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Symptoms Of Gestational Diabetes Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Overview Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy (gestation). Like other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes affects how your cells use sugar (glucose). Gestational diabetes causes high blood sugar that can affect your pregnancy and your baby's health. Any pregnancy complication is concerning, but there's good news. Expectant women can help control gestational diabetes by eating healthy foods, exercising and, if necessary, taking medication. Controlling blood sugar can prevent a difficult birth and keep you and your baby healthy. In gestational diabetes, blood sugar usually returns to normal soon after delivery. But if you've had gestational diabetes, you're at risk for type 2 diabetes. You'll continue working with your health care team to monitor and manage your blood sugar. Symptoms For most women, gestational diabetes doesn't cause noticeable signs or symptoms. When to see a doctor If possible, seek health care early — when you first think about trying to get pregnant — so your doctor can evaluate your risk of gestational diabetes as part of your overall childbearing wellness plan. Once you're pregnant, your doctor will check you for gestational diabetes as part of your prenatal care. If you develop gestational diabetes, you may need more-frequent checkups. These are most likely to occur during the last three months of pregnancy, when your doctor will monitor your blood sugar level and your baby's health. Your doctor may refer you to additional health professionals who specialize in diabetes, such as an endocrinologist, a registered dietitian or a diabetes educator. They can help you learn to manage your blood sugar level during your pregnancy. To make sure your blood sugar level has returned to normal after your baby is born, your health care team wil Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Has your doctor diagnosed you with gestational diabetes (GD or GDM), a form of diabetes that appears only during pregnancy? While it might feel overwhelming at first, it turns out that this pregnancy complication is much more common than you might think. In fact, up to 9.2 percent of pregnant women have GD, according to a 2014 analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Know that with careful monitoring and treatment, it can be managed, and you can have a safe and healthy pregnancy. READ MORE: What causes gestational diabetes? Who's most at risk? What are the symptoms? How is it diagnosed? What are the complications? How can you prevent gestational diabetes? How is it treated? What happens to mom and baby after birth? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes usually starts between week 24 and week 28 of pregnancy when hormones from the placenta block insulin — a hormone produced in the pancreas that regulates the body's metabolism of fats and carbs and helps the body turn sugar into energy — from doing its job and prevent the body from regulating the increased blood sugar of pregnancy effectively. This causes hyperglycemia (or high levels of sugar in the blood), which can damage the nerves, blood vessels and organs in your body. Who’s most at risk for gestational diabetes? While researchers aren't certain why some women get gestational diabetes while others don’t, they do know that you may be at an increased risk if: You are overweight. Having a BMI of 30 or more going into pregnancy is one of the most common risk factors for gestational diabetes because the extra weight affects insulin's ability to properly keep blood sugar levels in check. You have a higher level of abdominal fat. Recent research published in the American Di Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar that develops during pregnancy and usually disappears after giving birth. It can occur at any stage of pregnancy, but is more common in the second half. It occurs if your body cannot produce enough insulin – a hormone that helps control blood sugar levels – to meet the extra needs in pregnancy. Gestational diabetes can cause problems for you and your baby during and after birth. But the risk of these problems happening can be reduced if it's detected and well managed. Who's at risk of gestational diabetes Any woman can develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy, but you're at an increased risk if: your body mass index (BMI) is above 30 – use the healthy weight calculator to work out your BMI you previously had a baby who weighed 4.5kg (10lbs) or more at birth you had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy one of your parents or siblings has diabetes your family origins are south Asian, Chinese, African-Caribbean or Middle Eastern If any of these apply to you, you should be offered screening for gestational diabetes during your pregnancy. Symptoms of gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes doesn't usually cause any symptoms. Most cases are only picked up when your blood sugar level is tested during screening for gestational diabetes. Some women may develop symptoms if their blood sugar level gets too high (hyperglycaemia), such as: But some of these symptoms are common during pregnancy anyway and aren't necessarily a sign of a problem. Speak to your midwife or doctor if you're worried about any symptoms you're experiencing. How gestational diabetes can affect your pregnancy Most women with gestational diabetes have otherwise normal pregnancies with healthy babies. However, gestational diabetes can cause problems s Continue reading >>

What Are The Symptoms Of Gestational Diabetes?

What Are The Symptoms Of Gestational Diabetes?

Could you have gestational diabetes and not know it? Nearly 10% of pregnant women find out they have gestational diabetes midway through their pregnancies. Most of them are surprised by the news because they feel the same way that they’ve always felt: healthy and normal. Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that affects only pregnant women. It shows up in women who’ve never had diabetes before. And for many (but not all) such women, it goes away on its own after their babies are born. You may never have signs of gestational diabetes. Most pregnant women don’t. That’s why your doctor has to screen you for it, usually between your 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. The test checks your blood glucose (blood sugar) levels after a glucose load. Some pregnant women do notice subtle signs of gestational diabetes. The symptoms are similar to those of other forms of diabetes. But they’re also common symptoms in all pregnant women, so they’re easy to miss as the sign that something’s wrong. Signs of gestational diabetes include: Feeling thirsty. You may want to drink a lot more than you usually do. You’ll feel thirsty even when you haven’t eaten something salty, run around on a hot day, or done something else that would make you want an extra glass of water. Being tired. If you feel fatigued, even early in the day, it may be more than the strain of being pregnant that’s causing you to be so tired. Ask your doctor if you could be at risk for gestational diabetes. Having a dry mouth. A dry mouth may go hand-in-hand with your increased thirst. You may want to drink more water to get rid of the parched feeling. Both could be signs of gestational diabetes. All pregnant women are screened for gestational diabetes, whether you show any symptoms or not. But you s Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes | Diet And Symptoms

Gestational Diabetes | Diet And Symptoms

In my clinic, I'm seeing a growing number of cases of gestational diabetes. It's definitely on the increase, most likely due to our high carbohydrate diet and lack of proteins. Diabetes is a very common condition where there is too much glucose in the blood. Insulin (continuously produced in the pancreas) is the hormone responsible for lowering blood glucose levels. Insulin transports glucose from the blood stream into cells of the body for energy. Due to our poor diets these days, we are putting ourselves at increased risk of gestational diabetes. Not only that, but also type 2 diabetes, which can occur once you have had gestational diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Symptoms Gestational diabetes usually has no obvious symptoms. If symptoms do occur, they can include: Unusual thirst Excessive urination Tiredness Thrush (yeast infections) Gestational Diabetes Risk Factors Below is a list of risk factors for gestational diabetes: Family history of type 2 diabetes. Having a first-degree relative with type 2 diabetes leads to lifetime risk of 40%. Similarly 25% to 33% of all type 2 diabetics have a family history of the condition Older than 40 years of age Excess body fat, particularly if you're ‘apple shaped' with a waist circumference greater than 88 cm Sedentary lifestyle with a diet high grains and refined carbohydrates Glucose intolerance, dyslipidaemia, hypertension History of gestational diabetes History of polycystic ovarian syndrome History of assisted reproduction (IVF, IUI, ICSI etc) Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, Pacific Islander, Indian or Chinese, African American, Hispanic American, and Native American descent Low birth weight and/or malnutrition in pregnancy may cause metabolic abnormalities in a foetus that later lead to diabetes Gestational Diabetes Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes: Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Pregnancy

The increase of particular hormones during pregnancy can prevent insulin – a hormone that regulates blood glucose levels – from working properly, resulting in a form of diabetes called gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is temporary and affects about 4% of all pregnant women. But, even though gestational diabetes is temporary, it still poses some risks: Both you and your baby have a greater chance of developing type-2 diabetes, which could lead to organ and blood vessel damage if not properly treated. Half of all women who have gestational diabetes contract type-2 diabetes within 10-20 years of delivery. Babies whose mothers have diabetes are usually much larger than the average baby (a condition called macrosomia) because they receive extra glucose through the placenta that is then stored as fat. This may result in birth complications and the need for a cesarean section. Babies born to mothers with diabetes are also more likely to have hypoglycemia, breathing problems, and jaundice at birth, as well as an increased risk for childhood obesity. Having a family history of diabetes isn’t the only thing that increases your chances of developing gestational diabetes; in fact, there are a number of contributing factors, including age and ethnicity. Here are some components that affect your risk level: You’re overweight or obese You’re over 30 years of age You had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy You have a family history of type-2 diabetes You’re Native American, Middle Eastern, Chinese, Indian, Polynesian, Melanesian Vietnamese or an indigenous Australian or Torres Strait Islander The first signs of gestational diabetes are often missed because they are some of the most common symptoms of pregnancy. A glucose screening test, given to women who Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes definition and facts Risk factors for gestational diabetes include a history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, There are typically no noticeable signs or symptoms associated with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause the fetus to be larger than normal. Delivery of the baby may be more complicated as a result. The baby is also at risk for developing low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) immediately after birth. Following a nutrition plan is the typical treatment for gestational diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight and following a healthy eating plan may be able to help prevent or minimize the risks of gestational diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes, or high blood sugar levels, that develops during pregnancy. It occurs in about 4% of all pregnancies. It is usually diagnosed in the later stages of pregnancy and often occurs in women who have no prior history of diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is thought to arise because the many changes, hormonal and otherwise, that occur in the body during pregnancy predispose some women to become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by specialized cells in the pancreas that allows the body to effectively metabolize glucose for later usage as fuel (energy). When levels of insulin are low, or the body cannot effectively use insulin (i.e., insulin resistance), blood glucose levels rise. What are the screening guidelines for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Most pregnant women are tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy (see Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Complications

Gestational Diabetes: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Complications

MORE Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that develops, or is first diagnosed, during pregnancy. The condition, like other forms of diabetes, involves high blood sugar levels. Often times, gestational diabetes is a temporary disorder that occurs around the second trimester of pregnancy, and disappears after a woman gives birth. "Even if a woman had required quite a bit of therapy and treatment to keep her blood sugars under control when she was pregnant … usually the day after delivery, [her] sugars go back down to normal," said Dr. Christopher Glantz, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Rochester Medical Center. But women who've had gestational diabetes should be monitored closely after birth, because they are more likely to develop diabetes later in life, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). A 2014 study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that between 4 and 9 percent of pregnant women in the United States develop gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs more frequently among certain ethic groups, including African Americans, Hispanics, American Indians, Asians, and Pacific Islanders according to the March of Dimes. Symptoms Women with gestational diabetes usually have no symptoms or mild, non-life-threatening symptoms, according to the NIH. These symptoms are mostly related to abnormal blood sugar levels, and can include fatigue, excessive thirst and increased urination. Causes During pregnancy, changes happen in the mother's body to make sugar more available to the fetus, Glantz said. One of these changes is that the placenta produces hormones that interfere with the action of insulin, a hormone that helps sugar (or glucose) get from the bloodstream into cells. This means that sugar i Continue reading >>

Symptoms & Causes Of Gestational Diabetes

Symptoms & Causes Of Gestational Diabetes

What are the symptoms of gestational diabetes? Usually, gestational diabetes has no symptoms. If you do have symptoms, they may be mild, such as being thirstier than normal or having to urinate more often. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes occurs when your body can’t make the extra insulin needed during pregnancy. Insulin, a hormone made in your pancreas, helps your body use glucose for energy and helps control your blood glucose levels. During pregnancy, your body makes special hormones and goes through other changes, such as weight gain. Because of these changes, your body’s cells don’t use insulin well, a condition called insulin resistance. All pregnant women have some insulin resistance during late pregnancy. Most pregnant women can produce enough insulin to overcome insulin resistance, but some cannot. These women develop gestational diabetes. Being overweight or obese is linked to gestational diabetes. Women who are overweight or obese may already have insulin resistance when they become pregnant. Gaining too much weight during pregnancy may also be a factor. Having a family history of diabetes makes it more likely that a woman will develop gestational diabetes, which suggests that genes play a role. This content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. The NIDDK translates and disseminates research findings through its clearinghouses and education programs to increase knowledge and understanding about health and disease among patients, health professionals, and the public. Content produced by the NIDDK is carefully reviewed by NIDDK scientists and other experts. Continue reading >>

Early Detection: Gestational Diabetes & Preeclampsia

Early Detection: Gestational Diabetes & Preeclampsia

Diabetes and preeclampsia are among two of the reasons why regular prenatal visits are so important. Gestational Diabetes: The Basics Chances are you'll sail through pregnancy without trouble. But even if you're feeling great, you should still seek regular prenatal care because some health problems that could hurt your baby are symptomless. These include gestational diabetes, which raises blood sugar levels during pregnancy, and preeclampsia, a form of high blood pressure. But with early detection and treatment, you can manage these problems and still have a healthy baby. What Is It? Gestational diabetes occurs when pregnancy hormones interfere with the body's ability to use insulin, the hormone that turns blood sugar into energy, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Each year, up to 4 percent of women develop this serious illness in pregnancy. While most women with gestational diabetes have no symptoms, a small number may experience extreme hunger, thirst, or fatigue. How Do I Know If I Have It? Your doctor will probably screen you for gestational diabetes between your 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. If you have certain risk factors (see "Who's at Risk?" below), your doctor may opt to screen you sooner. During your screening, you'll drink a sugary liquid, then take a blood test. If your blood sugar levels appear high, you'll need to take a longer test, during which you'll drink more liquid and your blood sugar will be tested several times to determine whether you have gestational diabetes. What Are the Risks Associated with It? Women who fail to seek treatment for gestational diabetes run the risk of giving birth to big babies (9 pounds or more), since much of the extra sugar in the mother's blood ends up going to the fetus. Larger babies are more likely to suffer b Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Gestational diabetes has become one of the most common pregnancy complications in the US, with about 7 percent of pregnant women developing the condition. But just because it’s more widespread doesn’t mean it comes without risks. So what is gestational diabetes—and how can you minimize your chances of getting it? In this article What is gestational diabetes? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes symptoms Gestational diabetes treatment How to prevent gestational diabetes What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes means your body can’t properly regulate your blood sugar levels while you’re pregnant—either because you don’t produce enough insulin or your body can’t properly use the insulin it does produce. That causes your blood sugar levels to spike when you eat, leading to a condition called hyperglycemia. Most moms-to-be diagnosed with gestational diabetes experience diabetes only during pregnancy, and the condition clears up soon after birth. But 5 to 10 percent of women continue to have type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, and those whose diabetes clears up after childbirth are still at a 20 to 50 percent risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. So why are doctors so concerned about this condition? “Gestational diabetes puts the mom and baby at increased risk for pregnancy complications,” says Sherry A. Ross, MD, a Santa Monica, California-based ob-gyn and author of She-ology: The Definitive Guide to Women’s Intimate Health. Period. For moms, those include: High blood pressure Preeclampsia Preterm labor C-section Gestational diabetes effects on baby can increase the risk of: Higher birth weight Shoulder dystocia (when the shoulders get stuck in the birth canal) Congenital malformations (such as abnormal sp Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is first diagnosed during pregnancy. Like type 1 and type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes causes blood sugar levels to become too high. When you eat, your digestive system breaks down most of the food into a sugar called glucose. Glucose enters your bloodstream so your cells can use it as fuel. With the help of insulin (a hormone made by your pancreas), muscle, fat, and other cells absorb glucose from your blood. But if your body doesn't produce enough insulin, or if the cells have a problem responding to it, too much glucose remains in your blood instead of moving into cells and getting converted to energy. When you're pregnant, your body naturally becomes more resistant to insulin so that more glucose is available to nourish your baby. For most moms-to-be, this isn't a problem: When your body needs additional insulin to process excess glucose in blood, the pancreas secretes more. But if the pancreas can't keep up with the increased demand for insulin during pregnancy, blood sugar levels rise too high because the cells aren't using the glucose. This results in gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes needs to be recognized and treated quickly because it can cause health problems for mother and baby. Unlike other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes isn't permanent. Once a baby is born, blood sugar will most likely return to normal quickly. However, having gestational diabetes does make developing diabetes in the future more likely. Am I at risk of developing gestational diabetes? Anyone can develop gestational diabetes, and not all women who develop the condition have known risk factors. About 5 to 10 percent of all pregnant women get gestational diabetes. You're more likely to develop gestational diabetes if you Continue reading >>

5 Things You Didn't Realize Are Signs Of Gestational Diabetes

5 Things You Didn't Realize Are Signs Of Gestational Diabetes

Image Point Fr/Shutterstock There are some unexpected and scary things that come up while you're pregnant. Some can be mild conditions, while others can be quite serious and require constant monitoring and treatment. Thankfully gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a condition that can be screened for in pregnant women early on in the pregnancy. It also can be effectively managed so as to cause no problems for mom or baby. Many moms-to-be who get diagnosed with gestational diabetes are shocked, but there may be some things you didn't realize are signs of gestational diabetes that could prepare you for the doctor's news. According to WebMD, gestational diabetes is not rare and occurs in as many as nine out of 10 pregnant women. The same site noted that anyone can get the condition, but people who are Hispanic, African-American, Native American, Asian American, and Pacific Islander carry a higher risk. Others with an elevated risk include women who were overweight before getting pregnant, have family members with diabetes, have had abnormal blood sugar tests before, have had a very large baby (nine pounds or more) or a stillbirth. According to What To Expect, gestational diabetes usually starts somewhere between weeks 24 and 28. The site explained that it happens when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to deal with an increased amount of glucose, or sugar, that's circulating in your blood that helps a baby grow. Many of the symptoms of gestational diabetes mimic normal pregnancy symptoms and often go unnoticed, but if you notice any of the following five signs you might have gestational diabetes. giphy According to the Mayo Clinic, polydipsia, or excessive thirst, is a classic marker of any diabetes condition. The site explained that if you have diabetes, extra suga Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Gestational Diabetes

Symptoms Of Gestational Diabetes

The lack of obvious symptoms is confusing and can make some women doubt that they have it. This is also why every woman is questioned on possible risk factors for gestational diabetes during the booking appointment. If you have some of the risk factors you will then be tested to check whether you have it. If you do get symptoms, they may include those listed below – although these could also mean you may have type 2 diabetes: being very thirsty having a dry mouth needing to wee a lot being tired repeated infections, such as thrush blurred vision. "I wasn’t obviously skinny, but I wasn’t massively obese either… I had no symptoms whatsoever. I had no expectation that the Lucozade test would be anything other than a formality."Beth, mum of two If you have these symptoms during your pregnancy, tell your midwife or GP. If they are caused by gestational diabetes, you need to find out as quickly as possible, so you and your healthcare team can take action to reduce the risks for you and your baby. Find out more about the tests that you can have to tell whether you have gestational diabetes. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a condition of abnormally raised blood sugar levels that may occur in the second part of the pregnancy and goes away once the baby is born. Some women with gestational diabetes may need no treatment, some need a strict diet and others may need insulin injections. As GDM is a condition that occurs during pregnancy, it is not the same as having pre-existing diabetes during your pregnancy. Between 5% and 10% of pregnant women develop gestational diabetes, usually around the 24th to 28th week of pregnancy. Typically, women with gestational diabetes have no symptoms. Most women are diagnosed after special blood tests Some women with gestational diabetes (about 30%) have larger than average babies. As a result, they are more likely to have intervention in labour such as a caesarean birth. But the baby will not be born with diabetes. Studies have suggested that women who develop gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. Testing for gestational diabetes All women are screened for gestational diabetes at their 24 to 28 week routine check up. Women who are at higher risk may be tested more often. You are at higher risk of developing gestational diabetes if you: are overweight over the age of 25 years a family history of type 2 diabetes come from an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander or some Asian backgrounds have had gestational diabetes before have had a large baby before. The tests available for gestational diabetes are: Glucose challenge test There is no fasting required and you are given a 50g glucose drink (equivalent to 10 teaspoons of sugar) with a blood test taken one hour after. This is a screening test only and if the result is above a certain level, you will be advised to have a gl Continue reading >>

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