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Tea For Diabetes

Black Tea Inhibits Diabetes

Black Tea Inhibits Diabetes

Everybody knows green tea is healthier than black tea. Right? Well, not so fast! Though green tea has received much acclaim because of its superstar antioxidant content, black tea, it turns out, does more to lower blood sugar. Black tea contains a polysaccharide that works very much the way pharmaceutical diabetes drugs work, according to a new study out of Tianjin University in China. It's been known for some time that tea offers benefits to diabetics, but previous research hasn't compared the various kinds of tea to see which works best. This study compared the effects of green tea, black tea, and oolong. Although all three types of tea come from the same type of plant -- camellia sinensis -- they get processed differently, and it is the processing that creates differences in flavor and composition. Black tea undergoes the most processing and is fully fermented; green tea, which is unfermented, undergoes the least, and oolong tea fits right into the middle. The natural assumption is that less processing is better, and in fact, green tea does preserve its antioxidant content better, plus has less caffeine. It's the catechins in green tea that confer all those health benefits, and in processing, those catechins convert into other compounds. Still, according to Dr. John Weisburger of the Institute for Cancer Prevention, "Whether it's green or black, tea has about eight to 10 times the [antioxidants] found in fruits and vegetables." Plus, a closer look at what happens to the catechins in the process of making black tea reveals that they simply convert into other antioxidants -- theaflavins and thearubigens, which, although probably not as powerful as catechins, do confer health benefits that just now are starting to be investigated. Studies have shown that in addition to Continue reading >>

Three Cups Of Tea A Day Can Cut Your Risk Of Diabetes... Even If You Add Milk

Three Cups Of Tea A Day Can Cut Your Risk Of Diabetes... Even If You Add Milk

Drinking three cups of tea a day can cut the risk of diabetes, says new research. Two studies show that black tea has a glucose-lowering effect that could help prevent and manage type 2 diabetes, which affects 2.3 million Britons. Experts say the findings suggest around three cups a day might help the body control blood sugar levels more effectively. In the studies US and Japanese scientists investigated extracts from black tea in the laboratory. They discovered the action of natural ingredients in black tea could lead to reductions in blood sugar. The US research led by Lisa Striegel from Framingham State University analysed black tea leaves after being immersed in hot water. Scroll down for video They extracted a number of polyphenols – antioxidants – all of which were shown to block enzymes that push up blood sugar from the digestion of carbohydrates. They had 'significant activity' against the enzymes, alpha amylase and alpha-glucosidase. This suggests that black tea extract may reduce levels of glucose normally associated with these digestive enzymes, says a report in Frontiers of Nutrition. In a second study from Japan, a freeze dried powder extract of black tea leaves was found to have a similar effect on the two enzymes. The study from the Hokkaido Pharmaceutical University School of Pharmacy was published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology. Although black tea was analysed in the study, other research in humans suggests adding milk does not dilute the benefits. Dr Catherine Hood from the industry backed Tea Advisory Panel (TAP) said 'Diabetes is a condition of disordered glucose metabolism. 'The main source of glucose in the body comes from the digestion and hydrolysis of dietary carbohydrates. 'The digestive enzymes pancreatic alpha-amylase and the intesti Continue reading >>

Tea And Diabetes

Tea And Diabetes

Tweet Tea is one of the nation’s favourite drinks and research suggests it’s also a healthy drink. Tea brings a number of health benefits including improving insulin sensitivity. However, research notes that some the benefits are best experienced if you drink your tea without milk. Benefits of tea Research suggests the following benefits may be enjoyed from tea: Improving insulin sensitivity Maintaining healthy blood pressure Preventing blood clots Reducing risk of cardiovascular disease Reducing risks of developing type 2 diabetes Reducing risks of developing cancer How does tea help diabetes? Teas such as black tea, green tea and oolong tea contain polyphenols which researchers believe may increase insulin activity. An American study of 2002 found, however, that addition of milk in tea decreased the insulin-sensitising effects of tea. [22] Can tea prevent diabetes? Polyphenols are known to have anti-oxidative properties which can help protect against inflammation and carcinogens. In other words, the properties in tea can help to prevent type 2 diabetes as well as cancer. A Dutch study from 2009 indicates that drinking three cups of tea (or coffee) could reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 40%. [21] Other factors for preventing type 2 diabetes include: Eating minimal amounts of processed foods Eating fresh vegetables regularly through the day Including physical activity into each day Not smoking Keeping alcohol intake low Tea and stress relief Tea also contains tiny micronutrients called flavonoids which can help parts of the body to function better. There are many different types of flavonoid and each have different health properties. One flavonoid of interest that is found in tea is theanine which can help to control blood pressure and lower stress. Continue reading >>

Essiac Tea For Diabetes

Essiac Tea For Diabetes

People use Essiac for a multitude of health conditions, most notably cancer. However, another common use for Essiac is in treatment of diabetes. The discovery of the association between diabetes and Essiac occurred when one of Caisse’s patients with both colon cancer and diabetes not only saw remission of her cancer on Essiac, but also claimed that her diabetes disappeared. This result was so astounding that even Dr. Frederick Banting, a Nobel laureate and one of the primary discoverers of insulin, became interested in researching Essiac further. Dr. Banting wanted to investigate the possible ability of Essiac to regenerate the pancreas’ ability to produce insulin and thus treat diabetes, but the research never happened because one of the stipulations was that Caisse close her clinic until after the research was completed; Caisse found this unacceptable due to her number of cancer patients. Toxin Removal Many Essiac proponents believe that Essiac’s detoxifying property is one of the main physiologic mechanisms that makes it helpful in diabetes. With type II diabetes in particular, the pancreas loses function due to exposure to toxins from poor diet, environmental pollutants, and attacks from microbial pathogens. Regular use of Essiac tea reportedly flushes these toxins from the body by neutralizing them and allowing the body’s other organs (such as liver, kidney, skin) to remove them. This allows the pancreas to regain function and return to normal levels of insulin production. This theory, however, has not been proven with laboratory or clinical studies. Also, given that type II diabetes is related more to insulin insensitivity, rather than insulin deficiency, this theory seems unlikely to be the case in type II. With type I, though, where the problem is insuff Continue reading >>

Black Tea Improves Glucose Levels, May Help Prevent Diabetes

Black Tea Improves Glucose Levels, May Help Prevent Diabetes

Although green tea has been getting most of the attention lately for its myriad health benefits, accumulating research shows that black tea offers advantages, too. The latest revelation: black tea’s ability to blunt increases in blood sugar. 1 A new study has found that black tea significantly reduces rises in blood glucose levels among both healthy and pre-diabetic adults, in this case after consuming a sugary drink. 1 “We demonstrated that black tea reduced incremental blood glucose after sucrose consumption at 60, 90 and 120 minutes compared with placebo,” wrote the authors of the study, which appears in the Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1 “The data confirm that polyphenols lower glycemic response and may be responsible for the lower rates of diabetes observed with tea and coffee consumption,” said Peter Clifton, M.D., PhD., professor of nutrition at the University of South Australia in Adelaide, who recently conducted a review of the role of dietary polyphenols (in tea, cinnamon, coffee, chocolate, pomegranate, red wine and olive oil, among others) in regulating glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity, published in Nutrients. 2, 3 The Polyphenol Power of Tea Indeed, the major bioactive compounds in black tea are polyphenols—naturally occurring antioxidants abundant in plant foods (and drinks) that are said to promote health and protect against a range of diseases. 4 Black, green and oolong teas are all made from the plant Camellia Sinensis. Green tea, which is minimally oxidized, contains simple flavonoids called catechins. During the process of making black tea, which is more fully oxidized, the catechins convert to complex flavonoids known as theaflavins and thearubigens, and research has shown that theaflavins and thearubigens mainta Continue reading >>

Effects Of Coffee And Tea On Diabetes

Effects Of Coffee And Tea On Diabetes

A January 2004 study of coffee and diabetes shows that men who drank 6 cups of coffee a day reduced their chances of developing type-2 diabetes by half, and women who drank the same amount cut their risk by 30 percent. 126,000 people filled out questionnaires over the previous 12-18 years with information about their coffee intake and other health questions. In earlier studies, Dutch researchers discovered that there are compounds in coffee that aid the body's metabolism of sugar. Their study involved 17,000 men and women in the Netherlands. The results were published in November 2002, in the journal Lancet. According to their study, people who drank 7 cups a day (or more) were 50% less likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Drinking less coffee had less of an impact on diabetes onset. Researchers are still looking at the connection between coffee and diabetes, and caution people that 7 cups of coffee per day is enough to create other health problems. A number of older studies have shown that caffeine may increase your risk of developing diabetes. The theory is that the beneficial chemicals are able to offset the damage done by the caffeine. So drinking decaffeinated coffee would be the best bet if you are thinking of drinking coffee to prevent diabetes. Tea also has an effect on diabetes. Drinking tea can improve insulin activity up to 15 times, and it can be black, green or oolong. Herbal teas don't have any effect. The active compounds don't last long in the body, so you would have to drink a cup or more of tea every few hours to maintain the benefit. The catch is that you should drink it without milk (even soy milk), because milk seems to interact with the necessary chemicals and render them unavailable to your body. Continue reading >>

Drinking A Cup Of Tea Can Help Prevent Diabetes, New Research Shows

Drinking A Cup Of Tea Can Help Prevent Diabetes, New Research Shows

Drinking cups of tea can help prevent type-2 diabetes, according to a growing body of scientific research. A new study from researchers in the US found that black tea inhibits the body from absorbing glucose sugars, too much of which can cause type-2 diabetes. The researchers, who brewed the tea under laboratory conditions, said tea could help control diabetes in humans. “Our findings suggest that black tea and black tea pomace has potential for carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzyme inhibition and this activity depends on high molecular weight phenolic compounds,” the authors of the paper wrote. The research, which was conducted by researchers at Framingham State University in the United States, builds on work done by Japanese scientists two decades earlier. A 1995 study from the Hokkaido Pharmaceutical University School of Pharmacy found that black tea has what scientists call “anti-hyperglycaemic effects”. The study found that rats had “significantly” reduced levels of blood glocuse and that black tea could both prevent and cure rats with diabetes. “The study reveals that, like green tea, black tea also possesses antidiabetic activity,” the researchers found. According to NHS statistics there are approximately 3.1 million adults with diabetes in the UK, with the number expected to rise of 4.6 million by 2030. 90 per cent of those suffering from the condition have type 2 diabetes, which is affect by black tea consumption. Health officials say the increased level in type 2 diabetes is due to increasing level of obesity, a lack of exercise and unhealthy diets. One study funded by pharmaceutical companies and carried out by the York Health Economic Consortium found that the cost of the direct treatment of diabetes to the NHS would increase from £9.8 billion to Continue reading >>

Is It Ok For Diabetics To Drink Green Tea?

Is It Ok For Diabetics To Drink Green Tea?

Green tea may provide a number of health benefits, such as lowering your risk for cancer, high cholesterol and Parkinson's disease, according to MedlinePlus. Although research is still in the preliminary stages, green tea may also help reduce your risk for developing diabetes and the complications sometimes associated with this condition. It may also make it easier to control your blood sugar levels. Diabetics can safely drink green tea, but they should carefully monitor their blood sugar levels because of the potential blood sugar-lowering effect of green tea. Video of the Day A study using mice published in the "British Journal of Nutrition" in April 2011 found that an antioxidant found in green tea called epigallocatechin gallate, or ECGC, may help delay the onset of Type 1 diabetes. Other animal studies have shown that green tea may help regulate blood glucose levels and help slow the progression of this condition once you have it, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. Further studies would be needed to verify that these benefits occur in people as well as animals. Green Tea and Type 2 Diabetes Drinking caffeinated green tea may help lower your risk for Type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in "Annals of Internal Medicine" in 2006. Study participants who drank at least 6 cups of green tea per day had a 33 percent lower risk for Type 2 diabetes than participants who drank 1 cup or less per week. Drinking at least 3 cups of coffee per day had a similar effect, but drinking black or oolong tea didn't decrease diabetes risk. Once a person has diabetes, however, it may be best to drink less green tea; a preliminary study using animals published in "BioFactors" in 2007 found that high doses of green tea may increase blood sugar in diabetics, co Continue reading >>

Facts About Green Tea And Diabetes

Facts About Green Tea And Diabetes

Diabetes is a lifelong condition in which your blood glucose levels are constantly very high. The body finds it difficult to metabolize glucose due to a lack or an absence of insulin. Diabetes is the most common metabolic disorder, affecting one out of every ten Americans. According to the American Diabetes Association, the number of Americans with diabetes reached 29.1 million in 2012, and 1.4 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes each year. Prolonged diabetes can have an adverse effect on your eyes, kidneys and nerves. Other complications of diabetes can include high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke and gangrene. Green tea and diabetes Medication is usually the first line of treatment for diabetes. However, green tea may offer a natural remedy for prevention and management of this widespread public health issue. A study in Japan showed the potential benefits of green tea in decreasing diabetes risk. It showed a 33% reduction in the risk of type 2 diabetes in subjects who drank 6 or more cups of green tea per day, as compared to those who consumed less than 1 cup per week. EGCG Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is the most effective type of catechin found in green tea. EGCG is known to play a key role in exhibiting the beneficial effects of green tea. A study published in the Journal of Nutrition successfully proved the anti-diabetic effects of green tea EGCG consumption in animals with type 2 diabetes. And a study in the British Journal of Nutrition found EGCG to reduce the risk or delay the onset of type 1 diabetes in animals. Other studies suggest that EGCG may mimic insulin and could potentially help in reducing blood sugar levels in the body. Obestity and green tea Obesity is the greatest risk factor for diabetes, so weight management is very important Continue reading >>

Jiaogulan – One Of The Best Natural Home Remedies For Diabetes

Jiaogulan – One Of The Best Natural Home Remedies For Diabetes

There are many herbs around the world that can be used as natural home remedies for diabetes. They usually work by lowering blood sugar levels in a wide variety of ways. However, very few of these herbs will actually have a positive impact on the underlying causes for diabetes: insulin resistance and insufficient insulin production. They may also have side-effects just like drugs (although usually much less common or severe), and can cause hypoglycemia (below normal levels of blood sugar). The Jiaogulan herb (Gynostemma pentaphyllum) is unique in many ways when compared to other herbs, especially anti-diabetic ones. It is not only one of the best home remedies for diabetes by helping to reduce blood glucose levels and fighting the root causes of diabetes, but it also has many additional benefits that are very important and valuable for anyone suffering from this daunting disease. Jiaogulan’s Benefits for Diabetics There is strong evidence from a number of animal studies that Jiaogulan is able to increase insulin concentrations in the blood both by stimulating the pancreas to produce more insulin and by improving sugar metabolism. Jiaogulan was shown to protect the cardiovascular system, the liver and the kidneys from diabetic and non-diabetic damage. This is important for anyone, but especially for diabetics who are much more likely to suffer damage to these organs as a result of the disease. The herb will also lower cholesterol and blood fat levels if they are too high, and act to balance blood pressure. In this article I will only share with you the available scientific evidence directly related to diabetes (points 1-4 above). If you want to examine the studies supporting points 5-8, I invite you to take a look at our complete Benefits page. You can also join our ma Continue reading >>

Green Tea For Diabetes

Green Tea For Diabetes

Did you know that green tea can actually benefit people with both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes, as well as assist people who are actively working to prevent the onset of Type 2 Diabetes? This is due to the unique antioxidants contained in the green tea leaves, and the effect that these antioxidants have on our bodies. WHAT IS DIABETES? Diabetes is a chronic condition in which the levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood are too high. Blood glucose levels are normally regulated by the hormone insulin, which is made by the pancreas. In people with diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin or there is a problem with how the body’s cells respond to it. (*) THERE ARE TWO MAIN TYPES OF DIABETES: TYPE 1 AND TYPE 2 Type 1 Diabetes is where the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach, stops making insulin, and this type of diabetes is not preventable. (Diabetes Australia) Unless treated with daily injections of insulin, people with type 1 diabetes accumulate dangerous chemical substances in their blood from the burning of fat. This can cause a condition known as ketoacidosis. This condition is potentially life threatening if not treated. Type 2 Diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, affecting 85-90% of all people with diabetes. Type 2 diabetes results from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Although there is a strong genetic predisposition, the risk is greatly increased when associated with lifestyle factors such as high blood pressure, overweight or obesity, insufficient physical activity, poor diet and the classic ‘apple shape’ body where extra weight is carried around the waist. (Diabetes Australia) HOW COMMON IS DIABETES IN AUSTRALIA? Diabetes is an epidemic affecting over 1 million Australians. Every day, 280 people are being diagn Continue reading >>

Are Coffee And Tea Healthy? They Could Extend Life For Diabetics, New Study Shows

Are Coffee And Tea Healthy? They Could Extend Life For Diabetics, New Study Shows

The wonders of coffee are varied. Your morning cup has been thought to lower risks of certain diseases like Parkinson’s and diabetes, in addition to boosting metabolism. Now, a new study indicates that drinking coffee could also keep you living longer—if you’re a diabetic woman. Scientists in Portugal presented this new research at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes Annual Meeting in Lisbon, Portugal, held September 11–15. The observational study included more than 3,000 people, all of whom had diabetes and used a diary to track coffee, tea and soft drink consumption, according to a release. Related: Diabetes Vaccine Entering Human Testing Could Also Prevent The Common Cold The findings revealed that females with diabetes who regularly drank caffeine, either from tea or coffee, lived longer than those who abstained from caffeinated beverages. Unfortunately for men, the study didn’t indicate any difference in their life span. Women benefited from consuming caffeine regardless of the source of their buzz, but the type of health benefits varied depending on the beverage. Ladies who drank about one cup of coffee daily (roughly 100 mg) were 51 percent less likely to die from any cause compared to noncaffeinated participants. While moderation usually is key, that wasn’t the case in this study. When consumption was boosted to between 100 and 200 mg of coffee per day, women had a 57 percent lower chance of death. Drinking two cups of coffee daily lowered the risk to 66 percent. Caffeinated tea drinkers had a reduced risk of dying from cancer, the study found. Females who drank the most tea reduced cancer-related deaths by 80 percent, compared to non–tea drinkers. However, the study authors warn that the sample of tea drinkers was very small and tha Continue reading >>

Can Tea Help With Diabetes? Is It Beneficial?

Can Tea Help With Diabetes? Is It Beneficial?

When living with diabetes, every food and drink choice becomes a conversation. Deciding what you put in your body can be a daunting task when the consequences of choosing poorly are more extreme than what a person living without diabetes might face. It’s also true that food and drink choices can be some of the simplest, and most empowering, ways for people living with diabetes to manage their condition and its symptoms. There has been some evidence in recent years that drinking certain teas, in certain quantities, can have a beneficial effect on your health whether you have diabetes or not. For those living with diabetes, tea actually has the potential to do a lot of good. Depending on what type you drink, tea can chemically assist your body with processing and managing sugar and insulin levels, and can also help people manage some of the symptoms of diabetes, including circulation problems, energy levels, blood pressure and more. A Little Background on Tea Tea is a hot or cold beverage consumed by billions of people across the globe daily, with 3 billion tons of tea produced every year for human consumption. There are many varieties of tea; green, white, black, oolong, rooibos, herbal… the list can be long and a bit intimidating, especially when you take into account that many “teas” don’t actually contain the leaves of the tea plant, or camellia sinensis, which is an evergreen shrub native to Asia. Rooibos is made from a bush native to Southern Africa. Herbal teas can contain flowers, leaves, or other parts of a number of different plant varieties, and all of these plants can and do have a different effect on your body. Given that so many people drink tea of one sort or another on such a regular basis, science has been studying the effect that tea and it’s Continue reading >>

Sage Tea & Diabetes

Sage Tea & Diabetes

To many, it may seem that there is an herbal remedial answer to every ailment and believe it or not this is very close to the truth. For centuries, herbs have been utilized to help support and relieve miniscule problems as well as more serious health concerns. Many herbal teas, like sage tea, come with multiple benefits that can help aid the body on various levels. Sage tea has been used for its therapeutic properties, as well as for the constituents that allow it to help support good memory. Additionally, recent research has also uncovered that sage tea may also have potential benefits to offer diabetics as well. Overview of Diabetes Diabetes is a grave, life-long condition that affects the metabolic rate of the body as a result of the pancreas creating too little or not enough insulin to process glucose. As a result, elevated blood sugar levels are common in those who suffer from diabetes. Those afflicted with diabetes experience one of three types. Type 1 diabetes is an auto-immune disease in nature and occurs when the immune system attacks the cells responsible for producing insulin in the pancreas. This form of diabetes occurs at any age though generally it more commonly develops in children and young adults. Type 2 diabetes is the second and most common form of diabetes that can afflict an individual. This type usually sets in with factors such as age, obesity, genetics, and physical inactivity. In this form of diabetes, although the pancreas can still produce insulin, it cannot be effectively used by the body. This causes blood glucose levels to rise reducing the efficiency of the body’s metabolic rate. The final type of diabetes is known as gestational diabetes. This type generally develops during pregnancy and will dissipate after the birth of the baby. Howev Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Green Tea

Diabetes And Green Tea

According to the 2011 National Diabetes Fact Sheet (released Jan. 2011), 25.8 million people are diabetic and 79 million people are pre-diabetic. American Diabetes Association explains in their website, "Before people develop type 2 diabetes, they almost always have 'prediabetes': blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Recent research has shown that some long-term damage to the body, especially the heart and circulatory system may already be occurring during prediabetes." Green Tea antioxidants and Diabetic Health through Weight Loss The Pennsylvania State University published another research result on green tea and blood sugar level in "Molecular Nutrition Food Research" in December, 2013. In this study, they found mice on a high-fat diet increased health with green tea combined with voluntary exercise. The mice showed an average 37% abdominal fat mass reduction, a 17% reduction in fasting blood glucose level, a 65% decrease in plasma insulin level, and a 65% reduction in insulin resistance. All are substantial improvements related to diabetic health. The group of mice that exercised but no green tea intake showed less significant changes in these markers and health. The researcher said, "The changes in body weight and body fat may result from increased fat metabolism and decreased fat synthesis. Green tea seems to modulate genes related to energy metabolism." This study was conducted in the absence of caffeine. Researchers eliminated caffeine from tea because they did not want the caffeine's stimulatory effect to blur the results. This is great news since many people prefer less caffeine lifestyle. A recent analysis of 11 human trials with green tea antioxidants reported a 1.31 kilogram average body weigh Continue reading >>

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