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Tagi Pharma Metformin

Metformin Brands

Metformin Brands

Tweet Metformin is sold under a number of different brand names. As a diabetes treatment, Metformin has been marketed extensively. This page details some Metformin brands, all of which fall under the non-sulfonylureas class of diabetes drugs. The most common Metformin brand name is Glucophage, but there are many other less common Metformin brands. To make it easier for people with diabetes to understand the different brands of Metformin, we have profiled some of the most common ones below. Actoplus Met Actoplus Met is a combination of two oral diabetes medications (pioglitazone HCl and metformin HCl). This treatment is designed for people with type 2 diabetes. ACTOplus met includes an extended-release form of Metformin, alongside diabetes drug Actos (pioglitazone). This brand of metformin is designed to improve glyceamic control simply and conveniently. Whilst Metformin reduces the amount of glucose producted in the liver, Actos directly targets insulin resistance. Apo-Metformin Apo-Metformin is another brand of Metformin that comes under the medication calls of oral hypoglycaemics. Like other Metformin brands, Apo-Metformin functions to reduce the amount of glucose made by the liver. FORTAMET Extended-Release Tablets FORTAMET is a once-daily 1000 mg extended-release metformin tablet for people with type 2 diabetes. FORTAMET is for use by adults aged 17 years or older, and can be used either as a monotherapy or as a combination therapy. Like all Metformin, Fortamet should be used alongside diet and exercise to lower blood sugar levels and maintain control. Riomet Riomet (also called metformin hydrochloride oral solution) is a unique brand of metformin. It is the first and only type of liquid metformin available. Like all metformin, Riomet is used in conjunction with die Continue reading >>

Differing Brands Of Generic Metformin Behave Differently

Differing Brands Of Generic Metformin Behave Differently

Dr. Bernstein has been preaching about this on his web telecasts for years, but it bears repeating: If you are having problems with generic metformin or not seeing it make much impact on your blood sugar, change brands before you assume it isn't working or that you can't tolerate it. I just had this message brought home to me when my pharmacy (Walgreens) filled my prescription for metformin ER with tablets from SunPharma instead of the ones from Teva they'd given me for years. The pills were about half the size of the ones I'd been getting, which suggested they contained less of a matrix substance to slow the release of the metformin. And sure enough, when I took the same dose I had been taking with no problems with the Teva brand metformin, I felt exhausted and semi-poisoned. It felt just like when I had taken an overdose of metformin some years ago, when my family doctor prescribed an overdose after confusing the dosage instructions for regular metformin--which can be taken in larger doses--with those of metformin ER. Not only that, but my fasting blood sugars went up. Clearly the SunPharma metformin ER was not behaving like a true extended release should and releasing slowly through a 24 hour period but was hitting my blood stream all at once and then was done. A quick visit to Google revealed that Sun Pharmaceuticals is an Indian company and that in the past the FDA has forced them to recall batches for quality issues. When it was time to refill my prescription, I called my pharmacy and spoke with the pharmacist who shrugged off my concerns and told me I'd have to speak to the pharmacy manager (not available that day.) So I got on the phone and called other local pharmacies and asked them what brand they were dispensing. Two of them still carry the Teva brand, so I Continue reading >>

Metformin Hydrochloride - Tagi Pharma, Inc.

Metformin Hydrochloride - Tagi Pharma, Inc.

Prescription Drug Information: Metformin Hydrochloride By TAGI Pharma, Inc. | Last revised: 5 June 2017 METFORMIN HYDROCHLORIDE- metformin hydrochloride tablet, extended release Metformin hydrochloride extended-release tablets, USP is an oral antihyperglycemic drug used in the management of type 2 diabetes. Metformin hydrochloride (N,N -dimethylimidodicarbonimidic diamide hydrochloride) is not chemically or pharmacologically related to any other classes of oral antihyperglycemic agents. The structural formula is as shown: Metformin hydrochloride is a white to off-white crystalline compound with a molecular formula of C4 H11 N5 HCl and a molecular weight of 165.63. Metformin hydrochloride is freely soluble in water and is practically insoluble in acetone, ether, and chloroform. The pKa of metformin is 12.4. The pH of a 1% aqueous solution of metformin hydrochloride is 6.68. Metformin hydrochloride extended-release tablets, USP contain 500 mg or 750 mg of metformin hydrochloride as the active ingredient. In addition, each tablet contains the following inactive ingredients: copovidone, carboxymethylcellulose sodium, hypromellose, microcrystalline cellulose and magnesium stearate. Metformin is an antihyperglycemic agent which improves glucose tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes, lowering both basal and postprandial plasma glucose. Its pharmacologic mechanisms of action are different from other classes of oral antihyperglycemic agents. Metformin decreases hepatic glucose production, decreases intestinal absorption of glucose, and improves insulin sensitivity by increasing peripheral glucose uptake and utilization. Unlike sulfonylureas, metformin does not produce hypoglycemia in either patients with type 2 diabetes or normal subjects (except in special circumstances, Continue reading >>

Ndc 51224-007 Metformin Hydrochloride

Ndc 51224-007 Metformin Hydrochloride

Certain drugs tend to produce hyperglycemia and may lead to loss of glycemic control. These drugs include the thiazides and other diuretics, corticosteroids, phenothiazines, thyroid products, estrogens, oral contraceptives, phenytoin, nicotinic acid, sympathomimetics, calcium channel blocking drugs, and isoniazid. When such drugs are administered to a patient receiving metformin, the patient should be closely observed for loss of blood glucose control. When such drugs are withdrawn from a patient receiving metformin, the patient should be observed closely for hypoglycemia.In healthy volunteers, the pharmacokinetics of metformin and propranolol, and metformin and ibuprofen were not affected when coadministered in single-dose interaction studies.Metformin is negligibly bound to plasma proteins and is, therefore, less likely to interact with highly protein-bound drugs such as salicylates, sulfonamides, chloramphenicol, and probenecid, as compared to the sulfonylureas, which are extensively bound to serum proteins. Manufactured by: CSPC Ouyi Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.Shijiazhuang, Hebei, ChinaManufactured for: TAGI Pharma, Inc.South Beloit, IL 61080Rev. 05/2016 Metformin hydrochloride extended-release tablets, USP is an oral antihyperglycemic drug used in the management of type 2 diabetes. Metformin hydrochloride (N,N-dimethylimidodicarbonimidic diamide hydrochloride) is not chemically or pharmacologically related to any other classes of oral antihyperglycemic agents. The structural formula is as shown:Metformin hydrochloride is a white to off-white crystalline compound with a molecular formula of C4H11N5 HCl and a molecular weight of 165.63. Metformin hydrochloride is freely soluble in water and is practically insoluble in acetone, ether, and chloroform. The pKa of metformi Continue reading >>

News, Why Does Metformin Stink? Here's Why.

News, Why Does Metformin Stink? Here's Why.

News, Why does metformin stink? Here's why. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. News, Why does metformin stink? Here's why. Diabetes Drug Stinks 'Like Dirty Socks', Doctors Find WASHINGTON The commonly used diabetes drug metformin stinks, literally, and this may explain why many patients stop taking it, U.S. doctors reported on Monday.The drug smells like fish or dirty socks to some people and this could account for the well-known side effects of the drug, which can make people nauseated, they said. But the problem could be solved by coating the pills so they do not smell or release the odor into the stomach, where it can be burped up, they wrote in a letter to the Annals of Internal Medicine. "We wonder why this reaction to metformin has not been previously reported," Dr. Allen Pelletier of the Medical College of Georgia and colleagues wrote in a letter to the journal. "Patients may report that metformin nauseates them but do not further elaborate or distinguish this as a visceral reaction to the smell of the medication." The first had taken brand-name metformin (Glucophage, made by Bristol-Myers Squibb) for several years before being switched to an immediate release, generic version of metformin, which he refused to take. "He reported that it smelled like 'dead fish' and nauseated him," they wrote. An extended release generic version, coated to make it dissolve more slowly, solved the problem. A second man refused to ever take metformin again, even coated formulations, they said. "Our cases show that the distinctive odor of metformin (independent of other, well-known gastrointestinal adverse effects of the medication) causes Continue reading >>

Generic Brands Of Metformin

Generic Brands Of Metformin

I started on 2,000 mg metformin and had great results but the gastric side effects were troubling enough that I switched to metformin ER. That helped with the gastro-intestinal, resolved it enough that I can live with it. The up side: zero risk of constipation. My numbers have been about 10 points higher on the ER - fastings in the 90's/low100's vs 80's/90's - and daytime readings from high 90's-115 vs mostly keeping them <100. Dr. Bernstein recommends using the brand vs generic, but insurance won't pay and I can't afford. So - I'm stuck w/ varying generic brands and the most prevalent seem to be Teva and Sun Pharmaceuticals. CVS gave me Teva last month in NC, but now in CA they refilled with generic from Sun Pharmaceuticals. Jenny talked about generics on her blog Diabetes Update: Differing Brands of Generic Metformin Behave Differently and it got me a little concerned about starting my current refill. Am not in the mood for more issues or less efficacy. Any of you have issues with differing generic brands/mfgs? Often the drug company/brand is on the label somewhere. A1C: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other Stuff Continue reading >>

Metformin Smelling Fishy? What You Can Do.

Metformin Smelling Fishy? What You Can Do.

Researchers have discovered what many people with diabetes have known for years: The popular Type 2 diabetes drug metformin (brand names Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage, Fortamet, and others) has a distinctive scent that, for some people, is enough to cause them to stop taking it. But as the most widely prescribed diabetes drug in the United States, metformin plays an important role in helping people with Type 2 diabetes control their blood glucose levels, and experts have suggested several solutions for dealing with the medicine’s unique scent. In a letter published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, physicians from the Medical College of Georgia described two adult men with Type 2 diabetes who complained of a “dead fish” odor of metformin that had led both men to stop taking the medicine. Searching the medical literature for more information, author J. Russell May, PharmD, and colleagues found no reports of this issue. Upon searching the Internet, however, the researchers came across hundreds of message board posts referencing metformin’s odor, and an informal survey of pharmacists found that many could identify the medicine by its distinct smell. May and his colleagues wrote to the journal to raise awareness of this issue and questioned whether nausea, one of the most commonly reported side effects of metformin, could in some cases in fact be a reaction the fishy odor. May noted that “Metformin is an excellent drug, but the immediate-release formulation may have an odor to it. The smell is fishy or like the inside of an inner tube, and in a patient’s mind…they may think the drug isn’t good.” (A manufacturer of metformin notes that there has been no association between the odor of metformin and its effectiveness.) The authors indicated that switching t Continue reading >>

Metformin 750mg (51224-107) - Medication Videos - Myrx.tv

Metformin 750mg (51224-107) - Medication Videos - Myrx.tv

Metformin is the name of the medication. It comes in the form of a tablet, and should be taken by mouth. It belongs to a class of medications called Biguanide. This medication is used to treat type-2 diabetes and pre-diabetes conditions. Normally, when you eat food, the body breaks down all of the sugars and starches into a sugar called glucose. This is the basic fuel for the cells in the body. The body needs Insulin to be able to use this sugar for energy. Insulin takes the sugar from the blood into the cells. In type 2 diabetes, either the body does not produce enough insulin or the cells ignore the insulin. This causes glucose to build up in the blood instead of going into cells. It can lead to serious diabetes complications. Metformin belongs to a group of medications called Biguanides. They work by decreasing the amount of sugar produced by the liver and increasing the amount of sugar absorbed by muscle cells. As a result you get more sugar in the cells and less is in the blood. This medication comes as a tablet. You should put it in your mouth and swallow it with a glass of water. Do not chew, break or crush it. Swallow it whole. Tell your physician if you become pregnant. There are not enough studies about this medication in pregnant women. Use the medication during pregnancy only if clearly needed. Continue reading >>

Which Generic Brand Metformin

Which Generic Brand Metformin

Would like to make a decision regarding which generic brand of Metformin ER to buy. You have years of experience and knowledge. Have been pre-diabetic since my 20's. Started watching carb count in my early 50's and have kept myself from going full on diabetic. My age is now tracked on the geologic time scale. My GP and naturopath both want to see my fasting blood sugar lower, currently 115-120 upon waking, and both doctors keep pestering me about it. Keep my carbs around 40-50 gm./day. Front load my carbs and meat/veggies dinner. Tried eating protein snack before bed. Can't bring the fasting blood sugar any lower and both doctors have given me prescriptions for Metformin ER. Still sitting on them. Wish to avoid as much stomach upset as possible. Glucophage XL highly recommended but not covered by my insurance and way to spendy out of pocket. Any other way to purchase? Been doing research on generic brands and the Amneal from Walmart looks like a no-go. Teva no-go. Sun no-go. What brands work well and spare one from cramping and so forth. My online research predominates with the Extended Release as it makes Metformin easier on the stomach. That true? Was thinking of starting with 500 mg. ER 1/day with night meal to affect fasting blood sugar. Increase 500 mg. when I can tolerate the meds. Sound reasonable? Looking forward to your vast reservoir of knowledge. Continue reading >>

Teva Announces Approval Of Metformin Hcl Extended Release Tablets, 750 Mg

Teva Announces Approval Of Metformin Hcl Extended Release Tablets, 750 Mg

Teva Announces Approval Of Metformin Hcl Extended Release Tablets, 750 Mg Next Article Teva To Report First Quarter 2005 Financ... Teva Announces Approval Of Metformin Hcl Extended Release Tablets, 750 Mg Jerusalem, Israel, April 13, 2005 - Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (Nasdaq: TEVA) announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted final approval for the Company's ANDA for Metformin Hydrochloride Extended Release Tablets, 750 mg. Shipment of this product is expected to begin immediately. Teva's Metformin HCl ER Tablets, 750 mg, are the AB-rated generic equivalent of Bristol-Myers Squibb's Glucophage XR Tablets, 750 mg, a product indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Total annual sales of this product, including brand and generic sales, are approximately $28 million. Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., headquartered in Israel, is among the top 25 pharmaceutical companies and among the largest generic pharmaceutical companies in the world. The company develops, manufactures and markets generic and innovative human pharmaceuticals and active pharmaceutical ingredients. Close to 90% of Teva's sales are in North America and Europe. Safe Harbor Statement under the U. S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995: This release contains forward-looking statements, which express the current beliefs and expectations of management. Such statements are based on management's current beliefs and expectations and involve a number of known and unknown risks and uncertainties that could cause Teva's future results, performance or achievements to differ significantly from the results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Important factors that could cause or contribute to such differences inclu Continue reading >>

Medicine Information - Kaiser Permanente

Medicine Information - Kaiser Permanente

Brand name(s): Fortamet, Glucophage XR, Glumetza Rarely, too much metformin can build up in the body and cause a serious (sometimes fatal) condition called lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is more likely if you are an older adult, if you have kidney or liver disease, dehydration, heart failure, heavy alcohol use, if you have surgery, if you have X-ray or scanning procedures that use iodinated contrast, or if you are using certain drugs. For some conditions, your doctor may tell you to stop taking this medication for a short time. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.Stop taking this medication and get medical help right away if you have any symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as unusual tiredness, dizziness, severe drowsiness, chills, blue/cold skin, muscle pain, fast/difficult breathing, slow/irregular heartbeat, or stomach pain with nausea/vomiting/diarrhea. Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional.Metformin may be used with lifest Continue reading >>

Metformin Hydrochloride - Heritage Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Metformin Hydrochloride - Heritage Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Prescription Drug Information: Metformin Hydrochloride METFORMIN HYDROCHLORIDE- metformin hydrochloride tablet Postmarketing cases of metformin-associated lactic acidosis have resulted in death, hypothermia, hypotension, and resistant bradyarrhythmias. The onset of metformin associated lactic acidosis is often subtle, accompanied only by nonspecific symptoms such as malaise, myalgias, respiratory distress, somnolence, and abdominal pain. Metformin associated lactic acidosis was characterized by elevated blood lactate levels (>5 mmol/Liter), anion gap acidosis (without evidence of ketonuria or ketonemia), an increased lactate/pyruvate ratio; and metformin plasma levels generally >5 mcg/mL [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.1 ) ]. Risk factors for metformin-associated lactic acidosis include renal impairment, concomitant use of certain drugs (e.g. carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as topiramate), age 65 years old or greater, having a radiological study with contrast, surgery and other procedures, hypoxic states (e.g., acute congestive heart failure), excessive alcohol intake, and hepatic impairment. Steps to reduce the risk of and manage metformin-associated lactic acidosis in these high risk groups are provided [see Dosage and Administration ( 2.3 ), (2.7), Contraindications ( 4 ), Warnings and Precautions ( 5.1 )]. If metformin-associated lactic acidosis is suspected, immediately discontinue metformin hydrochloride tablets and institute general supportive measures in a hospital setting. Prompt hemodialysis is recommended [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.1 ) ]. Metformin hydrochloride tablets are indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients 10 years of age and older with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The recommen Continue reading >>

Search For A Drug

Search For A Drug

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Take this medicine with food. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed. Do not stop taking except on your doctors advice. Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 10 years of age for selected conditions, precautions do apply. Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once. NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others. This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine. Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. A test called the HbA1C (A1C) will be monitored. This is a simple blood test. It measures your blood sugar control over the last 2 to 3 months. You will receive this test every 3 to 6 months. Learn how to check your blood sugar. Learn the symptoms of low and high blood sugar and how to manage them. Always carry a quick-source of sugar with you in case you have symptoms of low blood sugar. Examples include hard sugar candy or glucose tablets. Make sure others know that you can choke if you eat or drink when you develop serious symptoms of low blood sugar, such as seizures or unconsciousness. They must get medical help at once. Tell your doctor or health care professional if you have high blood sugar. You might need to change the dose of your medicin Continue reading >>

Oser Communications Group

Oser Communications Group

cover previous page 11 next page back cover C h a i n D r u g s t o r e D a i l y S u n d a y, A u g u s t 7 , 2 0 1 61 2CARE-DRIVEN VALUE-ADDEDPHARMACY ACCREDITATIONThe Compliance Team's (TCT) pharma-cyaccreditation is the first accreditationmodel that is operations-based and care-driven, built upon existing day-to-daypharmacy routines while incorporatingsimplified measures to account fortoday's star-ratings payment and regula-tory realities.There's also a hands-on aspect toThe Compliance Team's accreditationprocess that isn't found in other national-ly recognized accreditation programs.Each new participating pharmacy isassigned a TCT Advisor who acts as amentorthroughout the implementationprocess, conducting a series of webinarsand teleconferences dealing with everyaspect of a pharmacy's daily business andpatient care practices.Process simplification is the key.The Compliance Team's industry-leadingSafety-Honesty-Caringquality stan-dards serve as plain language templatesfor setting in place an operations-basedmeasured improvement program thathelps pharmacies streamline their patientcare practices andimprove overall opera-tional efficiencies with-out disrupting their exist-ingeveryday work envi-ronments to do so.In addition, its Medicare-approvedDMEPOS accreditation is included inevery TCT Community Pharmacy pro-gram. Also featured are tracks for Infusion,Sterile and Non-sterile Compounding,Specialty Drugs, Long Term Care and anIn-store Clinic accreditation based on itsPart A Medicare-approved program forRural Health Clinics.Adding to all that, the companygives participating pharmacies access toits national Patient QualityMeasurement satis-faction reporting andbenchmarking data-base service, theindustry'soldest andlargest, and more than200 accreditation-related docume Continue reading >>

Fda Warns Sun Pharmaceutical Of Quality Problems

Fda Warns Sun Pharmaceutical Of Quality Problems

FDA Warns Sun Pharmaceutical of Quality Problems The US FDA has sent Indian drug maker Sun Pharmaceutical Industries a letter warning that its quality control problems persist. Sun Pharmaceutical Industries is Indias largest drug manufacturer. It supplies many generic medications to the U.S. market. But the giant is once again in trouble with US regulators. The Food and Drug Administration has issued another warning letter to the company because one of its major manufacturing plants has fallen short on quality control. The problems the FDA noted in its most recent communication are very similar to those named in a letter sent earlier this year. Sun Pharmaceutical purchased another large Indian generic drug maker, Ranbaxy, which also ran afoul of FDA on quality control problems. Ranbaxy agreed to pay $500 million in fines in May 2013 after pleading guilty to making false statements and violating drug safety laws. Another Indian generic drug manufacturer, Dr. Reddys Laboratories, has also been the target of FDA scrutiny. The company received a warning letter last month because of quality control problems, especially data integrity. Indian drug makers provide at least 40 percent of the generic drugs Americans take each year. This is not the first time we have written about trouble with poor quality control in certain Indian manufacturing plants. You can read more here and here . The message we hear repeatedly from the FDA about generic drugs is thatthe agency has everythingunder control and there is nothing to worry about. Nevertheless, we keep reading about violations in India and other countries. Unfortunately, the FDA rarely reveals which medications have been affected. There is no country of origin label on your prescription bottle so you have no way of knowing whethe Continue reading >>

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