diabetestalk.net

Tdap Vaccine And Type 1 Diabetes

Top 5 Vaccines Recommended For Patients With Diabetes

Top 5 Vaccines Recommended For Patients With Diabetes

Top 5 Vaccines Recommended for Patients with Diabetes Patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes may be at an increased risk of certain preventable conditions. Vaccination is recommended for all patients, but is strongly emphasized among young children and older adults. As patients age, they may believe that they no longer need to get routine vaccinations; however, this is not the case. The CDC reports that getting vaccinated can prevent illnesses that take time away from work and loved ones. Patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes may be at a higher risk for diseases and infections that can be prevented through vaccination, according to the CDC. The agency recommends that patients with diabetes stay up to date on necessary vaccines. The CDC recommends that patients with diabetes receive the following vaccines: Influenza affects many individuals each year, with some cases resulting in serious illness and even death. The CDC recommends an annual flu shot to prevent seasonal influenza . This vaccine prevents individuals from developing pneumococcal disease, which can result in pneumonia or meningitis. Both conditions can become severe and result in increased healthcare costs or hospitalization. While meningitis can resolve without treatment, it can be life-threatening. This vaccine prevents a hepatitis B infection, which can be contracted through sexual contact. While the condition typically clears on its own, chronic cases can lead to cirrhosis and require a liver transplant. The potent tdap vaccine protects patients against tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis. Tetanus can lead to tightening of the muscles of the head and neck and kills 1 in 10 people with the infection, while diptheria can cause breathing problems, heart failure, paralysis, and death, according to the CDC Continue reading >>

Childhood Vaccinations, Vaccination Timing, And Risk Of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

Childhood Vaccinations, Vaccination Timing, And Risk Of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

Childhood vaccinations, vaccination timing, and risk of type 1 diabetes mellitus. National Immunization Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30341-3724, USA. [email protected] To evaluate suggested associations between childhood vaccinations, particularly against hepatitis B and Haemophilus influenzae type b, and risk of developing type 1 diabetes; and to determine whether timing of vaccination influences risk. We conducted a case-control study within 4 health maintenance organizations (HMOs) that participate in the Vaccine Safety Datalink project of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Study eligibility was restricted to children who met the following criteria: 1) born during 1988 through 1997; 2) HMO member since birth; 3) continuously enrolled for first 6 months of life; and 4) at least 12 months of HMO membership before diabetes incidence date (or index date for controls) unless incidence date was before 12 months of age. All 4 HMOs maintain registries of their members who have diabetes, and we used the registries to identify potential cases of diabetes. We conducted chart reviews to verify that potential cases met the World Health Organization epidemiologic case definition for type 1 diabetes mellitus (ie, a physician's diagnosis of diabetes plus treatment with daily insulin injections). We defined the incidence date of diabetes as the first date that the child received a diagnosis of diabetes. We attempted to match 3 controls to each case. Controls had the same eligibility criteria as cases and were matched to individual cases on HMO, sex, date of birth (within 7 days), and length of health plan enrollment (up to the incidence or index date). The index date for controls was defined as the incidence date of the case to Continue reading >>

Current Evidence - No Link Between Vaccination And Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Current Evidence - No Link Between Vaccination And Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Current Evidence - No Link Between Vaccination and Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus On the basis of a postulated infectious mechanism for the development of type 1 (insulin dependent) diabetes mellitus, several studies have investigated the possibility of an association with vaccination. To date support has not been obtained for associations between type 1 diabetes mellitus and BCG, MMR, pertussis or Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccines. Postulated autoimmune mechanism for suggested link with vaccines Several researchers have postulated that type 1 (insulin dependent) diabetes mellitus may develop secondary to an abnormal immune response to some viral infections. The possibility that childhood vaccination may also be associated either negatively or positively has also been considered. The steady increase in the incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus in children in several countries 1,2 has lent some credence to the possibility of a positive association. Studies in diabetic mice have found that Bacille Calmette-Gurin (BCG) vaccine has interrupted the development of diabetes mellitus. 3 However, most studies in humans published to date have not supported the postulated negative association with BCG vaccine or the positive association with other vaccines, but rather have found evidence for no association. No difference in rate of BCG vaccination between cases and controls Classen and Classen 4 studied the incidence of diabetes and the immunisation schedule in a number of developed countries and found that the countries with the lowest rates of diabetes were those with pertussis vaccine in the vaccination programme and in which infants received BCG vaccine before 2 months of age. However, 2 of the areas where neither pertussis nor BCG were part of the schedule had among the lowes Continue reading >>

Childhood Vaccinations And Juvenile-onset (type-1) Diabetes By Harris Coulter, Ph.d

Childhood Vaccinations And Juvenile-onset (type-1) Diabetes By Harris Coulter, Ph.d

Childhood Vaccinations and Juvenile-Onset (Type-1)Diabetes President, Center for Empirical Medicine Testimony before the Congress of the UnitedStates, House of Representatives, Committee on Appropriations, subcommittee on Labor,Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies April 16, 1997 Diabetes, both juvenile-onset (Type I) and adult-onset (Type II), is a major healthproblem in the United States, and the number of diabetics is increasing every year. In1947, there were an estimated 600,000 cases of diabetes in the United States.(1) Thirty years later, in 1976, Henry Bearn wrote: It is perhaps not generally appreciatedthat in the United States diabetes, or at least the recognition of the disease, hasincreased about 300 percent over the last fifteen years. It is the second leading cause ofblindness, and the third cause of death. In 1950 there were 1.2 million diabetics in theUnited States; the estimation now is that there are over 10 million, yet the populationhas increased by only 50 percent.(2) Today the Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.'s quarterly Statistical Bulletin estimatesthat diabetics make up 5 percent of the US population, or 13 million persons.(3) Of these,85-90 percent are adult onset, which is more or less controlled by diet and exercise; theother 10-15 percent require daily injections of insulin. So, while the US population hasapproximately doubled since the 1940's, the number of diabetics has risen more than 20times. While the statistical data, like any medical statistics, are based to some degreeon estimates, there has clearly been a huge increase in the number of diabetics in theUnited States. Billions Spent to Help Diabetics - Furthermore, diabetics consumer about 15percent of all health care costs, again according to Metropolitan Life. Pe Continue reading >>

Tdap And Gd  - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

Tdap And Gd  - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

I got it Thursday at 30 weeks. I am diet controlled and it has not affected my numbers. The only issue I had was the soreness in my arm, which the nurse said would be a side effect. I couldn't even sleep on that arm last night. :( I'm a wimp, though. Got my Tdap shot and it had no effect on my numbers and no side effects. Just like a flu shot. I have not gotten it yet, I got it with my last pregnancy and I don't remember any side effects. Thanks for sharing. I feel better now. I will get it as soon as possible then. I was worried about GD numbers. Now iI feel better. Thanks agan! I got it around the same time my fasting numbers started to rise. I truly believe it was just a coincidence that it happened at the same time. I also had a strange reaction that could have been from the shot or a skin infection at the injection site. Basically I had swelling and redness that was over the size of a quarter and grew in the days after rather than shrink. I don't regret getting the shot- whooping cough is serious and the protection is worth the side effects I had to deal with. I got mine at 35 weeks and had no side effects and it did not raise my numbers. :) Just got mine at 33 weeks a few days ago. I had the option of in the arm or thigh. My doctor laughingly said "I usually do mine in the thigh...more cushion there!" Funny! It didn't bother me the first day, but is now tender to the touch two days later. No difference in numbers. I was already on 10 units of insulin for fasting numbers. I randomly had 3 high numbers after my TDap and then they were normal again. No idea if it was caused by that or if it was coincidence. I know I already posted about this, but.... I had my shot Thursday morning. Friday night, Saturday morning, and Saturday afternoon, my numbers have been super hi Continue reading >>

Vaccinations And Diabetes

Vaccinations And Diabetes

Childhood Vaccines Not Associated With Type 1 Diabetes Risk March 31, 2004 -- The largest study to date on the proposed link between childhood vaccination and type 1 diabetes suggests that common vaccines do not increase the risk of the disease. The Danish study followed nearly 750,000 children, comparing the risk of developing type 1 diabetes between vaccinated and non-vaccinated children, and found no evidence of an association between common vaccines and the disease. "Overall, there were no more cases of diabetes among the vaccinated children than in the unvaccinated children," says researcher Anders Hviid, of Statens Serum Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark. The findings appear in the April 1 issue of TheNew England Journal of Medicine. Type 1 diabetes (formerly known as juvenile or insulin -dependent diabetes ) occurs when insulin -producing cells in the pancreas are destroyed by the immune system. The exact cause of the disease is unknown, but a combination of genetic and environmental factors is thought to influence the risk of developing the condition. Diabetes and Vaccination Linked by Timing Alone Researchers say the fact that type 1 diabetes cases have risen by 3% each year in developed countries over the last 50 years has fueled speculation that various environmental factors, such as diet, lifestyle, and exposure to infectious agents, early in life might play an important role in the development of the disease. In addition, the rising incidence of type 1 diabetes in recent years has coincided with the introduction of a growing number of childhood vaccines. Current guidelines for infant vaccination call for up to 18 injections that protect against 12 different infectious diseases by the time children reach 2 years of age. "There has been this temporal associat Continue reading >>

Juvenile Diabetes And Vaccination: New Evidence For A Connection

Juvenile Diabetes And Vaccination: New Evidence For A Connection

In the fall of 1997, the Centers for Disease Control confirmed that the number of Americans living with diabetes has skyrocketed in the past 40 years with a record sixfold increase in this chronic disease since 1958. It is estimated that nearly 16 million Americans are suffering with diabetes and 5 million more may have it but not know it. Over the past four decades, intensive national mass vaccination campaigns have dramatically increased vaccination rates among American children who now are getting 34 doses of 10 different viral and bacterial vaccines before they enter kindergarten. Recent published data in the medical literature suggest increasing numbers of childhood vaccines may be playing a role in the big jump in the number of cases of juvenile diabetes. The most frequent kind of diabetes is diabetes mellitus, a chronic degenerative disease caused when the pancreas either fails to produce a protein hormone called insulin or the body's cells are resistant to the action of insulin. Without insulin, the body cannot process and use glucose, a blood sugar which is a chief source of energy for living organisms and is found in certain foods like fruit. If the body's cells have become resistant to insulin, glucose cannot be moved from the blood to cells in order to be transformed into energy. There are two types of diabetes mellitus: Type I, called insulin-dependent juvenile diabetes, and Type II, called adult-onset diabetes. Type I Diabetes - Type I diabetes, also called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), occurs mostly in children and young adults. Five to 10 percent of those diagnosed with diabetes are Type I diabetics. In Type I diabetes, the body cannot produce insulin. This causes glucose to build up in the bloodstream and be secreted from the body in the Continue reading >>

Vaccines - Diabetes And The Environment

Vaccines - Diabetes And The Environment

Most studies have not found vaccines to be associated with the development of type 1 diabetes or type 1-associated autoantibodies. For example: A meta-analysis of 11 studies found no associations between childhood type 1 diabetes and any routine vaccines ( Morgan et al. 2015). The HPV vaccine Gardasil did not increase the risk of type 1 diabetes, or any of the other 15 autoimmune conditions analyzed ( Chao et al. 2012). Another review also found that the HPV vaccine did not increase the risk of type 1 diabetes or other autoimmune conditions ( Grimaldi-Bensouda et al. 2017). Interestingly, the Pandemerix vaccine may have affected the efficacy of a diabetes-prevention intervention trial using the GAD-alum vaccine. It appears the GAD-alum vaccine was more effective in preserving beta cell function in people newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes who did not have the Pandemerix vaccine ( Tavira et al. 2017). Some vaccines (e.g., BCG) may be able to accelerate the progression of type 1 diabetes, although most studies have not found associations between vaccines and type 1 diabetes. In case you were wondering, my children are fully vaccinated, and we also all get flu shots every year. Researchers are also working to develop a vaccine to prevent or treat type 1 diabetes, e.g., the GAD65 vaccine ( Ludvigsson 2017). To see or download the references cited on this page, see the collection Vaccines and diabetes/obesityin PubMed. Continue reading >>

Vaccination Practices For People With Diabetes Aade Practice Synopsis

Vaccination Practices For People With Diabetes Aade Practice Synopsis

Introduction Influenza, pneumococcal, hepatitis B, tetanus, pertussis, and shingles are common preventable infectious diseases with high morbidity and mortality in people with chronic diseases, such as diabetes, renal failure, and in the elderly.1 Observational study of patients with a wide variety of chronic illnesses has shown that these conditions are associated with a higher hospitalization rate and complications compared to persons without chronic health conditions.2,3 Communities with pockets of unvaccinated and undervaccinated populations are at increased risk for outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases. 4,5 Background/Rationale and Evidence Annual administration of the influenza vaccine has been shown to decrease diabetes-related hospital admissions for influenza during “flu epidemics†by as much as 79% based on reports of case-controlled series.1 The number of seasonal influenza- associated deaths varies from year to year because of the unpredictability in length and severity. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates flu associated deaths ranged from a low of 3,000 to a high of about 40,000 during flu seasons from 1976-2007.6 While anyone can have influenza related complications and hospitalizations, serious illness and death, the CDC reports that older adults are especially vulnerable. According to the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), the American College of Physicians, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American Academy of Family Physicians, vaccinating individuals at high risk before influenza season each year is the most effective measure for reducing the impact of influenza.7 Individuals with diabetes are six times more likely to be hospitalized and three times more likely to die from complicat Continue reading >>

Childhood Vaccinations And Juvenile-onset (type-1) Diabetes

Childhood Vaccinations And Juvenile-onset (type-1) Diabetes

Testimony before the Congress of the United States, House of Representatives, Committee on Appropriations, subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Diabetes, both juvenile-onset (Type I) and adult-onset (Type II), is a major health problem in the United States, and the number of diabetics is increasing every year. In 1947, there were an estimated 600,000 cases of diabetes in the United States. (1) Thirty years later, in 1976, Henry Bearn wrote: It is perhaps not generally appreciated that in the United States diabetes, or at least the recognition of the disease, has increased about 300 percent over the last fifteen years. It is the second leading cause of blindness, and the third cause of death. In 1950 there were 1.2 million diabetics in the United States; the estimation now is that there are over 10 million, yet the population has increased by only 50 percent. (2) Today the Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.'s quarterly Statistical Bulletin estimates that diabetics make up 5 percent of the US population, or 13 million persons. (3) Of these, 85-90 percent are adult onset, which is more or less controlled by diet and exercise; the other 10-15 percent require daily injections of insulin. So, while the US population has approximately doubled since the 1940's, the number of diabetics has risen more than 20 times. While the statistical data, like any medical statistics, are based to some degree on estimates, there has clearly been a huge increase in the number of diabetics in the United States. Billions Spent to Help Diabetics - Furthermore, diabetics consumer about 15 percent of all health care costs, again according to Metropolitan Life. People not only die from diabetes (160,000 cases in 1994) but the disease leads to cardiovascular Continue reading >>

Vaccine Safety Do Vaccines Cause Diabetes?

Vaccine Safety Do Vaccines Cause Diabetes?

The 2012 report by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) [1], now called the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), described a number of studies with sufficient validity and precision that all reported a lack of an association between MMR, DTaP or Tdap vaccines and type 1 diabetes [2-7]. Studies published since this report also reported a null, or in some cases even protective, association between vaccination and type 1 diabetes [8-12]. Studies examining inactivated seasonal influenza vaccination in pregnancy reported either no association with, or even a possible protective effect against, gestational diabetes [13, 14]. Persons with chronic illnesses such as type 1 or type 2 diabetes have high morbidity and mortality associated with common infectious diseases such as influenza, hepatitis b, and pneumococcal disease. Thus, routine vaccination per current ACIP recommendations is also strongly recommended for all persons with diabetes by the American Diabetes Association [15, 16]. In addition, the ACIP recommends the administration of hepatitis b vaccine to all unvaccinated adults with diabetes mellitus aged 19 through 59 [17]. Mechanisms that may induce type 1 diabetes include activation of the complement system, in which a cascade of proteolysis and successive release of cytokines functions to amplify the immune response but can damage host cells if not properly regulated, as well as molecular mimicry, which refers to the possibility that similar epitopes shared between self-peptides and foreign peptides (introduced via infection or immunization) inadvertently cause the activation of autoreactive T or B cells, leading to autoimmunity. However, the IOM concluded that there was no mechanistic evidence for an association between vaccination and type 1 diabetes, as the publication Continue reading >>

Vaccines Cause Diabetes Another Myth Refuted And Debunked

Vaccines Cause Diabetes Another Myth Refuted And Debunked

Vaccines cause diabetes another myth refuted and debunked If you cruise around the internet, engaging with the antivaccination cult (not recommended), you will pick up on their standard tropes, lies, and other anti-science commentaries. One that has always bothered me, not because that it was a lie, but because I had enough evidence floating in my brain that I was wondering if it were truethat vaccines cause diabetes, especially the Type 1 version. A lot of the vaccine deniers believe that vaccines cause a lot of everything and several claims that vaccines cause Type 1 diabetes (or here ), based on little evidence.As far as I can tell, this myth is based on the research fromJ. Barthelow Classen, M.D., who has pushed the idea that vaccines cause type 1 diabetes, through some magical process that has never been supported by other independent evidence . In another example of the antivaccination worlds cherry picking evidence to support their a priori conclusions, they ignore the utter lack of plausibility supporting any link between vaccines and Type 1 diabetes. At best, Classenhas cherry-picked statistics to support his predetermined conclusions, comparing apples to oranges with health data from different countries, and misrepresenting studies to back his claim . Moreover, Classen seems to come to his beliefs based on population-wide correlations that rely on post hoc fallacies , rather than actually showing causality between vaccines and diabetes. Its like finding that a 5% increase in consumption of Big Macs is correlated with Republican wins in elections. They may happen at the same time, but it would take a laughable series events to show any relationship. Its going to get a bit science-y in this section. Sorry about that, but diabetes is complicated, it never can be Continue reading >>

Vaccinations - Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus - Diapedia, The Living Textbook Of Diabetes

Vaccinations - Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus - Diapedia, The Living Textbook Of Diabetes

The rising incidence of type 1 diabetes in genetically stable populations strongly suggests that environmental factors are involved. Childhood vaccinations have been introduced around the world over a period corresponding to the rise of type 1 diabetes, an immune mediated condition. It has therefore been suggested that vaccinations might increase (or decrease) the risk of type 1 diabetes in selected groups, and attempts have been made to link the introduction of new vaccines with changes in the incidence of type 1 diabetes. Linking vaccinations to increased risk of chronic or other severe diseases involves a number of methodological challenges and most available studies suffer from important limitations. Although scattered observations have suggested a somewhat increased or reduced risk associated with certain vaccinations, available data indicate that there is no association between vaccines and either increased or reduced risk of type 1 diabetes. The second half of the twentieth century saw a Rising incidence of type 1 diabetes, and infectious agents have been plausible candidates in its aetiology ( see Viruses and type 1 diabetes ). Over the same period, a world-wide effort has been made to introduce vaccination programmes designed to eradicate a number of common childhood infections. In theory, vaccination might increase the risk of type 1 diabetes by (for example) triggering immune responses that cross-react with beta cell antigens. Alternatively, the associated boost to the immune system might even prove beneficial ( see the page on the Hygiene hypothesis ) , but the best example is the eradication of congenital rubella (see The congenital rubella syndrome and diabetes ) by immunization. The attempt to link vaccinations to increased risk of chronic or other sever Continue reading >>

Causes Of Type 1 Diabetes

Causes Of Type 1 Diabetes

Tweet Type 1 diabetes belongs to a group of conditions known as autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune diseases are when the body incorrectly identifies its own useful cells as an attacking organism. In type 1 diabetes, it is the beta cells in the pancreas which produce insulin that are wrongfully targeted and killed off by specific antibodies created by the body’s immune system. Researchers have been investigating what may cause the immune system to act in this way but to date researchers have theories but no concrete proof. Genetic predisposition Researchers have uncovered a number of genetic regions that are linked closely with type 1 diabetes. Each of these is denoted with a name such as IDDM1. At least 18 different regions have been discovered and some of the genetic areas include an increased susceptibility for other autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and coeliac disease. Whilst genetics offers clues as to why some people are more susceptible to type 1 diabetes, it doesn’t explain why some people with these genes develop type 1 diabetes and why others with these genes don’t. For example, having an identical twin with type 1 diabetes gives you a statistically higher risk but it doesn’t necessarily mean you will develop the condition. Genetics does not explain either why people will develop type 1 diabetes at different ages. Type 1 diabetes is most commonly diagnosed in 10 to 14 year olds but can be diagnosed at any age. Read more on diabetes and genetics Type 1 diabetes triggers Researchers have hypothesised that whilst some people are have a genetic predisposition to type 1 diabetes, there is likely to be an environmental factor that triggers the initial development of type 1 diabetes. Some of the possible triggers that have been suggested include: Continue reading >>

Vaccine Information For Adults

Vaccine Information For Adults

Each year thousands of adults in the United States get sick from diseases that could be prevented by vaccines — some people are hospitalized, and some even die. People with diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) are at higher risk for serious problems from certain vaccine-preventable diseases. Getting vaccinated is an important step in staying healthy. If you have diabetes, talk with your doctor about getting your vaccinations up-to-date. Why Vaccines are Important for You Diabetes, even if well managed, can make it harder for your immune system to fight infections, so you may be at risk for more serious complications from an illness compared to people without diabetes. Some illnesses, like influenza, can raise your blood glucose to dangerously high levels. People with diabetes have higher rates of hepatitis B than the rest of the population. Outbreaks of hepatitis B associated with blood glucose monitoring procedures have happened among people with diabetes. People with diabetes are at increased risk for death from pneumonia (lung infection), bacteremia (blood infection) and meningitis (infection of the lining of the brain and spinal cord). Immunization provides the best protection against vaccine-preventable diseases. Vaccines are one of the safest ways for you to protect your health, even if you are taking prescription medications. Vaccine side effects are usually mild and go away on their own. Severe side effects are very rare. Vaccines You Need There may be other vaccines recommended for you based on your lifestyle, travel habits, and other factors. Take the Adult Vaccine Quiz and talk with your healthcare professional about which vaccines are right for you. Getting Vaccinated You regularly see your provider for diabetes care, and that is a great place to start! If yo Continue reading >>

More in diabetes