diabetestalk.net

Technology Diabetes

New Diabetes Technology To Expect In 2018

New Diabetes Technology To Expect In 2018

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. The start of a new year always brings curiosity about what's on tap in new diabetes technology, and we're excited to take an inside look, especially with the big JP Morgan Healthcare and Consumer Electronics Show events underway this month. Of course, these days Amazon and Google generate quite the medtech buzz, not to mention wearable smartwatches and Apple talk and the very many mobile health apps being developed . Some of the recent buzz includes FitBit investing $6M to develop a continuous glucose sensor, and rumors that Apple's developing its own super-secret continuous monitor built directly into its Apple Watch. On the flip side, you can't talk about innovation or D-tech these days without the lockstep concerns of access and affordability. It's encouraging to see reimbursement being more of a focus at the R&D stage of new products, and the latest news of Medicare coverage for the tubeless OmniPod pump and new Abbott FreeStyle Libre flash glucose monitor are big moves forward. We've reached out to many leading diabetes vendors and combed through public reports from investor earnings calls and other news announcements to compile this (not exhaustive) look at what's ahead in D-tech for this coming year. You might refer to this as Artificial Pancreas systems , but whatever the name it's about "closing the loop" in glucose-monitoring and insulin dosing. While we won't see any fully closed loops (requiring no user intervention) on the market during 2018, we'll certainly see progress from numerous players. Beta Bionics: This B-Corp startup in Boston now has its fourth-generation prototype of its iLet4 system, a dual-hor Continue reading >>

Technologies For Diabetes Management 2017-2027: Forecasts, Players, Opportunities

Technologies For Diabetes Management 2017-2027: Forecasts, Players, Opportunities

Glucose sensors, ketone sensors, insulin pens and pumps This report from IDTechEx covers mature, growing and emerging fields in diabetes technology, researched through primary interviews with companies, physicians and diabetic individuals to establish how the technological roadmap for diabetes management will develop over the next decade. Historically glucose levels have been monitored using disposable biosensors, whereby a drop of blood is placed on to a sensor and an associated reader provides the result. While the glucose test strip industry produces billions of single use sensors a year, cuts to medical budgets are driving profitability down. Current invasive methods of glucose monitoring result in low patient compliance, leading to poor glucose control and the associated long term health implications. These factors have led both start-ups and established players in the field to develop novel glucose sensing platforms based on alternative sampling sites and detection methods. Whilst many of these technologies will not be able to precisely replicate the accuracy of blood glucose measurements, some are making progress towards this goal and are achieving regulatory approval to commercialise products in to this emerging market. Advancements in diabetes care are not limited to glucose monitoring, novel insulin delivery platforms provide another area of growth for the industry, with wearable insulin pumps now widely available. Such devices contain a range of sensors to that enable the safe and controlled delivery of insulin to a patient. Progression in both glucose monitoring and insulin delivery technologies are enabling the delivery of a previously conceptual artificial pancreas system, able to deliver controlled insulin doses, based on sensor outputs to optimise glucos Continue reading >>

'smart' Diabetes Technology On The Horizon - Diabetes Ireland : Diabetes Ireland

'smart' Diabetes Technology On The Horizon - Diabetes Ireland : Diabetes Ireland

Diabetes Ireland > Latest Articles > Smart Diabetes Technology on the Horizon Smart Diabetes Technology on the Horizon People with diabetes today spend hours each week carefully tracking blood glucose levels, food intake and physical exercise to calculate when and how much insulin should be injected into their bodies. Living with diabetes requires constant vigilance and a strong sense of self-determination and efficacy. While diabetes research has made enormous strides in the past decade, those living with the condition are still faced with the daily reality of the fact that a cure remains elusive. As such, much of the current research has centered on the improvement of maintenance technologies. While the implementation of these treatments an artificial pancreas, insulin inhaler, and a myriad of mobile apps, among others has been less efficient than most would say is ideal, the proliferation of smart devices has positioned such new technologies to play a pivotal role in the way diabetes is controlled and monitored. With a health condition like diabetes, where the individual is responsible for round-the-clock self-monitoring, there are many benefits to come from care that is both increasingly automated and personalised for the individual. While many of us already use phone apps to help manage glucose levels, there are a multitude of other devices in development striving to offer new ways for both people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes to gain better control over this condition. Many of these new tools are influenced by healthcares recent progression towards greater patient-physician connectivity. The increased usage of mobile apps and patient portals to engage with people with diabetes allows researchers access to a plethora of useful data for analysis. Utilising techno Continue reading >>

7 Diabetes Technology Updates For 2018

7 Diabetes Technology Updates For 2018

As I gathered my notes and thoughts about the potential of diabetes technology in 2018, I kept coming back to the running list of caveats and elephants in the room. Access and affordability have been headline-generating conversations across the diabetes community this year. On one hand, it feels a little weird to talk about crazy-advanced technology that will hopefully make its way to the diabetes community next year while we’re still trying to figure out why live-sustaining medication costs as much as it does. If you are struggling to afford insulin, do you have room to get excited about automated insulin delivery? But, innovation is important. The clinical trials and resources spent developing better, smarter, faster tools are essential to the grander conversation about improving the lives of people with diabetes. This shouldn’t ignore the Very Real issues that are being discussed, so I’m going to propose we try to walk and chew gum at the same time. Yes, I want better technology to help manage my diabetes. Yes, it should be affordable so that no one is priced out of quality diabetes care. When I think about the scope and potential of diabetes technology, it’s more than just a specific product or products that may come to market. So here’s a glimpse at some of the companies and movements that I am going to pay close attention to next year as diabetes technology looks to take another major step forward in 2018. Tandem’s PLGS Algorithm PLGS, or Predictive Low Glucose Suspend, Tandem’s algorithm that will predict and prevent hypoglycemia events is coming next year. That’s a fact. What I’m curious to see is what’s next. Operating in the world of upgradeable firmware (instead of just hardware) is a bit of a new journey for consumer health technology. Wh Continue reading >>

Center For Diabetes Technology University Of Virginia School Of Medicine

Center For Diabetes Technology University Of Virginia School Of Medicine

The Center was recently honored by JDRF for its pioneering work in the development of Artificial Pancreas technology. Type 1 diabetes is a chronic disease affecting an estimated 11-22 million people worldwide. It caused by the autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas and results in the loss of the ability to maintain blood glucose homeostasis. Currently, diabetics manage their condition by self-monitoring blood glucose, counting carbohydrates and taking insulin either with multiple daily injections or via insulin pump. Using these techniques, only about 25% of diabetics meet the standard for good glycemic control. Failure to achieve tight glycemic control is associated with a plethora of long-term complications including heart disease, kidney disease and neuropathy. Poor blood glucose control has also been shown to cause low energy, mood swings and cognitive disruptions on a daily basis. Researchers at the CDT aim to make diabetes management easier and more effective through the development of automated insulin delivery. By implementing advanced algorithms that use continuous glucose monitor data to automatically adjust insulin delivery, we have shown that time-in-range can be increased while simultaneously reducing the occurrence of hypoglycemia. Our smartphone-based automated insulin delivery system, theDiAs (Diabetes Assistant), has been used by 425 subjects for a cumulative operation time of more than 18 years. If you or a loved one would like to participate in one of our clinical studies, please click here . Continue reading >>

5 New And Novel Diabetes Technologies

5 New And Novel Diabetes Technologies

Diabetes From the first-to-market hybrid closed loop technology for continuous glucose monitoring to the possibility of a contact lens able to measure glucose levels in tears, the slides above highlight 5 new technologies that are either available now or will be available soon to help both patients and clinicians refine managment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tech On The Horizon Part 3 - What To Expect For Cgm In 2018

Diabetes Tech On The Horizon Part 3 - What To Expect For Cgm In 2018

Diabetes Tech on the Horizon Part 3 - What to Expect for CGM in 2018 Learn more about new and upcoming glucose monitoring products whats available now and what could be coming soon Diabetes technology moves fast, so to help you keep track, weve rounded up some of the latest offerings and things coming soon related to CGM. (See here for updates about diabetes apps and software, and here for insulin delivery updates.) Below, youll find products that have recently become available or are expected to launch in the next year or so based on the most recent timing updates weve heard. This article is not fully comprehensive and timelines often change but this list covers many of the most notable CGM products. A more detailed description of each product follows the table of contents below. Abbott FreeStyle Libre (real time) Just launched in US pharmacies (CVS, Walgreens, Walmart, Kroger, Rite Aid) with a prescription Dexcoms G6 sensor with push-button applicator and 30% thinner transmitter currently under FDA review, US launch expected in 2018 (possibly with no fingerstick calibration) Launched in US pharmacies in late November 2017 Whats New? Following FDA approval in September , Abbotts long-awaited, no-fingersticks-needed FreeStyle Libre real-time CGM has launched in US pharmacies: Walgreens, CVS, Walmart, Kroger, and Rite Aid. Currently, there is no US reimbursement for FreeStyle Libre, though the cash pay price is less expensive than other CGM systems. We called our local Walgreens and CVS and learned that each 10-day sensor costs approximately $43-$53 ($129-$159 per month), while the reader is approximately $85-$97 (a one-time expense). Pricing varies by chain, and when Libre does obtain insurance coverage, people will likely have a copay (amount paid out of pocket). Does Continue reading >>

The Use Of Smart Technology For Diabetes Management

The Use Of Smart Technology For Diabetes Management

Blood Glucose , Fit4D CDE , Tips , technology , Fit4D , Diabetes , Diabetes Education , Diabetes Management , Access , apps Diabetes management can be complicated and often requires a multidisciplinary approach to help maintain optimal blood glucose control. Lifestyle modifications and regular blood glucose monitoring while proven to be helpful, can also be overwhelming. Recent technological advances, if incorporated correctly can help make diabetes care easier. Here are some examples of smart and innovative technology available and/or soon to be available: 1. Wearable Devices:Includes those equipped with sensors and wireless connectivity options that can help in a variety of ways such as collecting and relaying information to healthcare providers, monitor blood glucose levels, and administering medications. Some examples include: Special shoes and socks (footwear) - Researchers are working on manufacturing special shoes and socks that are pre-installed with pressure and heat sensors that have the ability to detect areas of the foot with inadequate blood supply. This can help reduce development of foot ulcers and lower the risk of amputations. The University of Arizona Department of Surgerys Southern Arizona Limb Salvage Alliance (SALSA) is currently working on developing a special kind of socks that is equipped with sensors; however, it may be a few years until this product is completely tested and available for commercial use. Skin Patches - Can detect blood glucose levels in sweat or blood that can transmit information to ones smartphone or other wireless device. Some of the patches can also help with adjustment of insulin dose based on blood glucose fluctuations. Some Smart watches are able to work in conjunction with certain Continuous Glucose monitoring (CGM) sys Continue reading >>

Diabetes Technology In 2018: Where To Start, What To Know

Diabetes Technology In 2018: Where To Start, What To Know

Diabetes Technology in 2018: Where to Start, What to Know Advances in technology aimed at making diabetes management simpler and better are plentiful, so where to start? Advances in diabetes technology are plentiful. Ask your healthcare provider which new device or technology might simplify or improve your diabetes management. Even if you're a techno-phobe, you're likely to know that advances in technology aimed at helping those with type 1 and type 2 diabetes manage better are multiplying quickly. Your doctor or diabetes educator may have talked about continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), an artificial pancreas system, smart pens, smartphone apps and other options. Even if you are a techno-geek, it's enough to make your head spin. So OnTrackDiabetes asked two experts to weigh in on what to know and do, and which advances look most promising in the immediate future. Technology must be personalized to the person, says Amy Hess-Fischl, MS, RD, DN, BC-ADM, CDE, the transitional program coordinator at Kovler Diabetes Center, Chicago, and an editorial board member for OnTrack Diabetes. Everyone must figure out which system or technology is their system or best bet, she says. That can start with an informed discussion between you and your diabetes educator or your doctorbut be sure your health care professional is up to speed on technology. (Not an easy question to ask them, but an important one that will serve you better in the long run.) When she discusses technology with patients, Hess-Fischl takes their approach to management of their diabetes, among other factors, into account. For instance, the new closed-loop system (AKA the artificial pancreas ) has wonderful features, but someone who wants to manipulate their insulin may not want to give up what they perceive as a go Continue reading >>

The 3cs Of Diabetes Technology Will Revolutionize Diabetes Care 2018. From Idf Meeting Dec. Report

The 3cs Of Diabetes Technology Will Revolutionize Diabetes Care 2018. From Idf Meeting Dec. Report

The 3Cs of Diabetes Technology Will Revolutionize Diabetes Care 2018. From IDF Meeting Dec. Report The 3Cs of Diabetes Technology Will Revolutionize Diabetes Care 2018. From IDF International Diabetes Federation Meeting 4-8 Dec Report Diabetes technology is the new kid on the block when it comes to the management of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but for most doctors and patients it's still an enigma, and only a small minority of people with diabetes in developed countries know anything about itor are actually using it. In an attempt to demystify the topic, Adam Brown, head of diabetes technology and digital health atClose Concerns a diabetes news and education website and a type 1 diabetes patient himself, with 50,000+ hours of experience using a continuous glucose monitor (CGM), gave a fascinating and highly informative talk at theInternational Diabetes Federation (IDF) Congress 2017recently, entitled: "Diabetes tools and apps: What's new, what works, and what do patients really want?" Brown broke down existing technology into three categories that he believes are starting to show real promise, which he christened"the 3Cs" CGM, coaching/remote care, and clever insulin delivery. What people with diabetes really want, he said, is "better outcomes time in range and HbA1c. They want to sleep better and have a happier life and mind-set." Brown has written a book,Bright Spots & Landmines: TheDiabetes Guide I Wish Someone Had Handed Me, which is available fromdiaTribe.org/BrightSpotsas a free PDF which shares the food, mind-set, exercise, and sleep strategies he has personally learned over the many years of dealing with his diabetes."Many endocrinologists have told us they are giving the book to patients in their clinic with diabetes," he told Medscape. Patients also want diab Continue reading >>

New Smart Tech Improves Diabetes Management

New Smart Tech Improves Diabetes Management

New Smart Tech Improves Diabetes Management Community Practice , Community Practice , FDA , The Latest , Customer Engagement , FDA Move over, test strips! Step aside, hand-held blood glucose monitors! Make way for a new generation of diabetes management tools that are changing the way patients manage their disease and their lives. Todays innovative smart technology ranges from insulin pumps and memory chip-equipped insulin pens to sensors applied directly to skin for continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and other wearables. All this and more is currently in development and coming to market at an impressive rate. CNBC reported earlier this year that a team of biomedical engineers at Apple is involved in an initiative to develop noninvasive sensor technology to continuously monitor blood sugar levels. Verily has at least two glucose sensing/monitoring projects in the works, including a glucose-sensing contact lens. Both companies are participating in the FDAs precertification pilot program, part of its initiative to foster digital health innovation. Related article: Five Innovative New Products for Diabetes Independent pharmacist Jonathan Marquess, PharmD, CDE, a Past President of the Georgia Pharmacy Association, is enthusiastic about new technology that makes it easier to individualize treatment plans for his patients. He is particularly excited about alternatives to the traditional finger stick, which provides information at just one point in time, and not a more useful glucose profile. Marquess also likes the versatility of the newer insulin pumps. It is exciting to know that we have new pumps that we can set for various basal rates, he says. There are many small, discrete pumps now that let patients enter the amount of carbohydrates that they ingest and the pump will Continue reading >>

Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics

Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics

ISSN: 1520-9156 | Online ISSN: 1557-8593 | Published Monthly | Current Volume: 20 *2016 Journal Citation Reports (Clarivate Analytics, 2017) The only peer-reviewed journal covering all aspects of diagnosing and managing diabetes with cutting-edge devices, drugs, drug delivery systems, and software. Search Subscribe/Renew Recommend This Title Sign Up for TOC Alerts Submit a Paper Share with a Colleague Diabetes Technology& Therapeutics is the only peer-reviewed journal providing healthcare professionals with information on new devices, drugs, drug delivery systems, and software for managing patients with diabetes. This leading international journal delivers practical information and comprehensive coverage of cutting-edge technologies and therapeutics in the field, and each issue highlights new pharmacological and device developments to optimize patient care. Diabetes Technology& Therapeutics coverage includes: Detection and prevention of long-term micro- and macrovascular complications Breakthrough technologies and new therapeutic drug classes Behavioral aspects and approaches to diabetes care The latest advancement and applications of new and emerging technologies, including: Continue reading >>

Diabetes Care Is Getting Much More High-tech. Will It Matter?

Diabetes Care Is Getting Much More High-tech. Will It Matter?

harma and tech giants are pouring hundreds of millions into diabetes technology, designing gadgets and developing software aimed at helping patients manage a burdensome disease. Theyre chasing what could be a blockbuster market: Close to 30 million Americans have diabetes and can face health problems including dangerously low blood sugar, vision loss, and kidney damage. Among thetech on the wayfromcompanies large and small: Socks designed to monitor diabetics feet for signs of injury. A bandage-like sensor that continuously measures their glucose levels. An app meant topredict how the sandwich they had at lunch is likely to affect their blood sugar. And, of course, the first artificial pancreas , which was approved by the Food and Drug Administration late last month to monitor glucose and adjust insulin flow semi-automatically. The key question: How much of a difference will these products make? Experts and patient advocates say theres real reason to be optimistic. Its truly an exciting time, said Dr. Lori Laffel, a Harvard Medical School professor who oversees the pediatric diabetes clinic at Bostons Joslin Diabetes Center. The risky bet behind the first artificial pancreas for diabetes patients But theres also reason for caution. Some of the new tech could carry high price tags, and even those that dont will add expenses for patients already grappling with the soaring costs of insulin . Patients by and large havent embraced the most promising technologies already on the market. And devices that were touted as transformative in years past have fallen flat. Theres a lot of gee-whiz stuff that we diabetics have heard about for so long that never really comes to fruition, said Michael Felts, a 51-year-old IT security professional from San Francisco who has type 1 diabete Continue reading >>

Which New Diabetes Devices And Apps Are Best For You?

Which New Diabetes Devices And Apps Are Best For You?

Admittedly, it is difficult,even frustrating, to try and keep up with what's new and which technology innovation may benefit which people, soEndocrineWebasked two experts to weigh in on what they see as the most promising new health-based devices offering advances that don't just impress a tech expert but might just inspire and motivate people with diabetes who are looking for solutions to make self-managing their health easier and may even simplify their lives. Ask your healthcare provider about whether or not new devices may be help you manage your diabetes. This list has been compiled with guidance from our two experts, with the understanding new products and solutions are being introduced daily so this list may need updating regularly. David T. Ahn, MD, is an associate clinical professor of medicine at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, who is an endocrinologist and diabetes technology expert. Amy Hess-Fischl, MS,RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE, is a diabetes educator at the transitional program coordinator at Kovler Diabetes Center in Chicago, Illinois. Continuous Glucose Monitoring Minus Calibration Abbott's continuous glucose monitoring system (CGM), FreeStyle Libre, requires no patient calibrationneither by fingerstick or manual data entry.1This newest approach to continuous glucose monitoring can replace the traditional blood glucose finger prick check. Instead, blood glucose levels are read through a sensor worn on the back of the upper arm. The sensor can be left in place for up to 10 days, according to the manufacturer. Among the perks of the FreeStyle Libre versus other CGMs is that it has just two components, the sensor and the reader. Other systems typically also have a transmitter. The FreeStyle Libre user captures glucose readings by passing the hand-held Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tools & Technology

Diabetes Tools & Technology

Diabetes treatment has changed considerably over the years with the development of new medical technologies. From talking meters to continuous glucose monitors, learn about some of the recent innovations and find out how they can help you achieve better control. Learn about eight recent diabetes breakthroughs that are changing how the condition is managed Innovative diabetes products aim to make self-management easier. In this installment, we look at insulin delivery devices that have recently hit the market Innovative diabetes products aim to make self-management easier. In this installment, we look at lancing devices and diabetes drugs Innovative diabetes products aim to make self-management easier. In this installment, we look at mobile apps, glucose gel, and sweetener Innovative diabetes products aim to make self-management easier. In this installment, we look at glucometers and CGMs that have recently hit the market If you have diabetes, you must consistently monitor your diet, lifestyle, and glucose levels. Fortunately, technology for diabetes can help Heres our lineup of some of the best new diabetes products, tools, and gadgets that have hit the market in the last year Continue reading >>

More in diabetes