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Differing Brands Of Generic Metformin Behave Differently

Differing Brands Of Generic Metformin Behave Differently

Dr. Bernstein has been preaching about this on his web telecasts for years, but it bears repeating: If you are having problems with generic metformin or not seeing it make much impact on your blood sugar, change brands before you assume it isn't working or that you can't tolerate it. I just had this message brought home to me when my pharmacy (Walgreens) filled my prescription for metformin ER with tablets from SunPharma instead of the ones from Teva they'd given me for years. The pills were about half the size of the ones I'd been getting, which suggested they contained less of a matrix substance to slow the release of the metformin. And sure enough, when I took the same dose I had been taking with no problems with the Teva brand metformin, I felt exhausted and semi-poisoned. It felt just like when I had taken an overdose of metformin some years ago, when my family doctor prescribed an overdose after confusing the dosage instructions for regular metformin--which can be taken in larger doses--with those of metformin ER. Not only that, but my fasting blood sugars went up. Clearly the SunPharma metformin ER was not behaving like a true extended release should and releasing slowly through a 24 hour period but was hitting my blood stream all at once and then was done. A quick visit to Google revealed that Sun Pharmaceuticals is an Indian company and that in the past the FDA has forced them to recall batches for quality issues. When it was time to refill my prescription, I called my pharmacy and spoke with the pharmacist who shrugged off my concerns and told me I'd have to speak to the pharmacy manager (not available that day.) So I got on the phone and called other local pharmacies and asked them what brand they were dispensing. Two of them still carry the Teva brand, so I Continue reading >>

News, Why Does Metformin Stink? Here's Why.

News, Why Does Metformin Stink? Here's Why.

News, Why does metformin stink? Here's why. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. News, Why does metformin stink? Here's why. Diabetes Drug Stinks 'Like Dirty Socks', Doctors Find WASHINGTON The commonly used diabetes drug metformin stinks, literally, and this may explain why many patients stop taking it, U.S. doctors reported on Monday.The drug smells like fish or dirty socks to some people and this could account for the well-known side effects of the drug, which can make people nauseated, they said. But the problem could be solved by coating the pills so they do not smell or release the odor into the stomach, where it can be burped up, they wrote in a letter to the Annals of Internal Medicine. "We wonder why this reaction to metformin has not been previously reported," Dr. Allen Pelletier of the Medical College of Georgia and colleagues wrote in a letter to the journal. "Patients may report that metformin nauseates them but do not further elaborate or distinguish this as a visceral reaction to the smell of the medication." The first had taken brand-name metformin (Glucophage, made by Bristol-Myers Squibb) for several years before being switched to an immediate release, generic version of metformin, which he refused to take. "He reported that it smelled like 'dead fish' and nauseated him," they wrote. An extended release generic version, coated to make it dissolve more slowly, solved the problem. A second man refused to ever take metformin again, even coated formulations, they said. "Our cases show that the distinctive odor of metformin (independent of other, well-known gastrointestinal adverse effects of the medication) causes Continue reading >>

Teva Announces Approval Of Metformin Hcl Extended Release Tablets, 750 Mg

Teva Announces Approval Of Metformin Hcl Extended Release Tablets, 750 Mg

Teva Announces Approval Of Metformin Hcl Extended Release Tablets, 750 Mg Next Article Teva To Report First Quarter 2005 Financ... Teva Announces Approval Of Metformin Hcl Extended Release Tablets, 750 Mg Jerusalem, Israel, April 13, 2005 - Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (Nasdaq: TEVA) announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted final approval for the Company's ANDA for Metformin Hydrochloride Extended Release Tablets, 750 mg. Shipment of this product is expected to begin immediately. Teva's Metformin HCl ER Tablets, 750 mg, are the AB-rated generic equivalent of Bristol-Myers Squibb's Glucophage XR Tablets, 750 mg, a product indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Total annual sales of this product, including brand and generic sales, are approximately $28 million. Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., headquartered in Israel, is among the top 25 pharmaceutical companies and among the largest generic pharmaceutical companies in the world. The company develops, manufactures and markets generic and innovative human pharmaceuticals and active pharmaceutical ingredients. Close to 90% of Teva's sales are in North America and Europe. Safe Harbor Statement under the U. S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995: This release contains forward-looking statements, which express the current beliefs and expectations of management. Such statements are based on management's current beliefs and expectations and involve a number of known and unknown risks and uncertainties that could cause Teva's future results, performance or achievements to differ significantly from the results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Important factors that could cause or contribute to such differences inclu Continue reading >>

Fda Warns Sun Pharmaceutical Of Quality Problems

Fda Warns Sun Pharmaceutical Of Quality Problems

FDA Warns Sun Pharmaceutical of Quality Problems The US FDA has sent Indian drug maker Sun Pharmaceutical Industries a letter warning that its quality control problems persist. Sun Pharmaceutical Industries is Indias largest drug manufacturer. It supplies many generic medications to the U.S. market. But the giant is once again in trouble with US regulators. The Food and Drug Administration has issued another warning letter to the company because one of its major manufacturing plants has fallen short on quality control. The problems the FDA noted in its most recent communication are very similar to those named in a letter sent earlier this year. Sun Pharmaceutical purchased another large Indian generic drug maker, Ranbaxy, which also ran afoul of FDA on quality control problems. Ranbaxy agreed to pay $500 million in fines in May 2013 after pleading guilty to making false statements and violating drug safety laws. Another Indian generic drug manufacturer, Dr. Reddys Laboratories, has also been the target of FDA scrutiny. The company received a warning letter last month because of quality control problems, especially data integrity. Indian drug makers provide at least 40 percent of the generic drugs Americans take each year. This is not the first time we have written about trouble with poor quality control in certain Indian manufacturing plants. You can read more here and here . The message we hear repeatedly from the FDA about generic drugs is thatthe agency has everythingunder control and there is nothing to worry about. Nevertheless, we keep reading about violations in India and other countries. Unfortunately, the FDA rarely reveals which medications have been affected. There is no country of origin label on your prescription bottle so you have no way of knowing whethe Continue reading >>

Full List Of Metformin Recalls, Fda 2012-2017

Full List Of Metformin Recalls, Fda 2012-2017

Metformin is a popular generic, widely used and generally well tolerated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. If you use sharps check out this helpful article on Sharps Container Disposal. Despite being made by dozens of manufacturers around the world, to date there have been only 15 recalls of the popular drug, with most being minor. The exceptions are a 27,000 kilo recall from Smruthi Organics in early 2014, and a recall of 117,049 sample cartons from Bristol-Myers Squibb in 2012. The next biggest Metformin recall after that came from Actavis Laboratories and affected 13,284 bottles in 2015. Metformin Recalls There have been 15 total recalls of Metformin from 2012 through 2017. The Metformin recalls involved a grand total of over 150,000 bottles of the popular diabetes medication. The most recent was a Class II event in late 2016 from Ascend Laboratories. Several other companies have been the focus of Metformin recalls. Most of the incidents were relatively small, in the sub-7,000 bottles range. The biggest by pill count was a 2012 recall from Bristol-Myers Squibb that affected over 117,000 sample packs. Metformin Facts Metformin is a diabetes medication in oral form that helps manage blood sugar levels. It’s used in cases of type 2 diabetes. It’s sometimes given along with insulin and other medications. It’s not meant for type 1 diabetes. Serious side effects can include allergic reaction with difficulty breathing or facial swelling, and dangerous or even fatal lactic acidosis marked by numbness, fatigue, slow heart rate, and vomiting. More common side effects are nausea, upset stomach, vomiting, and diarrhea. Major Metformin Recalls There have been three major Metformin recalls and several minor ones. The biggest in terms of bottles/cartons was a 2012 recall Continue reading >>

Search For A Drug

Search For A Drug

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Take this medicine with food. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed. Do not stop taking except on your doctors advice. Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 10 years of age for selected conditions, precautions do apply. Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once. NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others. This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine. Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. A test called the HbA1C (A1C) will be monitored. This is a simple blood test. It measures your blood sugar control over the last 2 to 3 months. You will receive this test every 3 to 6 months. Learn how to check your blood sugar. Learn the symptoms of low and high blood sugar and how to manage them. Always carry a quick-source of sugar with you in case you have symptoms of low blood sugar. Examples include hard sugar candy or glucose tablets. Make sure others know that you can choke if you eat or drink when you develop serious symptoms of low blood sugar, such as seizures or unconsciousness. They must get medical help at once. Tell your doctor or health care professional if you have high blood sugar. You might need to change the dose of your medicin Continue reading >>

Which Generic Brand Metformin

Which Generic Brand Metformin

Would like to make a decision regarding which generic brand of Metformin ER to buy. You have years of experience and knowledge. Have been pre-diabetic since my 20's. Started watching carb count in my early 50's and have kept myself from going full on diabetic. My age is now tracked on the geologic time scale. My GP and naturopath both want to see my fasting blood sugar lower, currently 115-120 upon waking, and both doctors keep pestering me about it. Keep my carbs around 40-50 gm./day. Front load my carbs and meat/veggies dinner. Tried eating protein snack before bed. Can't bring the fasting blood sugar any lower and both doctors have given me prescriptions for Metformin ER. Still sitting on them. Wish to avoid as much stomach upset as possible. Glucophage XL highly recommended but not covered by my insurance and way to spendy out of pocket. Any other way to purchase? Been doing research on generic brands and the Amneal from Walmart looks like a no-go. Teva no-go. Sun no-go. What brands work well and spare one from cramping and so forth. My online research predominates with the Extended Release as it makes Metformin easier on the stomach. That true? Was thinking of starting with 500 mg. ER 1/day with night meal to affect fasting blood sugar. Increase 500 mg. when I can tolerate the meds. Sound reasonable? Looking forward to your vast reservoir of knowledge. I had a very bad time with metformin. When I switched to metformin ER things got better. But it has to be metformin ER made by Teva. Metformin ER from other manufacturers gives me terrible gas and cramping. I think that there was a blog post here where the author also found the Teva was the best (and also most expensive) generic version. "My fitness trajectory in my senior years does not have to be a continuous down Continue reading >>

Dailymed - Metformin Hydrochloride- Metformin Hydrochloride Tablet, Extended Release

Dailymed - Metformin Hydrochloride- Metformin Hydrochloride Tablet, Extended Release

Compared with placebo, improvement in glycemic control was seen at all dose levels of metformin hydrochloride extended-release tablets and treatment was not associated with any significant change in weight (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION for dosing recommendations for metformin hydrochloride extended-release tablets). A 24-week, double-blind, randomized study of metformin hydrochloride extended-release tablets, taken once daily with the evening meal, and metformin hydrochloride tablets, taken twice daily (with breakfast and evening meal), was conducted in patients with type 2 diabetes who had been treated with metformin hydrochloride tablets 500 mg twice daily for at least 8 weeks prior to study entry. The metformin hydrochloride tablets dose had not necessarily been titrated to achieve a specific level of glycemic control prior to study entry. Patients qualified for the study if HbA1C was 8.5% and FPG was 200 mg/dL. Changes in glycemic control and body weight are shown in Table 3. Table 3: Summary of Mean Changes from Baseline * in HbA1C, Fasting Plasma Glucose, and Body Weight at Week 12 and at Final Visit (24-week study) There have been postmarketing cases of metformin-associated lactic acidosis, including fatal cases. These cases had a subtle onset and were accompanied by nonspecific symptoms such as malaise, myalgias, abdominal pain, respiratory distress, or increased somnolence; however, hypotension and resistant bradyarrhythmias have occurred with severe acidosis. Metformin-associated lactic acidosis was characterized by elevated blood lactate concentrations (> 5 mmol/L), anion gap acidosis (without evidence of ketonuria or ketonemia), and an increased lactate: pyruvate ratio; metformin plasma levels were generally > 5 mcg/mL. Metformin decreases liver uptake of Continue reading >>

Tagi Pharma, Inc.: Pharmaceutical Manufacturers, Suppliers, And Distributors

Tagi Pharma, Inc.: Pharmaceutical Manufacturers, Suppliers, And Distributors

For more informationtry a trial or see the plans and pricing Serving hundreds of leading biopharmaceutical companies globally: Drugs may be covered by multiple patents or regulatory protections. All trademarks and applicant names are the property of their respective owners or licensors.Although great care is taken in the proper and correct provision of this service, thinkBiotech LLC does not accept any responsibility for possible consequences of errors or omissions in the provided data.The data presented herein is for information purposes only. There is no warranty that the data contained herein is error free.thinkBiotech performs no independent verifification of facts as provided by public sources nor are attempts made to provide legal or investing advice. Any reliance on data provided herein is done solely at the discretion of the user.Users of this service are advised to seek professional advice and independent confirmation before considering acting on any of the provided information. thinkBiotech LLC reserves the right to amend, extend or withdraw any part or all of the offered service without notice. Continue reading >>

Metformin Manufacturer Information

Metformin Manufacturer Information

Given that most people take a generic form of Glucophage because of costs, combined with Paiges bad experience with one type, I decided to add to her excellent research (thank you, Paige, with my apology for not having credited you properly!) and create a free-standing Metformin Thread. Heres what Paige came up with after searching the net for anecdotal information on several of the Metformin generics. Please remember that your experience may differ. Heritage: Not a lot of data (there is now; see below) Sandoz: Works (not for me, much; see below for why) The actual medication and the amount of it, metformin hydrochloride, is the same for brand name and generics. Thats required by law. The difference between performance then, are the fillers used to bind the medication into a pill, as well as any coatings. People can be so affected by the particular fillers used, that they may not be able to absorb much of the medication. This is apparently what happened when Armour reformulated two years ago. That reformulation contained new fillers, and non-absorption complaints followed in massive numbers a month or so later. Fillers matter. In fact, some of them, as youll see below, might kill you. Extended Release Metformin is the worst form you can use. There isnt a single manufacturer who doesnt use fillers that make proper absorption difficult, and reports of digestive issues with it is legion. Furthermore, there is never a good reason to use it. Take regular Metformin and simply divide it up during the day or evening. Caveat Emptor has never been so important as it is here. I went hunting for filler information from every company I could find. Walmart Mail Order (as opposed to Walmart stores, whose warehouses different than the mail order warehouses currently use Sandoz) now us Continue reading >>

Generic Brands Of Metformin

Generic Brands Of Metformin

I started on 2,000 mg metformin and had great results but the gastric side effects were troubling enough that I switched to metformin ER. That helped with the gastro-intestinal, resolved it enough that I can live with it. The up side: zero risk of constipation. My numbers have been about 10 points higher on the ER - fastings in the 90's/low100's vs 80's/90's - and daytime readings from high 90's-115 vs mostly keeping them <100. Dr. Bernstein recommends using the brand vs generic, but insurance won't pay and I can't afford. So - I'm stuck w/ varying generic brands and the most prevalent seem to be Teva and Sun Pharmaceuticals. CVS gave me Teva last month in NC, but now in CA they refilled with generic from Sun Pharmaceuticals. Jenny talked about generics on her blog Diabetes Update: Differing Brands of Generic Metformin Behave Differently and it got me a little concerned about starting my current refill. Am not in the mood for more issues or less efficacy. Any of you have issues with differing generic brands/mfgs? Often the drug company/brand is on the label somewhere. A1C: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other Stuff Continue reading >>

Metformin Hydrochloride - Heritage Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Metformin Hydrochloride - Heritage Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Prescription Drug Information: Metformin Hydrochloride METFORMIN HYDROCHLORIDE- metformin hydrochloride tablet Postmarketing cases of metformin-associated lactic acidosis have resulted in death, hypothermia, hypotension, and resistant bradyarrhythmias. The onset of metformin associated lactic acidosis is often subtle, accompanied only by nonspecific symptoms such as malaise, myalgias, respiratory distress, somnolence, and abdominal pain. Metformin associated lactic acidosis was characterized by elevated blood lactate levels (>5 mmol/Liter), anion gap acidosis (without evidence of ketonuria or ketonemia), an increased lactate/pyruvate ratio; and metformin plasma levels generally >5 mcg/mL [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.1 ) ]. Risk factors for metformin-associated lactic acidosis include renal impairment, concomitant use of certain drugs (e.g. carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as topiramate), age 65 years old or greater, having a radiological study with contrast, surgery and other procedures, hypoxic states (e.g., acute congestive heart failure), excessive alcohol intake, and hepatic impairment. Steps to reduce the risk of and manage metformin-associated lactic acidosis in these high risk groups are provided [see Dosage and Administration ( 2.3 ), (2.7), Contraindications ( 4 ), Warnings and Precautions ( 5.1 )]. If metformin-associated lactic acidosis is suspected, immediately discontinue metformin hydrochloride tablets and institute general supportive measures in a hospital setting. Prompt hemodialysis is recommended [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.1 ) ]. Metformin hydrochloride tablets are indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients 10 years of age and older with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The recommen Continue reading >>

Stinky Diabetes Drug May Result In Poor Adherence

Stinky Diabetes Drug May Result In Poor Adherence

An immediate-release form of the antidiabetic agent metformin has a dead fish odor that may cause patients to stop taking the drug, clinicians warned. Metformin is known to cause adverse gastrointestinal effects such as diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, flatulence, distention, and abdominal pain. Those side effects "often necessitate discontinuing the drug," a group of physicians and pharmacists wrote in a letter published in the Feb. 17 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. The olfactory side effect -- a "stinky fish" smell -- appears to have been previously unreported in medical literature, and physicians may be prone to confusing the nausea induced by the foul smell with the well-known gastrointestinal pharmacologic side effect from metformin, according to Allen L. Pelletier, MD, of the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta, and colleagues. They reported two cases of patients who were driven away from metformin because of its stench. In the first case, a man who had been taking the branded drug Glucophage for several years was switched to an immediate-release, generic version of the drug. He reported that it smelled like "dead fish" and that it nauseated him. He was prescribed a generic, extended-release version and reported no further problems. In the second case, another man described the odor of the immediate-release generic metformin he took as "fishy" and he stopped taking it. He was unwilling to try an extended-release formula. Although drug directories list metformin as "odorless," and no previous studies have linked the smell of immediate-release metformin with discontinuation, the authors wrote that it's well known among pharmacists that metformin either smells like fish or "old locker room sweat socks." Diabetes and prescription drug message boards, too, contain Continue reading >>

Metformin Brands

Metformin Brands

Tweet Metformin is sold under a number of different brand names. As a diabetes treatment, Metformin has been marketed extensively. This page details some Metformin brands, all of which fall under the non-sulfonylureas class of diabetes drugs. The most common Metformin brand name is Glucophage, but there are many other less common Metformin brands. To make it easier for people with diabetes to understand the different brands of Metformin, we have profiled some of the most common ones below. Actoplus Met Actoplus Met is a combination of two oral diabetes medications (pioglitazone HCl and metformin HCl). This treatment is designed for people with type 2 diabetes. ACTOplus met includes an extended-release form of Metformin, alongside diabetes drug Actos (pioglitazone). This brand of metformin is designed to improve glyceamic control simply and conveniently. Whilst Metformin reduces the amount of glucose producted in the liver, Actos directly targets insulin resistance. Apo-Metformin Apo-Metformin is another brand of Metformin that comes under the medication calls of oral hypoglycaemics. Like other Metformin brands, Apo-Metformin functions to reduce the amount of glucose made by the liver. FORTAMET Extended-Release Tablets FORTAMET is a once-daily 1000 mg extended-release metformin tablet for people with type 2 diabetes. FORTAMET is for use by adults aged 17 years or older, and can be used either as a monotherapy or as a combination therapy. Like all Metformin, Fortamet should be used alongside diet and exercise to lower blood sugar levels and maintain control. Riomet Riomet (also called metformin hydrochloride oral solution) is a unique brand of metformin. It is the first and only type of liquid metformin available. Like all metformin, Riomet is used in conjunction with die Continue reading >>

Metformin Hcl Er

Metformin Hcl Er

Uses Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. How to use Metformin HCL ER Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking metformin and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist. Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually once daily with the evening meal. Drink plenty of fluids while taking this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor. Do not crush or chew this medication. Doing so can release all of the drug at once, increasing the risk of side effects. Also, do not split the tablets unless they have a score line and your doctor or pharmacist tells you to do so. Swallow the whole or split tablet without crushing or chewing. The dosage is based on your medical condition, response to treatment, and other medications you may be taking. Be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products). To reduce your risk of side effects (such as upset stomach), your doctor may direct you to start this medication at a low dose and gradually increase your dose. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully. Take this medication regula Continue reading >>

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