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The Women Who Shaped Politics

The Women Who Shaped Politics

Sophy Ridge, presenter for Sky News, has uncovered the extraordinary stories of the women who have shaped British politics. Never has the role of women in the political world ever been more on the news agenda, and Sophy has interviewed current and former politicians including among others, Nicola Sturgeon, Ruth Davidson, Betty Boothroyd gain exclusive insight into the role women play in politics at the highest level. The book also includes Theresa May's first at-length interview about her journey to becoming Prime Minister. These interviews have revealed the shocking truth about the sexism that is rife among the House of Commons both in the past and today, with sometimes astonishing, and sometimes amusing anecdotes revealing how women in Westminster have worked to counter the gender bias. Sophy provides gripping insight into historical and contemporary stories which will fascinate not just those interested in politics but those who want to know more about women's vital role in democracy. From royalty to writers and from class warriors to suffragettes, Sophy tells the story of those who put their lives on the line for equal rights, and those who were the first to set foot inside the chambers of power, bringing together stories that you may think you know, and stories that have recently been discovered to reveal the truth about what it is to be a woman in Westminster. This book is a celebration of the differing ways that women have shaped the political landscape. The book also, importantly, sheds light on the challenges faced by women in government today, telling us the ways that women working in politics battle the sexism that confront them on a daily basis. More »

Theresa May Handled Great British Bake Off Row Very Diplomatically With A Scone Recipe

Theresa May Handled Great British Bake Off Row Very Diplomatically With A Scone Recipe

When it comes to the Great British Bake Off, everyone just needs to take a deep breath and chill out – Theresa May’s got this. If you’re still bruised by the show’s big move to Channel 4, May has a scone recipe to help us cope with the change. The Prime Minister, who admitted to being a Great British Bake Off fan, said viewers will continue to enjoy the show when it shifts channels – as well as the rival show rumoured for the BBC. ‘If we have two Bake Offs in the future then people are going to enjoy them both,’ she told the Sunday Times. But a Victoria sponge baking in the oven or a fully assembled gingerbread house is probably a rare site at Number 10 due to May’s type 1 diabetes. ‘Because I’m diabetic I tend not to bake these days. So I can watch and admire the amazing showpieces that they produce,’ she added. Fans reacted with anger when it was revealed the BBC One show had been sold to Channel 4 – taking Paul Hollywood with it. People were further distressed to hear Mary Berry and presenters Mel Giedroyc and Sue Perkins would not be following the show to its new home. But there are rumours that the BBC is already discussing a rival show with the three devotees. And we have May’s scone recipe to ease the pain (it’s actually her mother’s) – why not give it a try. 80oz self-raising flour 1.5oz butter or margarine 1oz caster sugar Milk to bind Rub fat into flour. When mixture resembles breadcrumbs, stir in sugar. Bind with milk to a dough. Roll out and cut into preferred shape (May uses a medium pastry cutter). Place on a greased baking sheet and cook in a very hot oven for around 8 minutes. Keep an eye on them – they are ready when the top begins to colour. Continue reading >>

Kevin Mckenna: Leaked Memo From Bbc Hq — How To Treat Theresa May And Jeremy Corbyn

Kevin Mckenna: Leaked Memo From Bbc Hq — How To Treat Theresa May And Jeremy Corbyn

A POTENTIALLY pure dynamite document has fallen into my hands marked Top Secret which appears to have been issued by the BBC top brass in London. I have handed it over to a security contact of mine who, along with 10,000 other people who claim to have been former members of Britain’s Special Forces, was present at the Iranian Embassy siege in 1979. This chap is expert at both sniffing out forgeries as well as creating them for which latter purpose he has been on the Daily Telegraph’s payroll for decades. In this era of fake news you can never be too careful about so-called leaked documents. Nevertheless I here reprint it in full so that you can make up your own minds. The document is simply headed: “Guidelines for senior political reporting staff in ensuring that we get the right result on June 8”. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ MY dear chaps (and chapettes), as you all know the BBC’s Editorial Guidelines oblige us all (yawn): “To be fair to all — fair to those our output is about, fair to contributors, and fair to our audiences.” BBC content should be based on respect, openness and straight dealing. We also have an obligation under the Ofcom Broadcasting Code to “avoid unjust or unfair treatment of individuals or organisations in programmes”. Now listen here chaps; we’re all mature adults and obviously there is a certain degree of elasticity in the above statement. If there wasn’t then we’d all be reduced to unthinking automatons reading off an autocue script approved by the powers that be. And while that’s okay for our royal correspondents it’s jolly well not on for we who are in the business of preparing the news with a little bit of an edge. Quite how anyone could r Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Misdiagnosed In Many Adults

Type 1 Diabetes Misdiagnosed In Many Adults

Many might think type 1 diabetes is a "disease of childhood", but research, published in the Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, has found it has similar prevalence in adults. More than 40% of Britons diagnosed with the condition are over 30. Many of these are initially diagnosed with type 2, and receiving the wrong treatment can be life-threatening. Charity Diabetes UK is calling for doctors not to rule out the possibility a patient over 30 might have type 1. 'Banging my head against a wall' Helen Philibin, a mother of two from Torquay, who was 40, slim and active when she was diagnosed. She said: "Having the wrong diagnosis was extremely frustrating. I just knew it wasn't right. "I'm always running around with my two young kids and I walk the dog every day." She visited her GP complaining of extreme thirst. A blood test strongly indicated she had diabetes. Her doctor diagnosed her with type 2 and prescribed metformin, the most commonly-used drug for the condition. She was also sent on a course to learn about lifestyle factors including a low-sugar diet. "All the other people on the course were in their mid-60s and overweight. I was 5ft 10in and nine-and-a-half stone. I stood out like a sore thumb," said Helen. "When I raised it with nurses or my GP, I was told that type 1 diabetes is always diagnosed in childhood, so I had to be type 2. I felt like I was banging my head against a wall." Helen changed her diet to get better blood sugar control - but she began vomiting up to four times a week. "It was horrible," she said. "Even a single piece of toast would send my blood sugar levels through the roof and I was losing even more weight." Helen's story isn't unique. According to the new report, misdiagnosis may be a surprisingly common occurrence in the UK. The team analysed Continue reading >>

Theresa May: The First Prime Minister With A Discreet Need For Jelly Babies

Theresa May: The First Prime Minister With A Discreet Need For Jelly Babies

To say that British politics is in a state of flux is rather like saying an otter’s pocket is a little bit wet. As Theresa May walks into Downing Street as Prime Minister for the first time this week, she becomes the first to do so as someone who has type-1 diabetes and who will undoubtedly be carrying insulin, needles and blood testing equipment in whichever handbag she chooses to display to the public. Her story is an interesting one in that she was diagnosed in 2012, when she went to her GP feeling run down and with all the symptoms of a heavy cold. On questioning she admitted she had lost some weight, was feeling thirsty all the time and was passing more urine than normal. She put much of this down to her hectic schedule but a simple blood test showed that she was suffering from diabetes. Initially diagnosed as type-2 diabetes — which occurs in about 90 per cent of people with the problem — the tablet treatment she was given failed to work and she was subsequently found to have the less common type-1 diabetes, which is an autoimmune condition rather than one triggered by weight or lifestyle. She was started on insulin injections and she now injects herself four times a day while keeping a close watch on her blood sugar levels and what she is eating — not always easy when you’re a politician on the global stage. She has said that she is inspired by our greatest ever Olympian Sir Steve Redgrave, who also has type-1 diabetes and who says he ‘made the decision that diabetes was going to live with me — I wasn’t going to live with diabetes’. Both of them are excellent examples of why having the condition need be no barrier to achieving the very highest positions in life and should serve as an inspiration to younger people diagnosed with it who may be afr Continue reading >>

The Duchess Of Cornwall And Prime Minister Join Jdrf To Mark 30 Years Of Type 1 Diabetes Research Progress

The Duchess Of Cornwall And Prime Minister Join Jdrf To Mark 30 Years Of Type 1 Diabetes Research Progress

Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Cornwall and the Prime Minister Theresa May last night joined scientists, supporters and volunteers from JDRF to highlight life-changing new treatments and to support the ongoing mission to find the cure. The Duchess of Cornwall, the UK President of JDRF, spoke at Guildhall, in the heart of the City of London, of her support of the charity. The Duchess expressed her great pleasure of meeting UK-based scientists, funded by JDRF, and hearing about their exciting work. The occasion formed part of JDRF’s events to mark the 30 year anniversary of its UK origins and to thank every one of its supporters across the country. The event was hosted by the Lord Mayor of the City of London, Lord Mountevans, at Guildhall in the City of London. The Lord Mayor chose JDRF as a beneficiary charity of this year’s Lord Mayor’s Appeal. The Duchess of Cornwall and Mrs May joined JDRF patrons and supporters including BBC Radio 4 presenter Justin Webb. “I know that everyone at JDRF is looking forward in the hope that a cure for this devastating disease will be found in the not too distant future.” Addressing the assembled guests, The Duchess of Cornwall said in a speech: “I’m hugely encouraged by the news that research on a global scale has driven forward development of an artificial pancreas, with researchers in the UK now testing it in adults and children. “I know that everyone at JDRF is looking forward in the hope that a cure for this devastating disease will be found in the not too distant future.” "The accomplishments of the past 30 years reinvigorate us to work even harder" Karen Addington, Chief Executive of JDRF in the UK, paid tribute to researchers and healthcare professionals involved with research and treatment across the UK, as w Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day: How To Spot The Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

World Diabetes Day: How To Spot The Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

14 November is World Diabetes Day. Comprising hundreds of campaigns, activities, screenings, lectures and meetings, the aim of World Diabetes Day is to spread information about diabetes and raise awareness of the condition. The date also marks the birthday of the man who co-discovered insulin in 1922, Frederick Banting, who . While the 10% of those with Type 1 diabetes are usually diagnosed from an early age, the 90% of sufferers with Type 2 can develop the disease at any age. Shadow Home secretary Diane Abbott, Oscar winning actor Tom Hanks and tennis great Billie Jean-King all suffer from Type 2, while Prime Minister Theresa May is a Type 1 diabetic. May has been a vocal supporter of World Diabetes Day tweeting: “When I was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes, it came as a shock. But to all of you with diabetes, on World Diabetes Day, I want to say this: Type 1 Diabetes should not stop you from fulfilling your ambitions.” Here’s what you need to know about Type 2 and how to spot the symptoms: What is Type 2 diabetes? Diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not produce sufficient insulin to control the amount of glucose, or sugar, in the blood. Patients with Type 1 diabetes, which accounts for ten per cent of cases, cannot produce any insulin, while the 90 per cent with Type 2 either don't produce enough or their cells do not react to it. Yes and growing. Diabetes UK says the disease is "the fastest growing health threat of our times and an urgent public health issue". One person every two minutes is diagnosed with diabetes and almost 3.5 million people in the UK have the disease - more than double the level 20 years ago. In addition, there are an estimated 1.1 million Britons who have not yet been diagnosed. How do you develop diabetes? Type 2 diabetes usually develop Continue reading >>

Why Wasn’t Theresa May’s Type 1 Diabetes An Issue?

Why Wasn’t Theresa May’s Type 1 Diabetes An Issue?

Candidates love to sling mud at each other, but no one brought up May’s diabetes. Why? Charlie Bard / Shutterstock.com Commentary When Theresa May became prime minister of the United Kingdom this past week, it represented a major milestone for the Type 1 community. Whether you agree with May’s politics or not, her appointment as head of state for a major democracy is a validation that people with Type 1 are capable of anything. I should be completely happy about this. Instead, I’m a bit confused. That’s because I can’t shake the feeling that it shouldn’t have been this easy for her to win over her political party and gain the post of prime minister – and Type 1 diabetes should have been the reason. Let me clarify – I’m glad her diabetes wasn’t an issue; I’m just surprised it wasn’t. There are countless stories of people with Type 1 being barred from employment or fired from jobs, justly or unjustly, because of their diabetes. Despite this, Theresa May has ascended to arguably the most important job in the UK. Elections, even British elections, aren’t polite – they’re more like a bloodless version of Game of Thrones. Usually, if there is any hint of a medical condition that could impair a candidate’s ability to govern, it will be used against that candidate. Here are some recent examples in U.S. politics: In 1972, George McGovern was already facing an uphill battle to unseat Richard Nixon when it was revealed that his first choice for vice-president, Tom Eagleton, had been hospitalized for depression several times. Eagleton eventually was removed from the ticket, and McGovern lost. In 1984, Ronald Reagan had to fend off questions of his age as he campaigned for a second term, and he famously used those doubts as a punchline during a debate Continue reading >>

Diane Abbott Reveals She Has Type 2 Diabetes

Diane Abbott Reveals She Has Type 2 Diabetes

Diane Abbott has revealed she has Type 2 diabetes and that the condition is what forced her to take a break from the election campaign. The shadow home secretary told the Guardian she was diagnosed with the condition two years ago and it was "out of control" during the campaign, when she gave some faltering performances. "During the election campaign, everything went crazy," she said. She said she was managing the condition and was ready to get back to work. Type 2 diabetes is a long-term condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. It can be controlled by taking medication to reduce glucose to normal levels and also by making lifestyle and dietary changes. Police figures Ms Abbott was criticised for her performance during the election campaign, in which she stumbled several times during interviews and appeared unable to give detailed answers to questions. In one interview with LBC Radio, she mistakenly said plans to boost police numbers by 10,000 would cost £300,000. It led to a barrage of criticism from the Conservatives who said she could not "add up". She pulled out of an interview on BBC's Woman's Hour with just a few minutes' notice amid unconfirmed reports that some within the party leadership had lost confidence in her. Just 48 hours before polling day, Labour said Ms Abbott was taking a period of sick leave and would be replaced "indefinitely" by Lyn Brown. 'Vicious' Ms Abbott, a key ally and friend of Jeremy Corbyn, said she was badly affected after facing six or seven interviews in a row without eating enough food - vital to managing blood sugar levels. "During the election campaign, everything went crazy - and the diabetes was out of control, the blood sugar was out of control," she said. Ms Abbott, who was re-elected as MP for Hac Continue reading >>

Theresa May’s Sunday Times Interview Leaves Us With As Little Understanding Of The Prime Minister As We Have Of Brexit

Theresa May’s Sunday Times Interview Leaves Us With As Little Understanding Of The Prime Minister As We Have Of Brexit

Has any Prime Minister in the memory of anyone alive inherited a more petrifying, insomnia-causing, ‘what-in-the-name-of-sweet-Lord-Jesus-have-I-got-myself-into-here?’ legacy than Theresa May? She has only one rival and whether she or Winston Churchill deserves the title is less self-evident than it might appear. Obviously, Britain faced a clearer cut existential threat from forces massing on the other side of the Channel in May 1940, when Churchill slid into No 10 much as May did in July, albeit without the black comedy of several other contenders collapsing like kamikaze dominoes. Yet in some ways the old boy had it easier than May. Firstly, within days of taking office, he had illuminated the path ahead by persuading the inner Cabinet to fight to the death, rather than deal with Hitler to cut an Empire-preserving deal. From that history-shaping moment, whether it led to victory or defeat, he knew in outline what had to be done. Secondly, Churchill was leading an entirely united government and country at a time of media deference. And thirdly, he could drink. When the stress and his natural tendency to insomnia kept him up, he had the brandy bottle for solace. May has no such consolations. Even if she sometimes feels the urge (and she must), hard liquor and Type 1 diabetes make poor bedfellows. She heads a fractious, disunited government and a country split in half over Brexit, at a time when deference is not the dominant media trait. And the path to separation from the EU is not a single lane highway like the one facing Churchill. It is a labyrinth of such staggering complexity that it seems almost impossible to decide where it starts, let alone ends. On the plus side for May, no one is sleeping on underground platforms, and whatever rationing lies ahead when ste Continue reading >>

Theresa May Proves Type 1 Diabetes Is No Barrier To Achievement

Theresa May Proves Type 1 Diabetes Is No Barrier To Achievement

Theresa May is set to be officially confirmed as Britain’s 76th Prime Minister today and will be the first that we know of to have Type 1 diabetes, after being chosen as the Conservative Party leader following David Cameron’s resignation.Theresa May was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in 2012 after she sought medical attention for sudden weight loss - a classic symptom of the condition along with increased thirst, tiredness and urination. Since her diagnosis she has been very open about her condition and has made it clear that it has had little impact on the demands of her former role as Home Secretary, one of the most high-profile jobs in Government, which she held for six years. "Diabetes In an interview with Diabetes UK’sBalance magazine in 2014 she said: “I would like the message to get across that it doesn’t change what you can do. The more people can see that people with diabetes can lead a normal life doing the sort of things that other people do, the easier it is for those who are diagnosed with it to deal with it.” There have been a number of reports in the media that some MPs have questioned May’s suitability for the job because of her Type 1 diabetes. While it is true that May is very likely the first UK Prime Minister, and possibly the first world leader, that we know of to have Type 1 diabetes, suggestions that having Type 1 diabetes means that you are unfit to be Prime Minister are completely untrue and unacceptable. Type 1 diabetes is a serious health condition but it can be managed effectively with good care and support. It doesn’t change what you can do and people with the condition should have access to the same opportunities as people without the condition, whether that’s becoming Prime Minister, a doctor, teacher or any other job. Th Continue reading >>

The Women Who Shaped Politics

The Women Who Shaped Politics

Sophy Ridge, presenter for Sky News, has uncovered the extraordinary stories of the women who have shaped British politics. Never has the role of women in the political world ever been more on the news agenda, and Sophy has interviewed current and former politicians including among others, Nicola Sturgeon, Ruth Davidson, Betty Boothroyd gain exclusive insight into the role women play in politics at the highest level. The book also includes Theresa May's first at-length interview about her journey to becoming Prime Minister. These interviews have revealed the shocking truth about the sexism that is rife among the House of Commons both in the past and today, with sometimes astonishing, and sometimes amusing anecdotes revealing how women in Westminster have worked to counter the gender bias. Sophy provides gripping insight into historical and contemporary stories which will fascinate not just those interested in politics but those who want to know more about women's vital role in democracy. From royalty to writers and from class warriors to suffragettes, Sophy tells the story of those who put their lives on the line for equal rights, and those who were the first to set foot inside the chambers of power, bringing together stories that you may think you know, and stories that have recently been discovered to reveal the truth about what it is to be a woman in Westminster. This book is a celebration of the differing ways that women have shaped the political landscape. The book also, importantly, sheds light on the challenges faced by women in government today, telling us the ways that women working in politics battle the sexism that confront them on a daily basis. More »

List Of People With Diabetes Mellitus Type 1

List Of People With Diabetes Mellitus Type 1

This is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness. You can help by expanding it with reliably sourced entries. Diabetes mellitus type 1, also known as type 1 diabetes, or T1DM (formerly known as insulin-dependent diabetes or juvenile diabetes) is a condition in which the body does not produce insulin, resulting in high blood sugar levels in the body.[1][2] Whereas type 2 diabetes is typically diagnosed in middle age and treated via diet, oral medication and/or insulin therapy, type 1 diabetes tends to be diagnosed earlier in life, and people with type 1 diabetes require insulin therapy for survival.[1] The following is a list of notable people—including writers, artists, athletes, entertainers, and others—who have been documented as having type 1 diabetes. List of people[edit] Crystal Bowersox Damon Dash Sam Fuld Nick Jonas Este Haim Theresa May Mary Tyler Moore Anne Rice Derek Theler Name Lifespan Nationality Notability Ref. Akram, WasimWasim Akram 1966– Pakistani Cricketer, television personality [3] Bassinger, BrecBrec Bassinger 1999– American Actress [4] Bean, DexterDexter Bean 1987– American Auto racing driver [5] Bigard, Jean-MarieJean-Marie Bigard 1954– French Actor [6] Bowersox, CrystalCrystal Bowersox 1985– American Singer-songwriter and actress [7] Boynton, NickNick Boynton 1979– Canadian Ice hockey defenceman [8] Brass, DarrenDarren Brass 1972– American Tattoo artist [9] Burgalat, BertrandBertrand Burgalat 1963– French Musician and music producer [10] Canyon, GeorgeGeorge Canyon 1970– Canadian Country music singer [11] Channing, CarolCarol Channing 1921– American Actress, comedian [12] Clarke, BobbyBobby Clarke 1949– Canadian Ice hockey centre [13] Coker, BenBen Coker 1989– British Associ Continue reading >>

Bbc News

Bbc News

In a mini documentary by BBC Lifestyle & Health, Founder & Creative Director Natalie Balmain exclusively showcases the collection to the national media. The aim was to build awareness around the key issues surrounding type one diabetes and the problems girls and women around the world face on a daily basis. The video quickly became viral; it has over 3.5 million views to date, and has been shared by the main BBC News account, as well as BBC Three, BBC Science News and other prolific profiles and diabetes groups around the world. The response has been hugely positive, and some of the incredible messages from people around the world demonstrate the support for the cause. BBC Radio 5 Live Our Founder & Creative Director Natalie Balmain went on BBC Radio 5 Live Breakfast to talk to Nicky Campbell and Rachel Burden about Type 1 Clothing and how she hopes the line will make a difference to the lives of girls with Type 1 Diabetes. They discussed the daily routine of blood testing, injections and pump wearing, and also the fact the British Prime Minister Theresa May has Type 1 and what it might be like to see her wearing the line! You can listen to the full interview above. Natalie also went on her local BBC Radio Manchester to talk to Alison Butterworth and Shourjo Sarkar at Breakfast about the reasons why she came to develop Type 1 Clothing and how the practical fashion line works. They were keen to hear how she produces the line and also about the response that she has had from the Type 1 community around the world. Natalie showed off the 'Jen' jeans from the collection whilst in the studio (see above) and you can hear the full interview above. Chelsea Clinton Another celebrity admirer of Natalie's clothing line is none other than the daughter of Bill and Hillary Clinton. Wi Continue reading >>

Bbc Newsreader Suffers Severe Diabetic Reaction On Air | Daily Mail Online

Bbc Newsreader Suffers Severe Diabetic Reaction On Air | Daily Mail Online

Alex Ritson said basic functions such as his ability to speak began to 'switch off' Newsreader's 'worst nightmare' came true as he read out headlines on Radio 4 In the soundclip, he can be heard stumbling over words and repeating himself Mr Ritson suffers from Type 1 diabetes, the same condition as PM Theresa May This is the moment a diabetic BBC journalist had a hypoglycemic attack live on air as he read out the news to millions of people. Alex Ritson, who works for the BBC World Service, said basic functions such as his ability to think and talk began to 'switch off' as he recited the top items of the day. The newsreader's 'worst nightmare' came true as he read out the headlines on BBC Radio 4, as he is heard stumbling over his words and repeating himself. Mr Ritson suffers from Type 1 diabetes, the same condition as Prime Minister Theresa May , who is required to take insulin injections at least twice a day to stay alive. Alex Ritson (pictured during a reconstruction of the incident) said basic functions such as his ability to think and talk began to 'switch off' as he recited the top items of the day In the soundclip, Mr Ritson is heard saying: 'The new Pope has found a... I'm sorry, the Pope has... The upcoming... I'm sorry... In the United States, the Donald Trump... 'You're listening to the BBC World Service, this is the BBC World Service on the BBC World Service.' After a brief interlude, the show's producerNeil Nunes finishes the bulletin, whcih aired simultaneously on BBC Radio 4 and the World Service at 5am on December 1. In the meantime, colleagues of the newsreader helped him to 'wolf down' several sachets of sugar to help returns his blood levels to a safe range. Opening up about his on-air hypoglycemic attack, Mr Ritson told the BBC : 'It was terrifying. Continue reading >>

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