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Take Care Of Your Diabetes

Taking Care Of Your Diabetes

Taking Care Of Your Diabetes

To receive email updates about Diabetes Education enter your email address: Taking care of yourself and your diabetes can help you feel good today and in the future. Use these booklets, tip sheets, and fact sheets to help you take control of your health by working with your health care team and adopting healthy behaviors to avoid complications and enjoy a healthier life. This booklet helps people with diabetes understand, monitor, and manage their diabetes to help them stay healthy. It is especially useful for people who have recently been diagnosed with diabetes or who just want to learn more about managing the disease. Available in English, Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, French, Gujarati, Haitian, Hindi, Korean, Spanish, Tagalog, Urdu and Vietnamese. Tips to Help You Stay Healthy With Diabetes Use this tip sheet to help you manage your diabetes and live a long and active life. Print and use the Diabetes Care Record and Action Plan. This web page offers guidance on how to manage your diabetes to stay healthy and how to deal with financial costs, complications, and other issues that people with diabetes might face. Learn how to manage your diabetes with the help of your health care team with this tip sheet and patient care checklist. Managing your medicines is very important for people with diabetes. Use this fact sheet to learn how to manage your medicines and get your doctors and pharmacists involved in the management of your diabetes. Continue reading >>

Taking Control Of Your Diabetes Conference & Health Fair

Taking Control Of Your Diabetes Conference & Health Fair

Taking Control of Your Diabetes Conference & Health Fair Managing Your Diabetes For Type 1s, Type 2s, and Those Who Care A TCOYD Conference & Health fair willchange the way you live LEADINGDiabetes Doctors, Specialists & Researchers and its only one small part of the TCOYD conference experience Important Health Screenings A variety of complimentary health screenings Ask A Specialist Get your questions answered with our one-on-one consultations with diabetes experts Fun Fitness Try new ways to be active without the gym Cooking Demos Healthy and delicious, our experts willteach you how its done TYPE 1&TYPE 2PRESENTATIONS & WORKSHOPS given by the nations leading diabetes doctors, specialists & researchers Type 1 & Type 2 A variety of workshops and presentations geared towards type 1 and type 2 Type 3 Education, advice and help for those who care aboutsomeone with diabetes the most cutting-edge information onthe latest technologies, treatments & research TypicalTYPE 1lectureand workshop topicsinclude: Beginner & Advanced Workshops for CGM & Pumps Whats on the Horizon For Type 1: The Latest Research & Developments Dealing with the Emotional Toll of Type 1 & Complications Golden Rules for Living with Type 1 Presented by Doctors & Experts Who Have Type 1 Diabetes and The Stomach: Celica & Other GI Issues Daily Injections or Pump Therapy, Whats Right For You? (not all lectures & workshops are offered in each city, see city pages for details) practical easy to understand information & educationthat you can put into action now TypicalTYPE 2lectureand workshop topicsinclude: An In Depth Look at Type 2 Treatments Including Insulin Why Am I So Tired? Do I Have Sleep Apnea? My Doctor Doesnt Get It! My Patients Dont Listen! Patients vs. Providers Bite Me! Healthy, Yummy Food Choices Continue reading >>

7 Scary Things That Can Happen When You Don't Treat Your Diabetes

7 Scary Things That Can Happen When You Don't Treat Your Diabetes

7 Scary Things That Can Happen When You Don't Treat Your Diabetes Swallowing pills, checking your blood sugar all the time, or sticking yourself with needles full of insulin probably doesn't sound like your idea of a good time. But taking steps to keep your diabetes under control is your best shot at preventing a slew of frightening complications. If you don't take care of yourself, "diabetes complications typically start within 5 years; within 10 to 15 years, the majority of patients will progress to have multiple health issues," says Betul Hatipoglu, MD, an endocrinologist at Cleveland Clinic. Fortunately, eating a nutritious diet , exercising, and taking your medication may not only stop complications from progressing, but can also reverse them, she says. Need motivation to stick to your treatment plan? Here's what can happen when you slack off. Your cholesterol and blood pressure rise. Withtype 1 diabetes, your body stops producing insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar; withtype 2 diabetes , your body can't properly use the insulin you do produce. In turn, your HDL (or "good") cholesterol lowers, and your levels of harmful blood fats called triglycerides rise. Insulin resistance also contributes to hardened, narrow arteries, which in turn increases your blood pressure. As a result, about 70% of people with either type of diabetes also have hypertensiona risk factor for stroke, heart disease, and trouble with thinking and memory. (Add these 13 power foods to your diet to help lower blood pressure naturally .) Failing to control high blood pressure and high cholesterol, either with diet and exercise alone or by adding medications, accelerates the rate at which all your other complications progress, says Robert Gabbay, MD, PhD, chief medical officer at Joslin Continue reading >>

Diabetes Care: 10 Ways To Avoid Diabetes Complications

Diabetes Care: 10 Ways To Avoid Diabetes Complications

Diabetes care is a lifelong responsibility. Consider 10 strategies to prevent diabetes complications. Diabetes is a serious disease. Following your diabetes treatment plan takes round-the-clock commitment. But your efforts are worthwhile. Careful diabetes care can reduce your risk of serious — even life-threatening — complications. Here are 10 ways to take an active role in diabetes care and enjoy a healthier future. 1. Make a commitment to managing your diabetes Members of your diabetes care team — doctor or primary care provider, diabetes nurse educator, and dietitian, for example — can help you learn the basics of diabetes care and offer support along the way. But it's up to you to manage your condition. Learn all you can about diabetes. Make healthy eating and physical activity part of your daily routine. Maintain a healthy weight. Monitor your blood sugar level, and follow your doctor's instructions for managing your blood sugar level. Ask your diabetes treatment team for help when you need it. 2. Don't smoke Smoking increases your risk of various diabetes complications, including: Reduced blood flow in the legs and feet, which can lead to infections, ulcers and possible removal of a body part by surgery (amputation) Heart disease Stroke Eye disease, which can lead to blindness Nerve damage Kidney disease Talk to your doctor about ways to help you stop smoking or using other types of tobacco. 3. Keep your blood pressure and cholesterol under control Like diabetes, high blood pressure can damage your blood vessels. High cholesterol is a concern, too, since the damage is often worse and more rapid when you have diabetes. When these conditions team up, they can lead to a heart attack, stroke or other life-threatening conditions. Eating a healthy, reduced-fat d Continue reading >>

Take Control Of Your Diabetes At A Tcoyd Conference

Take Control Of Your Diabetes At A Tcoyd Conference

Take control of your diabetes with the nonprofit organization Taking Control of Your Diabetes (TCOYD) at a one-day conference that will ignite motivation for change, offer hope, provide invaluable education, and change the life of anyone who has the condition. I recently spoke with Dr. Steve Edelman, who has lived with Type 1 diabetes for over four decades and is the founder and director of TCOYD, about his conferences. AM: How, where, when, and why did the idea for these conferences originate? SE: Our first TCOYD conference was in September 1995 at the San Diego Convention Center. I had the thought that medical professionals were too slow to implement findings from clinical trials. The DCCT (Diabetes Control and Complications Trial), which was competed in 1993, clearly showed the benefits of glucose control in people with diabetes (PWD), but the health-care providers were doing the “same old, same old” and diabetes care was not improving. So I had the idea, why not take the important messages about living a long and healthy life with diabetes directly to the people most affected, along with their loved ones? We then realized how “thirsty” people were for education and we added in motivation, humor, and activation at our events. AM: What are your goals for these national conferences? SE: The main goal is to educate PWD about all the therapies and devices out there for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. The other major goal is to help motivate folks with diabetes to put diabetes higher on their priority list, basically activating folks. Teaching and showing PWD that having a chronic condition and then taking care of it…can lead to a long and healthy life. AM: “Control” is a loaded word for people with diabetes. As someone who has lived with Type 1 for 32 years, I Continue reading >>

Learn To Manage Your Diabetes - One-day Conference, Honolulu, Hi

Learn To Manage Your Diabetes - One-day Conference, Honolulu, Hi

Dr. Edelman is the founder and director of Taking Control Of Your Diabetes (TCOYD), a professor of medicine in the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) and the Veterans Affairs (VA) Healthcare System of San Diego. He is also the director of the Diabetes Care Clinic at the VA Medical Center. Dr. Edelman, who has type 1 diabetes himself, has written more than 200 articles, five books, and has won numerous awards for teaching and humanitarianism. He has been chosen by the medical students at UCSD as the teacher of the year numerous times. Among his many honors, Dr. Edelman has received the Diabetes Educator Of The Year award by the American Diabetes Association, the Distinction in Endocrinology award by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, and named Top 1% of U.S. Endocrinologists by US News and World Report. Endocrinologist, Private Practice; Volunteer of the American Diabetes Association Dr. Tom is a renowned Oahu endocrinologist who treats and cares for people living with diabetes. She has been instrumental in ensuring that TCOYD comes back year after year to host these life-changing conferences. Other than TCOYDs home-base of San Diego, Honolulu is the only other city that TCOYD returns to annually. We can thank Dr. Tom for this! Health Management Operations Department, HMSA; Coordinating Body Chair of the American Association of Diabetes Educators Viola has been educating and helping the Hawaiian diabetes community since 1990. As Co-Director, Viola has been responsible for recruiting local diabetes experts. We thank Viola for creating such a wonderful community of helping hands who come together each year at TCOYD to help YOU control your diabetes. AKA Sergeant Duke Lukela of Hawaii Five- Continue reading >>

School And Diabetes

School And Diabetes

Are you on your own at school when you're dealing with diabetes ? Not at all. Your teachers, coaches, school nurse, and even your friends can help you out. But they can't help if they don't know what you need or if they don't know that you have diabetes. So how can you let them know? Let's find out. The best way to get started is for your mom or dad to meet with teachers and others at your school to talk about helping you manage diabetes. That way, teachers and other school staff will know you have diabetes. They will know you need to check your blood sugar , take medicine, or maybe visit the nurse sometimes. Your parents can bring a copy of your diabetes management plan to school so people there will know how to handle any problems that come up. Of course, you'll need to do your part to take care of yourself at school. These steps will help: Be prepared. The things you need to take care of your diabetes at home, you'll also need to have at school. Your parent can help you pack your diabetes stuff, like medicines, testing supplies, lunch, snacks, water, and any other things that your doctor recommends. And make sure to wear your medical identification necklace or bracelet. Speak up. You need to do certain things to manage your diabetes, like test your blood, have a snack, or take medicine. Sometimes you'll be in a situation that's hard to interrupt (like taking a test). But speak up anyway. When you can, let your teacher know in advance that you'll need to step out. If a new teacher or coach doesn't know about your diabetes, tell the person or have your mom or dad write a note. Know what to do if you have a problem. Find out who can help you if you have a question or health emergency. If the school nurse isn't in, is there someone else who can help? Should you or the s Continue reading >>

4 Steps To Manage Your Diabetes For Life

4 Steps To Manage Your Diabetes For Life

This publication has been reviewed by NDEP for plain language principles. Learn more about our review process. Actions you can take The marks in this booklet show actions you can take to manage your diabetes. Help your health care team make a diabetes care plan that will work for you. Learn to make wise choices for your diabetes care each day. Step 1: Learn about diabetes. What is diabetes? There are three main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes – Your body does not make insulin. This is a problem because you need insulin to take the sugar (glucose) from the foods you eat and turn it into energy for your body. You need to take insulin every day to live. Type 2 diabetes – Your body does not make or use insulin well. You may need to take pills or insulin to help control your diabetes. Type 2 is the most common type of diabetes. Gestational (jest-TAY-shun-al) diabetes – Some women get this kind of diabetes when they are pregnant. Most of the time, it goes away after the baby is born. But even if it goes away, these women and their children have a greater chance of getting diabetes later in life. You are the most important member of your health care team. You are the one who manages your diabetes day by day. Talk to your doctor about how you can best care for your diabetes to stay healthy. Some others who can help are: dentist diabetes doctor diabetes educator dietitian eye doctor foot doctor friends and family mental health counselor nurse nurse practitioner pharmacist social worker How to learn more about diabetes. Take classes to learn more about living with diabetes. To find a class, check with your health care team, hospital, or area health clinic. You can also search online. Join a support group — in-person or online — to get peer support with managing your Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 7 Principles For Good Diabetes Care

Diabetes: 7 Principles For Good Diabetes Care

7 Principles for Good Diabetes Care These principles, or steps, will help you manage your diabetes and live a long and active life. Every person who has diabetes has different needs. Talk to your health care team about a treatment plan that is best for you. Diabetes affects almost every part of the body and good diabetes care requires a team of health care providers. They include doctors, diabetes educators, nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, mental health workers, eye specialists, foot specialists, dentists, and social workers. Print out and take this information with you when you visit your doctor or other members of your team to talk about your treatment plan. It Is Important to Control Diabetes Taking good care of diabetes can lower the chances of getting: eye disease that can lead to a loss of vision or even blindness nerve damage that may cause a loss of feeling or pain in the hands, feet, legs, or other parts of the body and lead to problems such as lower limb amputation or erectile dysfunction kidney failure As you read through this information, look for things with a to help you take action to control your diabetes. Principle 1: Learn as Much as You Can About Diabetes The more you know about diabetes, the better you can work with your health care team to manage your disease and reduce your risk for problems. You should know what type of diabetes you have. If you do not know, ask your doctor whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes. People who have this type of diabetes need to take insulin every day. This type of diabetes used to be called juvenile diabetes. Type 2 diabetes. Diet and daily physical activity help to control type 2 diabetes. Most people also need to take diabetes pills or insulin. Type 2 diabetes is very common and used to be cal Continue reading >>

Pardon Our Interruption...

Pardon Our Interruption...

As you were browsing www.apa.org something about your browser made us think you were a bot. There are a few reasons this might happen: You're a power user moving through this website with super-human speed. You've disabled JavaScript in your web browser. A third-party browser plugin, such as Ghostery or NoScript, is preventing JavaScript from running. Additional information is available in this support article. To request an unblock, please fill out the form below and we will review it as soon as possible. You reached this page when attempting to access from 35.226.59.238 on 2017-12-29 16:48:10 UTC. Trace: 9cf65386-27a0-4c27-99ae-9e9edd42b65a via 020cd700-68e4-4328-9c63-287de9f74976 Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Eyes For Diabetics In Lake Forest Laguna Woods

Treatment Of Eyes For Diabetics In Lake Forest Laguna Woods

Home Your Eye Health Eye Diseases Diabetes and Eyesight How to Take Care of Your Eyes if You Have Diabetes How to Take Care of Your Eyes if You Have Diabetes People with diabetes are at an increased risk of developing specific ocular diseases, such as glaucoma , diabetic retinopathy and cataracts . Fortunately though, proper blood glucose control can minimize this risk. If you have diabetes, our professional and compassionate eye doctors at South County Eye Care will keep watch on your eyes to help preserve your long-lasting vision. Dr. Justin Michaels and Dr. Lucy DeMoss are experienced in providing expert eye care services for people with diabetes, in our Lake Forest office. In general, vision problems due to diabetes indicate that blood glucose levels are not being kept within a normal range. When blood sugars run high, extra stress is put on your eyes, (in addition to many other parts of the body, such as the heart and kidneys). Proliferative diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema are the two primary ocular conditions that can result. In contrast, when diabetes is controlled well and blood glucose levels are maintained within the goal parameters that your physician advises, eye complications can be prevented. If you have diabetes, vision loss is not inevitable. Read on for more information about how to be proactive and take the best care of your eyes. Top Ways to Keep Your Vision Sharp With Diabetes When signs of diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma and cataracts are detected at a very early stage, the progression of these diseases can be slowed or halted. As symptoms are usually not experienced until the diseases have advanced, a comprehensive eye exam is the only reliable way to detect the onset of diabetic eye complications, and an early diagnosis = early tre Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Self-care

Type 2 Diabetes - Self-care

You may not have any symptoms. If you do have symptoms, they may include: Hunger Thirst Urinating a lot, getting up more often than usual at night to urinate Blurry vision Infections Trouble having an erection Red skin rashes in parts of your body Tingling or loss of sensation in your feet You should have good control of your blood sugar. If your blood sugar is not controlled, serious problems called complications can happen to your body after many years. Learn the basic steps for managing diabetes to stay as healthy as possible. Doing so will help keep the complications of diabetes away. Steps include: Also, be sure to take any medicine or insulin as instructed. Your provider will also help you by ordering blood tests and other tests. These help make sure your blood sugar and cholesterol levels are each in a healthy range. Also, follow your provider's instructions about keeping your blood pressure in a healthy range. Your doctor will likely ask you to visit other providers to help you control your diabetes. These providers include a: Dietitian Diabetes pharmacist Diabetes educator Foods with sugar and carbohydrates can raise your blood sugar too high. Alcohol and other drinks with sugar can also raise your blood sugar. A nurse or dietitian can teach you about good food choices. Make sure you know how to have a balanced meal with protein and fiber. Eat healthy, fresh foods as much as possible. Don't eat too much food at one sitting. This helps keep your blood sugar in a good range. Managing your weight and keeping a well-balanced diet are important. Some people with type 2 diabetes can stop taking medicines after losing weight (even though they still have diabetes). Your provider can let you know a good weight range for you. Weight-loss surgery may be an option if you a Continue reading >>

Caring For Your Body With Type 2 Diabetes

Caring For Your Body With Type 2 Diabetes

Moisturizer, toothpaste, a water bottle, and sunglasses: These might sound like things to pack for a weekend getaway, but they're actually an essential part of a diabetes hygiene plan that covers you from head to toe and keeps you healthy. That’s because, when you have diabetes, your blood vessels help transport glucose and insulin throughout the body. But when you have unmanaged high blood sugar, these blood vessels can also become damaged, which can in turn cause damage to various parts your body. So if you have diabetes, caring for your entire body is essential to help protect your overall health. Here's how to give yourself some serious TLC to help avoid many possible diabetes complications related to: Your skin. Getting enough water is important to good skin care with diabetes. That's because skin dries more easily with poorly controlled blood sugar, says Dianne Brown, CDE, a certified diabetes educator with the Adult Diabetes & Endocrinology Clinic, part of the Harold Hamm Diabetes Center at the University of Oklahoma in Oklahoma City. Dry skin is a concern because it can develop cracks. "This can allow bacteria to enter and cause a skin infection,” Brown says. Keep you skin hydrated and healthy by drinking plenty of water throughout the day, eating a diet that’s rich in omega-3 fatty acids, avoiding bathing in very hot baths and showers, using mild soaps, moisturizing immediately after bathing. If you do notice any skin problems, be sure to tell your doctor. Your eyes. Diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of adult blindness, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes also increases your likelihood of developing cataracts and glaucoma. But there are steps you can take to help avoid eye complications related to diabetes. Continue reading >>

Taking Care Of Your Diabetes Means Taking Care Of Your Heart

Taking Care Of Your Diabetes Means Taking Care Of Your Heart

Taking Care of Your Diabetes Means Taking Care of Your Heart Taking Care of Your Diabetes Means Taking Care of Your Heart Taking Care of Your Diabetes Means Taking Care of Your Heart For people with diabetes, heart disease can be a serious health problem. Many people dont know that having diabetesmeans that you have a greater chance of having heart problems such as a heart attack or stroke. Taking care of your diabetescan also help you take care of your heart. Use the tools in this tip sheet to help. They are: A list of things you can do such as eating healthy foods and getting more active. A form to write down and track your A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol numbers. This publication has been reviewed by NDEP for plain language principles. Learn more about our review process . Ask your health care team these questions: What can I do to lower my chances of getting heart disease? What should my goals be for A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol? Should I take medicine that can protect my heart such as aspirin or a statin? Eat foods that are high in fiber such as whole grain breads and cereals, brown rice, lentils, beans, fruits, and vegetables. Eat foods with heart-healthy fats such as fish, nuts, seeds, and avocado. Eat foods low in saturated and transfats such as lean meat, chicken without the skin, fish, and non-fat or low-fat milk, yogurt, and cheese. Use oils when cooking food instead of butter, cream, shortening, lard, or stick margarine. Limit desserts such as cookies and ice cream to only 1 or 2 times a week. Eat smaller amounts of foods that are high in fat, sugar, or salt. For example, if you want french fries, order the kid-sized portion. Bake, broil, or grill food instead of frying. Ask for help or call 1-800-784-8669 (1-800-QUIT-NOW). Be active for 30 min Continue reading >>

Taking Care Of Your Diabetes Every Day

Taking Care Of Your Diabetes Every Day

There are four things you need to do every day to lower high blood sugar: Eat healthy food Get regular exercise Take your diabetes medicine Test your blood sugar If you have diabetes, you should try to keep your blood sugar level as close as possible to that of someone who doesn’t have diabetes. This may not be possible or right for everyone. Check with your doctor about what the right range of blood sugar is for you. You will get plenty of help in learning how to do this from your health care team, which is made up of your doctor, nurses, and dietitian. Bring a family member or friend with you when you see your doctor. Ask lots of questions. Before you leave, be sure you understand everything you need to know about taking care of your diabetes. Eat Healthy Food The foods on your diabetes eating plan are the same ones that are good for everyone. Try to stick to things that are low in fat, salt, and sugar and high in fiber, like beans, fruits, vegetables, and grains. Eating right will help you: Reach and stay at a weight that is good for you Keep your blood sugar in a good range Prevent heart and blood vessel disease Ask your doctor for the name of a dietitian who can work with you on an eating plan for you and your family. Your dietitian can help you plan meals with foods that you and your family like and that are good for you. If You Use Insulin Give yourself an insulin shot. Eat about the same amount of food each day at about the same time. Don't skip meals, especially if you’ve already given yourself an insulin shot. Your blood sugar may go too low. If You Don't Use Insulin Follow your meal plan. Don't skip meals, especially if you take diabetes pills. Your blood sugar may go too low. Skipping a meal can make you eat too much at the next meal. It may be better to Continue reading >>

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