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Visiting 10 Downing Street And Being Inspired To Not Let Type 1 Diabetes Hold Me Back

Visiting 10 Downing Street And Being Inspired To Not Let Type 1 Diabetes Hold Me Back

Last Friday I visited 10 Downing Street with my family and proudly stood in front of the famous door with my FreeStyle Libre on my arm and insulin pump on my back, being inspired to not let type 1 diabetes hold me back. We were invited personally by Prime Minister Theresa May when I chatted to her about her type 1 diabetes and how she managed the condition at JDRF’s 30 years of progress event last year. Arriving at Downing Street with my JDRF banner and standing outside the front door where Theresa May resides was such a surreal experience. When you get diagnosed with type 1 you’re often told that the condition doesn’t stop you doing anything (apart from being in the army or being an astronaut) but sometimes it’s hard to actually believe this, especially when the person is normally a health care professional who usually doesn’t live with diabetes. However standing there I felt a sense of pride. Whether you support the Conservative Party, the Labour Party or any other, Theresa May shows us that type 1 diabetes has not held her back. For me this shows her as a positive role model, showing all of us that we can do whatever we want and although diabetes may make it a little more tricky, or we have to take a different path, we can achieve our dreams. I think being a Prime Minister is one heck of a dream! Being able to have this opportunity with my family was such a special experience. My Mum, Dad and sister, who have been there for me since day one helping carb count, attending hospital appointments and occasionally providing a shoulder to cry on were now stood beside me once again helping to spread the word about type 1 diabetes. Inside Downing Street we were greeted by our tour guide Michael who explained to us the history behind Number 10. Walking through the ma Continue reading >>

What Is On Theresa May’s Arm? The Prime Minister’s Clever Patch Helps Deal With Diabetes

What Is On Theresa May’s Arm? The Prime Minister’s Clever Patch Helps Deal With Diabetes

Theresa May has an awful lot on her plate at the moment, but away from her political troubles she also has to deal with diabetes. The Prime Minister was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in November 2012 and has taken daily insulin injections ever since to combat the illness. May said earlier this year: ‘I am a type one diabetic. That means when I eat, I have to inject insulin, which I do. ‘I will be injecting myself four or five times a day… You just get into a routine. You depend on that insulin and you just build that routine into your daily life. The crucial thing to me is being a diabetic doesn’t stop you from doing anything.’ Part of her way of dealing with the condition is wearing a diabetes monitoring patch, which is sometimes visible on her upper-arm, depending on what she is wearing. It is a small, white, circular patch which monitors blood sugar levels and will warn her when she has to inject insulin. The patch is an update on the finger-prick blood tests which were used previously, as it involves a tiny needle under the skin which tracks blood sugar levels and sends the results digitally to a phone or smartwatch. Diabetes Monitoring patches, such as the FreeStyle Libre are now available on prescription via the NHS. The reader is not available via prescription but can be provided free of charge via a Health Care Professional. For more information on how the product works and how to get one, click here. MORE: Homeless left with nowhere to sleep after gates are put up in doorways to deter them Continue reading >>

Why Theresa May Should Be Prime Minister

Why Theresa May Should Be Prime Minister

Theresa May for Prime Minister Look, I know this is not going to be a popular post with a lot of my friends. She voted remain, we (allegedly) wanted to leave. You all seem to hate her, declaring her anti-feminist, a homophobe, and a racist. Ok I’m exaggerating, but largely the Facebook posts of my online contacts are not indicating joy at her appointment. I’m not going to comment on her politics. I know very little of them, I’ve paid her no attention in the past. Does that mean I should be disqualified from my vote in the next election? Probably, though I’ll make every effort to gen up between now and then, I promise. I’m not going to bandy around my opinions when they’re barely formed, and I’m certainly not going to agree with anyone else’s just because it seems to be the thing to do. So, why do I want Theresa May for Prime Minister? She has type 1 diabetes. I know. How shallow of me. How dare I wish to put the country’s future in the hands of a person simply based on her medical history? It’s true, I’m not going to deny it. She might be bloody awful, but who cares? Everyone else in the last century has been bloody awful too, if you listen to casual (and not so casual) opinion. I bet a ton of people hated Winston Churchill too. Why then, is it relevant to me that she’s a diabetic? Because every bit of clout brought to the diabetes community raises its profile. True, she may never mention it; she may completely duff up the NHS and never pay diabetes any attention; she might do us all a disfavour by making it look like diabetes is not really a thing, keeping it invisible while she gets on with the job. Like most diabetics I know. But she’ll be the most high profile person in the UK to have type 1 diabetes, and that counts. So what else is good a Continue reading >>

British Home Secretary, Theresa May, Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

British Home Secretary, Theresa May, Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

British Home Secretary, Theresa May, has revealed her recent diagnosis with type 1 diabetes. According to a BBC report doctors initially thought Mrs May had type 2 diabetes, but two months ago it was revealed to be type 1 diabetes. In an exclusive interview with the Daily Mail she admitted that it was “It was a real shock” and that although it took her a while to come to terms with the diagnosis she is determined to continue with her gruelling routine as Home Secretary. In the interview May told the Mail that “It started last November. I’d had a bad cold and cough for quite a few weeks. I went to my GP and she did a blood test which showed I’d got a very high sugar level – that’s what revealed the diabetes.” Although she had all of the classic symptoms – weight loss, thirst and extreme tiredness, initially doctors thought the 56-year-old politician was suffering from type 2 diabetes. For months the British media speculated that Home Secretary May’s weight loss was linked to a potential Conservative Party leadership bid, but she said it was all a due to her illness and that she had no plans regarding Conservative Party leadership. When asked about her ability to remain in office while dealing with type 1 diabetes May said: “It doesn’t and will not affect my ability to do my work. I’m a little more careful about what I eat and there’s obviously the injections, but this is something millions of people have. I’m OK with needles, fortunately.” Continue reading >>

Channel 4 News Is On Facebook.

Channel 4 News Is On Facebook.

"I think it's good because she is saying your life is not limited." Theresa May has helped reassure some of the 30,000 children living with type 1 diabetes in the UK that their future is bright. Continue reading >>

'you Can Still Do What You Want To': Theresa May On How Diabetes Has Changed Her Life

'you Can Still Do What You Want To': Theresa May On How Diabetes Has Changed Her Life

When she came down with a heavy cold in November 2012, former Home Secretary and Prime Minister Theresa May’s first thought was that she should get it checked out by her GP. Her husband had just had a similar cold that had developed into bronchitis, so it made sense for her to get it looked at before the same thing happened to her. But she had no idea that this was a visit to the GP that would change her life forever. While she was there, she mentioned to her GP that she had recently lost a lot of weight, though she hadn’t thought much about it and had put it down to 'dashing about' in her role as Home Secretary. But the GP decided to do a blood test anyway. Suddenly, she was being told that she had diabetes. The news came as a shock, though looking back she realises she had some of the classic symptoms. As well as the weight loss, she was drinking more water than usual and making more frequent trips to the bathroom. But, it wasn’t something she thought about much at the time. “That summer was the Olympics, so life was in a different order,” she says. “There was a lot more going on, so I didn’t really notice.” She was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, but, when the medication didn’t work she went for further tests and, eventually, the news came back that she had Type 1. The more people can see that people with diabetes can lead a normal life doing the sort of things that other people do, the easier it is for those who are diagnosed with it to deal with it “My very first reaction was that it’s impossible because at my age you don’t get it,” she says, reflecting the popular misconception that only younger people get diagnosed with Type 1. In fact, one in five people diagnosed with Type 1 are over 40 when they develop it. “But, then my reaction wa Continue reading >>

You Can Do It…

You Can Do It…

“With the Freestyle Libre the blindfold disappears. ” I have been a type 1 diabetic for 39 years and whilst there have been many changes and technology advantages I have used, nothing at all compares to the confidence I have taken from my Freestyle Libre – to say this is life changing is an understatement. Not only can I now understand better than ever how my levels react to stress, food, time of day etc. I also have a new talking point which has so far seen me waxing lyrical and even removing clothing in shops to show off my sensor as I describe the system to people. I have taken to Freestyle Libre advocacy whenever I meet someone I find out is a diabetic or even to people who ask what I am doing when scanning who know a diabetic. On holiday last summer I watched as the hot weather affected my levels and sometimes at an amazing rate, the Freestyle libre meant I was able to take action before the dive south thus avoiding the hypos – fantastic, I read somewhere where having diabetes is like walking a tight rope blindfold and occaisionally lifting the blind (finger stick), with the Freestyle Libre the blindfold disappears. Those who know me have have commented on the change in confidence and that my diabetes is no longer quite at the forefront – diabetes absolutely doesn’t define me but even less so using this tool. All we need now is someone in the Government (perhaps Theresa May should be given one to try) to recognize how much of a saving this can make to the NHS, a diabetic friend of mine using Freestyle Libre has said how much more controlled he is now and how the number of emergency callouts has gone to zero for him as he has limited diabetic signals. Thank you Abbott for this change to my life Continue reading >>

Diabetic Theresa May Reveals Patch Which Monitors Her Blood Sugar As She Walks The Red Carpet At Awards Ceremony

Diabetic Theresa May Reveals Patch Which Monitors Her Blood Sugar As She Walks The Red Carpet At Awards Ceremony

THERESA MAY was seen with a diabetes monitoring patch on her arm as she trod the red carpet at a glitzy awards show last night. The Prime Minister, who was diagnosed with diabetes five years ago, had the small patch visible upper on her upper arm while shaking hands with well-wishers outside the Pride of Britain ceremony. PA Mrs May uses the device to monitor her blood sugar, which warns her when she has to inject insulin. The PM rarely shows any outward sign of her medical condition, although in interviews she has always been open about her diagnosis and the way she treats her diabetes. At last night’s ceremony in Mayfair, Central London, Mrs May joined rivals Jeremy Corbyn and Vince Cable on stage in a striking show of unity. The trio together paid tribute to PC Keith Palmer, who was killed by a terrorist while protecting Parliament during the Westminster Bridge terror attack in March this year. Getty - Contributor PA The PM said: “As he stood in defence of Parliament, facing down and tackling that evil terrorist unarmed, he stood for Britain, he gave his life for Britain, he was quite simply the pride of Britain.” Mrs May has previously spoken about the burden that her diabetes places on her, revealing earlier this year that she has to inject insulin up to five times a day. The monitoring patch she wore last night is a technological breakthrough which replaces the finger-prick blood tests of the past. Getty - Pool PA:Press Association It inserts an ultra-thin needle into the user’s skin and constantly monitors the level of sugar in the blood, sending a reading digitally using wireless technology. A source close to the PM told The Sun today: “She’s been very open about her diabetes diagnosis.” Mrs May is not the only senior politician to live with diabet Continue reading >>

‘my Mum Was Treated With Dignity’: Nhs Care Amid The Winter Crisis

‘my Mum Was Treated With Dignity’: Nhs Care Amid The Winter Crisis

Despite the pressure on immense health services, staff continue to work tirelessly. Here are a selection of your stories Hospitals are experiencing immense pressure on services this winter. On Wednesday, at least 21 trusts – many responsible for multiple hospitals – were on black alert, known as opel 4. This happens when trusts can no longer guarantee patient safety and provide their full range of services. Despite the problems that are hitting services across the country, doctors continue to work tirelessly to do incredible jobs. When we asked our readers for experiences, many of you responded to praise NHS workers who continued to do their best despite difficulties. Here are a selection. Continue reading… This post was syndicated from Health | The Guardian. Click here to read the full text on the original website. Continue reading >>

Theresa May’s New Accessory: A Glucose Monitor

Theresa May’s New Accessory: A Glucose Monitor

Theresa May is no stranger to flamboyant accessories but a discreet addition to her outfit at the Lord Mayor’s Banquet in London on Monday has a more practical purpose. A small white circle about the size of a £2 coin that was visible on her upper arm monitors glucose levels in her body and sends the data to a reader or smartphone app. Mrs May was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2012. Currently, most people with diabetes prick their fingers several times a day to check glucose levels in order to know when and how much insulin to inject. Sensors like that used by Mrs May can instead be worn on the back of the upper arm for up to 14 days. A small… Continue reading >>

Meeting The Prime Minister And Hrh The Duchess Of Cornwall – Jdrf 30 Years Of Progress Event

Meeting The Prime Minister And Hrh The Duchess Of Cornwall – Jdrf 30 Years Of Progress Event

‘Camilla praises Theresa May for ‘boosting’ charity by talking about her life with diabetes’ – (something we can all be grateful for) ‘As President, it has been a privilege to meet those who live every day with type 1 diabetes, as well as their all-important families who do so much to support them. They are at the heart of everything that this charity is doing. And although this is a time to look back over the many achievements of the last thirty years, I know that everyone at JDRF is looking forward in the hope that a cure for this devastating disease will be found in the not too distant future.’ – HRH The Duchess of Cornwall. Meeting the Prime Minister Theresa May and Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Cornwall last Wednesday night was an opportunity I never dreamed of having. Arriving at the Guildhall in London we were met by Kris from JDRF who told my parents and myself that in 10 minutes time id be speaking to The Prime Minister Theresa May. Fair to say I was very nervous! However after shaking her hand and being told to address her informally as Theresa, my nerves disappeared. We chatted about our diagnosis’s, and how Theresa managed her diabetes through her hectic schedule. We also spoke about my blog and how raising awareness for Type 1 was so important. I showed Theresa that I wore my insulin pump on one arm and my Freestyle Libre on the other and that i didn’t mind wearing my devices so publicly because it raises awareness. Theresa told me that she was just about to start using the Libre, so I couldn’t help giving her a tip! It was such a fantastic experience being able to talk to such a lovely and influential person about a disease we both face day in and day out. I also found out Theresa did a geography degree. We already have two simila Continue reading >>

Doncaster Diabetes Sufferer Meets Prime Minster

Doncaster Diabetes Sufferer Meets Prime Minster

A young Doncaster woman who has type 1 diabetes has been to Downing Street to raise awareness of her condition. Lydia Parkhurst, aged 20, visited London after a personal invitation from Prime Minister Theresa May, who also lives with the autoimmune condition. Lydia said: “I visited 10 Downing Street with my family and proudly stood in front of the famous door with my FreeStyle Libre on my arm and insulin pump on my back, being inspired to not let type 1 diabetes hold me back. “We were invited personally by Prime Minister Theresa May when I chatted to her about her diabetes and how she managed the condition.” Lydia first met the Prime Minister at an event last year at an event held by JDRF, which is the leading global organization which is funding type 1 diabetes research. Lydia, who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in August 2009 at the age of 12, added: “Arriving at Downing Street with my JDRF banner and standing outside the front door where Theresa May resides was such a surreal experience. “When you get diagnosed with type 1 you’re often told that the condition doesn’t stop you doing anything, (apart from being in the army or being an astronaut, but sometimes it’s hard to actually believe this, especially when the person is normally a health care professional who usually doesn’t live with diabetes. “However standing there I felt a sense of pride. Whether you support the Conservative Party, the Labour Party or any other, Theresa May shows us that type 1 diabetes has not held her back.” She added that she was proud to share the experience with her family. She said: “Being able to have this opportunity with my family was such a special experience. My Mum, Dad and sister, who have been there for me since day one helping carb count, attending hos Continue reading >>

Carlisle Mp Backs Diabetes Campaign Launched By Copeland Mp Jamie Reed

Carlisle Mp Backs Diabetes Campaign Launched By Copeland Mp Jamie Reed

Carlisle's MP has backed calls to make vital glucose monitors free to all adults and children living with Type 1 diabetes. Conservative John Stevenson is supporting the campaign launched by fellow Cumbrian MP Jamie Reed. The Labour politican is calling for these monitors to be made available on the NHS as a right to all those living with the condition. There are two types of diabetes, Type 1 and Type 2. The first is an autoimmune condition which causes the body to destroy its own insulin-producing cells. Unlike Type 2 diabetes, it is not triggered by lifestyle factors such as poor diet and lack of exercise. It means those diagnosed with the condition, many of them during childhood, can not prevent it and there is no cure. Those living with Type 1 diabetes rely on daily insulin injections and therefore need monitors - Continuous Glucose Monitors (CGMs) and Flash Glucose Meters - to check their levels regularly. The two MPs argue these should be available on the NHS as they would prevent severe hypos - episodes where insulin levels drop to severe lows. Mr Stevenson argued this would actually save the health service money, by preventing patients having to be rushed to hospital. Access to these monitors is currently limited on the NHS. The Carlisle MP has demonstrated his support by signing Mr Reed's petition, which has gathered more than 23,000 signatures to date. It aims to reach 100,000 signatures before January 5, to be considered for a debate in Parliament. He said this important technology should be accessible to everyone living with Type 1 diabetes - not only those with the resources to afford it. “It is clear to me that Continuous Blood Glucose Monitors and Flash Glucose Meters should be made available on the NHS. That’s why I have supported the petition calling Continue reading >>

Pioneering Technology Improves The Lives Of Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Pioneering Technology Improves The Lives Of Children With Type 1 Diabetes

(3) View gallery THE family of a girl with type 1 diabetes has shared the pioneering technology that they hope will transform her life and that of others with the condition. Lucy White, 10, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was just four after her parents noticed her losing weight and experiencing mood swings. The lesser known form of diabetes affects 29,000 children in the UK. Her father Robin White, said: “We went to the doctor and was sent straight away to the hospital. Had we not she could have fallen into a diabetic coma. There is more coverage about type 2 diabetes but for type 1 we are still unsure what triggers it.” Doctors believe a virus Lucy contracted while suffering from tonsillitis caused her pancreas, which generates insulin, to start shutting down and led to the diabetes diagnosis. Her life changed overnight as the family, who live in Maurice Way, Marlborough, began checking her blood sugar levels 15 times a day. Theresa May, Halle Berry and pop star Nick Jonas all have type one diabetes. The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation researches into the autoimmune disease and through their pioneering research, Lucy now uses a device which monitors sugar levels through her skin. The Freestyle Libre reduces Lucy’s need to prick her finger by 90 per cent and has given the St Francis schoolgirl her independence back. Mr White, a sales and marketing director, said: “She has lost some feeling in her fingers because of taking blood readings. “Now she can scan her own finger and decide herself what to do. For children this can be quite transformational.We tell her that diabetes will not stop her from achieving anything.” Further technology includes a pump system that injects insulin directly into the pancreas called an Omnipod. Mr White hopes f Continue reading >>

Open Letter To Theresa May: Leading With Type 1 Diabetes

Open Letter To Theresa May: Leading With Type 1 Diabetes

Dear Theresa May, Congratulations on your new role as Prime Minister. I am writing to you as we have one thing in common, type 1 diabetes. Being insulin dependent requires constant blood glucose monitoring and taking insulin injections. The greater challenge ahead is that you will have to manage your health condition under immense pressure. Some reports surfaced this week that you were questioned about your ability of becoming a PM with Diabetes Mellitus Type 1. In my opinion, the MP who imposed such a question most definitely does not understand our health condition. Our determination of taking the responsibility of our health, makes us a stronger and more disciplined person. This condition does not restrict us from performing a job, quite the opposite. We are more dedicated because we have to make extra effort. As a fellow T1D of 20 years, I think that your new priority is not only about Great Britain but also your health. Hence, I have put together a list of my top 10 tips of managing our common condition: No. 1. Informing people you have type 1 diabetes People who have good control of T1D have no obvious physical alterations. Explaining your health condition to others, can help them to understand you better. No. 2. Regular blood glucose monitoring This is the key to manage T1D. By testing your blood glucose frequently, you will be able to know if you are taking the right amount of insulin or eating well. No. 3. Hypoglycemia Tell people around you if you have hypoglycemia immediately and ask them to give you at least 15 minute recovery time after drinking some juice. Symptoms of Hypoglycemia include confusion and unable to make decisions. As you will be making some of the most important decisions for the GB nation, please carry a juice with you at all times. No. 4. H Continue reading >>

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