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Tequila Drinks For Diabetics

Diabetes Friendly Margaritas

Diabetes Friendly Margaritas

I am a huge fan of margaritas. Sometimes in college my friends and I would head over to this restaurant after class and share a pitcher of margaritas on the rocks, salt all around. A few years later, I developed Type 1 diabetes and had a near impossible time drinking margaritas. It wasnt until our trip to Orlando for the Friends for Life conference last week that I was able to have a margarita again. The restaurant we went to the first night used agave nectar in their margaritas, making them low carb and delicious. I had never tried agave nectar before, but was looking forward to the results. Two hours after my margarita, I was happily at 107 mg/dl and was excited to come home and try my own. I finally found some agave nectar, and thought Id try my hand at making one. I passed on the sugary and way too sweet sour mix and just used fresh lime juice- it made all the difference. The agave nectar tastes sweet, no chemical after taste. If youre in the mood for something refreshing, low carb, and tangy, give this margarita a try! Continue reading >>

8 Worst Drinks For Diabetics

8 Worst Drinks For Diabetics

For those who have diabetes, it's crucial that they watch what they drink in order to maintain a healthy weight and blood sugar level, because beverages high in carbohydrates, calories, and sugar can be seriously harmful. But being mindful of drinks with high levels of sugar and carbs can be tough when so many drinks out there are loaded with them. Drinks such as soda, alcohol, and energy drinks are generally known as unhealthier options. But some seemingly healthy drinks, including fruit juice, coffee, and whole milk, can also be dangerous for diabetics. Take a look at which drinks diabetics should stay away from. Continue reading >>

Is Tequila Good For Diabetes?

Is Tequila Good For Diabetes?

Answered Apr 10, 2017 Author has 472 answers and 296.1k answer views Wow! Love the question. But whatever made you think of asking this? When a person drinks alcohol, the body reacts to it as a toxin, and channels all energy into expelling it. This means that other processes are interrupted including the production of glucose and the hormones needed to regulate it. This is most noticeable is in heavy drinkers, as over time drinking too much alcohol decreases the effectiveness of insulin, which leads to high blood sugar levels. Alcohol also affects blood sugar levels each time its consumed, which means occasional drinkers can also be negatively impacted. Alcohol consumption causes an increase in insulin secretion, which leads to low blood sugar (otherwise known as hypoglycaemia). This causes light headedness and fatigue, and is also responsible for a host of longer-term alcohol-related health problems. The effects of alcohol on blood sugar, in particular hypoglycemia, can make excessive drinking very dangerous for anyone with diabetes. Alcohol can also make hypoglycemic medications less effective, meaning those with diabetes need to take extra care when drinking. Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Party Drink Recipes

Diabetes-friendly Party Drink Recipes

Festive drinks are a necessity when hosting a party, and now you can quench your thirst without relying on high-calorie cocktails. Whether you're looking for alcoholic mixed drinks or nonalcoholic mocktails, our collection of favorite healthy party drink recipes serve at least six people. Festive drinks are a necessity when hosting a party, and now you can quench your thirst without relying on high-calorie cocktails. Whether you're looking for alcoholic mixed drinks or nonalcoholic mocktails, our collection of favorite healthy party drink recipes serve at least six people. Festive drinks are a necessity when hosting a party, and now you can quench your thirst without relying on high-calorie cocktails. Whether you're looking for alcoholic mixed drinks or nonalcoholic mocktails, our collection of favorite healthy party drink recipes serve at least six people. Festive drinks are a necessity when hosting a party, and now you can quench your thirst without relying on high-calorie cocktails. Whether you're looking for alcoholic mixed drinks or nonalcoholic mocktails, our collection of favorite healthy party drink recipes serve at least six people. Festive drinks are a necessity when hosting a party, and now you can quench your thirst without relying on high-calorie cocktails. Whether you're looking for alcoholic mixed drinks or nonalcoholic mocktails, our collection of favorite healthy party drink recipes serve at least six people. Continue reading >>

Asknadia: Safe Alcoholic Drinks For Diabetics

Asknadia: Safe Alcoholic Drinks For Diabetics

Is a low-sugar drink such as San Miguel light regarded as a safe alcoholic drink for type 2 diabetics? George Dear George: Your question is a perennial: Where do alcoholic beverages fit in to the life of a type 2? Is the best answer one that advises type 2s to abstain rather than run the risks that too much alcohol consumption generates? I personally think that there’s room in type 2s’ lives for some alcohol consumption—such as San Miguel Light—which I’ll explain below. But first, let’s look at the reasons why alcohol is not wholeheartedly accepted as part of a type 2’s lifestyle. There’s a hierarchy of carbohydrate content in alcoholic beverages: Liquor (vodka, whiskey, tequila, gin, etc.) has no carbohydrates Wine has some carbohydrates in it Beer, ale, and malt liquors have the highest number of carbs among alcoholic drinks Most type 2s can tell you that even though beer and wine have carbohydrates, their alcohol content can delay the liver’s manufacture of glucose as it processes the alcohol. The result is an often deceptive low blood glucose reading, which might lead the unaware think that alcohol is a friend when it comes to blood sugar control. But delaying the manufacture of glucose is nowhere near the same as achieving control via the pleasant consumption of alcohol. It’s a practice that can backfire: Alcohol’s effect in lowering blood sugar can be harmful if BG numbers drop too much—hypoglycemia is never something to take lightly Diabetes is associated with increased risk of liver disease. Adding the burden of metabolizing alcohol only increases that risk. The kidneys, too, work extra hard to process alcohol. Low numbers can entice a drinker into overdoing alcohol. After all, if a little has such a good effect on blood glucose numbers, Continue reading >>

Tequila For Diabetes? Agave Plant Sweetener Cuts Blood Sugar Levels And Fuels Weight Loss

Tequila For Diabetes? Agave Plant Sweetener Cuts Blood Sugar Levels And Fuels Weight Loss

Tequila For Diabetes? Agave Plant Sweetener Cuts Blood Sugar Levels And Fuels Weight Loss Diabetic patients may find relief from their high blood glucose levels, and the overweight from their obesity, through a natural sweetener in the agave plant, a new study finds. Known as agavins, the plant-based sweeteners slow the stomach from emptying, boosting insulin production. Theyre also non-digestible, which means they act as a dietary fiber but cant elevate a persons blood sugar. While this inability to be broken down means some peoples digestive systems cant tolerate the sweetener, researchers are confident it can stimulate the growth of healthy microbes in the mouth and intestine. The research team presented their findings on Sunday at the American Chemical Societys 247th National Meeting, in Dallas. They found that, while agavins arent nearly as sweet as their artificial counterparts, they do a proficient job of reducing glucose levels in the blood. More hopefully, agavins are not expensive and they have no known side effects, except for those few people who cannot tolerate them, explained Dr. Mercedes G. Lpez, a researcher at the Centro de Investigacin y de Estudios Avanzados in Guanajuato, Mexico. Lpez and her colleagues tested agavins on mice as part of their normal diet. By and large, the mice that were given the sweetener ate less, lost weight, and showed lower blood glucose levels than both the control mice and those fed other sweeteners, such as sucrose, fructose, glucose, aspartame, and agave syrup. Future studies will need to show whether this success translates into human models. One thing Lpez emphasized at the conference was the difference between agavins and high-fructose corn syrup the 21st century agro-enemy thats often found as a substitute for good old Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alcohol: Do The Two Mix? (part 1)

Diabetes And Alcohol: Do The Two Mix? (part 1)

A nice glass of Chianti…a cold beer on a hot summer day…celebrating with a flute of champagne. There are so many ways that alcohol is integrated into both everyday life and special occasions. Granted, not everyone drinks alcohol, but many people do. And when it comes to the question, "Can I drink alcohol if I have diabetes?" the answer is about as clear as that for "Is a low-carb diet good for diabetes?" In other words, the answer really is, "It depends!" It’s important to mention right off the bat that there are certainly many reasons why people should not drink alcohol. Some may be related to diabetes and some may be related to other reasons. Therefore, it’s important to discuss this issue with your health-care provider if you have any doubts or concerns. And if you’re newly diagnosed with diabetes or starting on a new medicine, it’s worthwhile bringing up the topic if your provider doesn’t. While you’d be hard-pressed to find any health organization actually recommending that you drink alcohol, you might take some comfort in knowing that the American Diabetes Association, the American Heart Association, and even the American Cancer Society agree that drinking alcohol in moderation is certainly not off-limits to most people. But back to diabetes and alcohol. What’s the concern here? And why should some people with diabetes not drink alcohol? To answer these questions, it’s helpful to understand a little bit about how alcohol is processed in the body. The body treats alcohol as a drug, not as a food product. This means that, when you drink any type of alcoholic beverage, your liver kicks into high gear, preparing itself to “detoxify” the body of this “poison” (I’m using these words for dramatic effect). Essentially, the liver has to metabo Continue reading >>

Does Alcohol And Tobacco Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Does Alcohol And Tobacco Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Yes, alcohol and tobacco use may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Alcohol Although studies show that drinking moderate amounts of alcohol may actually lower the risk of diabetes, the opposite is true for people who drink greater amounts of alcohol. Moderate alcohol use is defined as one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than age 65, and up to two drinks a day for men age 65 and younger. Too much alcohol may cause chronic inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), which can impair its ability to secrete insulin and potentially lead to diabetes. Tobacco Tobacco use can increase blood sugar levels and lead to insulin resistance. The more you smoke, the greater your risk of diabetes. People who smoke heavily — more than 20 cigarettes a day — have almost double the risk of developing diabetes compared with people who don’t smoke. Continue reading >>

Can Tequila Treat Diabetes?

Can Tequila Treat Diabetes?

Tequila Treats Diabetes? I'm starting out with one of those headlines that brings a smile to my lips because it sounds so implausible: Scientists from the research center of the Polytechnic Institute of Guanajuato, Mexico, have found that the agave plant, which just happens to be the main ingredient in making tequila, may have value in treating diabetes. Experiments at the CINVESTAV research center found that a diet high in fructans from agave could help increase bone mass (and prevent osteoporosis) and stimulate GLP-1, a hormone that stimulates insulin release, according to Dr. Mercedes Lopez, the head of the research team. Now for the bad news: you can't get this healthy benefit from drinking a lot of tequila since the process of making the liquor destroys the fructans. Read more about this study here. Type 2 Diabetes Medications: A Study on Lowering A1c Levels The April 24, 2010, issue of The Lancet has an article titled "Liraglutide versus sitagliptin for patients with type 2 diabetes who did not have adequate control with metformin: a 26-week, randomized, parallel-group, open-label trial" by Richard E. Pratley, MD et al. This was a research project with office-treated patient participants from the United States, Europe, and Canada. The participants were followed for 3 months and were randomly given metformin and either liraglutide (marketed in the US as Victoza) or sitagliptin (marketed in the US as Januvia) to help lower hemoglobin A1c levels. The beginning A1c levels varied from 7.5% to 10.00% in participants, who were 18 to 80 years old. The researchers found that patients did better on the liraglutide; however, 21% to 17% reported nausea on this medication. On the plus side, they functioned with more controlled hypoglycemia events with only 5% reporting minor h Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Diabetes: How Does It Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Alcohol And Diabetes: How Does It Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

For many people, a glass of alcohol here and there does not pose a problem. However, for those with health conditions, such as diabetes, alcohol can affect blood sugar levels and pose a health risk. Understanding what you are consuming and how alcohol influences blood glucose levels is particularly important for people with diabetes. Alcohol can interfere with blood sugar levels. People with diabetes should sip drinks slowly and not drink on an empty stomach. Alcohol and the body Alcohol is a depressant; it is classed as a "sedative-hypnotic drug" because it depresses the central nervous system. Every organ in the body can be affected by alcohol. Once consumed, it is rapidly absorbed by the stomach and small intestine and enters the bloodstream. In an average person, the liver can breaks down roughly one standard drink of alcohol per hour. Excess alcohol moves throughout the body. The amount not broken down by the liver is removed by the lungs,kidneys, and skin in urine and sweat. How alcohol affects a person's body depends on how much they consume. At low doses, alcohol can act as a stimulant - people may feel happy, or become talkative. Drinking too much alcohol, however, can impair the body. Alcohol and blood sugar levels A person's overall health plays a big role in how they respond to alcohol. People with diabetes or other blood sugar problems must be careful when consuming alcohol. Alcohol consumption can interfere with blood sugar as well as the hormones needed to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Frequent heavy drinkers can wipe out their energy storage in a few hours. Over time, excessive alcohol consumption can reduce the overall effectiveness of insulin. This results in high blood sugar levels. Many people with alcoholic liver disease also have either gluc Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Alcohol: Proceed With Caution

Type 2 Diabetes And Alcohol: Proceed With Caution

Alcohol can worsen diabetes-related nerve damage.(RON CHAPPLE STOCK/CORBIS)Hoping for a beer at the ball game, or a glass of wine with dinner? If you have type 2 diabetes, that's probably OK as long as your blood sugar is under control, you don't have any complications that are affected by alcohol (such as high blood pressure), and you know how the drink will affect your blood sugar, according to the American Diabetes Association. An alcohol-containing drink a day might even help your heart (though if you don't already drink, most experts say that's not a reason to start). In moderation, alcohol may cut heart disease risk According to a study by researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health, women with type 2 diabetes who drank relatively small amounts of alcohol had a lower heart-disease risk than those who abstained. A second study found that men with diabetes had the same reduction in heart risk with a moderate alcohol intake as non-diabetic men. In general, the recommendations for alcohol consumption for someone with type 2 diabetes are the same as anyone else: no more than two drinks per day for men and no more than one drink per day for women. (Make sure to measure: A drink serving is 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of hard liquor such as scotch, gin, tequila, or vodka.) People with diabetes who choose to drink need to take extra care keeping food, medications, alcohol, and blood sugars in balance. Janis Roszler, RD, a certified diabetes educator in Miami, Fla., recommends: Mixing alcoholic drinks with water or calorie-free diet sodas instead of sugary (and calorie- and carbohydrate-laden) sodas and other mixers. Once you have had your drink, switch to a non-alcoholic drink, such as sparkling water, for the rest of the evening. Make sure yo Continue reading >>

Tequila Ingredient Could Help With Weight Loss, Diabetes

Tequila Ingredient Could Help With Weight Loss, Diabetes

email Print Article AA The key ingredient in tequila could help fight type 2 diabetes and obesity, according to a wonderful new study. The miracle substance is agavins, a natural form of sugar found in the agave plant. The reason it makes a perfect sweetener is it is both non-digestible and acts as a dietary fiber, so it won't raise blood glucose levels - and could actually lower them for the 26 million Americans and others worldwide who have type 2 diabetes. The report was presented at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in Dallas last Sunday. "We have found that since agavins reduce glucose levels and increase GLP-1, they also increase the amount of insulin," said Mercedes G. López, Ph.D. GLP-1 is a hormone that slows the stomach from emptying, thereby stimulating the production of insulin. She added, "Agavins are not expensive and they have no known side effects, except for those few people who cannot tolerate them." In addition, agavins, like other fructans, which are made of the sugar fructose, are the best sugars to help support the growth of healthful microbes in the mouth and intestines, she said. López, who is with Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados, Biotechnology and Biochemistry Irapuato in Guanajuato, Mexico, also noted that agavins can help people feel fuller, which could help them eat less. Agavins are not the same as agave nectar or syrup, however, which have more in common with high-fructose corn syrup, López said. Agavins are the only carbohydrates used to produce tequila. But because the agavins are converted to ethanol following cooking and fermentation of the agave pines, agavins are not found in the finished product, so unfortunately, tequila is not a health tonic. At least not the weight-loss kind. In the st Continue reading >>

Study: Drinking Tequila May Be Beneficial To Those Who Are Overweight Or Have Diabetes

Study: Drinking Tequila May Be Beneficial To Those Who Are Overweight Or Have Diabetes

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) – Want to lose weight and be healthier? Then drink more tequila! Actually, hold that thought. A new study suggests that the sugars in the plant used to make tequila may offer health benefits to people who are overweight or have diabetes. According to an article in Time, researchers say the sugars may lower blood glucose levels for people with type 2 diabetes. According to Mexican researchers, the type of natural sugar, agavins, are non-digestible and do not raise blood sugar. In their research, scientists fed mice a normal diet and added agavins to some of their drinking water. It was revealed that the mice who consumed the agavins ate less and had lower blood glucose levels. Those mice also produced a hormone called GLP-1 that keeps the stomach full for a longer period and produces insulin. The authors of the study say, “This puts agavins in a tremendous position for their consumption by obese and diabetic people.” The research was presented at the National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Dallas. Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Alcohol

Diabetes & Alcohol

Drinking alcohol can lead to serious low blood sugar reactions. Alcohol can also affect diabetic nerve damage, eye disease, and high blood triglycerides. You may wonder if drinking alcohol is safe for people with diabetes. If you drink alcohol, there are some things you need to know first about alcohol safety. Is it Safe to Drink Alcohol? Check with your doctor to make sure alcohol doesn’t interfere with your medications or complicate any of your medical conditions. Drinking alcohol can lead to serious low blood sugar reactions, especially if you take insulin or types of diabetes pills that stimulate the release of insulin from the pancreas. Alcohol can also affect other medical conditions you may have, like diabetic nerve damage, diabetic eye disease, and high blood triglycerides. Get guidelines for alcohol use from your medical provider. How Much Alcohol Can I Drink? If you choose to drink alcohol, drink in moderation. Limit your intake of alcohol to no more than one serving per day for women, and no more than two servings per day for men. One serving size of alcohol equals: 12 ounces of beer 5 ounces of wine 1½ ounces of distilled spirits (such as rum, whiskey, gin, etc.) Alcohol and Risk of Low Blood Sugar If you are managing your diabetes with diet and exercise alone, drinking alcohol can stil increase your risk of low blood sugars. And if you take insulin or types of diabetes pills that stimulate insulin production, drinking alcohol can lead to even more serious low blood sugar reactions. Normally, the liver releases glucose to maintain blood sugar levels. But when you drink alcohol, the liver is busy breaking the alcohol down, so it does a poor job of releasing glucose into the bloodstream. This can lead to a drop in blood sugar levels if you are drinking alco Continue reading >>

Diabetic Drinking Guide: Holiday Edition. Cocktails, Wine, Mixers And More.

Diabetic Drinking Guide: Holiday Edition. Cocktails, Wine, Mixers And More.

Happy Holidays! When family and friends get together during the holiday season, it usually involves a lot of different types of foods and beverages. When you are living with diabetes, one wrong decision can cause big problems, especially when it comes to choosing what to drink. This article will help you sort through the most popular drink options so you can choose what works best for you (it even includes drink carbohydrate charts - charts are great!). This includes beer, wine, spirits, mixed drinks and cocktails, shooters, juices, mixers, holiday punch, non-alcoholic drinks and even eggnog. So at this year's Christmas party or New Year's Eve event, you'll be able to make an informed decision for just about any drink that comes your way. There are two things to be mindful of when choosing something to drink: the amount of carbohydrate it provides and whether or not it contains alcohol (more on that later). For non-alcoholic beverages: Select diet sodas, seltzer or club soda instead of regular soda or tonic water. A non-diet soda can contain as much as 49 grams of carbohydrate per serving compared to the zero carbs found in a diet version. Choose unsweetened iced tea instead of sweetened and avoid the punch bowl. If you like to sweeten your coffee or tea, then it's always helpful to bring your favorite sugar-free sweetener along with you just in case there is none available. The chart below shows the number of carbs in commonly served non-alcoholic drinks (juices appear later). Beverage Carbs per 8-oz Carbs per 12-oz Diet Soda 0g 0g Regular Soda 23g 35g Regular Cream Soda 33g 49g Seltzer / Club Soda 0g 0g Tonic Water 22g 32g Egg Nog 20g Iced Tea, Unsweetened 0.4g 0.6g Iced Tea, Sweetened 22g 33g Fruit Punch (regular) 13-30g Holiday Punch with Juice & Soda 24g Holiday Pu Continue reading >>

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