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Tapeworm Diabetes

Tapeworms - Nhs.uk

Tapeworms - Nhs.uk

Tapeworms areflat, ribbon-like worms thatcan live in your gut if you swallow their eggs or small, newly hatched worms. Tapeworm infections are rare in the UK, but are fairly common in other parts of the world. Many don't cause obvious symptoms and can be easilytreated. But very occasionally, the wormscan spread to other parts of the body and cause serious problems. Tapewormsusuallycause few or no symptoms. You may only find out you have one if you spotabit of worm inyour poo. the size of a grain of rice but sometimes they're joined together in a long chain If you seetiny white worms that look like pieces of thread, they're probably threadworms .These are common in the UK, particularly in children. More serious symptoms can appear if worms get into other parts ofthe body, such as the brain or liver. Read more about thecomplications of tapeworm infections. yousee anyworms or bits of wormin your or your child's poo you have any worrying symptoms that don't go away, such as tummy pain, diarrhoea, or weight loss If you see aworm in your poo,it can help to putthe poo ina clean container and take it to your GP. They can send it to a laboratory tofind out what it is. If you don't have a sample to bring in, your doctor may give you a container and ask you collect one when you next do a poo. They may also look for eggs orsmall worms around your bottom. As tapeworms are rare in the UK, your GP may refer youto a specialist for further tests and treatment if they think you might have one. A tapeworm infection can usually be treated with a singletablet of a prescription medicine calledniclosamide or praziquantel. This kills the worm so it passes outin your poo. In the weeks after taking the tablet,make sure you wash your hands regularly particularly before eating and after using the Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Parasites

Diabetes And Parasites

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community This is a bit gross, so sorry if you're eating your tea! My 4 year old was diagnosed 3 weeks ago, and we've found a pattern of ridiculous blood glucose rise as soon as she goes to bed - have had to increase her basal by 150% A couple of days ago, I found out she had threadworm/pinworm (had put the itchy "bits" down to the diabetes, but now it may not have been). Anyhows, we treated her yesterday, and last night she was running hypo all night. I don't know if these hyperglycemic episodes were related to the pinworm, or if it's a co-incidence. Anyone else come across anything similar? Poor little soul, it must have driven her mad. Young children are particularly susceptible to pinworms and I don't envy you doing all the cleaning involved now that it has been discovered. Cannot help with the query about the hypos but someone will be along to give an answer. To anyone who has not heard of pinworms, a good article here explaining causes, symptoms and treatments. Thanks all for your replies. I'm steaming every piece of fabric, disinfecting every surface and vacuuming as if my life depended on it - urghh! No weight loss - we caught her diabetes very quickly. She lost weight the week after diagnosis with avoiding food because she didn't want to get "spiked" and also her sugars were runninng really high as we tried to sort out her dosage. Her weight normalised the following week and things have now settled, with sugars running near normal 90% of the time Her hyperglycemia occurs just after she falls asleep and will jump from 5 to 20mmol within 3 hours of going to bed. The pattern has been constant since a week or so after diagnosis once we had figured out her Continue reading >>

Tapeworms In Humans: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatments

Tapeworms In Humans: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatments

Tapeworms are flat, segmented worms that live in the intestines of some animals. Animals can become infected with these parasites when grazing in pastures or drinking contaminated water. Eating undercooked meat from infected animals is the main cause of tapeworm infection in people. Although tapeworms in humans usually cause few symptoms and are easily treated, they can sometimes cause serious, life-threatening problems. That's why it's important to recognize the symptoms and know how to protect yourself and your family. Six types of tapeworms are known to infect people. They are usually identified by the animals they come from -- for example, Taenia saginata from beef, Taenia solium from pork, and Diphyllobothrium latum from fish. Tapeworms have a three-stage lifecycle: egg, an immature stage called a larva, and an adult stage at which the worm can produce more eggs. Because larvae can get into the muscles of their hosts, infection can occur when you eat raw or undercooked meat from an infected animal. It is also possible to contract pork tapeworms from foods prepared by an infected person. Because tapeworm eggs are passed with bowel movements , a person who doesn't wash hands well after wiping and then prepares food can contaminate the food. Sometimes tapeworms cause symptoms such as: However, often tapeworms don't cause symptoms. The only sign of tapeworm infection may be segments of the worms, possibly moving, in a bowel movement. In rare cases, tapeworms can lead to serious complications, including blocking the intestine, or smaller ducts in the intestine (like the bile duct or pancreatic duct). If pork tapeworm larvae move out of the intestine, they can migrate to other parts of the body and cause damage to the liver, eyes, heart, and brain. These infections can Continue reading >>

Parasites And Diabetes....

Parasites And Diabetes....

Member type 2 Metformin & Insulin (type 1.5?) I have parasites. I also have type 2/1.5 insulin-dependent diabetes. Now although I suspected around 6 years ago I might have parasites because I could feel weird wriggling movements in my back, my one and only stool test came back negative and it was dismissed. I changed my diet from then on to gluten-free, low carb and things gradually kind of settled down, but 6 months ago they manifested big-time. Again, the only stool test came back negative (which is extremely common - unless the lab specialises in parasites, they don't have the facilities to do proper tests). Whilst my Doctor is sympathetic, she is powerless to do anything without 'proof'. I have learned a lot about parasites in the last 6 months. For a start, there are thousands of different types. Most labs can only test for a few. Many parasites are indigenous - contrary to popular opinion you don't have to go 'abroad' to pick them up. Why would your great-grandmother give her family a regular dose of 'the salts' or castor oil to keep them flushed out, if they weren't an issue locally? They weren't stupid. From tapeworms right down to Protozoa, these things can cause havoc in the body, but no one is looking for them. If they haven't been in situ very long and are still confined to the gut, ridding the body of them is relatively simple. But if they are established and have migrated from the gut, a whole new set of problems emerges. These things can get in everywhere. They can switch hormones on and off, neutralise enzymes, cause constipation and diarrhoea, anxiety, insomnia, joint pain, headaches, digestive disturbance, nerve and muscle issues, hair loss, you name it, they can be behind it. They can hijack nutrition, making us constantly deficient which will in its Continue reading >>

Eating Tapeworms For Weight Loss

Eating Tapeworms For Weight Loss

Steven Doerr, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Emergency Medicine Physician. Dr. Doerr received his undergraduate degree in Spanish from the University of Colorado at Boulder. He graduated with his Medical Degree from the University Of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver, Colorado in 1998 and completed his residency training in Emergency Medicine from Denver Health Medical Center in Denver, Colorado in 2002, where he also served as Chief Resident. Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stppler, MD Melissa Conrad Stppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology. Eating tapeworms for weight loss consideration? Individuals seeking to lose weight are constantly confronted with a variety of diets, supplements , and weight-loss regimens to choose from. Whether in magazines, on television or on the Internet, the consumer can be bombarded with any number of advertisements that claim to offer them the opportunity to lose weight with their products. However, individuals need to be cautious and well-informed when considering what products to use, as certain weight-loss marketing claims are not only misleading but also potentially detrimental to your health. The use of tapeworms for weight-loss purposes illustrates this risk. Tapeworms are parasitic, segmented ribbon-like worms that obtain nutrients from the digestive system of their host. They can infect many differ Continue reading >>

Tape Worm Tx Eases Diabetes In Mice

Tape Worm Tx Eases Diabetes In Mice

Dewormer provides a new lead for T2D treatment. by Salynn Boyles Salynn Boyles, Contributing Writer, MedPage Today The salt form of the FDA approved anthelmintic drug niclosamide -- used to treat intestinal tapeworms -- improved diabetic symptoms in mice by inducing mild mitochondrial uncoupling. Note that the company studying the drug holds patents to develop several chemical mitochondrial uncouplers, including niclosamide, and would like to begin trials in humans once federal regulators approve them. The salt form of the FDA approved anthelmintic drug niclosamide -- used to treat intestinal tapeworms -- improved diabetic symptoms in mice by inducing mild mitochondrial uncoupling, researchers reported. Oral niclosamide ethanolamine salt (NEN) increased energy expenditure and lipid metabolism in C57 mice, and it also proved efficacious for preventing and treating hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance induced by a high-fat diet. In a mouse model of type 2 diabetes, the drug was shown to improve glycemic control and delay disease progression, researcher Shengkan Jin, PhD , of Rutgers University-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in Piscataway, N.J., and colleagues wrote in Nature Medicine , published online Oct. 5. Jin told MedPage Today that his start-up company, Mito Biopharm, has patents to develop several chemical mitochondrial uncouplers, including NEN. Jin and colleagues are currently conducting toxicology studies of NEN to submit to the FDA, and they hope to begin trials in humans once federal regulators approve them. "Uncoupling mitochondria to burn excess fat is a fascinating idea, but the challenge has been to find a practical and safe way to do this," he said, adding that the researchers focused on niclosamide because the drug's mechanism of action is to un Continue reading >>

Key To Beating Diabetes May Be In Medicine For Treating Tapeworms

Key To Beating Diabetes May Be In Medicine For Treating Tapeworms

Key to Beating Diabetes May Be in Medicine for Treating Tapeworms Rutgers study seeks to find a safe, practical way to diminish fat content in the liver; niclosamide may be it Oct. 5, 2014 - New research from Rutgers shows promising evidence that a modified form of a different drug, niclosamide now used to eliminate intestinal parasites may hold the key to battling the disease at its source. Type 2 diabetes affects an estimated 28 million Americans and almost one out of four seniors 60 and over, according to the American Diabetes Association, but medications now available only treat symptoms, not the root cause of the disease. The study, led by Victor Shengkan Jin, an associate professor of pharmacology at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School , has been published online by the journal Nature Medicine. Jin says it is important to find a suitable medication to correct the cause of the disease as quickly as possible because the only way now known to cure the disease involves major gastric bypass surgery. The surgery can only be performed on highly obese people, Jin explains, and carries significant risks that include death, so it is not a realistic solution for most patients. And the number of patients continues to rise. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention projects that 40 percent of all Americans now alive will develop type 2 diabetes. Type 2 is the form of diabetes once known as adult onset, in which the body produces insulin that ordinarily would keep blood sugar under control, but either it does not produce enough insulin or the bodys ability to use that insulin is degraded. According to Jin, a major cause of insulin resistance is the accumulation of excess fat in the cells of the liver, as well as in muscle tissue. The fat disrupts the process where, Continue reading >>

Parasite-killing Drug May Reverse Diabetes By Targeting Fat Cells, Restoring Insulin Sensitivity

Parasite-killing Drug May Reverse Diabetes By Targeting Fat Cells, Restoring Insulin Sensitivity

Our world's modernization has brought with it a host of health problems, with one of the most prevalent among them being type 2 diabetes. It's only within the past few years that diabetes has manged to grow so drastically, affecting 347 million people worldwide — this number's expected to double in the coming years. Diabetes medications can only stop symptoms of the disease, and there are currently no treatments for the underlying causes. That's about to change, however, with new research showing that a modified version of the drug niclosamide, which is used to kill intestinal parasites, can also attack diabetes at its source. The research, led by Victor Shengkan Jin from Rutgers University, was published on Sunday in the journal Nature Medicine. Gastric bypass surgery, a type of weight loss surgery, has been shown to help diabetics control their symptoms, however, it carries a significant risk and can only be performed on very obese patients. So, researchers are trying to find ways to help diabetics for whom weight loss surgery isn't an option. Type 2 diabetes renders the body unable to efficiently use insulin, the hormone that metabolizes blood sugar. In many cases, the pancreas is unable to produce enough insulin, resulting in insulin resistance and rising blood sugar levels. A major cause of insulin resistance is the accumulation of excess fat in the cells of the liver, as well as in the muscle tissue, Jin said. This fat disrupts the normal functions of insulin, which helps blood sugar energize cells in the tissue. As a result, glucose remains in the bloodstream, damaging tissue and causing blindness, kidney damage, heart disease, and other health problems. Jin and his colleagues wanted to find a method to eliminate this fat in the liver. Using lab mice and the mo Continue reading >>

How Having Worms Could Ward Off Diabetes

How Having Worms Could Ward Off Diabetes

Posted by Carl Blesch-Rutgers September 11th, 2013 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4.0 International license. Worms could be the next weapon in the fight against autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohns disease, and lupus. The worms, or helminths as biologists call them, are small parasites that live in human intestines, especially in the developing world. According to an article in Nature Reviews Immunology by Rutgers immunologist William Gause and colleagues, the worms presence through millennia of human evolution likely has led to an immune response called type 2 immunity. This includes immune regulatory pathways that help control the inflammation that can contribute to autoimmune diseases. The immune reaction, the researchers say, appears to have developed as a way to rapidly repair wounds caused by these invaders as they move through the body. In fact, components of the type 2 immune response may someday be used to enhance the wound healing process. Additionally, this response triggers regulatory networks that block harmful immune responses, or inflammation, that otherwise would exacerbate the tissue injury. What we would like to do now is harness components of the type 2 immune response to target the control of harmful inflammation that can lead to autoimmune diseases like diabetes and inflammatory bowel disease, says Gause, of the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. He adds that inflammatory responses also have been linked to other diseases, including cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders, and even to allergic reactions and fibrosis that may result when titanium shavings that flake away from artificial joints settle in the body. Finding new ways to stimulate these regulatory components of the type Continue reading >>

Parasitic Worms Could Become Basis For Type 1 Therapy

Parasitic Worms Could Become Basis For Type 1 Therapy

Parasitic Worms Could Become Basis for Type 1 Therapy The idea of parasitic worms causes a shudder in most people. The very thought of some wriggly segmented thing latching onto an internal organ and ransacking it for nourishment is not pleasant. But the scientists who study the creatures may be on to a whole new tack in the fight against type 1 diabetes. It turns out that people who suffer from parasitic worms experience an unexpected beneficial side effect: the worms exert control over the human immune system that seems to protect against several inflammatory diseases, including asthma, Crohns disease, multiple sclerosis, allergies, and type 1 diabetes. According to an article published in the April 9, 2010, online edition of Technology Review , produced by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, both humans and animals afflicted with parasitic worms experience fewer allergies and immune diseases. And its true that as modern medicine and sanitation in wealthy nations have reduced the acquisition of parasitic worms, the incidence of allergies and inflammatory ailments has increased. In the article, Fighting Allergies by Mimicking Parasitic Worms, one Tufts University researcher theorizes that the human association with parasitic worms goes so far back that the relationship between them became mutually beneficial rather than combative. In exchange for access to all the goodies of the human digestive system and other internal organs, the worms conferred immunity or resistance to several diseases that are almost epidemic in modern times. Nobody knows just how the worms confer their protection. Scientists know that when people become infected by parasitic worms, it spurs an allergic response and levels of an antibody called IgE (immunoglobulin E) go up. In people witho Continue reading >>

Parasitic Worms And Inflammatory Diseases

Parasitic Worms And Inflammatory Diseases

Parasitic worms and inflammatory diseases Department of Pathology, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, UK Correspondence: A. Cooke, Department of Pathology, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1QP, UK (e-mail: [email protected] ). *Authors contributed equally to this work Re-use of this article is permitted in accordance with the Creative Commons Deed, Attribution 25, which does not permit commercial exploitation. Received 2006 Feb 6; Accepted 2006 Mar 6. Copyright 2006 The Authors Journal compilation 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The debate on whether infection precipitates or prevents autoimmunity remains a contentious one. Recently the suggestion that some unknown microbe can be at the origin of some chronic inflammatory diseases has been countered by accumulating evidence that decreasing infection rates might have an important role to play in the rising prevalence of autoimmune disorders. The Hygiene Hypothesis was initially postulated to explain the inverse correlation between the incidence of infections and the rise of allergic diseases, particularly in the developed world. Latterly, the Hygiene Hypothesis has been extended to also incorporate autoimmune diseases in general. Amongst the various infectious agents, a particular emphasis has been put on the interaction between parasitic worms and humans. Worm parasites have co-evolved with the mammalian immune system for many millions of years and during this time, they have developed extremely effective strategies to modulate and evade host defences and so maintain their evolutionary fitness. It is therefore reasonable to conclude that the human immune system has been shaped by its relationship with parasitic worms and this may be a necessary requirement for maintai Continue reading >>

Tapeworm Symptoms, Tapeworm Treatment & Tapeworm Diet - Dr. Axe

Tapeworm Symptoms, Tapeworm Treatment & Tapeworm Diet - Dr. Axe

Current: Tapeworm Symptoms to Watch & Natural Tapeworm Treatments Tapeworm Symptoms to Watch & Natural Tapeworm Treatments Dr. Axe on Facebook937 Dr. Axe on Twitter25 Dr. Axe on Instagram Dr. Axe on Google Plus Dr. Axe on Youtube Dr. Axe on Pintrest1432 Share on Email Print Article Jillian BabcockSeptember 11, 2016March 26, 2018 More than 100 million cases of tapeworm infections occur globally every year. ( 1 ) Tapeworm infections affect the intestines of humans and occur when people eat raw or undercooked, contaminated animal foods. Surprisingly, tapeworms dont cause any noticeable symptoms at all. However when they do, tapeworm symptoms and those caused by other similar parasitic infections can sometimes become very serious, even life-threatening. When present, tapeworm symptoms include nausea, diarrhea, cramps, trouble sleeping and more. The actual infections that tapeworms cause mostly affect the intestinal wall but can become more complicated when tapeworm larva/eggs move through the bloodstream and attach to skeletal muscle or tissues, where theyre able to form cysts. These cysts are exactly what humans consume when they eat contaminated meat (especially pork) or fish. Eggs stored inside the cysts eventually hatch, and the newly born worms then continue the cycle by latching on to the hosts intestinal wall as an energy supply. What can you do to help overcome a tapeworm infection and relieve tapeworm symptoms? Natural treatments include performing a parasitic cleanse , consuming supplements to help improve detoxification, and enemas or colonics. Tapeworms are flat, sometimes very long worms that are able to survive inside the digestive system of both humans and animals. A parasite is an organism that lives on or in a host and gets its food from or at the expense Continue reading >>

Diabetes Progress | In The Pipeline

Diabetes Progress | In The Pipeline

There have recently been some welcome developments in diabetes therapy, both Type I and Type II. For the latter, theres an interesting report of a metabolic uncoupling therapy in Nature Medicine. Weirdly, it uses a known tapeworm medication, niclosamide (specifically, the ethanolamine salt). Its toxic to worms by that same mechanism. If you uncouple oxidative phosphorylation and the electron-transport system in the mitochondria , you end up just chewing up lipids through respiration while not generating any ATP. Thats what happens in brown fat (through the action of uncoupling proteins), and thats what used in mammals for generating extra body heat. Many schemes for cranking this up in humans have been looked at over the years, but a full-scale mitochondrial uncoupling drug would be a nasty proposition in humans (see, for example, dinitrophenol ). DNP will indeed make you lose weight, while at the same time you ravenously try to eat your daily supply of ATP, but this is done at a significant risk of sudden death. (And anything that does a better job than DNP will just skip straight to the sudden death part). But niclosamide seems to be less efficacious, which in this case is a good thing. This mechanism diminishes the fat content in liver and muscle tissue, which should improve insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake, and seems to do so very well in mouse models. The authors (Shengkan Jin and colleagues at Rutgers) have formed a company to try to take something in this area into humans. I wish them luck with that this really could be a good thing for type II and metabolic-syndrome patients, but the idea has proven very difficult over the years. The tox profile is going to be key, naturally, and taking it into the clinic is really the only way to find out if itll be acce Continue reading >>

Scientists Aim To Treat Autoimmune Diseases With Worm-based Therapy

Scientists Aim To Treat Autoimmune Diseases With Worm-based Therapy

Scientists aim to treat autoimmune diseases with worm-based therapy For more than 20 years, scientists have been studying the theory of the hygiene hypothesis the idea that organisms we might consider dangerous today were actually protecting our immune systems before modern medicine existed. In the 19th century, autoimmune diseases like Crohns, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes were virtually non-existent. Since people didnt frequently bathe or wash their hands as often (nor was hand sanitizer around), the filth actually activated an immune response. Subsequently, those who live in third-world countries also have a lower rate of developing these sorts of diseases. Parasitic worms: A retro cure for autoimmune diseases? Scientists at Coronado Biosciences are using immunotherapy biologic agents to treat autoimmune diseases, including helminthic therapy, the use of parasitic worms to modulate the immune system. Theyve seen the success the therapy has had on patients suffering from Crohns disease, so theyve started three trials in which they hope to prevent and treat type 1 diabetes using Trichuris suis ova (TSO), or the eggs of a pig whipworm. Youre resetting the balance so that instead of attacking itself, the immune system is attacking what its supposed to attack, which is outside bacteria." - Dr. Karin Hehenberger, chief medical officer of Coronado Biosciences We give them in a solution, so its essentially a liquid that is a saline solution, and these eggs are microscopic; you cant see them they are odorless, tasteless, Dr. Karin Hehenberger, chief medical officer of Coronado Biosciences, told FoxNews.com. Type 1 diabetes is a chronic disease, typically diagnosed in children and adolescents. The condition is marked by high levels of sugar in the blood, caused when Continue reading >>

Could A Pill For Parasites Cure Type 2 Diabetes?

Could A Pill For Parasites Cure Type 2 Diabetes?

Could a pill for parasites cure type 2 diabetes? By Kathleen Blanchard G+ Oct 7 2014 - 9:23pm Scientists are working on a way to attack type 2 diabetes to reverse it with a safe and already approved medication currently used to get rid of parasites. Could the pill work in humans as well as it did in mice. If so, it could mean diabetes could be "cured". Researchers have discovered a potential new way o tackle type 2 diabetes with an anti-parasite drug that rather than treating just glucose levels can help the body become more sensitive to the body's natural insulin production. Rutgers University researchers have discovered that a modified form of the anti-parasite drug niclosamide could help treat the cause and not just symptoms of type 2 diabetes. Victor Shengkan Jin, an associate professor of pharmacology at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School led the study that is published online by the journal Nature Medicine. Type 2 diabetics are either unable to use insulin properly even when the body is manufacturing proper amounts or not enough insulin is produced. Jin explains excess fat in the liver cells and muscle makes the body unable to use glucose properly. Blood sugar normally enters cells where it is used for fuel. When insulin is unused it degrades and glucose remains in the bloodstream. Blood sugar also circulates to damage organs instead of being pulled into cells when there is no longer enough of the hormone being produced. Safely burning liver fat improves insulin effect Removing fat from the liver of mice could treat type 2 diabetes. The researchers used niclosamide ethanolamine salt (NEN), a safe and effective way to "burn" liver fat that they found improved the animal's ability to use insulin. Jin said in a press release that NEN acts like car at full th Continue reading >>

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