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Texas Diabetes Council Toolkit

Diabetes Programs And Laws

Diabetes Programs And Laws

You asked three questions about state diabetes programs and laws. The questions and answers appear below. Much of this report is drawn from information provided by the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL). More information about state diabetes programs is available on NCSL's website: . The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) also maintains a website with links to all states' diabetes prevention and control programs: . 1. For the New England states, New York, and New Jersey, summarize their (a) diabetes prevention and awareness programs including the agency responsible for them and (b) laws concerning diabetes reporting or prevention. In addition to coordinating the National Diabetes Prevention Program, the CDC provides funding for state diabetes prevention and control programs. Table 1 below provides an overview of the programs in the states you specified, highlighting significant features or components. The table also includes links to program websites for more information. There are several common elements to these states' diabetes programs. The programs generally include (1) disease monitoring, (2) professional development or similar initiatives for health care providers or diabetes educators, and (3) outreach or education for patients. Some states have comprehensive diabetes plans or clinical guidelines for diabetes care. Others have made efforts to address the disparate impact of the disease on certain demographic groups. For most of these states, there is little detail in statute about the diabetes prevention and control programs or reporting requirements. The table includes citations for those states that include details in their laws. This report does not address laws concerning student glucose self-testing or other school-specific issu Continue reading >>

14th Annual Faces Of Diabetes Conference El Paso 79925 - Har.com

14th Annual Faces Of Diabetes Conference El Paso 79925 - Har.com

PURPOSE:The purpose or outcome of this conference is to further the knowledge, competence, and skills of practitioners to improve the overall care of patients with diabetes. TARGET AUDIENCE: Physicians, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, registered nurses, certified diabetes educators, physician assistants, registered dieticians, social workers, health educators, community health workers, students, and other professionals involved in the care and treatment of patients with diabetes. CONFERENCE INFORMATION:Dress for the conference is casual. Each attendee is encouraged to bring a sweater or jacket for comfort during the meeting. Persons with special dietary needs or persons withdisabilities needing auxiliary aids, must send a written request to Anabel Orquiz [email protected], so that appropriate arrangements can be made. Copies of this brochure may be printed from the EPDA website at www.epdiabetes.org. NO TRANSLATION AVAILABLE AGENDA 7:00 am - Registration and Breakfast 8:00 am - Welcome/Housekeeping 8:15 am - Stay Fit With the Kit! - Presented by Anabel Orquiz, BS, CHES Review the use of the Texas Diabetes Council (TDC) Toolkit in regard to exercise recommendations for diabetes prevention and weight loss. 8:45 am - Coaching Patients Through the Nutritional Maze - Presented by Sarah Ruiz, MPH, RD, CDE Compare and contrast the current fad diets. Assist patients with diabetes to create an individualized lifelong diet plan. 9:45 am - Break 10:00 pm - The Changing Face of Diabetes in Children. - Presented by Hector Granados, MD, FAAP Identify markers of Type 2 diabetes in children and how to utilize them in the prevention and diagnosis of diabetes. Review strategies to reverse the trends of Type 2 diabetes in children. 11:00 am - The Good, the Bad and the Ugly: SGLT2 Continue reading >>

Education Service Center 16

Education Service Center 16

Vision Screening To schedule a training contact the Regional DSHS office at (806) 783-6490 or Elijah Brown at the State DSHS office at1-888-963-7111 ext. 6442 or [email protected] Photoscreening for Vision Screening: DSHS has approved photoscreening for vision screening but is only for children five years old and younger. The vision screening results are recorded pass/fail. If photoscreening is used, the screener must obtain training from the manufacturer, sales representative or someone who has be trained to train others. For example, some people from the Lions Club have been trained to train others. Also, students with disabilities, above the age of 5 years, who cannot respond appropriately to acuity screening (i.e. wall charts or telebinocular) can be screened using photoscreening. Photoscreening machines do not have to be calibrated annually. Only audiometers have this requirement. The new Vision Certification cards will indicate if the screener has been trained prior to the workshop which is a requirement if photoscreening is utilized. Screeners with valid certification cards do not have to attend an additional certifying workshop, but instead the information will be updated at their next renewal workshop using the 5 year renewal cycle. For more information please contact Elijah Brown by phone at (512) 458-7420 or toll free 1-888-963-7111 ext. 6442 or by email at [email protected] . Hearing Screening To schedule a training contact the Regional DSHS office at (806) 783-6490 or Elijah Brown at the State DSHSofficeat1-888-963-7111 ext. 6442 or [email protected] . Spinal Screening To schedule a training, contact Sheila Rhodesin the Regional DSHS office at (806) 783-6485 or [email protected] . Unlicensed Diabetic Care As Continue reading >>

Travis County Medical Society | 07-16-tcms E-news

Travis County Medical Society | 07-16-tcms E-news

You and your physician colleagues are invited to attend the TCMS Networking Social on Thursday, July 14 at Opal Divines located at Penn Field (3601 South Congress) from 6-8 pm. Complimentary appetizers provided. Cash bar. No RSVP necessary. Questions? [email protected] or 512-206-1249. TMAIT and Prudentials Financial Wellness Program The Texas Medical Association Insurance Trust and Prudential Pathways are presenting Cruising Along: Protecting You and YourLoved Onesat 6 pm on Tuesday, July 26 in the TMA Thompson Auditorium. To register, contact Prudential at [email protected] or 844-592-8993. After careful consideration of many worthy nominations, the 2nd quarter TCMS Unsung Hero Award goes to Devin Borum, operations manager for CommUnityCare Blackstock Family Health Center. Devin will receive a certificate and a gift card. According to physicians at the clinic, Devin has been instrumental in improving access to care by leading an initiative to bring telepsychiatry services to the Blackstock clinic in addition to improvingaccess to pharmacy services and patient assistant programs. Nominations for the 2016 3rd quarter recipient are now being accepted. Complete the nomination form and return to the Society no later than June 30. View information and photos of new TCMS members . See Disneys Mary Poppins live at the Zach TheatreTCMS members enjoy a $10 discount per ticket. Read more . Spanish Meducation is a practical 8-week medical Spanish program. Affiliated with the Travis County Medical Society since 1994. Designed for all health care professionals. Development of beginning, intermediate and advanced skills in general Spanish for medical purposes. Earlybird discount of $25 for registration by August 26. Click here for registration forms. Questions? Contact Jill Snyde Continue reading >>

Texas Diabetes Council

Texas Diabetes Council

Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) TEXAS DIABETES COUNCIL. The Texas Diabetes Council (TDC) is an advisory body created by the Texas state legislature in 1983 to coordinate state efforts to promote diabetes awareness and prevention. The TDC was the first state-based, interagency body of its kind in the United States to address a chronic, degenerative disease like diabetes and its multiple long-term complications, such as kidney failure, blindness, and nerve damage. Legislative action began in 1981 with bipartisan support of the appointment of the Special Committee on Diabetes Services in Texas to examine the problem statewide. Senator Carl A. Parker from Port Arthur chaired the committee, which submitted its report to the Sixty-eighth Texas Legislature in January 1983. Based on research, public testimony, and the support of professional and volunteer associations like the Texas Medical Association and the American Diabetes Association, the committee found three major problems. These findings served as the impetus for the new council. First, Texas had no coherent plan to manage the disease. In the early 1980s existing diabetes programs focused on treating the costly, life-threatening complications but did not address how to prevent the disease or its complications. While many different state boards and commissions dealt with diabetes, state services lacked centralization. This situation created gaps in the delivery of care, which Senator Parker aptly described: If youre a diabetic and you show up at the Rehabilitation Commission or the Commission for the Blind or one of the other agencies and say, Here I am. I have diabetes, they say, Are you blind? No. Do you need to be on a kidney machine? No. Do you need a limb amputated? No. Are you going into a coma? No. Wel Continue reading >>

Texas Diabetes Council - Health Care Professionals

Texas Diabetes Council - Health Care Professionals

The Texas Diabetes Council is committed to assuring that Texans with diabetes receive high-quality care from health care providers who have access to the latest information related to diabetes. Activities related to this priority area include developing, updating, and distributing standards of care that serve as guides for health care providers who treat people who have diabetes. Other activities support changes in the health care system including providers, payers, and educators that promote not only quality care, but also prevention. Read the latest issue of Texas Diabetes, the newsletter of the Texas Diabetes Council . View the latest diabetes treatment algorithms approved by the Texas Diabetes Council. Need to update the educational materials youre giving your patients? Download your copy of the Diabetes Tool Kit today! Diabetes Mellitus Registry Pilot Program Consent Form San Antonio Metropolitan Health District (SAMHD) has participated in a diabetes registry since 2007 to better understand local trends in diabetes diagnosis and management. Laboratories in the public health district that serve Bexar County residents have been collecting the results of glycosylated hemoglobin tests (A1C) and submitting them to the Health District and to the Department of State Health Services as required by House Bill 2132 [80R] . Prior to November 2009, only test results have been collected. After November 1, 2009, physicians must submit diagnosis codes along with specimens as required by House Bill 1363 [81R] , unless patients opt out of including their information in the registry. The consent form below is designed to give patients in Bexar County the option to withhold diagnosis codes when their blood sample is sent to the lab. Diabetes Mellitus Registry Pilot Program Consent F Continue reading >>

Improving Diabetes Care Quality

Improving Diabetes Care Quality

After reviewing your MONAHRQ-generated information for diabetes, you may be ready to take steps to improve the quality of care of diabetes in your area. The MyQI Improving Diabetes Care Quality portal provides a framework, action steps, and resources for planning and implementing initiatives to improve the quality of diabetes care in the community, thereby reducing hospitalizations for diabetes patients. The goals of improving the quality of diabetes care are to close gaps between current and best medical practice, improve access to care, and eliminate disparities. Resources and links in this portal answer these questions: Why is Quality Diabetes Care Important? The quality of diabetes care can vary widely across communities and population groups. Gaps in care can lead to complications or death and can increase costs. Information from government agencies illustrates why diabetes has been a target for quality improvement efforts: The prevalence has been increasing. Obesity increases the risk for diabetes. Over the past 20 years, obesity has dramatically increased in the U.S. There are wide racial and ethnic disparities in diabetes diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes (after linking to the NHQR report, see page 50 for diabetes information). Diabetes can be effectively treated and controlled. Diabetes complications are preventable. More information on the importance of improving the quality of care for diabetes is available from AHRQ. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which blood sugar levels are too high because the body does not produce or properly use insulin. Effective blood sugar management can delay the onset of diabetes. Persons with diabetes are at risk for serious complications , including blindness, leg amputations, kidney failure, and premature death. A g Continue reading >>

Empowering Your Patient Is Powerful Medicine.

Empowering Your Patient Is Powerful Medicine.

- Resources | Algorithms & Guidelines | Order Patient Materials | DSME Information - Empowering your patient is powerful medicine. As the number of people with diabetes grows, so do the demands on your time and practice. It can be challenging to spend the time necessary to help patients understand their diabetes and make lifestyle changes to protect their health. Patients who arent fully committed are less likely to meet follow-up guidelines, so they require more frequent office visits. Patients who are empowered to manage their own care tend to have better outcomes. Effective diabetes self-management is possible. The Texas Diabetes Council Tool Kit can show you how. The Texas Diabetes Councils Diabetes Tool Kit was prepared by an interdisciplinary team of certified diabetes educators (CDEs) and professional staff of the Texas Department of State Health Services Diabetes Prevention and Control Program to be of service to Texas practitioners and diabetes educators working with patients who have diabetes. Many partners contribute to its development, revision, and distribution. Self-management training content based on the National Standards for Diabetes Education Minimum standards of care and evidence-based treatment algorithms prepared by endocrinologists, physicians, nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, and other professionals appointed to the Medical Professionals Advisory Subcommittee of the Texas Diabetes Council The Diabetes Tool Kit is a resource that includes professional and patient education materials. It assists primary care providers, educators, and health plans in delivering quality care and implementing quality improvement efforts. Copy masters of patient handouts in English and Spanish help primary care providers and educators address basic self-management edu Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Hispanic Farmworkers: A Family Affair

Diabetes & Hispanic Farmworkers: A Family Affair

By Elisabeth Almekinder RN, BA, CDE 2 Comments One of my favorite diabetes classes to teach is my migrant farmworkers class. This class lets me get right in community health grass roots programs where diabetes education can really make a difference. What they lack in resources, they gain in community and family support that is unmistakably helpful and effective, not to mention uplifting. Before we continue with this article, I wanted to let you know we have researched and compiled science-backed ways to stick to your diet and reverse your diabetes. Want to check out our insights? Download our free PDF Guide Power Foods to Eat here. A large migrant farmworker class, which included children, grandchildren, and community members, was held at the local high schools health center. Along with a healthy meal, daycare was provided as well as Spanish materials for diabetes management. All class members signed a release for pictures. Henrico, a farmworker, came in to see the nurse practitioner. He had lost 30 pounds recently. He was cachectic, literally bones with skin pulled over it. He was limping into the clinic in his work boots, favoring his left leg. The lab did a random blood sugar that was 1064 mg/dL. He looked dehydrated, and exhausted. Melina, one of our farmworker staff, walked him in. Melina interpreted, I feel very tired, she said. The worst part was when Henrico took his boots off. Inside his work boots, with dirty socks from working the fields that morning, Enrico had a blister. It looked just like an ordinary looking blister. The nurse practitioner said, Oh my, thats not good. I couldnt hide the concern on my face. With a blood sugar of over 1000 mg/dL, Henricos blister could be of great concern. He was admitted to the hospital that day, where he received treatme Continue reading >>

The Pride (partnership To Improve Diabetes Education) Toolkit

The Pride (partnership To Improve Diabetes Education) Toolkit

The PRIDE (Partnership to Improve Diabetes Education) Toolkit Development and Evaluation of Novel Literacy and Culturally Sensitive Diabetes Education Materials The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Diabetes Educ See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. Patients with low literacy, low numeracy, and/or linguistic needs can experience challenges understanding diabetes information and applying concepts to their self-management. The authors designed a toolkit of education materials that are sensitive to patients' literacy and numeracy levels, language preferences, and cultural norms and that encourage shared goal setting to improve diabetes self-management and health outcomes. The Partnership to Improve Diabetes Education (PRIDE) toolkit was developed to facilitate diabetes self-management education and support. The PRIDE toolkit includes a comprehensive set of 30 interactive education modules in English and Spanish to support diabetes self-management activities. The toolkit builds upon the authors' previously validated Diabetes Literacy and Numeracy Education Toolkit (DLNET) by adding a focus on shared goal setting, addressing the needs of Spanish-speaking patients, and including a broader range of diabetes management topics. Each PRIDE module was evaluated using the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM) instrument to determine the material's cultural appropriateness and its sensitivity to the needs of patients with low literacy and low numeracy. Reading grade level was also assessed using the Automated Readability Index (ARI), Coleman-Liau, Flesch-Kincaid, Fry, and SMOG formulas. The average reading grade level of the materials was 5.3 (SD 1.0), with a mean SAM of 91.2 (SD 5.4). All of the 30 modules received a superio Continue reading >>

Resources

Resources

ADA Health Poliy Institute, " The Oral Health Care System: A State-by-State Analysis:Texas " ADA Health Policy Institute, Oral Health and Well-Being, National Report and Texas Report Affordable Care Act -Healthcare.gov has launched a new Local Help function to help you find nearby, in-person enrollment assistance for the Health Insurance Marketplace Maryland Cultural Competency Technical Assistance Resource Kit (Health Literacy, Language Services, Workforce Diversity) National Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) Standards in Health and Health Care Dental Health Professional Shortage Areas, See Health Professional Shortage Areas Dental Patient, For the - full page oral health information for dentists to copy as handouts from ADA Brush Up on Oral Health:Dental Clinic Care for Children with Disabilities Oral Health For Children and Adolescents with Special Health Care Needs: Challenges and Opportunities fact sheet Promoting the Oral Health of Children with Special Health Care Needs: In Support of the National Agenda policy brief Resource Highlights: Focus on Children and Adolescents with Special Health Care Needs: Strategies for Improving the Oral Health System of Care for Children and Adolescents with Special Health Care Needs tip sheet Handouts from Special Care: An Oral Health Care Professional's Guide to Serving Young Children with Special Health Care Needs Continue reading >>

State-based Diabetes Prevention And Control Programs

State-based Diabetes Prevention And Control Programs

Diabetes Monitor Resources State-based diabetes prevention and control programs State-based diabetes prevention and control programs State-based diabetes prevention and control programs are funded in part by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and are available in all 50 states. These programs work to promote public policy changes, improve the access to quality diabetes care and expand diabetes prevention efforts. Below is a list of links to state-based programs and a description of each program. List of state-based diabetes prevention and control programs Alabama Diabetes Program . The Alabama Diabetes Program is a branch of the Alabama Department of Public Health. It collaborates with other state and local programs to raise diabetes awareness and prevent the disease. Alaska Diabetes Prevention and Control Program . The Alaska Diabetes Prevention and Control Program is part of the Division of Public Health and works to reduce the number of cases in the state by coordinating public education and community-based programs, providing educational programs for health care professionals and other strategic activities. Arizona Diabetes Program . The Arizona Diabetes Program is part of the Arizona Department of Health Services. The program includes the Arizona Diabetes Coalition, which is guided by the Arizona Diabetes Strategic Plan, 2008-2013. The coalition has a three-pronged approach: education, advocacy and surveillance. Arkansas Diabetes Prevention and Control Section . The Arkansas Diabetes and Prevention Control Section is part of the Arkansas Department of Health. Formed in 1997, it provides various services to local community members and professionals throughout the state. California Diabetes Program . The California Diabetes Program is the result of Continue reading >>

Toolkits | Epicc Program

Toolkits | Epicc Program

Step one in developing a worksite wellness program is to do an assessment of the current health status of the target population. "Studies show that when a health promotion program is unfocused, it has little long-term impact. So choosing the right kind of program is vital to its success, impact on employee health, return on investment, and ability of the program to be sustained." (Building a Healthy Worksite, pg 11) Once the assessment is finished, a program plan is developed based on the needs shown in the assessment. Once the plan is developed it is implemented into the workplace and then evaluated to measure its success. Below is a pictorial diagram of this process developed by the CDC. A more detailed description of this process can be found on their website about the Workplace Health Model. The tools listed below are to help you start developing an overall wellness program. Help about specific topics can be found in subsequent sections. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has created a checklist with recommendations to help you analyze your insurance benefits around heart disease and stroke and will guide you to negotiate for the benefits that would be beneficial for your employees. It is best to complete this checklist with the help of the person who purchases insurance, a health insurance company representative, and the director or CEO of the company. The Utah Department of Health through the Bureau of Health Promotion has created a worksite wellness toolkit entitled, "Building a Healthy Worksite A Guide to Lower Health Care Costs and More Productive Employees." Wellness Councils of America provide many free resources to people interested in worksite wellness. They have examples of Employee Needs Assessments (ENAs), instructions on how to start a well Continue reading >>

Health Services / Health Service Manual

Health Services / Health Service Manual

Facts on Whooping Cough and Adult TDaP Vaccination Official Guidelines for Implementation of HB 984 - Texas Diabetes Council official guidelines for implementation of HB984: "Guidelines for Training School Employees who are not Licensed Healthcare Professionals". Basic Diabetes Information and Teaching Resources - National Diabetes Educational Program- Free download of "Helping the Student with Diabetes Succeed: A Guide for School Personnel - Recommended by the Texas Diabetes Council as a guide for implementation of HB 984. - The American Diabetes Associantion's eight module power-point presentation, "Diabetes Care Tasks at School: What Key Personnel Need to Know". - American Diabetes Association - Texas Diabetes Council Diabetes Tool Kit - Provides information and guidance for professional nurses and educational handouts for use in training - Center for Disease Control - fact sheets , stats, publications, information about prevention and control of diabetes - Website offers information on types of insulin, pens, pumps, & carb counting. - The Diabetes Mall - books, scales, information - Diabetes Monitor - Monitors diabetes information in cyberspace Continue reading >>

Setma.com | Your Life Your Health | Population Perspective: Adult Diabetes In Southeast Texas Inter-professional Collaboration And Health Outcomes

Setma.com | Your Life Your Health | Population Perspective: Adult Diabetes In Southeast Texas Inter-professional Collaboration And Health Outcomes

Your Life Your Health - Population Perspective: Adult Diabetes in Southeast Texas Inter-professional Collaboration and Health Outcomes (Editor's Note: Major (Retired) Bryan Sims is the Chief Medical Officer for SETMA and heads SETMA's Office of Evidenced-Based Medicine. In collaboration with others, he is leading the development of SETMA's Medical Home and is working on his Doctorate as an Advanced Nurse Practitioner. The following paper was prepared in partial fulfillment of one of his Doctoral courses. Diabetes is a growing problem in American, in Texas and in Southeast Texas. If it were an infectious disease it would qualify for the designations of "endemic" and "pandemic." Major Sims' paper gives the rationale for SETMA's formation of our Diabetes Center of Excellence and for our development of a state-of-the-art diabetes disease management tool. It is also why SETMA is routinely auditing the diabetes care received by our patients based on the standards of NCQA, NQF, PQRI and Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement.) Diabetes mellitus is a progressive disease of the endocrine system. More specifically, diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both. As a function of time, the chronic hyperglycemia of diabetes is associated with long-term damage, dysfunction, and failure of various organs, especially the eyes, kidneys, nerves, heart, and blood vessels (Noble, 2001). Diabetes results from the body's failure to produce insulin (Type I) or from insulin resistance combined with relative insulin deficiency (Type II). The majority of persons with diabetes have Type II diabetes accounting for as much as 90% of this disease population ("Texas Diabetes Council," 2009). Rec Continue reading >>

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