microscopic storage units for insulin and glucose-sensing enzymes that rapidly release their cargo when blood sugar levels get too high. The study found that the new, painless patch could lower blood glucose in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes for up to nine hours. More pre-clinical tests and subsequent clinical trials in humans will be required before the patch can be administered to patients, but the approach shows great promise. A paper describing the work, “Microneedle-array patches loaded with hypoxia-sensitive vesicles provide fast glucose-responsive insulin delivery,” is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “We have designed a patch for diabetes that works fast, is easy to use, and is made from nontoxic, biocompatible materials,” said co-senior author Zhen Gu, PhD, a professor in the Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering at NC State and UNC-Chapel Hill. Gu also holds appointments in the UNC School of Medicine, the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, and the UNC Diabetes Care Center. “The whole system can be personalized to account for a diabetic’s weight a Continue reading >>

Diabetic Theresa May Reveals Patch Which Monitors Her Blood Sugar As She Walks The Red Carpet At Awards Ceremony

Diabetic Theresa May Reveals Patch Which Monitors Her Blood Sugar As She Walks The Red Carpet At Awards Ceremony

THERESA MAY was seen with a diabetes monitoring patch on her arm as she trod the red carpet at a glitzy awards show last night. The Prime Minister, who was diagnosed with diabetes five years ago, had the small patch visible upper on her upper arm while shaking hands with well-wishers outside the Pride of Britain ceremony. PA Mrs May uses the device to monitor her blood sugar, which warns her when she has to inject insulin. The PM rarely shows any outward sign of her medical condition, although in interviews she has always been open about her diagnosis and the way she treats her diabetes. At last night’s ceremony in Mayfair, Central London, Mrs May joined rivals Jeremy Corbyn and Vince Cable on stage in a striking show of unity. The trio together paid tribute to PC Keith Palmer, who was killed by a terrorist while protecting Parliament during the Westminster Bridge terror attack in March this year. Getty - Contributor PA The PM said: “As he stood in defence of Parliament, facing down and tackling that evil terrorist unarmed, he stood for Britain, he gave his life for Britain, he was quite simply the pride of Britain.” Mrs May has previously spoken about the burden that her diabetes places on her, revealing earlier this year that she has to inject insulin up to five times a day. The monitoring patch she wore last night is a technological breakthrough which replaces the finger-prick blood tests of the past. Getty - Pool PA:Press Association It inserts an ultra-thin needle into the user’s skin and constantly monitors the level of sugar in the blood, sending a reading digitally using wireless technology. A source close to the PM told The Sun today: “She’s been very open about her diabetes diagnosis.” Mrs May is not the only senior politician to live with diabet Continue reading >>

Theresa May:

Theresa May: "type 1 Doesn't Change What You Can Do"

Despite showing the classic diabetes symptoms, Home Secretary Theresa May put them down to her hectic schedule during the London 2012 Games. Now diagnosed with Type 1, she reveals how she hasn’t let the condition affect her demanding role.When she came down with a heavy cold in November 2012, Home Secretary Theresa May’s first thought was that she should get it checked out by her GP. Her husband had just had a similar cold that had developed into bronchitis, so it made sense for her to get it looked at before the same thing happened to her. But she had no idea that this was a visit to the GP that would change her life forever. While she was there, she mentioned to her GP that she had recently lost a lot of weight, though she hadn’t thought much about it and had put it down to “dashing about” in her role as Home Secretary. But the GP decided to do a blood test anyway. Suddenly, she was being told that she had diabetes. The news came as a shock, though looking back she realises she had some of theclassic symptoms. As well as the weight loss, she was drinking more water than usual and making more frequent trips to the bathroom. But, it wasn’t something she thought about much at the time. “That summer was the Olympics, so life was in a different order,” she says. “There was a lot more going on, so I didn’t really notice.” A change in diagnosis She was diagnosed withType 2diabetes, but, when the medication didn’t work she went for further tests and, eventually, the news came back that she hadType 1. “My very first reaction was that it’s impossible because at my age you don’t get it,” she says, reflecting the popular misconception that only younger people get diagnosed with Type 1. In fact, one in five people diagnosed with Type 1 are over 40 w Continue reading >>

Theresa May’s New Accessory: A Glucose Monitor

Theresa May’s New Accessory: A Glucose Monitor

Theresa May is no stranger to flamboyant accessories but a discreet addition to her outfit at the Lord Mayor’s Banquet in London on Monday has a more practical purpose. A small white circle about the size of a £2 coin that was visible on her upper arm monitors glucose levels in her body and sends the data to a reader or smartphone app. Mrs May was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2012. Currently, most people with diabetes prick their fingers several times a day to check glucose levels in order to know when and how much insulin to inject. Sensors like that used by Mrs May can instead be worn on the back of the upper arm for up to 14 days. A small… Continue reading >>

Diabetes Technology That Would Change This Schoolgirl's Life Has Been Refused On The Nhs

Diabetes Technology That Would Change This Schoolgirl's Life Has Been Refused On The Nhs

Diabetes technology that would change this schoolgirl's life has been refused on the NHS St Ives School pupil Robin Fulker has Type 1 diabetes so severe it's led to an eating disorder and problems with self-harm Could not subscribe, try again laterInvalid Email A schoolgirl whose diabetes is so severe it has led to an eating disorder and problems with self-harm has made an emotional plea to the NHS Kernow Clinical Commissioning Group to fund a device that will change her life forever. St Ives School pupil Robin Fulker, 14, lives in Lelant Downs and has Type 1 diabetes. Robin has poor hypo awareness which means she rarely recognises the symptoms of an oncoming episode of hypo-glycaemia or low blood sugars. As a result of the absence of warning signs, before Robin knows anything is happening she is unable to look after herself, often passing out and sometimes resulting in a temporary loss of vision and speech. 14-year-old Robin Fulker has Type 1 Diabetes and is hoping for funding for new technology that could change her life Robin said: This can be very serious if I am not with someone who knows how to care for me, as in these situations I cannot look after myself. This can happen as often as several times a day, and the resulting recovery isnt very nice either as I can be left feeling very confused, disorientated, weak and emotional. It also disrupts class when it happens at school and is stressful for the teachers too. As you can imagine, this has a profound effect on my day-to-day life as I have very little freedom or independence. I always have to be with someone who knows how to look after me and is willing to be responsible for my welfare, with the obvious exception of my parents, this is a serious obligation and there is understandably not a long list of volunteer Continue reading >>

Revolutionary Skin Patch Helps Ten-year-old With Type 1 Diabetes

Revolutionary Skin Patch Helps Ten-year-old With Type 1 Diabetes

Singing a solo on stage under the spotlights, Keira Oliver looks like a star in the making. But the ten-year-old is able to perform only thanks to a revolutionary skin patch on her arm which constantly monitors her blood sugar levels. The patch a sensor the size of a £2 coin means Keira can take part in two-hour performances without worrying about falling ill from type 1 diabetes. READ:Cancer and your child: The power of positivity She has even wowed audiences at the Royal Albert Hall. In the autoimmune condition, which the Prime Minister Theresa May also has, the pancreas stops producing insulin, meaning glucose in the blood cannot be turned into energy. Sufferers monitor their levels and adjust their insulin intake. Keira normally has to prick her finger up to 15 times a day to check her blood sugar levels but is terrified of needles. With the FreeStyle Libre patch, she can find out her levels by simply scanning the sensor using a smartphone-sized device. The technology has allowed her to perform in her first full-length production on a London stage without having to be taken off for treatment. Her mother Sharon, 42, said the patch is helping Keira fulfil her dream of becoming a stage star. ‘She just loves to perform,’ she said. ‘But before she had the patch I had to sit in the wings and keep dragging her off to do fingerprick tests.’ Keira, from Ashford, Kent, was ecstatic to be picked for a solo at her stage school Theatretrain’s How To Make A Hero! show at the Royal Albert Hall in September. Her mother said: ‘She had the scanner hidden in a pocket of her costume and she was able to quickly and discreetly scan.’ Keira calls the device her ‘Bleepy’ after the sound it makes and said it is ‘really cool’. She added: ‘It would be really hard to g Continue reading >>

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