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Tea Tree Oil For Diabetic Wounds

Natural Wound Healing For People With Diabetes

Natural Wound Healing For People With Diabetes

For people with diabetes, a simple scratch can become a serious medical challenge. Fortunately, you have a kitchen. And a windowsill. That means there’s a good chance that you already have natural remedies at your fingertips that can help your skin heal itself safely. And if you don’t have them, we’ll tell you what to get! WHY WOUND SELF-CARE IS SO IMPORTANT When blood sugar is elevated, and especially when it’s poorly controlled, the normally energetic immune system isn’t as vigilant as it should be—and bacteria can quickly get the upper hand. Plus, the tiny vessels that carry oxygen and nutrient-rich blood, needed to heal a wound, don’t function as well in people with diabetes. Before you know it, an unchecked blister, scratch or scrape can become infected. Of course, keeping your blood sugar under control is the key first step to minimizing the risk from wounds. But there are natural remedies that safely and effectively boost your body’s response to wounds. Caveat: If you have a serious wound—especially one that could be contaminated, such as by dirt, saliva, food or waste, or where the skin can close over the injury and trap infection deep in tissue—get professional medical help right away. Examples: You get a puncture wound from a nail or staple gun…a penetrating wound such as from a piece of glass that gets embedded in your skin…or a deep wound from a kitchen knife or while gardening or working in soil…or you were bitten by an animal. For everyday scrapes, scratches and minor cuts, however, most people can try the following natural remedies first. You can use just one…or layer two of them together…and repeat as often as needed. Experiment with the combinations that work best for you. These remedies are actually great for everyone, but Continue reading >>

Days Island - Lavender Oil: Using Lavender Oil For Diabetic Sores

Days Island - Lavender Oil: Using Lavender Oil For Diabetic Sores

How to use lavender oil to treat diabetic sores: Apply lavender oil to affected area as soon as possible. Make sure to clean skin prior to application to minimize the risk of infection. Continue to apply neat (undiluted) every one or two hours to the affected area to reduce inflammation and prevent infection. For sores on feet or hands, apply lavender oil with a Q-tip to exactly cover only the blister. Cover with a band-aid to avoid infection. For sensitive skin or larger ulcers, mix 10-20 drops of lavender oil with 1 oz carrier oil (such as almond, coconut or jojoba) and apply to clean skin 3-5 times a day. If possible, leave uncovered for as long as possible to increase oxygen and assist in cell rejuvenation. This information is for educational purposes only, and is not intended to prescribe, treat, prevent, or diagnose any disease or condition. As always, before you begin any sort of regimen using essential oils, please consult with your physician, naturopath, or aromatherapist before doing so. The use of oils can be very empowering and effective in the treatment of a variety of ailments. However, use your own discretion; the medical community is there to help us when oils can't. Continue reading >>

Essential Oils For Feet

Essential Oils For Feet

Our feet carry us farther than anyone. All that pounding can occasionally leave them in cracked, itchy, and dry—it's important to take time to give our tootsies the TLC they deserve. Using common essential oils, find out how to create a lavish foot spa, luxurious oil rub, and anti-bacterial foot powder, to get you back up on your feet in no time. The world may be in your hands, but you walk through it with your feet. And they need to be taken care of! Our feet carry us many thousands of miles in a lifetime. So when they are tired, sore, ulcerated, infected, cracked, dry, or itchy, they can cause the rest of the body stress from these constant irritations. There are many reasons for foot problems, ranging from dehydration and mineral deficiencies to diabetes. Diabetics can suffer from damage to their nerve endings, which can affect their extremities. They may endure numbness, tingling, or burning sensations in their legs, hands, and feet. Because of this, diabetic feet sweat less frequently or not at all, leading to dryness. Treatment for dry diabetic feet should be aimed at restoring moisture to the feet and preventing bacterial and fungal infections from occurring. It is important to avoid products that contain petroleum, mineral oil, or various forms of waxes that clog the pores and prevent the skin from breathing. If you are diabetic, proper foot care should be a part of your daily routine, and essential oils can play a positive role in this self-care practice. Tea tree essential oil has natural deodorizing and anti-fungal properties, while lavender is known for its wound healing properties. Peppermint essential oil is helpful in purifying the skin, increasing circulation, and promoting new cell growth. Its cooling effect can keep the feet feeling refreshed all day Continue reading >>

5 Essential Oils That Heal

5 Essential Oils That Heal

Facebook 0 Twitter 0 livefyre Email Print ( ) Essential oils, containing potent medicinal and cosmetic properties, are a versatile part of a natural medicine cabinet. They work to support the bodys own healing system, and when used correctly, may be able to take the place of conventional over-the-counter remedies. Essential oils have a very small molecular size, which means that their healing properties are easily absorbed by the skin, but should not be ingested. The potency ensures that only a few drops are needed at a time, so a small bottle can last a few years when used sparingly. Most have a shelf life of five to 10 years with the exception of citrus oils, which lose their potency after about two years. When purchasing essential oils, keep in mind that they are not the same as fragrance oils, which are synthetic and may not be safe to use on the skin; essential oils are always natural. Many oils also need to be diluted with a carrier oil which serves as a base to add a few drops of essential oils to. Some good carrier oils are sweet almond, sesame and coconut oil. Always use a carrier oil when using essential oils on babies and children since their skin is much more sensitive to the effects, and to be safe, all essential oils should be avoided during the first trimester of pregnancy. And always check with your doctor before using essential oils on yourself or your children. Here are five essential oils that are great for beginners since they have few contraindications and can be used for a variety of different ailments. Lavender is the most well known of the essential oils, and for good reason. It has antiviral and antibacterial properties, which can reduce the healing time for scrapes, bites and stings. It doesnt require a carrier oil, and can be put directly ont Continue reading >>

Tea Tree Oil For Wound Care

Tea Tree Oil For Wound Care

Most minor wounds are caused by accidents or falls and can be easily treated at home. However an animal bite can cause wounds with a greater risk of infection. Approximately 4.5 million dog bites and 400,000 cat bites occur each year in the United States. Dogs and cats cause damage and infection by different means. Dogs with their rounded teeth and strong jaws can cause deep tissue damage by exerting over 200 pounds per inch . Cat bites can cause more serious infections than dog bites because their teeth are sharp and capable of infecting an area around a joint or tendon with bacteria. A study found that about one out of three people who were treated at Mayo Clinic for a cat bite to the hand had to be hospitalized, and most needed surgery to clear out bacteria and infected tissue . Bites over a joint or tendons that were red, swollen and painful tended to require hospital admission. A cat or dog bite, or even a scratch, can transmit antibiotic resistant staph bacteria (MRSA). Interestingly people can also transmit staph bacteria to their pets. If antibiotic resistant staph enters the skin through a wound it can cause a life threatening infection. The Melaleuca Wellness Guide tells us that cat bites and scratches from all animals, and man, promote infection. Cat bites and scratches are among the worst. Because of the high population of bacteria growing on the claws, scratches can be particularly bad. Immediately wash the area with Sol-U-Guard Botanical Hand Wash or the Gold Bar. Apply a few drops of Sol-U-Mel to the wet washcloth for additional disinfecting. Apply straight T36-C5 to deep and bleeding wounds to speed drying and to slow bleeding. Apply MelaGel to a sterile bandage and cover. T36-C5 Melaleuca Oil is a very effective first aid treatment for a cat or dog bit Continue reading >>

Kills Infection-causing Bacteria.

Kills Infection-causing Bacteria.

More than 3X the bacteria-fighting power of other products* to stop the germs that delay diabetic ulcers from healing Relieves swelling and pain associated with sores Customer report relief within 1 to 7 days‡ Designed for easy, at-home use: no complicated therapies or procedures Eliminates Bacteria for Fast Relief and Diabetic Ulcer Closure What Are Diabetic Ulcers: Diabetic ulcers, also known as neurotropic ulcers, are a common side affect for individuals with diabetes. Diabetics often experience neuropathy (a lasting numbness) in their feet, which makes it hard to detect if there are cuts and cracks due to malnourished skin. These unnoticed sores could go on unattended and can worsen without the proper care. Diabetic ulcers are commonly located at increased pressure points on the bottom of the feet. Individuals who are concerned about having these sores should take a closer look. Diabetic ulcers appear as red, swollen, slow-healing open sores. In general, a diabetic ulcer may appear redish-pink or brownish-black. However, the base color may depend on circulation. The border may look “punched out” and the surrounding skin may be calloused. If you suspect a diabetic ulcer, remember to look for the signs. Signs of an infected diabetic ulcer include: Large or deep break in the skin Numbness in the feet Moist and/or pus-filled wound Red streaking away from wound Warmth around sore Fever Diabetic ulcers are caused by reduced skin moisture, dulled surface sensitivity, and insufficient circulation. Many diabetics battle with these skin conditions on a regular basis and if not properly cared for, they can cause the skin to crack or tear. Once the skin is torn, bacteria can easily infect the wound and lead to an ulcer. To prevent serious complications with diabetic ulcer Continue reading >>

Tea Tree Oil For Wound Care

Tea Tree Oil For Wound Care

Consider using tea tree oil to cleanse mild wounds. To Whom It May Concern:I am an avid writer who is also a work-at-home mom. As the stay-at-home parent of three active boys, it is my goal to be able to spend quality time with my family while also making a living working from home. Currently, I tutor online and do office transcriptions, with occasional freelance jobs; however, my dream is to be able to write from home full-time. I would love to be able to do that with Demand Studios.The writing sample that I have attached is part of a series of articles that I wrote for a freelance project about small farming. As a person who was raised on a family farm and who worked on a farm during summers in college, I am also qualified to write about farms and homesteading, in addition to those topics that I selected.I look forward to hearing from you regarding my application. Please let me know if you have any questions and have a wonderful day!Sincerely,Rachael A Clements Praised by many, tea tree oil has been used by the aboriginal people of Australia for hundreds of years as a natural treatment for a range of diseases and health conditions. The oil essence is collected from the long, slender leaves of the tea tree plant. Tea tree oil may be an effective, natural option for wound care in certain situations. Talk to your primary care doctor before using it, especially on deep, open wounds or those that are severely infected. Characterized by a spicy odor and pale yellow appearance, tea tree oil comes from the tea tree plant, which grows in the swampy regions of Australia. After it is extracted through steam distillation, the oil is found in many commercial products, including deodorants, disinfectants, soaps and lotions. Available diluted as well as in its pure form, tea tree o Continue reading >>

A Pilot Evaluation Of Tea Tree Oil In The Management Of Chronic Venous Leg Ulcers

A Pilot Evaluation Of Tea Tree Oil In The Management Of Chronic Venous Leg Ulcers

A pilot evaluation of tea tree oil in the management Department of General Surgery, Hinchingbrooke Hospital, Huntingdon, UK Background:Venous ulcers are often complicated by infection, which may retard their healing. This pilot study was undertaken to see if topical application of tea tree oil (TTO) would aid healing in longstanding venous ulcers, and to evaluate its side-effects. Methods:TTO was applied to 10 venous leg ulcers in eight patients. The patients were to be reviewed at intervals designated 0, 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 weeks. At each visit the ulcers were inspected, bacteriological swabs taken and digital photography was to be performed for Results:No systemic side-effects were noted. Leg ulcer healing occurred in one patient at 15 weeks, with wound sterilization by week 6. Bacterial colonization was noted in all ulcers (Pseudomonas aeruginosa [n6], Staphylococcus aureus [n7], Proteus [n2], Streptococcus sp. [n3] and coliforms [n4]). Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was successfully eradicated in one ulcer. In all other subjects, TTO had to be discontinued because of maceration of tissues and uid strike-through of bandages. Conclusion:TTO was not useful as a general aid to healing in these leg ulcers. It may, however, be useful as a short-course treatment for treating MRSA in leg ulcers. Using TTO in a different vehicle may avoid the maceration that prevented completion of the study. Phlebology 2005; 0: 000000 r2005 Royal Society of Medicine Press Keywords: Tea tree oil; chronic venous leg ulcers Tea tree oil (TTO) has been used to treat ulcers and various infections. TTO has been shown to have in vitro topical bactericidal activity against both mupir- ocin-susceptible and -resistant methicillin-resistant be marketed as a preparation for treating vaginal It Continue reading >>

Essential Oils For Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Essential Oils For Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Do you get the weekly newsletter that Podiatry Arena sends out to update everybody? If not, click here to organise this. The Wound Healing Effects of Herbal Cream Containing Oliveria Decumbens and Pelargonium Graveolens Essential Oils in Diabetic Foot Ulcer Model The number of diabetic patients in adult population is increasing. All this population are at risk of developing diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) that are associated with unwanted ailments and high mortality. In spite of current therapies for DFUs, further therapies The efficacy of herbal cream containing Pelargonium graveolens and Oliveria decombens essential oils was evaluated topically for treatment of DFUs in rat animal model in comparison with two other herbal formulas containing each essential oil alone, placebo (the basic formula without active ingredients) and normal saline as control groups. After anesthesia of diabetic rats (n=75) induced by streptozotocin (STZ), diabetic wounds were visible on the hind dorsal surface of the foot. The treatments were initiated on Day 1 and repeated 3 times in a day for thirteen consecutive days. On day 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13, the wound sizes were determined and assessed histologically. Three herbal formulations reduced the size of wounds in rats with DFUs, while the cream containing combined herbals of O. decumbens and P. graveolens essential oils had the highest tissue Due to better wound healing effects of combined herbal cream containing O. decumbens and P. graveolens essential oils, it can Continue reading >>

A Randomized Controlled Trial Of Topical Tea Tree Preparation For Mrsa Colonized Wounds - Sciencedirect

A Randomized Controlled Trial Of Topical Tea Tree Preparation For Mrsa Colonized Wounds - Sciencedirect

Volume 1, Issue 1 , March 2014, Pages 7-14 Author links open overlay panel Rainbow L.P.Leea Polly H.M.Leungb Thomas K.S.Wongc Open Access funded by Chinese Nursing Association The prevalence of MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) colonized wounds in home care residents is expected to grow continuously as a result of the substantial proportion of older people requiring institutionalized care due to chronic disease and declining functional status, which contribute to more frequent skin breakdown and wound formation. Tea tree oil has been claimed to have anti-bacterial, analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects that have been suggested in many in-vitro studies to have good efficacy against MRSA. The aims of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of 10% topical tea tree preparation to eradicate MRSA and to ascertain its influence on wound healing for MRSA-colonized wounds. It was a randomized controlled trial, single-blind study. Those with stage II or above MRSA-colonized wounds and who had given their informed consent formed the sample. The determined sample size was based on the effect size of our previous pilot study, which was 0.46. Five outcome measurements were taken for the MRSA bacterial count and wound healing condition at baseline and at 1-week intervals during the 4-week dressing intervention period. Thirty-two participants were recruited from two non-government nursing homes, 16 in the control group and 16 in the tea tree oil group. The control group residents received routine saline gauze dressing, while the tea tree oil group residents received the 10% topical tea tree preparation dressing. In the tea tree oil group, all chronic wounds that had previously been delayed in healing were healed within 28 days without adverse reaction. MRSA wa Continue reading >>

Gas Gangrene And Osteomyelitis Of The Foot In A Diabetic Patient Treated With Tea Tree Oil

Gas Gangrene And Osteomyelitis Of The Foot In A Diabetic Patient Treated With Tea Tree Oil

Gas gangrene and osteomyelitis of the foot in a diabetic patient treated with tea tree oil 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Hyperbaric Medicine, SUNY Upstate Medical University, EMSTAT Center/550 East Genesee, Syracuse, New York 13202, USA 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Hyperbaric Medicine, SUNY Upstate Medical University, EMSTAT Center/550 East Genesee, Syracuse, New York 13202, USA 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Hyperbaric Medicine, SUNY Upstate Medical University, EMSTAT Center/550 East Genesee, Syracuse, New York 13202, USA Received 2011 Mar 13; Accepted 2011 Apr 14. Copyright 2011 Cooney and Cooney; licensee Springer. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Diabetic foot wounds represent a class of chronic non-healing wounds that can lead to the development of soft tissue infections and osteomyelitis. We reviewed the case of a 44-year-old female with a diabetic foot wound who developed gas gangrene while treating her wound with tea tree oil, a naturally derived antibiotic agent. This case report includes images that represent clinical examination and x-ray findings of a patient who required broad-spectrum antibiotics and emergent surgical consultation. Emergency Department (ED) detection of these complications may prevent loss of life or limb in these patients. The lifetime incidence of diabetic foot ulcers may be as high as 25% [ 1 ]; however, gas gangrene is not common in these patients. The most common causative organism in gas gangrene is Clostridium perfringens [ 2 ]. It is also important to rule out underlying osteomyelitis. Continue reading >>

Causes, Treatments, & Home Remedies For Leg Ulcers - Common Ailments

Causes, Treatments, & Home Remedies For Leg Ulcers - Common Ailments

Leg ulcers are commonly found on the ankle and the lower legs. They appear as an asymmetrical wound with clear edges. Around the ulcer, the skin may be inflamed or hardened and pigmented. Leg ulcers may contain pus and are very painful, especially when standing or walking. There are many reasons why leg ulcers form but the most common causes are related to the health of the veins deep vein thrombosis and ulceration of the veins. Your veins are responsible for carrying deoxygenated blood back from the body to the heart. As the muscles around the veins contract, blood is pumped towards the heart and prevented from moving backwards with the help of one-way valves. The calves act as powerful muscular pumps to counteract the effects of gravity and push the blood upwards. Problems with the veins such as blockages or venous insufficiency can hinder this pumping action and cause a pooling of blood in the lower extremities. As the blood collects, it causes inflammation of the surrounding tissues and leg ulcers. While it is not known exactly how poor vein circulation can cause a leg ulcer, a popular theory states that as the blood pools in the legs, white blood cells collect and get trapped in the narrow capillaries and destroy the nearby skin cells and tissues. This may also account for the high levels of white blood cells found in the pus of leg ulcers. There are certain factors that increase a persons chance of developing leg ulcers such as age, the presence of varicose veins or any form of arterial disease, and other medical conditions such as arthritis or diabetes. Smokers and those who take certain medications such as cardiovascular drugs are also prone to leg ulcers due to compromised circulation. Treatment for a venous leg ulcer must begin with cleaning the wound well to Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Ulcers And Essential Oils

Diabetic Foot Ulcers And Essential Oils

Basic PLUS Author | 26 Articles By Tawne Bachus | Submitted On June 22, 2007 Often and unfortunately, ulcers on the feet become a common result of diabetes. Once an open wound is present on the foot, it also becomes prone to complications that may rise from infection. Prevention of infection may be achieved through the use of anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and anti-viral essential oils like Tea Tree oil. Tea Tree oil is also a commonly recommended essential oil that has historically assisted with the recovery of foot ulcers for several reasons. First, Tea Tree oil has an unusually high concentration of terpinen-4-ol, an alcohol, which constitutes up to 35% of the finest quality Tea Tree oils. Research indicates the Terpinen-4-ol, successfully helps the body achieve normal inflammation levels, as indicated in a November, 2003, Australian study. Inflammation naturally occurs any time the body responds to trauma within the body. Inflammation results in redness, swelling, increased body temperature and pain. Thus, reducing inflammation may result in a reduction of the discomforts associated with the ulcer. Additionally, Tea Tree oil is used on foot ulcers is, because Tea Tree oil contains a unique blend of constituents that cannot be found in this combination anywhere else in nature. In 1978, G. Swords and G. L. K. Hunter authored an article titled: 'Composition of Australian Tea-Tree Oil (Melaleuca alternifolia)' in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry (vol. 26, 1978, pp. 734-9). This article pointed out that Tea Tree contains viridiflorene, present at I %, B- terpineol (0.24%) 1-terpineol (trace amounts) and allyl hexanoate (trace amounts). Second, Tea Tree oil has been reported to have strong antiseptic properties. An antiseptic is defined as an anti-microbial sub Continue reading >>

Tea Tree Oil (melaleuca Oil): Side Effects And Dosage

Tea Tree Oil (melaleuca Oil): Side Effects And Dosage

What is tea tree oil-topical, and how does it work (mechanism of action)? Tea tree oil is topical antiseptic . It contains Terpinen-4-ol, which has antifungal and antimicrobial properties. What brand names are available for tea tree oil-topical? Is tea tree oil-topical available as a generic drug? Do I need a prescription for tea tree oil-topical? What are the side effects of tea tree oil-topical? Side effects of tea tree oil may be local irritation and inflammation at the application area. What is the dosage for tea tree oil-topical? The recommended dose for acne is: Apply 5% gel to affected areas daily. The recommended dose for nail fungus ( Onychomycosis ) is: Apply 100% solution twice daily for 6 months. The recommended dose for athlete's foot is: Apply 10% cream topically twice a day for 1 month OR apply 25% or 50% solution twice a day for 1 month. Tea tree oil 100% solution can be applied to cuts, scrapes, burns, abrasions, insect bites, and stings. Which drugs or supplements interact with tea tree oil-topical? There is no information on drug interactions with tea tree oil. Is tea tree oil-topical safe to take if I'm pregnant or breastfeeding? There are no adequate studies done on tea tree oil to determine safe and effective use in pregnant women. It is not known whether tea tree oil enters breast milk; therefore, it is best to be cautious before using it in nursing mothers. What else should I know about tea tree oil-topical? What preparations of tea tree oil-topical are available? Tea tree oil is available as 5% gel, 5% ointment, 100% solution, 25-50% solution, and 10% cream. How should I keep tea tree oil-topical stored? Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Essential Oils | Diabetic Connect

Diabetes And Essential Oils | Diabetic Connect

Maybe youve heard your running buddy raving that his sore is gone after treating it with lavender oil, or your neighbor bragging on Facebook that her whole family is feeling less stressed after introducing something called bergamot into her home. But when you search online, all of the information about essential oils like these can get confusing. Whats fact, and whats fiction? You cannot cure your diabetes with essential oils, and you wont be able to force your blood sugar higher or lower, but this alternative treatment may be able to help relieve some symptoms that are common in people with diabetes. The two main diabetes issues where essential oils may help are skin and wound care and stress management. Only a limited number of clinical trials have tested the effectiveness of essential oils at reducing these symptoms, but anecdotal evidence may be enough to make you want to talk with your doctor about adding essential oils to your treatment plan. Essential oils are extremely concentrated forms of distilled extracts from leaves, roots, stems, flowers, and seeds. Different oils are thought to benefit you in different ways via aromatherapy. Researchers from the University of Maryland define aromatherapy as "the use of essential oils from plants for healing." Oils can be inhaled by wafting from the bottle or from a diffuser that disperses the oils scent throughout a room. They can also be rubbed directly onto the skin (diluted with a carrier oil like coconut oil or grape seed oil), often on the bottom of the feet or back of the neck. You can find essential oils through online retailers and at many health food stores. Many aromatherapists recommend checking the bottles label to be sure that it is a pure essential oil or 100% essential oil so that you know you are not purc Continue reading >>

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