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Teachers With Diabetes

Tips For Teachers: American Diabetes Association

Tips For Teachers: American Diabetes Association

The information provided below is meant to help inform teachers about how to keep kids with diabetes safe at school. Learn as much as you can about diabetes. Knowledge is power. Become aware of essential diabetes care tasks and be prepared to respond in the event of a diabetes emergency. Your willingness to learn will help to ensure a safe classroom environment and optimize your student's success and participation. Every student with diabetes is different. Students may use different therapies to manage their diabetes. Some need help and some are independent. Learn about your student's diabetes and how you can best respond and support. Provide a supportive learning environment. It is important to provide a classroom environment that enables the student to have unrestricted access to needed care. Depending upon the student's level of independence, he or she should be allowed to self-manage their diabetes and should have unrestricted access to the school nurse and other trained school personnel. Collaborate with other school staff. Teachers and other school staff members with supervisory responsibility for the student should participate in team meetings and understand your role in implementing the student's diabetes care plan and written accommodations plan. Understand federal and state legal protections for the student with diabetes. Become familiar with federal and state laws that protect students with diabetes and understand your role in the development and implementation of the student's written plans. Provide modifications as set out in the student's written accommodation plan. Familiarize yourself with the modifications spelled out in the student's written plan(s). Always be prepared. A "low kit" containing food and other supplies to treat hypoglycemia should always Continue reading >>

How Teachers Can Support Students With Type 1 Diabetes

How Teachers Can Support Students With Type 1 Diabetes

How teachers can support students with type 1 diabetes How teachers can support students with type 1 diabetes All students with type 1 diabetesno matter how independent they areneed the support of trusted, caring adults at school. If you have a student with type 1 diabetes, whether for all or part of the day, there are many simple ways you can help. Here are some suggestions: Learn about type 1 diabetes . Start by exploring the resources on this website, or have a look at some of the other resources we have gathered. Watch our video series on key concepts in managing diabetes at school. Be familiar with the signs and symptoms of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and high blood sugar (hyperglycemia), and know what to do in an emergency . Be familiar with the students Individual Care Plan . Know who at the school has been designated to provide day-to-day support. Ensure the student has easy access to supplies for blood glucose monitoring and treating low blood sugar (their diabetes kit ). Ensure the student eats meals and snacks on time . Talk to the students parents at the start of the school year (or right after diagnosis), and agree on a way to share information as needed. Provide parents with as much notice as possible about field trips, special events and changes to the school routine, especially where food or activity is involved. If a student experiences a low blood sugar before or during a test/exam, allow a reasonable amount of time to treat and recover from the low (they may need up to an additional 30 to 60 minutes to complete the task). Ensure that information about the student is available to supply teachers. Support the students self-care by allowing blood sugar monitoring at any time or anywhere, respecting the students wish for privacy. Know that a student m Continue reading >>

13 Things All Teachers Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

13 Things All Teachers Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

Brought to you by JDRF Millions of people around the world live with type 1 diabetes (T1D), a life-threatening autoimmune disease that strikes both children and adults. JDRF is the leading global organization funding research that will one day create a world without T1D. By joining JDRF Kids Walk, not only can your students make a difference for those living with T1D, but it’s fun and easy for everyone involved! Find out how your school can help today. As an educator, you provide an extremely important set of eyes and ears for students. Since you see them throughout the day, you notice when things are different, off or just not quite right. This is incredibly helpful and comforting to parents because teachers often uncover important and even life-changing discoveries. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is one of those diseases that teachers can often see signs of in the classroom, so it’s important to know what to look for. Take a look at some of these warning signs, and also get tips about how to accommodate a child with T1D in your classroom. 1. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. It is not related to lifestyle, nor is it the result of anything the child (or family) did or did not do. Normally, the pancreas produces insulin, a hormone that helps the body use glucose (“blood sugar”) for energy. In people who have T1D, the body’s immune system attacks the insulin-producing cells and the pancreas produces very little or no insulin, so blood sugar levels can rise if unchecked. A person with T1D needs insulin injections or infusions to live. 2. Excessive urination, thirst and hunger are all symptoms of T1D. Because teachers spend so much time with kids, they may be among the first to notice symptoms that could be linked to diabetes. A child who is asking to use the bath Continue reading >>

Actions For The Teacher

Actions For The Teacher

Please print and distribute to the Teacher Understand your responsibilities under Federal and State laws that may apply to students with diabetes, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Understand the procedures for implementing these laws. (See School Responsibilities Under Federal Laws ) Participate in school health team meeting(s). The teacher(s) who has primary responsibility for the student participates in the school health team meeting(s) when the students health care plans ( Diabetes Medical Management Plan (DMMP) [PDF, 218 KB] , Individualized Health Care Plan [PDF, 96 KB] , and/or Emergency Care Plans for Hypoglycemia [PDF, 96 KB] and Hyperglycemia [PDF, 97 KB] ) and education plan (Section 504 Plan, other education plan, or individualized education program) are discussed. (See How Do You Plan Effective Diabetes Management in the School Setting? ) Work with other members of the school health team to implement the students health care and education plans. Consult with the school nurse and the principal to determine the appropriate level of diabetes management training you should attend for carrying out your responsibilities and complete the training. Review the information about diabetes in this guide and refer to it, as needed, to help the student with diabetes. Recognize that a change in the students behavior could be a symptom of blood glucose changes. Be aware that a student with low or high blood glucose levels may have some cognitive impairment that could adversely affect classroom performance, especially in timed-testing situations. Be prepared to respond immediately to the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) and hyperglycemia (h Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes At School Playbook

Managing Diabetes At School Playbook

Goodbye, summer. Hello, homework. And guess what—the first assignment isn’t for kids. Parents, make a game plan to ensure all the bases are covered for your child’s diabetes care at school. Getting back into the routine of school takes a little more preparation for kids with diabetes, but it pays off over and over as the weeks and months go by. And since kids spend nearly half their waking hours in school, reliable diabetes care during the school day really matters. Some older students will be comfortable testing their blood sugar, injecting insulin, and adjusting levels if they use an insulin pump. Younger students and those who just found out they have diabetes will need help with everyday diabetes care. In a perfect world, all teachers and other school staff would understand how to manage diabetes so they could support your child as needed. But here in the real world, you’ll want to provide information to the school and work with staff to keep your son or daughter safe and healthy, no matter what the school day brings. Put it in Writing No two kids handle their diabetes exactly the same way. Before the year begins, meet with your child’s health care team to develop a personalized Diabetes Medical Management Plan (DMMP). Then visit the school and review the DMMP with the principal, office secretary, school nurse, nutrition service manager, teachers, and other staff who may have responsibility for your son or daughter during the day and after school. The DMMP explains everything about diabetes management and treatment, including: Target blood sugar range and whether your child needs help checking his or her blood sugar Your child’s specific hypoglycemia (low blood sugar, or “low”) symptoms (see the list on this page) and how to treat hypoglycemia Insuli Continue reading >>

How Teachers Can Help Students With Diabetes

How Teachers Can Help Students With Diabetes

How Teachers Can Help Students with Diabetes Home / News/Blog / How Teachers Can Help Students with Diabetes As of 2015, an estimated 132,000 American children and teenagers under 18 have been diagnosed with some form of diabetes . Despite these numbers, many teachers havent received in-depth diabetes training. If you have yet to encounter or arent sure how to best accommodate students with diabetes, this summary will help you learn the basics of how to address it in the classroom. Even though diabetes is more widely accepted and understood than other medical conditions, it is still serious and should be approached with the appropriate gravity. Your student may want to keep this information private because they feel that they are different from their peers. They may even be picked on for their glucose monitor or diet plan. Play it safe and do not bring unnecessary attention to the students medical situation. If the student wishes to talk about diabetes freely, sharing may boost their confidence and provide a great learning opportunity for other students. However, that is their personal choice. #2 Allow the Student to Manage Their Diabetes Most students have been coached by family members and doctors on how to manage their diabetes. Because of this, its best to let your student take care of their own medical condition. Here are some of the things a student with diabetes may need from you so they can successfully manage their condition: A water bottle or gallon jug at their desk Diabetes makes people extremely thirsty, so your student will need to hydrate throughout the day to stay healthy. Unlimited restroom breaks Because your student is staying hydrated, they will need to use the restroom more often than the typical student. Let them leave their desk quietly whenever Continue reading >>

10 Tips For Teachers Of Students With Diabetes

10 Tips For Teachers Of Students With Diabetes

Home Education and Information 10 Tips for Teachers of Students with Diabetes 10 Tips for Teachers of Students with Diabetes Posted by Editorial Team On August 14, 2014 In Education and Information The upcoming school year is approaching and its time to start preparing your children for a successful year. If one (or more) of them live with diabetes, you have a little more planning than most to think about. Elementary school Principal with type 1 diabetes and MiniMed Ambassador, Vince Myers , who you may remember from Life is a Journey, Not a Race , provides his 10 tips for you to share with your childrens teachers in preparation of the new school year. A printed copy of these tips can also come in handy when a teacher is absent and a substitute teacher is filling in. We hope this will be of value to all educators, particularly those who have never had a student with diabetes in their classroom. Every child with diabetes may experience different symptoms of low blood sugar. Some of these symptoms could include weakness and/or fatigue, headaches, sweating, irritability, shaking, excessive hunger and rapid heart rate. Situations that may affect blood sugar include insulin intake, food consumption, exercise, illness, stress, and changes in routine. Your student will likely need to eat snacks during class when they feel low. This is imperative and essential in helping make sure their blood sugar doesnt drop too low. You can help your student by allowing them to keep an emergency stash of snacks (including fast-acting carbohydrates) in your classroom in case they forget. Most kids with diabetes dont want to and shouldnt be treated differently. Do not limit their activities, draw attention, or deny their request if they have or ask for water, a snack, blood sugar test, or bat Continue reading >>

Colorado Kids With Diabetes | School Handouts

Colorado Kids With Diabetes | School Handouts

Tools including visuals, handouts, letters for the school nurse to use in the school setting #720 Low-High BS Hands :A great visual tool that lists the symptoms, causes and how to problem solve both high and low blood sugars on one piece of paper.Great reference for classroom teachers, substitute teachers, and aids and other school staff like bus drivers! #721 Low blood sugar Hand graphic :A great visual tool that lists symptoms, causes, and how to problem solve low blood sugars. Great reference for classroom teachers, substitute teachers, aids and other school staff like bus drivers! #722 High blood sugar Hand graphic :A great visual tool that lists symptoms, causes and how to problem solve high blood sugars. Great reference for classroom teachers, substitute teachers, and aids and other school staff like bus drivers! #726 FieldTripConsiderations :A tip sheet for making arrangements with the classroom teacher and school so that your child is safe and well cared for on field trips. #727 PartiesandSnacks :A letter that the school nurse and parent/guardian (s) can use to bring awareness to other parents of alternate snack ideas if they are considering bringing treats to celebrate a birthday or holiday in the classroom. Also includes a handy table to help identify the portion size of typical classroom treats. Dissemination to staff should be through school nurse. #724 Parent letter to teachers :A sample letter for school nurse and parent/guardian (s)to help simplify diabetes care tasks for your child at school. Fill out all the necessary information that classroom teachers need to know to help them keep your child safe at school. #725 EmergencyCards :This is a handy little card that you can print out, trim and glue together and makes a quick and easy to follow reference f Continue reading >>

Diabetic Teachers? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetic Teachers? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I just wondered if there are any other diabetic teachers out there? I find it very hard to test/ eat regularly with my job as I often end up having to see pupils over breaks and I run a lot of over lunch activities. Does anyone have similar experiences/ advice on phrasing "I have to eat right now" without being accused of skiving? I feel like it's sometimes an expectation that you won't eat or take a break all day! Does your head teacher know much about diabetes? S/he will know you have diabetes, but might need some info about how you personally need to manage your diabetes. It would be useful to discuss it with him/her, because there may be other teachers with diabetes in your school and probably a number of students also trying to fit diabetes into their school day, and the head teacher will have a policy on how to support students and staff with diabetes. I know what you mean about break time and lunchtime being gobbled up by meetings, activities and supervision. I think your phrase, "I have to eat right now" is fine and will be perfectly well understood when colleagues know you have diabetes. Your health has to come first. So be clear and unapologetic about that. Hi heelee, I teach and I'm type 1. I understand what you mean - a break tends not to be a break. I make sure that I have emergency snacks stashed everywhere. I also take in food that Can be eaten straight away, no spending time walking to and from the canteen for crap food. I have been known to eat in front of the kids and explained it away as 'didn't get a break'. You must make time to test - I've managed it discretely under the desk. I would die if I ever had a hypo in front of a kid or Continue reading >>

What Your Child’s Teacher Should Know To Manage Diabetes At School

What Your Child’s Teacher Should Know To Manage Diabetes At School

Whether your child has been newly diagnosed or has been living with type 1 diabetes for some time, it’s very challenging. Many parents find it difficult to trust someone other than themselves or family members with training to care for their children. But when school time arises it will be time to send them off to be monitored and cared for by someone else many hours out of the day. Entrusting the medical needs of your child to someone else will be hard, but it’s a necessary step in teaching them to be more independent and live a happy, social life despite having type 1 diabetes. Parents Responsibilities for School It is your job, as your child’s parent to help create an environment when they are at school where they feel safe, cared for properly and treated equally to other students. With the proper planning and preparation, you provide this environment with the help of their teachers and school staff. The first step is to take the initiative to educate staff and teachers on the care of a type 1 student. Many school staff members may not realize there are a few additional efforts which are required on their end to ensure a positive learning environment where the child with type 1 diabetes feels safe. I advice reading the following: Ensuring Success at School Advanced planning: By making sure you plan ahead of time you will help to enable your child how to problem solve specific situations in school involving their diabetes. Here is a great tip: remember even with proper planning and a well-organized family, there will still be times when your plans don’t go according to plan. Communication: Good communication with the school and yourself is crucial to your child’s safety and well-being while at school. It will also help to provide yourself with a peace of min Continue reading >>

10 Things School Staff Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

10 Things School Staff Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

10 things school staff should know about type 1 diabetes 10 things school staff should know about type 1 diabetes Children will not outgrow type 1 diabetes: With type 1 diabetes, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin have been destroyed. People with type 1 diabetes will always have to take insulin injections (until there is a cure). Changes in lifestyle or diet will not improve type 1 diabetes. Insulin is not a cure: But it is the only treatment. Without insulin, people with type 1 diabetes would die. It takes a lot of work to manage diabetes: Children with type 1 diabetes usually look healthy. Thats because they and their families are working hard to keep blood sugar levels in a target range. They do this by checking levels frequently, and acting quickly when neededsuch as adding insulin to account for a special treat, or having a snack because of extra physical activity. Technology is helpful, but it doesnt work on its own: Some students wear insulin pumps to deliver insulin. A pump is another way to deliver insulin, and whether or not to use a pump is an individual choice. Other students wear continuous glucose monitors (CGMs), which take blood sugar readings every few minutes. But none of these devices works on its own. People still have to carefully monitor blood sugar, food intake, and activity, and make decisions about how much insulin to give and when. Blood sugar levels can change quickly: Its important to check blood sugar often, because there are many factors that can cause it to change from minute to minute. Low blood sugar needs immediate attention: If a student feels low, or you suspect a student is low, act right away. Do not leave the student alone. Check blood sugar, and give fast-acting sugar as needed. High blood sugar means extra trips to t Continue reading >>

Teaching With Diabetes

Teaching With Diabetes

T1D Tuesday is a blog series on TypeOneNation.org that features guest bloggers who are sharing their voices of how T1D affects their life. For the month of August we are featuring all things Back to School! Today meet Juliet, who teaches her first graders about her diabetes with Rufus the Bear with diabetes . Ive always knew that I wanted to be a teacher, and after I graduated college, I was lucky enough to secure a job teaching first grade. After going through the student teaching process, I knew that I had to find a way to make my diabetes routine part of my classroom management plan. I decided very early on that I wanted to be honest with my students about my diabetes. I was diagnosed when I was five years old, so I knew that my first graders would be able to understand the basics of diabetes care. Also, I hoped that I might be able to help any other students with diabetes or teachers with diabetic students in our school. The summer before my first year of teaching, I found the picture book Rufus Comes Home a good age-appropriate resource about diabetes education that I use with my students during the first week of school. This picture book is about a young boy who is diagnosed with T1D. To help the boy, his mom makes him a special teddy bear friend named Rufus. Rufus has diabetes just like the small boy. He has a JDRF tee shirt, and patches of clothe sewed onto the spots on his body where he takes his shots. After reading the book, I decided to make my own Rufus bear, however I added one slight change. My Rufus has a small pump that I clipped to his side because I get so many questions from my students about my pump. During the first week of school, I introduce Rufus and read the book to my class. Afterwards, we have a discussion about what diabetes is, and is not, Continue reading >>

Living With Diabetes: Unexpected Teachers

Living With Diabetes: Unexpected Teachers

Living With Diabetes: Unexpected Teachers When I was 15 years old, I had my first music lesson with Art. Art is a jazz pianist who lives in my hometown of Boulder, CO, and just happens to be one of the most brilliant musical minds in the country. For reasons that are still not completely known to me, Art is not a household name in the jazz listening community. He is, however, a household name in the community of professional jazz musicians, all of whom revere him as one of the finest musicians to inhabit this earth. Art didnt mince words. If you played something mindlessly, if you got lazy, if you didnt put the kind of intention into the music that the music deserved, Art would tell you. In fact, his first words to me were, and I quote, that was bull****, now play it again and MEAN it this time. It sounds harsh, but heres the thing: He was RIGHT. I was trying to impress him, and playing something totally outside of what was actually inside of me. And he caught it. He said exactly the right thing. It knocked me out of trying to impress him (as if a 15-year-old kid could impress a living legend of jazz, anyway), and brought me back to myself. He was much nicer after my second attempt, though he still had quite a few pointers on what I could have done better. Arts style was that of a skillful Zen teacher. He said things directly, he didnt offer false praise, and he did what any good teacher SHOULD do: He pruned away the stuff that wasnt working in his students playing, and gave us the tools to make ourselves better. And if we didnt put in the work that the music deserved, well, hed tell us what he thought about that (and it wasnt good). What makes me think of all this? First, Ive always regarded diabetes in somewhat the same way: a sometimes harsh Zen teacher who doesnt m Continue reading >>

Teachers Talk: “5 Things Moms Of Kids With Type 1 Taught Me”

Teachers Talk: “5 Things Moms Of Kids With Type 1 Taught Me”

If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a team to manage type 1 diabetes at school. That team will likely be made up of you, your child, and any school personnel who interact with him or her throughout the day. “It should include — but is not limited to — teachers, nurses, guidance counselors and physical education instructors,” says Colleen Shamberger, a nurse at Maple Avenue Middle School in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. Typically, a school nurse will train staff members to recognize basic signs and symptoms of low and high blood sugar, and what to do in an emergency. Of course, you can’t have great teamwork without great communication. “Parents are the best resource for a child’s individual needs,” says Beth Anderson, a nurse who covers four elementary schools in San Diego County, Calif. Sharing behavioral information about your child is particularly important because the signs of low blood sugar can vary greatly among kids with type 1 diabetes. “Some children may get a little goofy, while others may get cranky,” explains Anderson. Once a nurse knows a child’s symptoms, she can include them in the care plan that is shared with the school staff. “It’s extremely important to get off to a good start, even before the school year begins if possible,” stresses Janice Tate, a registered nurse and certified diabetes educator based in Missoula, Mont., who frequently educates staff at schools in her area. “Communicate, communicate, communicate. Be very specific about what you need — if your son needs a snack at 10 a.m., then put it in writing.” What else should you share with the staff at your child’s school — and how? We asked a panel of school personnel — teachers, nurses, and administrators — to share the most useful nuggets they Continue reading >>

Tips For Teachers With Diabetic Kids In The Class

Tips For Teachers With Diabetic Kids In The Class

Tips for teachers with diabetic kids in the class Informed and caring teachers can be a tremendous help in teaching children with diabetes how to lead normal, active lives outside of the home. Teachers have to learn much about the kids that are left in their care, a challenge that includes everything from playing mommy to building future leaders. Unfortunately this role, means that they are at times pressed to deal with children who have special health needs. With nearly 6.5 million South Africans, and up to 45% new diabetes cases diagnosed in children, the chances of a teacher having a child with diabetes in class are quite high, according to the International Diabetes Federation and the American Diabetes Association. And as diabetic episodes can be life-threatening, its important for teachers to know what to do if they have a child living with diabetes in their care. As always, forearmed is forewarned, so its important to notify teachers if theres a child with diabetes in one of their classes. This will enable them to be alert to any changes in the childs behaviour or to any signs of distress. Home room teachers should also speak to the childs parents at the start of the school year in order to obtain better insight into his or her individual health status. "Written instructions and guidelines from parents can be very helpful," says Shelley Harris, public relations manager of the local division of leading diabetes healthcare company Novo Nordisk . "These should ideally be put up in an easily-accessible place in the classroom, where both the teacher and fellow learners can refer to them if necessary." On an everyday level teachers should, for instance, ensure that children with diabetes have a healthy snack before undertaking strenuous exercise, either in the gym or o Continue reading >>

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