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Taking Metformin Too Close Together

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Metformin – What Every Diabetic Should Know

Metformin – What Every Diabetic Should Know

Diabetes affects millions of people throughout the world and for all the ones who know that they have it and are doing something to control it there will be just as many who do not know they have it. It is caused by the pancreas not creating enough insulin and this leaves you with too much sugar in the blood as your body can not process it properly. Metformin is a drug that is used to treat diabetes. Its main role is in regulating the amount of sugar in the body and this alone will help the diabetic. It only treats type 2 diabetes and there are other medicines available for those suffering from type 1. It is a member of a group of drugs known as biguanides and they have been used effectively for some time. How Does It Work? Metformin manages to control the amount of sugar in the blood in three distinct ways. Firstly it works on the food that you eat. Most foods have some degree of sugar in them and too much can cause the diabetes to become worse. The amount that the body absorbs is important and Metformin makes sure that not too much gets through. If too much does get through the body cannot deal with it and it is then that you become ill. Secondly it keeps down the amount of sugar that is produced by the liver. If this can be slowed down, there will be less sugar travelling around the body and the outcome will be that you are less likely to be ill. Its final function is to make sure that insulin is regulated. It works on both injected insulin and that produced naturally by the body. As a result of this some people who already have to inject may find that they no longer have to do this, or at least cut down the amount of times they have to do it. It will be important how much Metformin that you take and the amount will be prescribed by your doctor. This will be an exact Continue reading >>

When Do I Take Metformin For My Diet: Morning Or Night?

When Do I Take Metformin For My Diet: Morning Or Night?

Metformin helps control blood sugar and increase your body's sensitivity to insulin. The drug is available only by prescription and sold under several different brand names, including Fortamet, Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage and Glucophage XR. Your dosage will depend on your normal diet and exercise habits -- too much metformin can lead to low blood sugar and hypoglycemia. Always follow your doctor's directions for taking your medication. Video of the Day Metformin works by limiting your liver's production of glucose and stopping your body from absorbing some of the glucose in your bloodstream. Additionally, metformin increases your body's sensitivity to insulin, allowing your pancreas to produce less insulin. Keeping blood sugar levels stable can decrease hunger and food cravings, leading to weight loss. Metformin is not an appetite suppressant, nor does it boost metabolism; to lose weight, you'll still need to pay close attention to your diet and increase your physical activity. Standard vs. Extended Release Options The amount of metformin you'll take depends on why you are using the medication, how often you take the medicine, other medications you might be taking and the time between doses. The National Institutes of Health explains that metformin is available as a tablet or a liquid solution. Tablets come in an extended release dose -- Glucophage XR -- or in a standard release option. Extended release pills are designed to be taken once daily, with your evening meal. Standard tablet and liquid solutions may be taken once or multiple times daily -- with meals. Metformin should be taken with food. Always follow your doctor's orders. It's typical to start with a 500 milligram dose once daily, then increase both the amount of medication and the frequency. If you're using Continue reading >>

About Metformin

About Metformin

Metformin is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes and sometimes polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the insulin that it makes doesn't work properly. This can cause high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). PCOS is a condition that affects how the ovaries work. Metformin lowers your blood sugar levels by improving the way your body handles insulin. It's usually prescribed for diabetes when diet and exercise alone have not been enough to control your blood sugar levels. For women with PCOS, metformin stimulates ovulation even if they don't have diabetes. It does this by lowering insulin and blood sugar levels. Metformin is available on prescription as tablets and as a liquid that you drink. Key facts Metformin works by reducing the amount of sugar your liver releases into your blood. It also makes your body respond better to insulin. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. It's best to take metformin with a meal to reduce the side effects. The most common side effects are feeling sick, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach ache and going off your food. Metformin does not cause weight gain (unlike some other diabetes medicines). Metformin may also be called by the brand names Bolamyn, Diagemet, Glucient, Glucophage, and Metabet. Who can and can't take metformin Metformin can be taken by adults. It can also be taken by children from 10 years of age on the advice of a doctor. Metformin isn't suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting the medicine if you: have had an allergic reaction to metformin or other medicines in the past have uncontrolled diabetes have liver or kidney problems have a severe infection are being treated for heart failure or you have recentl Continue reading >>

How Often To Take Metformin? | Yahoo Answers

How Often To Take Metformin? | Yahoo Answers

what can happen if you take metformin doses too close together? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: the dose is a doctor matter but the frequency is every 8hours or every 12hours with or after food the max dose is 3 grams in divided dose though most physicians limits this to 2 grams daily I take 2000 mg of Metformin a day, and I am supposed to take one pill in the a.m. and one pill in the p.m. However, it is often very difficult for me to remember, so sometimes I just take both pills together. I have been doing this for a couple of years, and I've never had a problem. I think it's better to get the medication in your body completely than it is to keep on forgetting doses. This is my opinion as a patient, not a doctor of course. taking too much metformin can result in hypoglycemia (not enough glucose in the blood). signs of hypoglycemia include nausea, confusion, feeling cold, shakiness, double vision and a whole host of symptoms. if you're concerned about how often you should be taking your metformin, see your primary care physician or endocrinologist. be sure that you are monitoring and recording you sugar levels, and taking your recording when you go to see your physician. that will help them immensely in determining the right dosing for your diabetes medications. I think this question violates the Community Guidelines Chat or rant, adult content, spam, insulting other members, show more I think this question violates the Terms of Service Harm to minors, violence or threats, harassment or privacy invasion, impersonation or misrepresentation, fraud or phishing, show more If you believe your intellectual property has been infringed and would like to file a complaint, please see our Copyright/IP Policy I think this answer violates the Community Gui Continue reading >>

Apo-metformin

Apo-metformin

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. What is in this leaflet This leaflet answers some common questions about metformin It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist or diabetes educator. The information in this leaflet was last updated on the date listed on the last page. More recent information on this medicine may be available. You can also download the most up to date leaflet from www.apotex.com.au. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you using this medicine against the benefits they expect it will have for you. Pharmaceutical companies cannot give you medical advice or an individual diagnosis. Keep this leaflet with your medicine. You may want to read it again. What this medicine is used for The name of your medicine is APO-Metformin 500, 850 or 1000 tablets. It contains the active ingredient metformin (as metformin hydrochloride). It is used to treat type 2 diabetes (also called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus or maturity onset diabetes) in adults and children over 10 years of age. It is especially useful in those who are overweight, when diet and exercise are not enough to lower high blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia). For adult patients, metformin can be used alone, or in combination with other oral diabetic medicines or in combination with insulin in insulin requiring type 2 diabetes. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why this medicine has been prescribed for you. Your doctor may have prescribed this medicine for another reason. This medicine is available only with a doctor's prescription. How it works Metformin lowers high blood glucose by helping your body make better Continue reading >>

A Comprehensive Guide To Metformin

A Comprehensive Guide To Metformin

Metformin is the top of the line medication option for Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. If you must start taking medication for your newly diagnosed condition, it is then likely that your healthcare provider will prescribe this medication. Taking care of beta cells is an important thing. If you help to shield them from demise, they will keep your blood sugar down. This medication is important for your beta cell safety if you have Type 2 Diabetes. Not only does Metformin lower blood sugar and decrease resistance of insulin at the cellular level, it improves cell functioning, lipids, and how fat is distributed in our bodies. Increasing evidence in research points to Metformin’s effects on decreasing the replication of cancer cells, and providing a protective action for the neurological system. Let’s find out why Lori didn’t want to take Metformin. After learning about the benefits of going on Metformin, she changed her mind. Lori’s Story Lori came in worrying. Her doctor had placed her on Metformin, but she didn’t want to get the prescription filled. “I don’t want to go on diabetes medicine,” said Lori. “If I go on pills, next it will be shots. I don’t want to end up like my dad who took four shots a day.” “The doctor wants you on Metformin now to protect cells in your pancreas, so they can make more insulin. With diet and exercise, at your age, you can reverse the diagnosis. Would you like to talk about how we can work together to accomplish that?” “Reverse?” she asked. “What do you mean reverse? Will I not have Type 2 Diabetes anymore?” “You will always have it, but if you want to put it in remission, you are certainly young enough to do so. Your doctor wants to protect your beta cells in the pancreas. If you take the new medication, Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Editor’s Note: This is the second post in our miniseries about diabetes drugs. Tune in on August 21 for the next installment. Metformin (brand names Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Riomet, Fortamet, Glumetza) is a member of a class of medicines known as biguanides. This type of medicine was first introduced into clinical practice in the 1950’s with a drug called phenformin. Unfortunately, phenformin was found to be associated with lactic acidosis, a serious and often fatal condition, and was removed from the U.S. market in 1977. This situation most likely slowed the approval of metformin, which was not used in the U.S. until 1995. (By comparison, metformin has been used in Europe since the 1960’s.) The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) required large safety studies of metformin, the results of which demonstrated that the development of lactic acidosis as a result of metformin therapy is very rare. (A finding that has been confirmed in many other clinical trials to date.) Of note, the FDA officer involved in removing phenformin from the market recently wrote an article highlighting the safety of metformin. Metformin works primarily by decreasing the amount of glucose made by the liver. It does this by activating a protein known as AMP-activated protein kinase, or AMPK. This protein acts much like an “energy sensor,” setting off cellular activities that result in glucose storage, enhanced entry of glucose into cells, and decreased creation of fatty acids and cholesterol. A secondary effect of the enhanced entry of glucose into cells is improved glucose uptake and increased storage of glycogen (a form of glucose) by the muscles. Additionally, the decrease in fatty acid levels brought about by metformin may indirectly improve insulin resistance and beta cell func Continue reading >>

I May Have Took My Metformin Twice ??

I May Have Took My Metformin Twice ??

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi can anyone give me some advice , I think its possible that I took my morning does of Metformin twice 20 I may have taken 2000mg instead of 100mg within the space of 15 mins between each 1000 I also take 10mg of Byetta , if I have doubled my dose what should I expect to happen if anything at all ?? In a rush I meant I may have taken 2000mg instead of 1000mg I doubt anything will happen (apart from maybe a slight upset tummy). I'm really bad at rembering to take my tablets, so I often used to take a double dose in the evening to make up for one that I missed in the morning. (although of course I'm not a medical professional). Thanks that put my mind at ease earlier .I did a BG test at around 10:00am it was 3.6 but I was feeling ok had a rich tea biscuit .. I dont usually test around that time so guess 3.6 could be normal as I eat every day at 10:30 .. I'm lucky I only need to take 1 tablet a day so as soon as I open a new pack I write m, tu, w etc for each day of the week on the back of where I push the pill through so I know if i've taken mine or not I'm lucky I only need to take 1 tablet a day so as soon as I open a new pack I write m, tu, w etc for each day of the week on the back of where I push the pill through so I know if i've taken mine or not Mine were always spread halfway round the house, loads of half opened packets. I'd be just ready to go for a repeat prescription, when I'd find an unopened box. Not as much as I hate Americanised spellings on a UK board! But that's another story. Not as much as I hate Americanised spellings on a UK board! But that's another story. I work for an American company and we have to use American spellings in o Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex This medicine usually comes with a patient information insert. Read the information carefully and make sure you understand it before taking this medicine. If you have any questions, ask your doctor. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is a very important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. Metformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few weeks of treatment. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not crush, break, or chew it. While taking the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stool after your body has absorbed the medicine. This is normal and nothing to worry about. Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Use only the brand of this medicine that your doctor prescribed. Different brands may not work the same way. You may notice improvement in your blood glucose control in 1 to 2 weeks, but the full effect of blood glucose control may take up to 2 to 3 months. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about this. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the Continue reading >>

Missing Dose Of Metformin

Missing Dose Of Metformin

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community If I've missed one of my twice-daily doses of metformin, for example if I've been eating out and not had the tablets with me, is it best to take the tablets later, or skip them on that occasion? Or doesn't it really matter if it's a one-off? if it is the same day then I take it when I remember but I wouldn't necessarily double dose to catch up. Art Of Flowers I reversed my Type 2 Well-Known Member Metformin only has minimal benefits, so missing taking it occasionally won't have much effect. Metformin builds up so missing one dose won't hurt - I forgot mine yesterday too ! I wish people would not post negative comments about Metformin- it has been extremely beneficial to me If I've missed one of my twice-daily doses of metformin, for example if I've been eating out and not had the tablets with me, is it best to take the tablets later, or skip them on that occasion? Or doesn't it really matter if it's a one-off? If I eat out and do not take any metformin with me then I miss that dose because they are supposed to be during or immediately after a meal so it is to late to take it when I get home I wish people would not post negative comments about Metformin- it has been extremely beneficial to me Well, I have been taking it for 2 months and, together with some dietary changes, seem to have stabilised my fasting blood glucose level below 7, so it seems to be working for me. I've also not experienced the unpleasant side effects that some people have reported, although I'm not saying they don't happen. I would probably take it later the same evening, but certainly not double up the following day. It's rare for me to forget these days, but I take it when I dis Continue reading >>

Glyburide-metformin, Oral Tablet

Glyburide-metformin, Oral Tablet

Glyburide/metformin oral tablet is available only as a generic drug. It’s not available in a brand-name version. Glyburide/metformin only comes as a tablet you take by mouth. Glyburide/metformin is used to treat type 2 diabetes. This drug has a black box warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous. Glyburide/metformin can cause lactic acidosis. Don’t use this drug if you already have lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is a rare problem that happens when oxygen levels in your body drop. This leads to a buildup of lactic acid in your bloodstream. The condition can sometimes be fatal. Your risk of lactic acidosis may be higher if you have diabetes with kidney damage or heart failure. Other warnings Surgery or medical procedures warning: If you’re going to have surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computerized tomography (CT) scan, or any other procedure, your doctor may temporarily stop your treatment with glyburide/metformin. Having procedures done that use radiocontrast dyes while taking this drug can cause kidney failure or lactic acidosis. Sun sensitivity warning Glyburide/metformin can make your skin more sensitive to the sun. This means you’re more likely to get sunburned. While you’re taking this drug, use sunscreen and wear protective clothing whenever you’re in the sun. Don’t use sun lamps or tanning beds or booths. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) warning: Glyburide/metformin can cause severe low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). This can cause seizures or fainting. It’s important to know how to spot and treat low blood sugar reactions as directed by your doctor. Symptoms may include: shakiness nervousness or anxiety swea Continue reading >>

Metformin 850mg Tablets

Metformin 850mg Tablets

1. WHAT METFORMIN IS AND WHAT IT IS USED FOR The name of this medicine is Metformin 500mg or 850mg Tablets (called metformin in this leaflet). It belongs to a group of medicines called biguanides (a type of oral hypoglycaemic). Metformin is used for the sort of diabetes called Type 2 diabetes or non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In type 2 diabetes, there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood. This is because your body does not make enough insulin or because it makes insulin that does not work properly. Insulin is a hormone that allows your body tissue to take glucose from the blood and use it for energy or for storage for future use. Metformin works by improving the sensitivity of your body to insulin. It helps your body to use glucose in the normal way again This medicine is given when diet and exercise alone has not been able to control your blood sugar levels. Metformin can be given on its own. However, sometimes it is given with other medicines for diabetes or with insulin. In patients who are overweight, long-term use of metformin also helps to lower the risk of any problems related to diabetes you are allergic (hypersensitive) to metformin or any of the other ingredients in this liquid (see section 6: Further information). An allergic reaction can include a rash, itching or shortness of breath. you have recently had a heart attack or any other heart problems you have severe circulation problems or difficulty in breathing you have had serious problems with your diabetes in the past called diabetic ketoacidosis. When you have this you lose weight quickly, feel sick (nausea) or are sick (vomiting). See also in Section 4: Possible side effects you have recently had a severe infection, injury or trauma (shock) you are going to have an X-ray where you will b Continue reading >>

Best Way To Take Metformin

Best Way To Take Metformin

i was diagnosed in june of this year and since then i have been on metformin but lately it doesnt seem to be helping my blood sugars much and i wonder if maybe its because of the way i have been taking it? i usually take 1,000 mg with lunch everyday between 12-1 (except weekends it varies) and then i take 1,000 mg with dinner but my dinner is unpredictable it could be anywhere between 6-10. am i taking it to close together or to far apart? some days i dont have an appetite and i may not eat on time or at all and in those cases i may not take a dose of metformin at all, i try not to miss meals but sometimes i feel to sick to eat. any advice Blood sugar regulation in the human body is one of the most stunning and intricate systems in the universe. Your body receives glucose from two (2) sources: Food you consume and your liver . You think your problem involves food, only. Too bad. Doctors don't expect their patients to understand why diabetes messes with your blood sugar. Therefore, they are very, very, very careful to explain how and when to take your meds. &, thus, this is why people don't control their blood sugars. They don't know how Type 2 Diabetes works. They are not interested in knowing. And, when they don't follow their doctors exact orders, well..... Bruno's got it right. Glucose control is very complex. It won't make much of a difference of exactly what time you take your met (as long as you don't keep skipping it). What is most important is how many grams of carbohydrate you are eating. Is there room to cut back? That will help significantly with your glucose control. The opinions expressed in WebMD Message Boards are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. Messa Continue reading >>

When To Take Metformin?

When To Take Metformin?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Just a couple of quick questions which I hope someone will have the answer to! Have been diet controlled type 2 diabetic for a year. Yesterday the GP prescribed Metformin because as a result of recent really stressful events my BS levels have gone sky high. What I want to know is, if or when stress levels return to normal will my BS return to its previous level and will I be able to stop the Metformin? Or is it the case that once you start it you can't stop it? I would also like to know exactly when to take it. The GP said take it twice a day, the leaflet says take it twice with meals. I never eat breakfast - only lunch at 1pm and dinner at about 6pm. So what I wanted to ask is -is it OK to take it with only 5 hours in between doses or should it be taken at two regular 12 hour slots even though I haven't eaten or doesn't it matter? My advice would really to have a breakfast and take one then and one after the evening meal, the reason being that Metformin is long lasting, which means it works for a few hours so taking it close together could bring your blood glucose levels down too low. As it has been mentioned it can cause an upset stomach, especially at first. For this reason my doctor started me on 2.5 mg twice a day for the first 2 weeks and then went on to 5.0 mg twice a day and I had no problems this way. Do you have a blood glucose meter to check your blood glucose levels? The effect of metformin lasts for up to 6 hours (12 hours for the slow-release variety). It is normally recommended that you should take them with a meal (that is with some water about halfway through the meal) rather than before or after the meal. This means they get digested Continue reading >>

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