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Thanksgiving For Diabetics

Looking For Diabetic-friendly Desserts For Thanksgiving

Looking For Diabetic-friendly Desserts For Thanksgiving

Q: I'm making desserts for Thanksgiving. My dad was recently diagnosed with diabetes. Any suggestions for some delicious diabetic desserts? Sent by Harmony Editor: Harmony, this is a tough one. You can go a couple routes: Find a recipe for a pie or cake that includes artificial sweetener, like Splenda; or avoid sweets altogether. Since your dad is recently diagnosed, and, as our commenters pointed out last time we discussed a similar question, the holidays can be very fraught and difficult for diabetics. It may be better to stay away from sweets completely, and go with a cheese platter. You could bring a selection of really delicious and decadent cheeses, like a triple-creme and a stinky blue cheese. Pair with some roasted nuts and you have yourself a great way to finish a meal without sugar. Readers, what are your suggestions for Harmony and her dad? Continue reading >>

Thanksgiving Dinner: Five Diabetes-friendly Dishes

Thanksgiving Dinner: Five Diabetes-friendly Dishes

Thanksgiving Dinner: Five Diabetes-Friendly Dishes The whole family is heading to your house for Thanksgiving next week. In addition to setting the perfect table and cooking that turkey to bronzed, juicy perfection, youve got a new challenge on your plate this year: feeding a loved one with diabetes. Everyone knows Thanksgiving dinner isnt exactly the healthiest meal of the yearso what can you do to make sure your loved one eats right, and everyone else enjoys the meal, too? As you begin to plan your menu for next Thursday, think about including some of these diabetic Thanksgiving recipes to ensure everyone can enjoy the meal together. In honor of National Diabetes Month, here are five diabetes-friendly Thanksgiving dishes that are healthy and delicious: A delicious, traditional first course, most butternut squash soup is loaded with cream and butter. This version gets a punch from curry powder, and the creamy texture everyone loves from yogurt. Thanksgiving dinner wouldnt be complete without gravy to pour over that roasted bird, and welleverything else on your plate. But most gravy recipes are extremely high in fat and calories. For a diabetes-friendly version, try this gravy, which gets its flavor from apple cider. Everybody loves creamy, fluffy mashed potatoes. For a healthier substitute, try this recipe, which switches carb-laden potatoes with cauliflower, and packs in flavor with tangy buttermilk and garlic. For an even healthier version, substitute buttermilk with nonfat Greek yogurt. To many people, stuffing is the best part of the holiday meal. But Grandmas classic recipe is full of fat and carbs. Revamp classic stuffing with this recipe for sausage stuffing, which keeps that rich, delicious stuffing taste, but switches pork sausage for healthier turkey sausage Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Counts For Thanksgiving Food Staples

Carbohydrate Counts For Thanksgiving Food Staples

Home Education and Information Carbohydrate Counts For Thanksgiving Food Staples Carbohydrate Counts For Thanksgiving Food Staples Posted by Naomi Ruperto On November 16, 2015 In Education and Information When you look at the list of holidays in the U.S., there is one holiday in particular that revolves around food and sitting around a table with many people you love Thanksgiving. The good news about Thanksgiving meals is it often involves some well-known staples. I highly recommend researching carb counts in popular foods, and reviewing serving sizes (i.e. studying the size of a measuring cup) ahead of time. Knowing the approximate nutrition facts in advance can help when youre amidst the hustle and bustle trying to make food decisions and bolusing for whats on your plate. Here are nutrition facts for popular Thanksgiving foods you may find helpful, and a printed version you can keep on your fridge for convenience. Keep in mind recipes may vary depending on the brand and ingredients used (Aunt Janes home baked recipes will vary as well). 4 ounces of roasted turkey breast, without skin and additional flavoring: 0g carbs 4 ounces of roasted boneless cured ham: 0g carbs 4 ounces of lean roasted pork tenderloin: 0g carbs 1/6 box or 1 ounce of dry mixed stuffing: 21g carbs cup of sweet potato casserole: 37g carbs 1 cup of chopped collard greens: 9g carbs 1 cup of home prepared coleslaw: 15g carbs cup of canned cranberry sauce: 25g carbs 1 piece or 2.1 ounces of corn bread: 29g carbs 1 piece or 1/6 of a 8 inch apple pie: 40g carbs 1 piece or 1/8 of a 9 inch pumpkin pie: 41g carbs 1 piece or 1/8 of a 9 inch pecan pie: 64g carbs I know its hard to multi-task filling up your plate when there is a lot going on around you, but taking a few moments to pay attention and think thro Continue reading >>

6 Strategies For Surviving The Thanksgiving Meal With Diabetes

6 Strategies For Surviving The Thanksgiving Meal With Diabetes

6 Strategies for Surviving The Thanksgiving Meal with Diabetes November 25, 2015 || Written by Michelle deHaaff Thanksgiving is my absolute favorite holiday. No work, no school and full time with my family are all great things, but the real thing I love is the meal. I usually spend the day cooking with family and spend the weeks leading up to it researching recipes (e.g., buying magazines in the grocery store line that have the prettiest pictures of turkeys, side dishes and of course desserts) until I find the ones that are just right. At our monthly birthday celebration yesterday here at Glooko , we all got to talking about strategies we all use to survive Thanksgiving without driving our blood sugar so high that we regret it for the rest of the weekend. With such a focus on the meal we came up with a list of what many of us felt allowed us to really enjoy the meal in years past, but keep our blood sugars decent. Here are the 6 getting through the Thanksgiving meal strategies we came up with: We recommendwalking! Make it a family tradition to either take a walk just before the meal or just after maybe as a break before clean-up? Even if everyone gets outside and walks just a few blocks, it will not only feel great, it will help you process the sugars better! A trick that many of us had used when faced with a big meal is an old one for those of us who watch our weight. Just before everyone is called to the table, drink a bottle of fizzy/bubbly water. It fills you up and makes you want to take smaller servings. We kept the math simple (isnt there enough math in diabetes already?) and agreed that if of the plate consists of white meat turkey and fresh veggies and of the plate is made up of the side dishes, we could enjoy all of the good stuff, but not over indulge on the Continue reading >>

Healthy Apple Crisp - Simply A (rd) Foodie

Healthy Apple Crisp - Simply A (rd) Foodie

It is officially two weeks from Thanksgiving. Cue the annual disbelief that the time of large family gatherings is upon us (where did the year go?!) and realization that we are not in possession of a turkey (might want to get on that). While it is hard to believe that Thanksgiving is right around the corner, it also means that we can start having a discussion about the most important Thanksgiving dinner component PIE! (who really likes turkey, anyway?) While many families go the traditional pumpkin pie route for Turkey Day, our family is apple pie people. Flaky crust, soft apples, and a huge scoop of salted caramel ice cream on top dessert rarely deviates from this in our house. But as much as I love regular apple pie during the holidays, what about the regular fall day? I pondered this question when I was scouring the internet for healthy fall dessert recipes to bring my godfather who wasnt feeling too well. I wanted to bring a warm, comforting dessert, but I didnt want to give him something that was too high in fat and sugar. And I stumbled upon a healthy apple crisp recipe from the American Diabetes Association. With a little tweaking, I decided that this was a great every day apple crisp recipe especially if you have an abundance of apples like I do this time of year! Since there is no sugar in the filling of the crisp, I recommend using a sweeter apple that is still firm, like a gala or honey crisp apple. A firm Granny Smith apples are a little too tart for this dessert and a sweeter, yet soft, Red Delicious apple will break down too much during cooking. On top of the apples, I poured over some apple cider. And some water. This will help the apples soften and cook. Then I added some corn starch (to keep the filling together), cinnamon, and nutmeg. This filling is Continue reading >>

See How Easily You Can Have A Diabetes Friendly Thanksgiving

See How Easily You Can Have A Diabetes Friendly Thanksgiving

See How Easily You Can Have a Diabetes Friendly Thanksgiving Join the fight against diabetes on Facebook Thanksgiving is one of the more challenging holidays for those of us with diabetes. The reason? The entire holiday revolves around food. Lets face it, you gather with family and friends on this day to celebrate and have a Thanksgiving feast. As we have come to accept, there is no taking a vacation from Diabetes. Its not like you are on a special diet to lose some pounds and can choose to make Thanksgiving your cheating dayit doesnt work like that. As a diabetic on Thanksgiving you are left with a couple of choices: You can either stay home and not celebrate with your family and loves ones Or you can make sure that you have a game plan for healthy diabetic eating before you sit down for your meal. If you choose the first option, be prepared to never hear the end of the time you decided not to go to Thanksgiving dinner. If you choose the second option keep reading . The ideal scenario would be if you, the diabetic, were having people over to your home for the Thanksgiving day meal. You would be able to ensure a large selection of diabetes friendly choices to feast on along with having the traditional Thanksgiving day favorites. But lets face it, we dont live in a perfect world. If you are like me, you are probably NOT going to be doing any of the cooking for your Thanksgiving meal. Youre probably going to: Watch The Macys Thanksgiving Day Parade on TV Work your way over to the home of the responsible adult in your family that is able to hold a Thanksgiving Dinner If that sounds more like it, then you are going to have to get a diabetes game plan in place prior to sitting down to your Thanksgiving day meal. Keep in mind that you were invited to wherever you are going o Continue reading >>

A Thanksgiving Day Meal Plan

A Thanksgiving Day Meal Plan

Curious if you can enjoy your favorite holiday foods without sabotaging your health efforts? It takes a little planning, but it can be done! 3/4 cup cooked oatmeal (cooked with water) with the following mixed in: 2 tablespoons dry roasted almonds (unsalted) 1/2 teaspoon brown sugar blend (half brown sugar, half sugar substitute) cup roasted sweet potatoes (simply dice up sweet potatoes, toss in 1 teaspoon olive oil and season with paprika and ground black pepper) 1/2 cup canned reduced-sodium garbanzo beans (drained and rinsed) 2 celery stalks (cut into snack-size pieces) 1/2 cup cooked green beans seasoned with: 1 4-ounce pear, sliced into snack-size pieces Tips for adjusting the calories and carbohydrates in this month's meal plan. Photo: Creamy Cheesy Cauliflower from The Family Classics Cookbook. Taran Z Photography Tips to help you enjoy your favorite Thanksgiving foods without sabotaging your health efforts. Find examples of how to fit a serving of your favorite dessert in this Thanksgiving. This book features over 140 tasty recipes plus other tips and techniques from our Diabetes Forecast Magazine. For the new or aspiring chef, there is a section called Cooking 101, featuring tips and tricks for developing your kitchen skills. Find tips to adjust the carbohydrates and calories in this month's meal plan to better fit your needs. Calculate the number of calories you should eat each day to maintain your present body weight: Please select an option before you continue. I don't do any physical activity other than what I need to do for my usual activities, such as going to work or school, grocery shopping, or doing chores around the house. I do some moderate exercise every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk about 1.5 to 3 miles a day at Continue reading >>

A Diabetic At The Thanksgiving Table

A Diabetic At The Thanksgiving Table

Yahoo!-ABC News Network | 2018 ABC News Internet Ventures. All rights reserved. Many people feel stuffed and uncomfortable after gorging themselves on turkey, stuffing, and desserts on Thanksgiving. But for diabetics, the situation can be downright dangerous, as eating high-sugar foods can send blood sugar into a chaotic rollercoaster. The problem lies in simple carbohydrates and sugars -- common ingredients in holiday meals -- that boost blood sugar immediately and can throw glucose levels out of whack. However, other options such as whole grains can provide carbohydrates that impact the blood sugar more slowly. With a little foresight, meals can be tweaked to integrate diabetic-friendly options, say diet experts. "People with diabetes need to give thought to what they will eat so that they can keep their blood sugars in a normal range," says Connie Diekman, current president of the American Dietetic Association, noting that most non-diabetics are not accustomed to this level of precise planning. "People with diabetes can enjoy most of the foods so typical to the holiday season if they know how to balance the right portion of food into their meal plans. Such planning might be difficult for a new diabetic, but with a little experience it really isn't that tricky." For example, Diekman says, eating basic foods such as turkey, potatoes, vegetables, and salad is easier when options don't appear to be loaded with hidden ingredients. Serving plenty of whole grains, fruits and vegetables is a healthy option for all guests. Other diet experts agree that healthy options can be incorporated into holiday meals for all. "It is important to keep health in mind when planning the menu for the good of all party guests, not just those with diabetes," says Dr. George Blackburn, a profe Continue reading >>

Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving "vacation"? - Diabetes Self-management

It is a common saying within the diabetes community that there are no vacations from diabetes . This seems to be especially true for people with Type 1 diabetes, for whom the pancreas inability to produce insulin means there is no way for the body to regulate blood glucose on its own a situation that can quickly lead to a dangerously high or low blood glucose level if the normal treatment routine is disrupted. Many people with Type 2 diabetes are, of course, in a similar situation, especially if they use insulin or another blood-glucose-lowering drug that requires calibrating doses with carbohydrate intake to avoid blood glucose spikes or dips. As the title of a recent post on the New York Times blog Well suggests, these individuals are often thinking about diabetes with every bite. But some people with diabetes especially Type 2 diabetes suffer few, if any, short-term consequences from lapses in their diabetes routine. For these people, a vacation from diabetes may be possible, even if it incrementally raises the risk of certain long-term diabetic complications . Of course, what a vacation entails will be different for every person, and ignoring diabetes completely by not taking prescribed drugs or completely ignoring eating recommendations can be dangerous. But once in a while, it is undeniable that many people with diabetes allow themselves some wiggle room in their routine. So this Thanksgiving, how much wiggle room will you give yourself? Do you think its important to stop worrying about what you eat every once in a while, or do you find deviating even slightly from your meal plan too risky? Do you feel guilty when you eat something you shouldnt, or bitter when you skip a treat because of your diabetes? What, for you, is the right balance? Leave a comment below! D Continue reading >>

Enjoying Thanksgiving With Diabetes

Enjoying Thanksgiving With Diabetes

Thanksgiving can be challenging for people with diabetes who are trying to manage blood glucose levels and weight. Many traditional Thanksgiving foods are high in fat as well as carbohydrates, but with careful planning, you can make healthy choices that fit into your diabetes meal planand enjoy this wonderful celebration with friends and family, says Tracey Lucier, R.D., Nutrition Educatorat Joslin Diabetes Center. Start the day off with a good breakfast so you wont be tempted to overeat. Nibble on raw vegetables with low-fat dips before dinner rather than salted nuts or cheese and crackers. Choose white rather than dark turkey meat, without the skin. Make mashed potatoes with low-fat milk and margarine instead of butter, and take it easy with the gravy. Skim the fat off the top of the gravy before serving. Steam vegetables like peas and green beans rather serving them in a casserole with creamed sauces. Bake stuffing in a casserole dish rather than inside a turkey so you can make it with less fat. Bake with low-fat broth and margarine. Make cranberry sauce with fresh cranberries. Canned cranberry sauce is high in sugar. If youre going to drink a glass or two of wine, do it with dinner, rather than starting earlier. Consider diluting white wine with seltzer water to make a wine spritzer. Have dessert with everyone else, but choose pumpkin pie over pecan pie, or bring a dessert youve made with an artificial sweetener . Top it with low-fat whipped cream. It is unquestionably hard to stick to your diabetes meal plan on Thanksgiving when you see allof thefood and everyone else is overindulging. It's also difficult if you have food police in your family who try totell you what you can or cant eat, or havesomeone who wants to load more food on your plate, saying its only onc Continue reading >>

3 Recipes For A Happy T1d Thanksgiving

3 Recipes For A Happy T1d Thanksgiving

Chef Lourdes Castro shares tips for getting the most out of the biggest food day of the year. At first glance, Thanksgiving can feel like a culinary minefield for people with Type 1 diabetes. The thinking is that you have to either use a truckload of insulin to cover for the carb fest of mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce, and pie, or you have to avoid it altogether. Worse, people with diabetes can feel like the odd person out during the festivities; well-meaning relatives might have trouble resisting the urge to police the Thanksgiving dinner plate of someone with diabetes, which can get real awkward real quick. Noted chef Lourdes Castro advocates for a different way of thinking about Thanksgiving with diabetes, one that feels more like a win-win for everyone involved. Thanksgiving actually already is predisposed to be more accessible for people with Type 1 diabetes than many other traditional meals, as the centerpiece of the meal is a baked source of protein, says Castro, a cookbook author, dietician, and adjunct professor. Also, the American diet is shifting to be more in line with the optimal diet for people with diabetes, she adds, with more protein and fresh vegetables and less empty carbs. I think diabetes-friendly food is healthy food that anyone can and should be eating, Castro says. Castro is partnering with Novo Nordisk to help the diabetes supply company to relaunch its Cornerstones4Care initiative, which helps provide educational information for people with Type 1 diabetes and Type 2 diabetes. As part of the initiative, Castro has released a free downloadable bilingual cookbook . You can view a few of the cookbooks recipes below. In an interview with Insulin Nation, Castro suggested a few Thanksgiving eating tips that can help you enjoy Thanksgiving while ke Continue reading >>

Healthy Sweet Potato Casserole {paleo, Vegan & Sugar-free}!

Healthy Sweet Potato Casserole {paleo, Vegan & Sugar-free}!

You are here: Home / Gluten-Free / Healthy Sweet Potato Casserole {Paleo, Vegan & Sugar-Free}! Healthy Sweet Potato Casserole {Paleo, Vegan & Sugar-Free}! Can you believe Thanksgiving is ONE week away?! ONE!! I am so excited I cant even tell you! Ive shared many of my favorite Turkey Day recipes , but this Healthy Sweet Potato Casseroleranks in the top three for sure! This recipe is literally bursting with rich flavors, is velvety smooth, and crazy healthy! Thats right, no butter or brown sugar or marshmallows are needed to make this delicious dish! Naturally sweetened with applesauce and spiced with cinnamon and nutmeg, this healthy sweet potato casserole is a sure-fire crowd pleaser! Its nutritional profile cant be beat eithervegan, paleo, gluten-free, and dairy-free with absolutely NO sugar added! Everyone at your Thanksgiving celebration will be able to enjoy this dish! I know what youre thinkingreally? Could something so healthy really replace the classic recipe laden with not-so-good-for-youingredients? The answer is YES! Seriously, there are many healthier dishes that my husband says are goodbut you can tell its healthy. This healthy sweet potato casserole is NOT one of those recipes! I made itfor a group offriends and one of the men gave it the thumbs up and asked for the recipe! (In my circle its the ladies who are more likely to enjoy healthier fare). Many of us are plant lovers who have meat eating husbands (can I get a hand raise fromall my veggie ladies out there?!) So if we get the meat and potatoes manstamp of approval on a healthier dish it has to be a winnerright? Not only is this healthy sweet potato casserole delicious, but its very easy to make! Simply bake your sweet potatoes and let cool slightly. Then toss the rest of the ingredients (except for Continue reading >>

Stress-free Diabetic Thanksgiving

Stress-free Diabetic Thanksgiving

November 10, 2017 Luke Adams Uncategorized How to enjoy Thanksgiving dinner while living with diabetes Thanksgiving is meant to be a time of community, gratefulness, and enjoyment. The last thing anyone wants to think too much about is the health of their plate. However, that is a necessary reality for diabetics during the holiday season and is sometimes a cause for stress. Weve got you covered with a few tips and some delicious recipes that will take the anxiety out of meal planning and have you looking forward to sharing quality time with family and friends. Tell your friends or family you have diabetes! Dont be afraid of being a burden. Your host will want you to enjoy your meal, so theyll be glad you said something. If they dont know what your diet entails, offer to chat with them about your needs or volunteer to bring some dishes of your own. Dont fall into the trap of skipping meals to allow for extra carbs and sugar at dinner. Eat regular meals before the big event to keep your blood sugar steady and prevent you from overindulging. Be sure to test your sugar levels and do some exercise; a post-dinner walk could be a great new family tradition! If youve planned ahead, there should be plenty of food at the table you can enjoy. But there are ways to enjoy your dinner even if you dont have any control over the spread. Try small tastes of things that look great. Sacrifice alcohol and starches early in the meal if youd like to sample some dessert at the end. Dive into salads and white turkey meat. And, most of all, savor what you eat. Taking the time to enjoy your meal will make you appreciative rather than making you feel like youre missing out. Weve included links to some diabetic friendly recipes you can use to substitute some holiday favorites. Be sure to compare Continue reading >>

Sugar Free Pecan Pie

Sugar Free Pecan Pie

This Sugar Free Pecan Pie is easy and a nice alternative those folk who can't have the regular version. It's also easy and fast to make. Ingredients Filling Steps Continue reading >>

Diabetes Shares November With Turkey, Which Diabetics Should Eat | The State

Diabetes Shares November With Turkey, Which Diabetics Should Eat | The State

Diabetes shares November with turkey, which diabetics should eat | The State In the midst of giving thanks and eating turkey dinners, November is also known as Diabetes Awareness Month. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Dr. Janice Key, co-chairwoman of the S.C. Medical Association Childhood Obesity Taskforce, answers common questions about type 2 diabetes. How is type 2 diabetes different from type 1 diabetes? Diabetes mellitus is a disease that causes high blood sugar (glucose) due to a problem with the sugar controlling hormone, insulin. There are two types of diabetes: one in which there is not enough insulin produced by the pancreas (type 1) and one in which there is plenty of insulin but the body is resistant to it and is unable to use it normally (type 2). Sign up today for a free 30 day free trial of unlimited digital access. Being overweight or obese carries the greatest risk for developing type 2, however, the risk is not the same for all people. If your parents or grandparents have type 2 diabetes, you should be especially careful to keep your weight in a healthy range as you might have a genetic predisposition to obesity-related type 2 diabetes. The high blood sugar caused by diabetes coats the lining of blood vessels throughout the body, causing those blood vessels to become clogged, damaging every organ in the body. Over time, this can result in kidney failure (requiring dialysis), poor circulation in the legs (requiring amputation), blindness, stroke and heart attacks. Diabetes has such a gradual effect that people usually cant feel it happening. Some symptoms, such as lack of energy and fatigue, are so nonspecific that people dont think of diabetes. In fact, undiagnosed diabetes can even cause a silent heart attack. The only real way t Continue reading >>

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