diabetestalk.net

Ted Talks Type 1 Diabetes

A Good Tedx Talk By Dr Sarah Hallberg

A Good Tedx Talk By Dr Sarah Hallberg

That’s a good strategy Anon. Regarding Diabetes NZ, the only reason they give for not recommending low carb on their website – given the positive things they say about it – is that you might miss out on essential nutrients (vitamins and minerals) by cutting out foods. This is not a problem with a whole-food approach to low carb. They summarize “A low carbohydrate diet may work for some people”. “However, such a diet needs to be carefully managed” – this is true of all diets with diabetes, and more true of high-carbohydrate diets, which require management with increasing medication – “and is not the answer for most people with diabetes” – there are no reasons given for this statement. In fact the belief that a low-carb diet should be the first option for diabetes is not only held by a few rebels like ourselves, Tim Noakes, and others, but has a long history within the global community of diabetes experts. In fact, before the discovery of insulin in 1922, you could not feed high carbohydrate diets to diabetics; type 2 diabetics would deteriorate, and type 1 diabetics would die. Diets high in fat, limited in protein, and restricted in carbohydrate were the standard of care. The mass production of insulin, and the later invention of other drugs, slowly undermined this practice. There were a number of reasons for this; many people wanted to enjoy carbohydrate-rich foods, and live a relatively normal life, and the drugs allowed them to do this. Also, the early low-carb diets weren’t as nutritionally adequate as we can make them today, because we now understand that the fibre from vegetables, though it is technically a carbohydrate, doesn’t turn to glucose in the body – so there is no reason to limit non-starchy veges, which are a great source of Continue reading >>

Tedx - Type 1 Diabetes: From Cubism To A Cure

Tedx - Type 1 Diabetes: From Cubism To A Cure

Reviewed by Yuk-Fun Liu For those who may be jaded about claims for a “cure" for Type 1 diabetes this talk gives an overview of how far things have come in less than 100 years. Dr Robin Goland a paediatric diabetologist, gives a TEDx talk describing the strides in clinical care from the inception of insulin in 1922 to current day, and also how research is shaping the future. Importantly she talks about the importance of integrating research into the clinic and sharing it with PWD. Adrienne Burton Dr Robin Goland is very easy to listen to. She is an American endocrinologist and part of the Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center in New York. This video takes you from 1922 through to today and how far diabetes research has taken medication, technology and care. Really good video to watch for all especially families, very positive. Continue reading >>

Bringing Hs (hidradenitis Suppurativa) Out Of The Dark | Jackson Gillies

Bringing Hs (hidradenitis Suppurativa) Out Of The Dark | Jackson Gillies

"Have you ever woken up one morning to discover an abscess that would grow to the size of a baseball in your armpit? I have. I have HS or Hidradenitis Suppurativa, and so does up to 4% of the population. That's 230 million people, and yet no one is talking about it. Well, I will." Jackson Gillies is an 18-year-old student at Santa Barbara City College whose life took a major turn when he won Santa Barbara’s Teen Star USA crown in 2016. Since then he has performed at the Concert to End Gun Violence Across America with Kenny Loggins and opened for Jim Messina at the William Sansum Diabetes Center fundraiser, among many other noteworthy appearances. Jackson is a spokesperson for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation for whom he has made national TV public service ads with Mary Tyler Moore and a DVD titled “Almost Bionic” about the Artificial Pancreas Project. Jackson, a Type 1 diabetic since age 3, has come full circle, this year becoming one of 250 Type 1 diabetics who took part in the international Closed Loop Artificial Pancreas Trial. Four years ago Jackson developed the first sign of another disease. After more than a few misdiagnoses, his condition was finally pegged as Hidradenitis Suppurativa, an autoinflammatory disease that causes painful skin abscesses. HS afflicts as many as four percent of the population (potentially 30 million people), yet is rarely discussed or studied. HS can be physically, psychologically, and socially debilitating, the lesions affecting the most sensitive parts of the body, places where there is skin to skin contact. The painful abscesses can take months or years to heal. Despite all this, and after five surgeries, Jackson conceived, produced, and starred in the “Something That Matters Concert” to raise awareness about Hidra Continue reading >>

5 Inspiring Ted Talks For People With Diabetes

5 Inspiring Ted Talks For People With Diabetes

Jewels Doskicz, RN, is a freelance writer, patient advocate, health coach, and long-distance cyclist. She and her daughter both live healthfully with type 1 diabetes. Perhaps you have already joined the millions of people across the globe engaging with the wildly popular TED Talks on topics that speak to the varied aspects of our humanity. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, and Design, and is the acronym for a non-profit organization with the slogan, "Ideas Worth Spreading." With more than 1,400 free TED Talks to view, odds are in your favor that you'll find one that resonates with you. Each talk is unique and emanates from a global set of private conferences. You can choose to watch them on YouTube and TED.com, or read the transcript instead. I like watching best. They are an incredibly easy and rich resource to benefit from. Why are TED Talks important? Tim Bajarin sums it up well in Time: "TED has become a launching point for some interesting soul searching, creating within me a desire to learn more about things that matter outside of my own world." Here are five TED Talks that may have special meaning for you as you deal with diabetes. 1. On finding happiness The Surprising Science of Happiness—Dan Gilbert is a Harvard psychologist and author of Stumbling on Happiness. His Ted Talk breaks down our traditional thoughts on happiness with ideas that are applicable to everyone. He explains that it is possible to find happiness even when things don’t go as we would like—diabetes included. 2. On vulnerability The Power of Vulnerability—Brené Brown is a vulnerability researcher who studies human connections. Her talk is fascinating on many levels, with subject matter that holds true for those of us living with diabetes. Brown reminds us that “Connection i Continue reading >>

Ted Talk On The Bionic Pancreas By D-parent Dr. Edward Damiano

Ted Talk On The Bionic Pancreas By D-parent Dr. Edward Damiano

Dr. Edward Damiano has the world’s best motivation for his work on the bionic pancreas: a son with type 1 diabetes. In his talk, he explains type 1 diabetes and does us all a favor by accurately describing insulin as a “very dangerous substance” with a “high toxicity index and a narrow therapeutic range.” Dr. Damiano goes on to explain how the bionic pancreas works and how it could help people with type 1 diabetes calling it a “bridge to a cure”. To learn more about the bionic pancreas, you can visit the website. Further reading on the bionic pancreas and other automated systems for people with diabetes: Photo Credit: TED Continue reading >>

Niki Bezzant Ted Talk

Niki Bezzant Ted Talk

Healthy Food Guide’s Niki Bezzant on healthy eating made simple The excellent series of Ted Talks covers a range of issues, from politics to technology and now healthy eating. Watch Niki Bezzant outline how healthy eating can be made simple and the six things we need to know about how we think of our food. __________________________________________________________________________ Continue reading >>

#lchf Must Share Ted Talk - Fantastic Explanation Of Insulin Resistance & #diabetes!

#lchf Must Share Ted Talk - Fantastic Explanation Of Insulin Resistance & #diabetes!

I liked your talk, one thing related to a question on exercise performance. Exercise on low carb for high intensity, the highest intensity is fueled via the atp phosphocreatine system 2-7 seconds eg 50m sprint and 1-3 RM lifts. Power declines and anaerobic glycolytic system increases after that to sustain high but lower output up to maybe 45 seconds, power output decreases after that. The thing is your glycogen supplies never fully deplete and will be replenished under a zero dietary carb diet just slower and not to as high a level so no super compensation as when you chug sugars. Skeletal muscle lacks glucose-6-phosphatase, it can produce glycogen but can't deliver glucose to the blood stream, think about why that would be, it would obviously be an advantage to replenish significant glycogen levels in skeletal muscle when there is no carbohydrate intake for fight or flight purposes. TLDR you can work out several times a week without carbs when fat adapted in the normal rep ranges and make progress. Also protein isn't the devil as it is portrayed in ketoland because unlike carbs the insulin response which is required help move amino acids to where they are needed is accompanied by glucagon so no hypoglycemia in a normally functioning humans. Continue reading >>

Ted: Ideas Worth Spreading – Type 1 Diabetes

Ted: Ideas Worth Spreading – Type 1 Diabetes

Are you familiar with TED Talks? I can’t remember how I first heard of them. I started watching and listening to them a couple of years ago and have been really moved by a few of them. If you haven’t seen any of them, or have never heard of them, nearly everything is available at TED.com for absolutely free. TED is a nonprofit devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading. Their mission? Spreading ideas. As they say on their website: We believe passionately in the power of ideas to change attitudes, lives and ultimately, the world. So we’re building here a clearinghouse that offers free knowledge and inspiration from the world’s most inspired thinkers, and also a community of curious souls to engage with ideas and each other. This site, launched April 2007, is an ever-evolving work in progress, and you’re an important part of it. I think it is so incredible to see so many brilliant people getting together and sharing ideas. Who knows what seed might sprout from any of these sorts of talks or presentations. The potential is often tangible. So when Ellen shared an update about a TEDx session all about curing type 1 diabetes, I was very excited. This is happening on October 15th, 2011 in the San Diego, CA area. If you are local, the tickets to this daylong event are a very reasonable $100. There will be a full day of talks by the country’s leading researchers and clinicians addressing the cause, the most advanced treatments and ultimately a cure for diabetes. I would love to go, but I don’t have the financial resources to pay for a flight and a couple of nights in a hotel. If you’re reading this, and would like to sponsor this underemployed type 1 diabetes blogger, please let me know. (Hey – it’s worth a shot, right?) Here’s a neat little video about the TEDx even Continue reading >>

How To Teach ... Diabetes

How To Teach ... Diabetes

Do you know the difference between the two types of diabetes? Here’s a quick refresher: type 1 is where your body destroys the cells that make insulin, which means that your glucose levels increase, potentially damaging your organs. It can develop at any time, but is often discovered in childhood and requires daily doses of insulin. Type 2, on the other hand, means that your body doesn’t produce enough insulin, or doesn’t react to it. Symptoms can be controlled with diet, exercise and monitoring blood glucose levels. It is linked to obesity and usually develops in later life; it also accounts for 90% of all UK cases. The disease is at once complex, common (it affects 4 million people in the UK) and scary – prevalence rates are rising and about half of cases are thought to be undiagnosed. So how can you discuss it with your students? Primary This video, from Diabetes UK, uses simple, child-friendly language to explain what type 1 diabetes is and how it affects the body. An extreme zoom takes viewers inside a person with diabetes: there we meet talking cells and flying insulin and glucose, detailing how treatment works and how to handle a diagnosis. The charity has a huge number of resources aimed at children who have diabetes, including guidance sheets about exploring the outdoors safely and taking care in cold weather. Advice includes wearing a diabetes wristband in case of an emergency and keeping a testing kit and snacks to hand. The idea of testing blood and injecting insulin can be intimidating. Give your students a look at a day in the life of a diabetic with this pack from the International Diabetes Federation. It uses a cartoon strip to demystify the process of checking blood sugar levels, as well as offering advice on how to keep active and eat healthily Continue reading >>

“reversing?” Type 2 Diabetes

“reversing?” Type 2 Diabetes

Ted Talk – “Reversing Type 2 Diabetes Starts with Ignoring the Guidelines” by: Sarah Hallberg” This is a great video explaining how improve type 2 diabetes. Stop using medicine to treat something that can be treated with food! I do not necessarily agree that Type 2 Diabetes can always be reversed, but I do like her guidelines for dealing with insulin resistance. Her Rules for Eating: If it says “light”, “low fat” or “fat free” it must stay in the grocery store EAT FOOD Don’t eat anything you don’t like Eat when you are hungry. Don’t eat when you’re not. NO GPS – No grains, potatoes or sugar. Continue reading >>

My 10 Favorite Ted Talks

My 10 Favorite Ted Talks

You may be thinking, “What does this have to do with nutrition? Or exercise? Or ketosis? Or the other things Peter obsesses over?” Well, technically, nothing. But since this is a personal blog, I figure every once in a while I can write something for my friends or family members who have zero interest in nutrition or ketosis or VO2 maxes or FTP or RQ or LDL-P… (this list of folks is actually quite long!). I remember the first time I ever watched a TED talk in the summer of 2007. My first thought was, “Hey this is great. How have I never heard of these, especially since this conference has been going on since 1984?” Well, back in the 80’s and 90’s, and really up until about 2005 or 2006, I don’t think the talks were posted online, so perhaps I can be forgiven. If you’re so inclined, I’d invite you to watch these talks over the next few weeks. (Or, if you’re OCD like me, you may just watch them all in one sitting.) I hope they speak to you in the way they have spoken to me. And I hope you’ll share your favorites back with me. I’m always up for a great TED talk. Ok, so on to my list. First of all, this was very difficult to narrow down. If there is a nine-way tie for 2nd place, below, there is a 20-way tie for 3rd place (not shown). Also, picking a favorite talk is like picking a favorite food or drink. It sort of depends on what you’re craving. Each of these talks means something different to me. Depending on my “need” at the moment, I guess my appetite for each one varies over time. If you read the post I wrote after the TEDMED conference this year, you’ll recall that I specifically called out my all-time favorite TED talk, that of Ric Elias. Any time and every time I feel like I’m losing sight of things, I fire up Ric’s talk (or jus Continue reading >>

10/15/2015 A Ted Talk At The Met On Tid Presented By Dr. Robin Goland Goes Global

10/15/2015 A Ted Talk At The Met On Tid Presented By Dr. Robin Goland Goes Global

Very soon after presenting on the TEDx stage at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (Met) on September 26, the Berrie Center’s Co-Director, Robin Goland, J. Merrill Eastman Professor of Clinical Diabetes, learned her talk had been viewed in Sri Lanka. Such is the power of the TED stage-- to make great ideas immediately accessible and spark conversation. This year's theme was "The In-Between", a daylong celebration of what isn't. Yet. The main stage of TEDxMet was at The Met Breuer. The building itself served as the inspiration for the day: no longer the Whitney, not yet the Met, a building in-between. Dr. Goland, who was invited to speak on type 1 diabetes (T1D), took the stage with 14 other noted artists and experts, including two Pulitzer Prize winners. Dr. Goland led the audience on a journey. It began in 1922 when Edwin Manheimer was admitted to the hospital as a sickly boy with a diagnosis of T1D and became among the first persons to ever receive insulin, changing his life forever. Through advances in treatment and technology Dr. Goland showed how people living with T1D today, including Edwin Manheimer’s granddaughter, are able to live normal, healthy lives. “The outlook for people diagnosed today is much brighter for a healthy normal life expectancy, free of terrible complications,” said Dr. Goland. On prevention and early detection of T1D she said, “Thanks to scientists collaborating together on a study called the NIH TrialNet study we have found ways to identify T1D in relatives of our patients even before it occurs and we are working for the future to prevent diabetes so that no additional family members will develop it.” For those living with T1D, the cure can’t come soon enough, and no one is more aware of those feelings than Dr. Goland. She talked a Continue reading >>

Doctor Explains How Reversing Type 2 Diabetes Starts With Ignoring The Guidelines On Carbohydrates

Doctor Explains How Reversing Type 2 Diabetes Starts With Ignoring The Guidelines On Carbohydrates

Obesity is a life-threatening disease not taken on by choice. Yet, thanks at least in part to our society’s glorification of thinness, many have preconceived notions about those who are obese, believing they are to blame for their situation — that they are simply lazy, gluttonous, and lack the willpower to change. But as Sarah Hallberg, the Medical Director of the Medically Supervised Weight Loss Program at IU Health Arnett, United States, notes, obesity is a hormonal disease, not a lifestyle choice. And one of those hormones is insulin. The body processes insulin when glucose is released into the bloodstream following carbohydrate consumption. Usually, this insulin responsF As for the general recommendations put forth by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), she explains that, “The general recommendations are to tell patients with type 2 to consume 40-65g of carbohydrate per meal, plus more at snacks. We are essentially recommending that they eat exactly what’s causing their problem.” Hallberg notes that, when treating type 2 patients with insulin, glucose levels rise after eating carbs, as does the need for insulin. But because insulin is the body’s fat storage hormone, this causes hunger fat to be stored, making it difficult for patients to lose weight. “The ADA guidelines specifically state that there is inconclusive evidence to recommend a specific carbohydrate limit. Nowhere in the ADA guidelines is the aim of reversing type 2 diabetes. This needs to be changed because type 2 can be reversed, in many if not most situations, especially if we start early,” she says. As for Hallberg’s diet recommendation, she points out that, though the body needs proteins and essential fatty acids, it doesn’t have a certain amount of daily carbohydrates it mus Continue reading >>

Speaker Doug Melton Making Frontpage News

Speaker Doug Melton Making Frontpage News

Reported today in the Boston Globe, TEDxBeaconStreet alum Doug Melton is making groundbreaking progress in the battle to end type 1 diabetes. His research will inform the rest of the scientific community and serve as a critical stepping stone on the path to a cure. Stirring news for those living with or watching a loved one manage the disease (Melton’s own inspiration). In addition to local coverage, the world is taking note and sharing in the excitement over his pioneering work and potentially game-changing approach. By transforming stem cells into insulin-regulating pancreatic cells, patients’ own bodies are redesigned to keep insulin stabilized as opposed to lifelong reliance on injections. Stem-Cell Breakthrough in Treatment of Diabetes – Harvard Magazine‎ Scientists Coax Human Embryonic Stem Cells Into Making Insulin – NPR Cure for Type 1 diabetes imminent after Harvard stem-cell breakthrough – Telegraph.co.uk‎ Harvard researcher Douglas Melton developed a process that starts with stem cells and results in pancreatic cells that secrete insulin. When his two children were stricken with type 1 diabetes, Harvard stem cell scientist Douglas Melton says, he did what any father would want to do: He set out to cure the disease. After 15 years of effort, including some false starts and regulatory hurdles, Melton has taken a major step toward that goal. In a paper published in the journal Cell on Thursday, he reported a step-by-step procedure that starts with stem cells and results in hundreds of millions of the precious pancreatic cells that secrete the hormone insulin, keeping blood sugar levels in balance. It is the lack of insulin produced by those cells, called beta cells, that lies at the root of type 1 diabetes. Ultimately, the hope is those cells could Continue reading >>

Tedmed 2015 Highlights

Tedmed 2015 Highlights

Twitter summary: #TEDMED2015 speakers on food policy, data science, mindfulness, food deserts, and more TEDMED, the health and medicine edition of the world-famous TED conference, recently hosted its annual TEDMED event, where thought leaders gathered to share their innovative ideas, cutting-edge research, and inspiring stories on everything health-related. The engaging talks were chockfull of insights on topics ranging from food policy to new frontiers in genetic testing. As a nonprofit organization, we had the very cool opportunity to receive free access to stream the event live and learn from 46 amazing speakers. Read below for our top four highlights of the TEDMED event, focusing on topics in diabetes, nutrition, and wellness. 1. US Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy highlighted the importance of prioritizing “happiness” to improve public health. In a very moving talk, he emphasized that happiness alone can lower levels of stress hormones, lead to better heart rates, lower blood pressure levels, and even strengthen immune systems. Discussing his personal experiences as a doctor, Dr. Murthy pointed out that while he cared for a wide range of illnesses, the most common condition he saw in patients was “unhappiness.” He highlighted many tools for combatting unhappiness such as gratitude exercises, meditation, physical activity, and social connectivity, emphasizing that such simple and low-cost actions can have dramatic impacts. Specifically, Dr. Murthy shared the story of a meditation program at San Francisco’s Visitation Valley Middle School that led to reductions in suspension rates and teacher absenteeism, as well as remarkable improvements in students’ academic performance. He concluded with a stirring call to action to “create happiness in our own live Continue reading >>

More in diabetes