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Technology For Diabetes Management

No More Finger Prick. New Technology May Help With Diabetes Management.

No More Finger Prick. New Technology May Help With Diabetes Management.

Type 1 and type 2 diabetes technology and medications have come a long way since the invention of insulin in 1921. But day-to-day management still requires countless finger pricks to draw blood and measure glucose levels. FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, manufactured by Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. and officially approved on September 27 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), strives to be a true game-changer for people with diabetes. Unlike the Dexcom or Medtronic’s Guardian and Enlite continuous glucose monitors (CGM), which require a minimum of twice-daily finger pricks to calibrate the CGM’s readings with that of a traditional blood glucometer, the Libre system requires zero calibration. The technology is still similar in that the Libre also uses a small sensor wire that a patient inserts into their subcutaneous tissue. This sensor measures glucose levels in the interstitial (body fat) fluid versus glucose in the bloodstream. How the device works Where the technology continues to differ greatly is in how the glucose levels measured by the sensor wire are then reported to the person using it. From the get-go, the Libre requires a lengthy 12-hour startup period before the sensor is able to measure and report glucose levels while the Dexcom and Medtronic sensors startup window is a mere two hours. The most significant difference between these technologies is that the Libre isn’t “continuous.” When a patient wants to measure their blood glucose level, the Libre requires them to wave a small handheld “mobile reader” over the part of the body where their sensor is located. The handheld device then displays the glucose level, allowing the user to determine if it’s too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia). Dexcom and Medtronic Continue reading >>

The Use Of Smart Technology For Diabetes Management

The Use Of Smart Technology For Diabetes Management

Blood Glucose , Fit4D CDE , Tips , technology , Fit4D , Diabetes , Diabetes Education , Diabetes Management , Access , apps Diabetes management can be complicated and often requires a multidisciplinary approach to help maintain optimal blood glucose control. Lifestyle modifications and regular blood glucose monitoring while proven to be helpful, can also be overwhelming. Recent technological advances, if incorporated correctly can help make diabetes care easier. Here are some examples of smart and innovative technology available and/or soon to be available: 1. Wearable Devices:Includes those equipped with sensors and wireless connectivity options that can help in a variety of ways such as collecting and relaying information to healthcare providers, monitor blood glucose levels, and administering medications. Some examples include: Special shoes and socks (footwear) - Researchers are working on manufacturing special shoes and socks that are pre-installed with pressure and heat sensors that have the ability to detect areas of the foot with inadequate blood supply. This can help reduce development of foot ulcers and lower the risk of amputations. The University of Arizona Department of Surgerys Southern Arizona Limb Salvage Alliance (SALSA) is currently working on developing a special kind of socks that is equipped with sensors; however, it may be a few years until this product is completely tested and available for commercial use. Skin Patches - Can detect blood glucose levels in sweat or blood that can transmit information to ones smartphone or other wireless device. Some of the patches can also help with adjustment of insulin dose based on blood glucose fluctuations. Some Smart watches are able to work in conjunction with certain Continuous Glucose monitoring (CGM) sys Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tools & Technology

Diabetes Tools & Technology

Diabetes treatment has changed considerably over the years with the development of new medical technologies. From talking meters to continuous glucose monitors, learn about some of the recent innovations and find out how they can help you achieve better control. Learn about eight recent diabetes breakthroughs that are changing how the condition is managed Innovative diabetes products aim to make self-management easier. In this installment, we look at insulin delivery devices that have recently hit the market Innovative diabetes products aim to make self-management easier. In this installment, we look at lancing devices and diabetes drugs Innovative diabetes products aim to make self-management easier. In this installment, we look at mobile apps, glucose gel, and sweetener Innovative diabetes products aim to make self-management easier. In this installment, we look at glucometers and CGMs that have recently hit the market If you have diabetes, you must consistently monitor your diet, lifestyle, and glucose levels. Fortunately, technology for diabetes can help Heres our lineup of some of the best new diabetes products, tools, and gadgets that have hit the market in the last year Continue reading >>

How Do We Use Technology For Diabetes Management?

How Do We Use Technology For Diabetes Management?

How Do We Use Technology for Diabetes Management? How Do We Use Technology for Diabetes Management? New technologies have the potential to improve diabetes management. I was strolling at a shopping mall while running errands recently, and I was struck by the number of individuals wearing a FitBit or similar device. This got me thinking, What about diabetes? What's the role for technological tools specifically for individuals living with this disease, and can these resources help them thrive? Can health apps revolutionize diabetes care the way smartphones and tablets changed how we shop, work, and spend our leisure time? The World Health Organization defined mobile health, or mHealth, as the medical and public health practice supported by mobile devices.1 Nineteen percent of adults in the United States used at least 1 health-related mobile app in 2014.2 Nearly 100 000 health-related apps are featured in the Google Play and Apple iTunes App Stores.3 These applications, or apps, can potentially inform and inspire by helping patients and physicians track self-monitoring blood glucoses (SMBGs), weight, dietary intake , as well as other functions. With all due respect to my sisters and brothers in the medical profession, we have generally been far too slow in adapting these technological innovations to health care who else uses pagers and fax machines regularly as first-line options to communicate? Up until just several years ago, electronic medical records (EMRs) were not widely used. I strongly believe that we must harness technology to help make our patients' lives better. Technology can help patients by 1) facilitating attaininment and maintenance of glycemic control, 2) enhancing engagement and motivation, rather than seeing self-management tasks as noisome chores, and Continue reading >>

Diabetes Technology In 2018: Where To Start, What To Know

Diabetes Technology In 2018: Where To Start, What To Know

Diabetes Technology in 2018: Where to Start, What to Know Advances in technology aimed at making diabetes management simpler and better are plentiful, so where to start? Advances in diabetes technology are plentiful. Ask your healthcare provider which new device or technology might simplify or improve your diabetes management. Even if you're a techno-phobe, you're likely to know that advances in technology aimed at helping those with type 1 and type 2 diabetes manage better are multiplying quickly. Your doctor or diabetes educator may have talked about continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), an artificial pancreas system, smart pens, smartphone apps and other options. Even if you are a techno-geek, it's enough to make your head spin. So OnTrackDiabetes asked two experts to weigh in on what to know and do, and which advances look most promising in the immediate future. Technology must be personalized to the person, says Amy Hess-Fischl, MS, RD, DN, BC-ADM, CDE, the transitional program coordinator at Kovler Diabetes Center, Chicago, and an editorial board member for OnTrack Diabetes. Everyone must figure out which system or technology is their system or best bet, she says. That can start with an informed discussion between you and your diabetes educator or your doctorbut be sure your health care professional is up to speed on technology. (Not an easy question to ask them, but an important one that will serve you better in the long run.) When she discusses technology with patients, Hess-Fischl takes their approach to management of their diabetes, among other factors, into account. For instance, the new closed-loop system (AKA the artificial pancreas ) has wonderful features, but someone who wants to manipulate their insulin may not want to give up what they perceive as a go Continue reading >>

Smart Technology For Diabetes Self-care

Smart Technology For Diabetes Self-care

Wearables, Implants, and Apps, Oh My! If you have diabetes, you must consistently monitor your diet, lifestyle, and glucose levels, and keeping track of everything can be both inconvenient and difficult. Matters can become even more complicated if you have other health conditions with which to contend. Fortunately, technology can help. Technological innovations Strides have been made to ensure technology keeps pace with assisting people in self-managing their diabetes. By incorporating a personalized approach, technology has become a useful tool; in particular, mobile and Internet-ready smartphones have been found to be the most effective for integrating diabetes care into day-to-day living. A 2009 study conducted by Julie Polisena and her team at the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health found storing or sharing self-monitored blood glucose using home telehealth tools such as PDAs or fax machines, supported with physician feedback, showed improved glycemic levels and reduced hospitalizations. Technology now has evolved beyond telehealth. Smart technology exists as wearables, implants, and mobile applications to track glucose levels, share data, access relevant information, communicate with both health-care providers and others with diabetes, and, ultimately, guide you in making better decisions. Wearable technology Wearable technology comprises gadgets that can be worn and are equipped with sensors and wireless connectivity to assist with monitoring blood sugar levels, personalizing treatment, connecting with health-care providers, and even delivering medication into the body. It’s a huge departure from the traditional finger pricking method of glucose monitoring. Some wearables on the horizon for diabetes include smart skin patches, contact lens, and Continue reading >>

Managing Type 1 Diabetes: New Technology And Its Application

Managing Type 1 Diabetes: New Technology And Its Application

Managing type 1 diabetes: new technology and its application Insulin pumps, continuous glucose monitoring, smart glucose meters and phone apps are rapidly changing the way people with diabetes manage their blood glucose levels. General practitioners need to keep up with these innovations to feel comfortable managing people with type 1 diabetes both now and into the future. An understanding of how new devices for managing type 1 diabetes work and familiarity with the terminology used will help GPs support patients presenting with the common problems of hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia. Insulin pumps use only rapid-acting insulin and achieve the effect of long-acting insulin through constant delivery of rapid-acting insulin at varying rates across a 24-hour period. The common complication of insulin pump therapy of an occluded insulin delivery infusion set can be quickly corrected out of hospital if recognised and appropriately managed before diabetic ketoacidosis develops. Continuous glucose monitoring is now available for people using multiple daily injection insulin regimens as well as those using insulin pump therapy. It will be used increasingly by young people with type 1 diabetes because of new funding for those aged under 21 years. Smart glucose meters and phone apps can be used to calculate bolus insulin doses in people on multiple daily injection insulin regimens similarly to as in those using insulin pumps. Picture credit: BSIP/Belmonte/Diomedia.com Model used for illustrative purposes only Continue reading >>

Which New Diabetes Devices And Apps Are Best For You?

Which New Diabetes Devices And Apps Are Best For You?

Admittedly, it is difficult,even frustrating, to try and keep up with what's new and which technology innovation may benefit which people, soEndocrineWebasked two experts to weigh in on what they see as the most promising new health-based devices offering advances that don't just impress a tech expert but might just inspire and motivate people with diabetes who are looking for solutions to make self-managing their health easier and may even simplify their lives. Ask your healthcare provider about whether or not new devices may be help you manage your diabetes. This list has been compiled with guidance from our two experts, with the understanding new products and solutions are being introduced daily so this list may need updating regularly. David T. Ahn, MD, is an associate clinical professor of medicine at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, who is an endocrinologist and diabetes technology expert. Amy Hess-Fischl, MS,RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE, is a diabetes educator at the transitional program coordinator at Kovler Diabetes Center in Chicago, Illinois. Continuous Glucose Monitoring Minus Calibration Abbott's continuous glucose monitoring system (CGM), FreeStyle Libre, requires no patient calibrationneither by fingerstick or manual data entry.1This newest approach to continuous glucose monitoring can replace the traditional blood glucose finger prick check. Instead, blood glucose levels are read through a sensor worn on the back of the upper arm. The sensor can be left in place for up to 10 days, according to the manufacturer. Among the perks of the FreeStyle Libre versus other CGMs is that it has just two components, the sensor and the reader. Other systems typically also have a transmitter. The FreeStyle Libre user captures glucose readings by passing the hand-held Continue reading >>

7 Diabetes Technology Updates For 2018

7 Diabetes Technology Updates For 2018

As I gathered my notes and thoughts about the potential of diabetes technology in 2018, I kept coming back to the running list of caveats and elephants in the room. Access and affordability have been headline-generating conversations across the diabetes community this year. On one hand, it feels a little weird to talk about crazy-advanced technology that will hopefully make its way to the diabetes community next year while we’re still trying to figure out why live-sustaining medication costs as much as it does. If you are struggling to afford insulin, do you have room to get excited about automated insulin delivery? But, innovation is important. The clinical trials and resources spent developing better, smarter, faster tools are essential to the grander conversation about improving the lives of people with diabetes. This shouldn’t ignore the Very Real issues that are being discussed, so I’m going to propose we try to walk and chew gum at the same time. Yes, I want better technology to help manage my diabetes. Yes, it should be affordable so that no one is priced out of quality diabetes care. When I think about the scope and potential of diabetes technology, it’s more than just a specific product or products that may come to market. So here’s a glimpse at some of the companies and movements that I am going to pay close attention to next year as diabetes technology looks to take another major step forward in 2018. Tandem’s PLGS Algorithm PLGS, or Predictive Low Glucose Suspend, Tandem’s algorithm that will predict and prevent hypoglycemia events is coming next year. That’s a fact. What I’m curious to see is what’s next. Operating in the world of upgradeable firmware (instead of just hardware) is a bit of a new journey for consumer health technology. Wh Continue reading >>

Technologies For Diabetes Management 2019-2029: Technology, Players And Forecasts

Technologies For Diabetes Management 2019-2029: Technology, Players And Forecasts

Show All Description Contents, Tables & Figures List Order Information This report covers the entire landscape for diabetes management devices, including mature, emerging and future options. The report has been researched via primary interviews with companies, physicians and diabetic individuals to characterize and predict the technology landscape for diabetes devices over the coming decade. In total, activities of 75 companies are covered throughout the report, ranging from the largest players to technology developers and startups developing the next generation of device options. Historically, diabetics have monitored their blood glucose concentration by using disposable biosensors; following a finger prick, a drop of blood is placed onto a glucose test strip, which is inserted into a reader to provide the result. Whilst billions of test strips are produced each year, this sector as seen profitability shrink due to changing medical subsidies and increased competition. Alternative options have been developed to enable continuous glucose monitoring. These involve devices that are typically worn on the skin, using a sensor on a small needle to test glucose in interstitial fluid. There are now approved devices from several key players, with this industry growing each year. However, challenges still remain with glucose monitoring devices, with the ultimate aim of providing the best experience for diabetics. CGM devices in the past have been reliant on test strips for calibration, as well as still being invasive or implantable, leading to discomfort. This has led to many players investigating glucose monitoring options which are less invasive, whilst maintaining the required accuracy and reliability. In addition, the possibility of pairing CGM devices with insulin pumps for Continue reading >>

Technology And Diabetes Self-management: An Integrative Review

Technology And Diabetes Self-management: An Integrative Review

Technology and diabetes self-management: An integrative review Caralise W Hunt, School of Nursing, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, United States Author contributions: Hunt CW conducted the literature search, reviewed the data, and wrote the paper. Correspondence to: Caralise W Hunt, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, Auburn University, 219 Miller Hall, Auburn, AL 36849, United States. [email protected] Telephone: +1-334-8446763 Fax: +1-334-8445654 Received 2014 Aug 29; Revised 2014 Nov 26; Accepted 2014 Dec 16. Copyright The Author(s) 2015. Published by Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Technology can be used to supplement healthcare provider diabetes care by providing both educational and motivational support. Education can be provided using technology allowing patients to learn new practices and routines related to diabetes management. Technology can support daily diabetes self-management activities including blood glucose monitoring, exercising, healthy eating, taking medication, monitoring for complications, and problem-solving. This article describes an integrative review conducted to evaluate the types of technology being used to facilitate diabetes self-management and the effect of that technology on self-management and diabetes outcomes for adults living with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A literature review was conducted by searching Medline, PubMed, and Psych INFO databases using the search terms: diabetes self-management, technology, type 2 diabetes, smartphones, cell phones, and diabetes mellitus covering the years from 2008-2013. Articles relying on secondary data (editorials, systematic reviews) and articles describing study protocol only were excluded. Fourteen stud Continue reading >>

'smart' Diabetes Technology On The Horizon - Diabetes Ireland : Diabetes Ireland

'smart' Diabetes Technology On The Horizon - Diabetes Ireland : Diabetes Ireland

Diabetes Ireland > Latest Articles > Smart Diabetes Technology on the Horizon Smart Diabetes Technology on the Horizon People with diabetes today spend hours each week carefully tracking blood glucose levels, food intake and physical exercise to calculate when and how much insulin should be injected into their bodies. Living with diabetes requires constant vigilance and a strong sense of self-determination and efficacy. While diabetes research has made enormous strides in the past decade, those living with the condition are still faced with the daily reality of the fact that a cure remains elusive. As such, much of the current research has centered on the improvement of maintenance technologies. While the implementation of these treatments an artificial pancreas, insulin inhaler, and a myriad of mobile apps, among others has been less efficient than most would say is ideal, the proliferation of smart devices has positioned such new technologies to play a pivotal role in the way diabetes is controlled and monitored. With a health condition like diabetes, where the individual is responsible for round-the-clock self-monitoring, there are many benefits to come from care that is both increasingly automated and personalised for the individual. While many of us already use phone apps to help manage glucose levels, there are a multitude of other devices in development striving to offer new ways for both people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes to gain better control over this condition. Many of these new tools are influenced by healthcares recent progression towards greater patient-physician connectivity. The increased usage of mobile apps and patient portals to engage with people with diabetes allows researchers access to a plethora of useful data for analysis. Utilising techno Continue reading >>

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