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Taking 2 500mg Metformin At Once

Metformin Overview

Metformin Overview

Metformin is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. Metformin belongs to a group of drugs called biguanides, which work by helping your body respond better to the insulin it makes naturally, decreasing the amount of sugar your liver makes, and decreasing the amount of sugar your intestines absorb. This medication comes in tablet, extended-release tablet, and liquid forms. It is taken up to 3 times daily, depending on which form you are taking. Swallow extended-release tablets whole. Common side effects of metformin include diarrhea, nausea, and upset stomach. Metformin is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Metformin may be found in some form under the following brand names: Serious side effects have been reported including: Lactic Acidosis. In rare cases, metformin can cause a serious side effect called lactic acidosis. This is caused by a buildup of lactic acid in your blood. This build-up can cause serious damage. Lactic acidosis caused by metformin is rare and has occurred mostly in people whose kidneys were not working normally. Lactic acidosis has been reported in about one in 33,000 patients taking metformin over the course of a year. Although rare, if lactic acidosis does occur, it can be fatal in up to half the people who develop it. It is also important for your liver to be working normally when you take metformin. Your liver helps remove lactic acid from your blood. Make sure you tell your doctor before you use metformin if you have kidney or liver problems. You should also stop using metformin and call your doctor right away if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treate Continue reading >>

Timing Your Metformin Dose

Timing Your Metformin Dose

The biggest problem many people have with Metformin is that it causes such misery when it hits their stomachs that they can't keep taking it even though they know it is the safest and most effective of all the oral diabetes drugs. In many cases all that is needed is some patience. After a rocky first few days many people's bodies calm down and metformin becomes quite tolerable. If you are taking the regular form of Metformin with meals and still having serious stomach issues after a week of taking metformin, ask your doctor to prescribe the extended release form--metformin ER or Glucophage XR. The extended release form is much gentler in its action. If that still doesn't solve your problem, there is one last strategy that quite a few of us have found helpful. It is to take your metformin later in the day, after you have eaten a meal or two. My experience with metformin--and this has been confirmed by other people--is that it can irritate an empty stomach, but if you take it when the stomach contains food it will behave. There are some drugs where it matters greatly what time of day you take the drug. Metformin in its extended release form is not one of them. As the name suggests, the ER version of the pill slowly releases the drug into your body over a period that, from my observations, appears to last 8 to 12 hours. Though it is supposed to release over a full 24 hours, this does not appear to be the case, at least not with the generic forms my insurer will pay for. Because there seems to be a span of hours when these extended release forms of metformin release the most drug into your blood stream, when you take your dose may affect how much impact the drug has on your blood sugars after meals or when you wake up. For example, the version I take, made by Teva, releases Continue reading >>

Metformin - Taking Daily Dose All At Once?

Metformin - Taking Daily Dose All At Once?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Metformin - taking daily dose all at once? I was prescribed metformin about a week ago, so still learning about it. I'm really struggling to take the four pills spread out throughout the day. Firstly, I am AWFUL at remembering pills (never forgot an injection in 15 years, though!) and second, I sometimes only have two meals a day and I don't want to take them on an empty stomach. A diabetes nurse told me today I can take two at once, with a meal, but now it occurs to me that taking four all at once would be even easier. Even I can remember once a day, and I can have them with my main meal when there's a good amount of food in my stomach. Does anybody do this? Is there any disadvantage to taking them all at once? I had an upset stomach on the first day of taking them, but that quickly disappeared and I have no other side effects. I was afraid that would be the answer! 4 all at once did seem like a bit much. I feel bad asking for the slow release version because it's so much more expensive. If I was having horrible side effects I'd feel justified, but my poor memory with pill-taking is a problem I can control with some effort. I've set up reminders on Outlook for when I'm at work, so 15 minutes after my breakfast and lunch times it will flash up "PILL" at me. Hopefully that will help me remember to take two with one of those meals, and in the evening my family are tasked with reminding me to take two after dinner. Perhaps for weekends I can get my husband to set an alarm on his phone at lunch time as well. Hello PepperTed, yes a bad memory is a pest to deal with. I have to put my tablets out each night, by my bed 3 little cups, with different tablets in Continue reading >>

About Metformin

About Metformin

Metformin is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes and sometimes polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the insulin that it makes doesn't work properly. This can cause high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). PCOS is a condition that affects how the ovaries work. Metformin lowers your blood sugar levels by improving the way your body handles insulin. It's usually prescribed for diabetes when diet and exercise alone have not been enough to control your blood sugar levels. For women with PCOS, metformin stimulates ovulation even if they don't have diabetes. It does this by lowering insulin and blood sugar levels. Metformin is available on prescription as tablets and as a liquid that you drink. Key facts Metformin works by reducing the amount of sugar your liver releases into your blood. It also makes your body respond better to insulin. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. It's best to take metformin with a meal to reduce the side effects. The most common side effects are feeling sick, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach ache and going off your food. Metformin does not cause weight gain (unlike some other diabetes medicines). Metformin may also be called by the brand names Bolamyn, Diagemet, Glucient, Glucophage, and Metabet. Who can and can't take metformin Metformin can be taken by adults. It can also be taken by children from 10 years of age on the advice of a doctor. Metformin isn't suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting the medicine if you: have had an allergic reaction to metformin or other medicines in the past have uncontrolled diabetes have liver or kidney problems have a severe infection are being treated for heart failure or you have recentl Continue reading >>

What Is Metformin?

What Is Metformin?

Commonly Used Brand Name(s)Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet Therapeutic ClassificationsHypoglycemic QUICK LINKS Oral route (Tablet;Tablet, Extended Release;Solution) Death, hypothermia, hypotension, and resistant bradyarrhythmias have been reported due to metformin-associated lactic acidosis. Onset may be subtle and include nonspecific symptoms such as malaise, myalgia, respiratory distress, somnolence, and abdominal distress; laboratory abnormalities include low pH, increased anion gap and elevated blood lactate. The risk of lactic acidosis increases with renal or hepatic impairment, aged 65 years or older, having a radiological study with contrast, surgery, or other procedures, hypoxic states, and excessive alcohol intake. If lactic acidosis is suspected, metformin hydrochloride should be discontinued, supportive measures started in a hospital setting. Prompt hemodialysis is recommended . Save up to 85% on Metformin Find big savings at pharmacies near you with GoodRx discount coupons Average Retail Price: $27.12 Lowest GoodRx Price $4.00 View All Prices Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels that are caused by a type of diabetes mellitus or sugar diabetes called type 2 diabetes. With this type of diabetes, insulin produced by the pancreas is not able to get sugar into the cells of the body where it can work properly. Using metformin alone, with a type of oral antidiabetic medicine called a sulfonylurea, or with insulin, will help to lower blood sugar when it is too high and help restore the way you use food to make energy. Many people can control type 2 diabetes with diet and exercise. Following a specially planned diet and exercise will always be important when you have diabetes, even when you are taking medicines. To work properly, t Continue reading >>

What Time Of Day Do You Take Metformin?

What Time Of Day Do You Take Metformin?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I am on two 500 mg. Metformin twice a day. I'm unsure of when to take them, as I've read so many different things. Some people take them before eating, some after. The thing that most concerns me is what time of day should I be taking them? My bottle just says two twice day. Is it best to take them with breakfast early in the a.m. (I eat at 7:00 a.m.) and then wait until dinner (which varies for me--I don't eat "dinner" at a set time, but it is usually around 4 p.m. or so). When do YOU take Metforming (if that is the drug you are using). Thanks for any advice you can give. I've been taking Metformin earlier in the day (around 3 p.m.) and I eat snacks before bed (low carb), and also oftentimes take p.m. pain meds. I have found that my morning glucose reading is often too high (137-140). I can't sleep if my stomach is growling, so I have to eat something before I can sleep! It actually becomes a fairly personal thing as to when it suits you best to take your Metformin and depends on a few things. Some people experience gastric side effects for the first few weeks of taking Metformin, this can range from cramps, wind to diarrhea - for people who experience this, often the advice is to eat something before take the Metformin - the instruction from the Doctor can be "Take with food", which can be translated as don't take it on an empty stomach. I personally was very lucky and had no issues and so that didn't apply to me (I'm on the same dose as you). I generally don't eat breakfast, but take my Metformin just before leaving the house for work in the morning, or at weekends when I get up. The eveni Continue reading >>

Metformin 850mg Tablets

Metformin 850mg Tablets

1. WHAT METFORMIN IS AND WHAT IT IS USED FOR The name of this medicine is Metformin 500mg or 850mg Tablets (called metformin in this leaflet). It belongs to a group of medicines called biguanides (a type of oral hypoglycaemic). Metformin is used for the sort of diabetes called Type 2 diabetes or non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In type 2 diabetes, there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood. This is because your body does not make enough insulin or because it makes insulin that does not work properly. Insulin is a hormone that allows your body tissue to take glucose from the blood and use it for energy or for storage for future use. Metformin works by improving the sensitivity of your body to insulin. It helps your body to use glucose in the normal way again This medicine is given when diet and exercise alone has not been able to control your blood sugar levels. Metformin can be given on its own. However, sometimes it is given with other medicines for diabetes or with insulin. In patients who are overweight, long-term use of metformin also helps to lower the risk of any problems related to diabetes you are allergic (hypersensitive) to metformin or any of the other ingredients in this liquid (see section 6: Further information). An allergic reaction can include a rash, itching or shortness of breath. you have recently had a heart attack or any other heart problems you have severe circulation problems or difficulty in breathing you have had serious problems with your diabetes in the past called diabetic ketoacidosis. When you have this you lose weight quickly, feel sick (nausea) or are sick (vomiting). See also in Section 4: Possible side effects you have recently had a severe infection, injury or trauma (shock) you are going to have an X-ray where you will b Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex This medicine usually comes with a patient information insert. Read the information carefully and make sure you understand it before taking this medicine. If you have any questions, ask your doctor. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is a very important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. Metformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few weeks of treatment. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not crush, break, or chew it. While taking the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stool after your body has absorbed the medicine. This is normal and nothing to worry about. Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Use only the brand of this medicine that your doctor prescribed. Different brands may not work the same way. You may notice improvement in your blood glucose control in 1 to 2 weeks, but the full effect of blood glucose control may take up to 2 to 3 months. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about this. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the Continue reading >>

Accidental Double Dose Of Metformin

Accidental Double Dose Of Metformin

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Good morning - I had my head in the clouds this morning and accidentally took my Metformin twice - 2 tablets (total 4) plus my 300 mg dose of Invokana. Should I be concerned? I am at work and don't have my meter with me to test (stupid I know). I would contact you doctor or pharmacist for advice as soon as you can but I suppose it depends what strength the metformin is and if combined with the other medication is likely to do you any harm. how much mg is there in those metformin pills ? if it all in all does not exceed 2000mg , I think you after you have asked a doctor, that you can just eat very much carbs before you sleep, so you are sure not to be too low when you sleep, but metformin does only lower ones blood glucose a bit so I dont think it is very dangerous if it is only for one day... worse would be overdosing for a longer period... but if you have taken more than 2000-2500 mg I think it can be very important to ask for advice.. as that is the maximum dosis for a day ... Continue reading >>

Efficacy Of Once- Or Twice-daily Extended Release Metformin Compared With Thrice-daily Immediate Release Metformin In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Efficacy Of Once- Or Twice-daily Extended Release Metformin Compared With Thrice-daily Immediate Release Metformin In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Abstract BACKGROUND: The extended-release formulation of metformin (MXR) prolongs drug absorption in the upper gastrointestinal tract and permits once-daily dosing in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This newer formulation may enhance patient compliance with oral therapy compared to conventional immediate-release metformin (MIR) in T2DM. OBJECTIVES: To analyse whether a switch from thrice daily MIR to once or twice daily MXR wouldachieve comparable degrees of glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). METHODS: We conducted an open study of the efficacy and tolerability of MXR in 40 patients with T2DM who had achieved moderate or good glycemic control with MIR alone or in combination with other antihyperglycemic agents. After a lead in period of 3 months patients were switched over to a specific brand of MIR at baseline (Visit 0). Patients were subsequently followed for 4 more visits. These visits were done monthly, after taking MIR in a dose of 1-2 g/day (Visit 1); MXR as a single dose at dinner but 0.5 g less than baseline dose of MIR (Visit 2); MXR, 1-2 g/day as a single dose at bedtime, with strength same as that of baseline dose of MIR (Visit 3); and MXR, 1-2 g/day in two divided doses keeping dose same as baseline MIR (Visit 4). Glycemic control was assessed by a four-point glucose profile (fasting and three postprandial levels) at each visit. RESULTS: At visit 2, when patients had been on 500 mg lesser dose of MXR for 1 month, glucose profile worsened. However, glycemic control, at visit 3, returned to earlier levels when dose of MXR was increased back to original dose. Overall the MXR formulation was well tolerated with minor gastrointestinal adverse effects, reported by only 3 patients. CONCLUSION: Patients with T2DM who had Continue reading >>

Metformin 500mg Tablet

Metformin 500mg Tablet

Metformin: Side Effects, Dosages, Treatment, Interactions, Warnings Unfortunately our full catalog may not be displayed in your state. If you contact our Customer Support by one of the methods below, we will be able to assist you in. These measures will help to protect the environment. The other ingredients are sodium starch glycollate, maize starch, povidone, colloidal anhydrous silica, magnesium stearate. The film coating is made up of hypromellose, titanium dioxide Epropylene glycol, macrogol and purified talc. What Metformin Tablets look like and contents of the pack Metformin Tablets are white coloured, film coated round biconvex tablets. And delay of intestinal glucose absorption. Metformin stimulates intracellular tablet synthesis by acting on glycogen synthase, metformin 500mg tablet. Metformin increases the transport capacity of all types of membrane glucose transporters GLUTs known to date, metformin 500mg tablet. In humans, independently of its action on glycaemia, metformin has favourable effects on lipid metabolism. This has 500mg shown at therapeutic doses in controlled, medium-term or long-term clinical studies: Metformin reduces total cholesterol, LDL, cholesterol and triglycerides levels. The prospective randomised UKPDS study has established long-term benefit of intensive blood glucose control in type 2 diabetes. Analysis of the results of the overweight patients treated with metformin after failure of diet alone metformin In type I diabetes, the combination of metformin and insulin has been used in metformin tablets, but the 500mg benefit of this combination 500mg not been formally established. Controlled clinical studies in a limited paediatric population aged years treated during 1 year demonstrated a similar response in glycaemic tablet to that se Continue reading >>

Efficacy, Tolerability, And Safety Of A Novel Once-daily Extended-release Metformin In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Efficacy, Tolerability, And Safety Of A Novel Once-daily Extended-release Metformin In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

OBJECTIVE—The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of a novel extended-release metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Adults with type 2 diabetes (newly diagnosed, treated with diet and exercise only, or previously treated with oral diabetic medications) were randomly assigned to receive one of three extended-release metformin treatment regimens (1,500 mg/day q.d., 1,500 mg/day twice daily, or 2,000 mg/day q.d.) or immediate-release metformin (1,500 mg/day twice daily) in a double-blind 24-week trial. RESULTS—Significant decreases (P < 0.001) in mean HbA1c (A1C) levels were observed by week 12 in all treatment groups. The mean changes from baseline to end point in the two groups given 1,500 mg extended-release metformin (−0.73 and −0.74%) were not significantly different from the change in the immediate-release metformin group (−0.70%), whereas the 2,000-mg extended-release metformin group showed a greater decrease in A1C levels (−1.06%; mean difference [2,000 mg extended-release metformin − immediate-release metformin]: −0.36 [98.4% CI −0.65 to −0.06]). Rapid decreases in fasting plasma glucose levels were observed by week 1, which continued until week 8, and were maintained for the duration of the study. The overall incidence of adverse events was similar for all treatment groups, but fewer patients in the extended-release metformin groups discontinued treatment due to nausea during the initial dosing period than in the immediate-release metformin group. CONCLUSIONS—Once- or twice-daily extended-release metformin was as safe and effective as twice-daily immediate-release metformin and provided continued glycemic control for up to 24 weeks of treatment. Metformin hydrochloride has been w Continue reading >>

Taking Metformin All At Once

Taking Metformin All At Once

If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. First of all I am so excited that I found this, even though I havent talked to anyone yet, I dont feel so alone anymore with PCOS. Anyway I have been on Met for 6 months, suppose to take two 750mg pills a day, and I dont! I may take one if I remember. So I was wondering if anyone knows if I can take both pills at one time after dinner or will it make me sick? I have been very lucky not to have really bad side effects but I REALLY need to start taking them the way the dr says. Im interested to hear the stories. Thanks When I started Met i tried to take it all at once before bed but it was way to harsh on my stomach and I had to switch to 500 in am and 500 in pm, which I have no problems with at all. But you can always try it and see how you handle it some people see to be more senisitve to side effects. Good Luck. The reason you're supposed to take two at twelve hours apart is that this will give your body a constant supply, does that make sense? I think you will just need to come up with a routine that will help you remember to take your pills. HTH. Met rules! Hidden Content It cleared my brain fog, brought back af, helped me lose weight, made me o' again, and helped me get pregnant. My first Metformin miracle is now 5 years old, my second (surprise one) just turned 2. Hidden Content Thanks! I will just try to remember to take it twice a day and not at the same time because I really dont want to get sick! Japan... How long were you on met before you were able to get pregnant or just have a period on your own? Continue reading >>

When Do I Take Metformin For My Diet: Morning Or Night?

When Do I Take Metformin For My Diet: Morning Or Night?

Metformin helps control blood sugar and increase your body's sensitivity to insulin. The drug is available only by prescription and sold under several different brand names, including Fortamet, Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage and Glucophage XR. Your dosage will depend on your normal diet and exercise habits -- too much metformin can lead to low blood sugar and hypoglycemia. Always follow your doctor's directions for taking your medication. Video of the Day Metformin works by limiting your liver's production of glucose and stopping your body from absorbing some of the glucose in your bloodstream. Additionally, metformin increases your body's sensitivity to insulin, allowing your pancreas to produce less insulin. Keeping blood sugar levels stable can decrease hunger and food cravings, leading to weight loss. Metformin is not an appetite suppressant, nor does it boost metabolism; to lose weight, you'll still need to pay close attention to your diet and increase your physical activity. Standard vs. Extended Release Options The amount of metformin you'll take depends on why you are using the medication, how often you take the medicine, other medications you might be taking and the time between doses. The National Institutes of Health explains that metformin is available as a tablet or a liquid solution. Tablets come in an extended release dose -- Glucophage XR -- or in a standard release option. Extended release pills are designed to be taken once daily, with your evening meal. Standard tablet and liquid solutions may be taken once or multiple times daily -- with meals. Metformin should be taken with food. Always follow your doctor's orders. It's typical to start with a 500 milligram dose once daily, then increase both the amount of medication and the frequency. If you're using Continue reading >>

One Of The Most Effective Diabetes Drugs

One Of The Most Effective Diabetes Drugs

You may recall that I recently wrote a series on various medicines and how they can affect your diabetes (see "The Ups and Downs of Meds and Diabetes [Part 1]" as well as Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, and Part 5). One kind reader, who happens to be a nurse, asked me to devote a post to metformin with regard to its effects on kidneys and special considerations to keep in mind with this drug. I wrote about metformin back in December 2006 (was it that long ago?) and its link to vitamin B12 deficiency (see “Metformin and Risk For Vitamin B12 Deficiency”). But there are other important facts to know about this very popular diabetes drug. Raise your hand if you take metformin. OK, obviously I can’t see you, but I’ll wager that many of you reading this are on this medication. Metformin is the generic name for Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Fortamet, and Riomet. It also comes combined with other diabetes medications, including glyburide (in Glucovance), glipizide (in Metaglip), rosiglitazone (in Avandamet), pioglitazone (in Actoplus Met), sitagliptin (in Janumet), and repaglinide (in PrandiMet). I’ve read that approximately 35 million prescriptions were written for metformin in 2006, making this one of the top 10 best selling generic drugs. And you may not be aware that the American Diabetes Association, in its 2006 practice guidelines for health-care professionals, recommended metformin over sulfonylureas as the first drug of choice for people with Type 2 diabetes. This really isn’t surprising. Metformin has a long track record for being safe and causing relatively few serious side effects—plus, it also works! Chances are, if you have Type 2 diabetes and need to start on medication, your health-care provider will recommend you take metformin. How It Works Just a Continue reading >>

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